US861289A - Metal-working dies. - Google Patents

Metal-working dies. Download PDF

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Publication number
US861289A
US861289A US19108804A US1904191088A US861289A US 861289 A US861289 A US 861289A US 19108804 A US19108804 A US 19108804A US 1904191088 A US1904191088 A US 1904191088A US 861289 A US861289 A US 861289A
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United States
Prior art keywords
die
dies
stock
molder
blank
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Expired - Lifetime
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US19108804A
Inventor
Horace K Jones
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CORBIN SCREW CORP
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CORBIN SCREW CORP
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Application filed by CORBIN SCREW CORP filed Critical CORBIN SCREW CORP
Priority to US19108804A priority Critical patent/US861289A/en
Priority claimed from US319977A external-priority patent/US862641A/en
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Publication of US861289A publication Critical patent/US861289A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21GMAKING NEEDLES, PINS OR NAILS OF METAL
    • B21G3/00Making pins, nails, or the like
    • B21G3/005Nails or pins for special purposes, e.g. curtain pins

Description

PATENTED JULY 30, 1907.
s sums-sum 1,
' H. K, JONES.
- METAL WOR G APPLICATION FILE AH.
Nd. 861.,2'89. PATENTED JULY 30, 1907.
H. K. JONES. METAL WORKING DIES. APPLICATION FILED JAH.29,1904.
s Sunn -sum 2.
Witneomw tn: NORRIS Pin-Rs ca, WASHINGTON, a c.
'PATEN TED JULY 30, 1907.
' .H. K. JONES. METAL WORKING DIES. APPLICATION FILED JAN.29,1904.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 3- l v-Lkwaoow 1 ms norm): PETERS ca, WASHING-TON, n. c
HORACE K. JONES,
PORATlON, OF NEW or HARTFORD, oo
BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT, A
NNEGTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE GORBIN SCREW COR- OONNEGTIOUT GORPORATION.
METAL-WORKING DIES.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented. July 30,1907.
Application filed January 29, 1904. Serial No. 191,088.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, HORACE the United States, residing at K. Jones, a citizen of Hartford, in the county of Hartford, State of Connecticut, have'invented certain new and useful Improvements in Metal-Working Dies, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.
My invention relates to improvements in metal working dies and particularly for the construction of what is termed boot calks used by lumbermen and others.
The process and the mechanism employed in my construction as shown in the is, so far as I am aware, new and accompanying drawings original. The process is claimed in my application No. 319,977, filed June The main object of my invention is to construct a boot calk of the character herein shown by automatic means so that the calks may-be made cheaply and with rapidity. Their construction be employed with safety is such that they may since they are strongly made.
I have endeavored to employ apparatus which is simple in its parts and which is readily assembled and operated and the parts of which may be interchanged or replaced when desired as hereinafter set forth. One
being used to proper times.
anvil which has an elongated feeding of the stock in the form of the dies.
without great expense. The invention consists in the employment of dies its proper manner to allow for These dies serve not only to of a pair of dies is which is slot to permit of the taper off or point both ends of the calk but also to act as an abutment to hold one end molder is being moved toward it of the calk. The chips which of the blank while a to give the final shape are formed and separated by the action of the die are removed by a blast of air. this object which consists of I also provide an auxiliary means for assisting in a hammer carried by the header which supports the molder.
All the parts will be more an drawings, in which Figure 1 is a those parts of plainly understood from inspection of the accompanying three sheets of the operation of one step in my process, the stock or wire from which the calks are to be formed being shown in side elevation.
Fig. 2 is an end elevation of the Fig. 3 is a fragmentary detail view on an enlarged scale illustratcross-sectional view between the dies of the mechanism necessary to illustrate ing the formation of the two dies for tapering or pointing the ends of the blanks. Fig. 4 is a view of the cutting face of a die. Fig. 5 is a cross-section and plan view of the apparatus embodying my invention in substantially the same position as shown in Fig. 1. Both these views are takenjust after the machine has performed what may be termed the first operation and the front end of the stock has been tapered or pointed and fed forward. Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 1 taken immediately after the second operation showing the result of the action of the dies forming the rear end of the blank and the new end of the stock. It also shows the action of the auxiliary hammer for removing the chips which might have adhered to the blank after the first die operation. Fig. 7 is an end view of the anvil showing the elongated slot through which the stock passes. Fig. 8 is a cross-section and side elevation showing the apparatus after the second operation with the chips removed, those between the dies having been removed by the air blast and any adhering to the outer end having been removed by the hammer, the molder being in position to begin its operation. Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the positions and formation of the calk after the third operation when the molder has operated. Fig. 10 is an end view of the molder employed. Fig. 11 is a perspective detail view of the finished calk. The left-hand end may be screw-threaded if desired in any suitable manner after the calk has been formed as indicated in Fig. 8.
1 is a stationary frame or support.
2 is a guide secured in the frame and having an opening 3 in the bottom. This opening is directly above and in line with an opening 4 in the frame, the openings being for the escape of chips from the work. The guide 2 is preferably provided to assist in mounting and supporting the parts.
5 is the stock which is in this form of my invention of round wire. Suitable mechanism is provided for feeding the stock longitudinally during the operation of the machine.
6 is an anvil which has a shoulder 7 to support it socurely in the guide. The anvil has a longitudinal passage 8 therethrough for the stock. This passage is elongated as seen particularly in Fig. 7, the total width of the passage being slightly more than one and one-half times the diameter of the wire stock.
9 is a die which is supported in the guide 2. The die has a semi-cylindrical holding portion 10 and the 100 cutting edges 11 preferably converge as the elements of a cone. The die also has another semi-circular holding portion 12 and the cutting edges 13 converge oppositely as the elements of another cone or conical surface.
These cutting edges 11 and 13 unite at the apices of the cones. One end, the rear, of the die rests against the guide 2 and the anvil 6 the anvil affording the principal longitudinal abutment therefor. The other or outer end of the-die is provided with a raised boss 14 of semicircular form.
15 is a stationary support for the die 9 to prevent the die from having longitudinal movement in the guide.
16 is a movable die also mounted on the guide 2. This die 16 has the semi-cylindrical holding portions 17 and 18 and the cutting edges 19 and 20 to correspond with the semi-cylindrical portions 10 and 12 and the cutting edges 11 and 13. This die also has a bearing at the rear against the guide and the anvil on one end. The other or outer end has a semi-circular raised boss 21 corresponding with the boss 14 on the die 9.
22 is a die-bar having a reciprocatory movement in the guide 2 for the purpose of forcing the die 16 toward the die 9.
23 is a spring-pressed bar for throwing the movable die 16 away from the die 9.
24 and 25 are face-plates secured to the frame 1 for guiding and holding the dies in their proper positions. The dies herein shown are approximately square and have corresponding operative faces on each of the four sides so that a new cutting or operating face may be quickly substituted for the old when necessary. Each corner of the dies is beveled off as shown particularly in Fig. 2 so as to permit of the operation of the retractor or release bar 23.
26 is a conduit or piping for the supply of compressed air by means of which the parts are more readily separated and cleaned after the die-action, the conduit leading to the recess 32 in the operative faces of the dies. Fig. 3 shows plainly how the dies are formed so that the air-blast may have access above and the chips have egress from the recess 33 below when the dies are separated. Fig. 2 shows the positions of the mechanisms when the movable die 16 is retracted and the stock is in position for operation.
27 is a movable carrier or header for supporting the hammer 28 and the molder or die 29. The molder has a recess or cavity in the outer end so as to form the stock as desired.
30 is a pointed inner end of the cavity and 31 is a dish or saucer-like enlargement corresponding to but larger than the boss formed by the two semi-circular portions 14v and 21 of the dies combined.
The calk is formed entirely from the stock 5.
51 is a double-ended or pointed blank formed in an intermediate stage of the operation.
52 is the final calk which is pointed 011 the rear end the same as the blank 51 and on the other end is formed in the cavity 30 as the result of the action of the molder 29.
53 is a collar which is formed in the cavity 31 as the result of the molder action in conjunction with the abutment provided by the boss of the dies.
The operation of the dies is as follows: First the mechanism is assembled substantially as shown in Figs. 2 and 5, the parts being held in place by the face plates 24 and 25 and the dies 9 and 16 being separated. The stock 5 is then fed forward for the first preliminary operation until the front end projects beyond the cutting center of the dies and preferably substantially even with theouter end of the dies. The die-bar 22 is then operated forcing the stock over against the stationary die 9 and forming a pointed end on the stock. The die-bar 22 is now retracted and the die 16 is moved back by the spring acting upon the release bar. The air blast now acts to remove the chips made in the formation of the point. The stock is now fed forward the proper distance to the position shown in Figs. 1 and 5.
The die-bar 22 then forces the die 16 to the rear against die 9 as before and forms the first blank as shown in Figs. 6 and 8. If the chips formed by the previous die-action have not fallen or been blown away, they are removed by the action of the hammer 28 which is brought into action for that purpose. Fig. 5 shows clearly the purpose of the elongation of the passage in the anvil 6, which allows the stock to pass over the cutting edges of the die 9 and showing that the stock is held on a horizontal plane while the die-block 16 is acting. After the chips on the front end of the blank 51 have been removed and while the blank is held securely by the dies, the molder 29 is brought into position as shown in Fig. 8, with its cavity in alinement with the blank. The molder-die is then moved toward the blank and forced up against the same, causing the metal to flow into the position shown in Fig. 9 consequent upon the shape of the abutment formed by the bosses 14 and 21 and the cavities 30 and 3]. in the molder. At this time it will be noted that the dies are held tightly together and supported longitudinally by the anvil 6 so as to form a rigid abutment for the rear end of the blank. When this operation is completed the blank as shown in Fig. 11 is finished. The molder is then retracted to allow the blank to be removed. At the same time the die-bar 22 is released, the release-bar 23 throws the die 16 back and thus permits the stock to be fed forward again into the position shown in Fig. 1 when the cycle of operations is again effected.
It is obvious that many changes may be made in the forms of the dies and in the molder and in the operation of themachine without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention.
' What I claim is:
1. In a machine of the character described, the combination of a stationary cutting die and a movable cutting die having corresponding adjacent operating faces with cutting edges in the form of the letter X, a support for said dies, an anvil having a passage elongated in the direction of movement of the movable die and a molder adapted to be brought into alinelnent with the dies.
2. In a metal Working machine, the combination of an anvil having a longitudinal feed passage therethrough elongated in cross section, a stationary die and a die movable at rightv angles to the feed passage in the anvil, each die having corresponding adjacent operating faces with cutting edges in the form of the letter X.
3. In a metal working machine, an anvil having a passage for wire stock, a pair of dies having adjacent cooperating faces with cutting edges and holding cavities in front and to the rear of the cutting edges and directly in line with the passage through the anvil when in closed position, and a header arranged to operate in line with the feed passage and die cavity.
4. In a metal Working machine, the combination of an element having a longitudinal guide passage elongated in cross section through which wire stock may be fed, a. stationary die and a movable die each having adjacent cooperating cutting edges in the form of the letter X adapted to simultaneously form a point on the rear end of a blank and a point on the front end of the continuous stock por tion, While it is protruding through said guide passage, one of said dies being movable at right angles to the direction of feed of the stock.
5. In a metal working machine, the combination of a stationary die and a movable die each having converging cutting edges adapted to simultaneously form a point upon the rear of a blank and a point upon the front end of the stock a support for the dies, an anvil having a passage elongated in the direction of the movement of the die, a
frame, a longitudinally reciprocable hammer thereon adaptv ed to be brought into alinement with the front end of the pointed blank for forcibly removing chips adhering thereto, and a molder carried by said frame adapted to be brought into alinernent with the die.
Signed at New Britain, Connecticut, this 15th day of January 1904.
HORACE K. JONES.
Witnesses Mv S. WIARD, C. E. Rnssnnn.
US19108804A 1904-01-29 1904-01-29 Metal-working dies. Expired - Lifetime US861289A (en)

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US19108804A US861289A (en) 1904-01-29 1904-01-29 Metal-working dies.
US319977A US862641A (en) 1904-01-29 1906-06-04 Process of forming boot-calks.

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5207084A (en) * 1990-05-25 1993-05-04 Shanley And Baker Severing continuous-length wire

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5207084A (en) * 1990-05-25 1993-05-04 Shanley And Baker Severing continuous-length wire

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