US8410431B2 - Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis - Google Patents

Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US8410431B2
US8410431B2 US13122651 US200913122651A US8410431B2 US 8410431 B2 US8410431 B2 US 8410431B2 US 13122651 US13122651 US 13122651 US 200913122651 A US200913122651 A US 200913122651A US 8410431 B2 US8410431 B2 US 8410431B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
ion
transfer member
gas flow
ions
ion transfer
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US13122651
Other versions
US20110240844A1 (en )
Inventor
Zheng Ouyang
Robert Graham Cooks
Sandilya Venkata Garimella
Jason David Harper
Nicholas Alan Charipar
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Purdue Research Foundation
Original Assignee
Purdue Research Foundation
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/04Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components
    • H01J49/0404Capillaries used for transferring samples or ions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N27/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of electric, electro-chemical, or magnetic means
    • G01N27/62Investigating or analysing materials by the use of electric, electro-chemical, or magnetic means by investigating the ionisation of gases; by investigating electric discharges, e.g. emission of cathode
    • G01N27/622Investigating or analysing materials by the use of electric, electro-chemical, or magnetic means by investigating the ionisation of gases; by investigating electric discharges, e.g. emission of cathode separating and identifying ionized molecules based on their mobility in a carrier gas, i.e. ion mobility spectrometry
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/0027Methods for using particle spectrometers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/0027Methods for using particle spectrometers
    • H01J49/0031Step by step routines describing the use of the apparatus
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/04Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/04Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components
    • H01J49/0409Sample holders or containers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/04Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components
    • H01J49/0422Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components for gaseous samples
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/04Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components
    • H01J49/0459Arrangements for introducing or extracting samples to be analysed, e.g. vacuum locks; Arrangements for external adjustment of electron- or ion-optical components for solid samples
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/02Details
    • H01J49/10Ion sources; Ion guns
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/26Mass spectrometers or separator tubes
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/26Mass spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/34Dynamic spectrometers
    • H01J49/40Time-of-flight spectrometers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/26Mass spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/34Dynamic spectrometers
    • H01J49/42Stability-of-path spectrometers, e.g. monopole, quadrupole, multipole, farvitrons
    • H01J49/4205Device types
    • H01J49/421Mass filters, i.e. deviating unwanted ions without trapping
    • H01J49/4215Quadrupole mass filters

Abstract

The invention generally relates to systems and methods for transferring ions for analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample including an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure, an ion analysis device, and an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, in which the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device.

Description

RELATED APPLICATION

This PCT application claims the benefit of and is related to U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/104,793, filed Oct. 13, 2008, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

This invention was made with government support under the terms of Contract Number 2007-ST-069-TSL001 awarded by Transportation Security Laboratory and Contract Number N000140510454 awarded by Office of Naval Research. The government has certain rights in the invention.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention generally relates to systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis.

BACKGROUND

In the field of analytical chemistry, the demand for direct sampling under ambient conditions has increased, and this has led to the development of a variety of ambient ionization sources. Ambient ionization sources ionize analytes in the ambient environment (in situ) with no intrinsic requirement for sample preparation. This advantage allows real-time, on-site detection, saving time and resources.

A typical set-up that uses an ambient ionization source to analyze ions from a sample is configured such that the ionization source is uncoupled from a mass analyzer, such as a mass spectrometer (MS). The mass spectrometer must be located sufficiently close to the ionization source (on the order of about 2 cm or less) so that the ions that are generated will transfer to an inlet of the mass spectrometer. The opening of the MS inlet is typically smaller than 700 μm, due to the fact that a vacuum must be maintained inside a manifold where ions are mass analyzed. In applications in which the ions are generated far from the MS inlet (on the order of about 5 cm), it is difficult, if not impossible, to transfer the ions to the mass analyzer. Thus the distance between the ambient ionization source and the mass analyzer limits the use of these ambient ionization sources.

Further, the ions generated from an ionization source at atmospheric pressure, such as an electrospray ionization (ESI) or desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), also have a wide angular dispersion. The intake of the ions by the MS inlet of a small opening is relatively inefficient. In an application in which analytes over a large area need to be analyzed or monitored simultaneously, it is highly desirable that the ions generated be transferred into the MS inlet at high efficiency.

There is a need for devices that can facilitate transfer of ions from an ambient ionization source to an inlet of a mass spectrometer.

SUMMARY

The invention provides systems that use a gas flow to bring ions into a confined space and generate a laminar gas flow that focuses the ions and facilitates transfer of the ions from an ambient ionization source to an inlet of an ion analysis device, such as a mass spectrometer. Systems of the invention allow for transfer of ions over long distances (e.g., at least about 5 cm), and also allow for sampling over large areas (e.g., at least about areas of 4 cm×3 cm or 10 cm×10 cm). For example, systems of the invention allow for use of ambient ionization sources under conditions in which the ionization source cannot be positioned sufficiently close to an inlet of an ion analysis device for collection of ions generated from a sample.

An aspect of the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample including an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure, an ion analysis device, and an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, in which the gas glow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion detection device.

A typical prior art set-up that uses an ambient ionization source positions the ionization source about 2 cm or closer to the inlet of the ion analysis device. Distances greater than 2 cm between the ionization source and the inlet of the ion analysis device result in diffusion of ions into the atmosphere and degradation of signal, i.e., inefficient or no transfer of ions to the ion analysis device. Systems and methods of the invention generate a laminar gas flow, thus allowing for efficient transfer of ions over long distances without significant loss of signal intensity, such as distances of at least about 5 cm, at least about 10 cm, at least about 20 cm, at least about 50 cm, at least about 100 cm, at least about 500 cm, at least about 1 m, at least about 3 m, at least about 5 m, at least about 10 m, and other distances.

In certain embodiments, the ion analysis device is a mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the ion analysis device is an ion mobility spectrometer. In other embodiments, the ion analysis device is a simple ion detector such as a Faraday cup. In certain embodiments, the ions are detected or analyzed after transfer. In other embodiment, the ions are re-collected after transfer.

In certain embodiments, the gas flow generating device is a pump having a high flow rate and a low compression ratio, such as a house vacuum, that is connected to the ion transfer member to produce a laminar gas flow for transfer of ions to the inlet of the ion analysis device. In other embodiments, the gas flow generating device is the ambient ionization source. For example, a source used for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) generates a gas flow sufficient to produce a laminar flow through the ion transfer member, and thus produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions to an inlet of the ion analysis device. In other embodiments, the gas flow generating device is a combination of the pump and the gas jet of the ambient ionization source.

The system may further include an electric focusing lens device operably coupled to the ion transfer member to facilitate transfer of ions to the inlet of the ion analysis device. The system may further include an air dynamic lens device operably coupled to the ion transfer member to facilitate focusing of heavy ions to the inlet of the ion analysis device. The system may further include an electro-hydrodynamic lens device operably coupled to the ion transfer member. The system may further include at least one vacuum pump connected to the ion detection device. The system may further include a computer operably connected to the system. The system may further include a stage for holding the sample.

In certain embodiments, the ion transfer member is coupled with a dielectric barrier discharge to enhance ion transfer efficiency. In other embodiments, a distal end of the ion transfer member includes a plurality of inlets for transferring ions from multiple locations to the inlet of the ion analysis device.

The ion transfer member may be any connector that allows for production of a laminar flow within it and facilitates transfer of ions without significant loss of ion current. An exemplary ion transfer member is a tube. The tube may be composed of rigid material, such as metal or glass, or may be composed of flexible material such as TYGON tubing. The ion transfer member may be any shape as long the shape allows for production of a laminar flow within it and facilitates transfer of ions without significant loss of ion current. For example, the ion transfer member may have the shape of a straight line. Alternatively, the ion transfer member may be curved or have multiple curves.

The ionizing source may operate by any technique that is capable of converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions at substantially atmospheric pressure, i.e., an atmospheric pressure ionization source or an ambient ionization source. Exemplary techniques include electrospray ionization, nano-electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge ionization, atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma desorption ionization, and electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization.

The ions generated from the ionization source are sent through the ion transfer member and are transferred to an inlet of an ion analysis device. Exemplary ion analysis devices include a mass spectrometer, and an ion mobility spectrometer. Exemplary mass spectrometers include an ion trap, a quadrupole filter, a time of flight, a sector, an ion cyclotron resonance trap, and an orbitrap mass spectrometer.

Systems of the invention may analyze samples in any state, e.g., solid phase, liquid phase, or gas phase. The sample may be of any origin, such as a biological origin or a non-biological origin. Exemplary samples include an industrial work piece, a pharmaceutical product or ingredient, a food or food ingredient, a toxin, a drug, an explosive, a bacterium, or a biological tissue or fluid.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method of analyzing a sample including ionizing a sample to convert molecules of the sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure, providing an ion transfer member coupled to a gas flow generating device to produce a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions to an inlet of the ion analysis device, and analyzing the ions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic showing an embodiment of a system for transferring ions from an ambient ionization source to an inlet of an ion analysis device.

FIG. 2 is a photograph showing a setup for long distance ion transfer.

FIG. 3 is a tandem mass spectrum of 1.7 μg cocaine on glass desorbed/ionized via LTP helium and transferred 4 ft using a flexible TYGON tubing.

FIG. 4 is a tandem mass spectrum of 2 μg of TNT on glass desorbed/ionized via LTP helium and transferred 4 ft using a flexible TYGON tubing.

FIG. 5 is a tandem mass spectrum of 1.7 μg cocaine on glass desorbed/ionized via LTP helium and transferred 10 ft in stainless steel ¾″ diameter conduit.

FIG. 6 is a photograph showing a setup for long distance ion transfer using large area analysis via LTP probes.

FIG. 7 panel A is a photograph showing an LTP large area sampling funnel (area=33 cm2) with four LTP probes coupled with long distance ion transfer instrumentation. FIG. 7 panel B is a total ion chronogram of m/z 226 transferred 4 ft, showing when funnel is over 2 μg of TNT on glass slide.

FIG. 8 is a schematic showing that ions generated from samples at multiple locations can be transferred to mass spectrometer for analysis, simultaneously or in a sequence.

FIG. 9 is a schematic showing a tube electric lens that can be implemented to focus the charged particles toward the center of the transfer tubing.

FIG. 10 is a schematic showing an electro-air dynamic lens system that can be implemented to use the air dynamic effects to focus the heavier particles and to use the electric field to focus the charged particles toward the center.

FIG. 11 panel A is a schematic of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) tubing. FIG. 11 panel B is a photograph showing DBD tubing made with double strand speaker wire. FIG. 11 panel C is a photograph showing the DBD inside the tubing with high voltage AC applied.

FIG. 12 is a schematic showing a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) long distance transport setup.

FIG. 13 is a graph showing variation of TIC with sampling distance. A rhodamine ink spot was used as analyte. It was observed that signal fall rate decreases beyond 40 mm. A fully developed laminar flow could be generated between 40 mm and 50 mm downstream in the drift tube.

FIG. 14 is a diagram showing a CFD simulation, indicating fully developed laminar flow is achieved at around 55 mm.

FIG. 15 is a mass spectrum of 10 μg of cocaine detected on a glass slide, 10 cm away from the MS inlet using the device shown in FIG. 12. The MS/MS spectrum is shown in the inset. An LTQ (Thermo Fisher Scientific) mass spectrometer was used.

FIG. 16 is a set of mass spectra for different drift tubes showing differences in relative intensities of analyte vs. background signal intensities. Spectra were collected using the device shown in FIG. 12 and an LTQ mass spectrometer.

FIG. 17 is a schematic of the large area sampling configuration with a DESI source.

FIG. 18 is a diagram showing a configuration of an experiment with a large area sampling DESI source.

FIG. 19 is a mass spectrum corresponding to position 1 for a large area sampling DESI source.

FIG. 20 is a graph showing peak signal intensities achieved with each transfer tube in DESI configuration.

FIG. 21 is a set of mass spectra showing cocaine detected on a Mini 10 instrument with a DESI focusing source.

FIG. 22 is a schematic diagram of showing an LTP probe and a miniature mass spectrometer with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface coupled through an ion transfer member and a gas flow generating device.

FIG. 23 shows a typical spectra of melamine in different matrices using LTP/Mini 10.5. Samples: A) MS spectrum of 300 ng/mL melamine in water/methanol (v:v=1:1), loading volume 3 μL (absolute melamine amount of 0.9 ng). B) 5 μg/mL melamine in whole milk, loading volume 3 μL (absolute melamine amount of 15 ng). C) 5 μg/g melamine in milk powder, loading volume 5 mg (absolute melamine amount of 25 ng). D) 1μμg/mL melamine in synthetic urine, loading volume 3 μL (absolute melamine amount of 3 ng). Inserts: MS/MS product ion spectrum of the protonated molecule.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A typical prior art set-up that uses an ambient ionization source positions the ionization source about 2 cm or closer to the inlet of the ion analysis device. The transfer of the ion into the inlet of a mass spectrometer relies on the gas flow into the inlet under the influence of the vacuum of the spectrometer and the electric field in the surrounding area. The gas flow is typically low due to the low conductance of the inlet, which serve as the conductance barrier between atmosphere and vacuum manifold. Distances greater than 2 cm between the ionization source and the inlet of the ion analysis device result in diffusion of ions into the atmosphere and degradation of signal, i.e., inefficient or no transfer of ions into the ion analysis device. Systems and methods of the invention generate a laminar gas flow that allows for efficient transfer of ions without significant loss of signal intensity over longer distances, such as distances of at least about 5 cm, at least about 10 cm, at least about 20 cm, at least about 50 cm, at least about 100 cm, at least about 500 cm, at least about 1 m, at least about 3 m, at least about 5 m, at least about 10 m, and other distances.

Systems and methods of the invention are useful for chemical analysis in situations in which it is important for the instrument and the object being examined to be in different locations. For example, systems and methods herein are useful for screenings at security checkpoints, e.g., airport security checkpoints or road-side checkpoints, for interrogation of luggage surfaces for the detection of foreign substances.

An aspect of the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample including an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure, an ion analysis device, and an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, in which the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions to an inlet of the ion analysis device.

Systems of the invention provide enlarged flow to carry ions from a distant sample to an inlet of an ion analysis device, such as an inlet of a mass spectrometer. The basic principle used in the transport device is the use of the gas flow to direct gas and ions into the ion transfer member and to form a laminar flow inside the ion transfer member to keep the ions away from the walls while transferring the gas and ions through the ion transfer member. The analyte ions of interest are sampled at some point downstream along the ion transfer member. The laminar flow is achieved by balancing the incoming and outgoing gas flow. Thus recirculation regions and/or turbulence are avoided. Thus, the generated laminar flow allows for high efficient ion transport over long distance or for sampling of ions over large areas.

Systems of the invention also provide enlarged flow to carry ions from the ion source to an inlet of a miniature mass spectrometer, which has small pumping systems and compromised gas intake capability at the inlet. Additional gas flow provided by a miniature sample pump connected with the ion transfer member facilitates ion transfer from an ambient ionization source to the vicinity of the inlet of the miniature mass spectrometer. Thus the intensity of the ions for the analytes of interest is increased for mass analysis.

As shown in FIG. 1, an ion transfer member, e.g., a tube with an inner diameter of about 10 mm or greater, is used to transfer ions from the ionization source to the inlet of an ion analysis device, e.g., a mass spectrometer. The larger opening of the ion transfer member, as compared to the opening of the inlet of the ion analysis device, is helpful for collection of sample ions generated in a large space, e.g. on a surface of large area. The large flow conductance of the ion transfer member allows the gas carrying ions to move toward the inlet of the ion analysis device at a fast flow rate. The ion transfer member is coupled to a gas flow generating device. The gas flow generating device produces a gas flow inside the ion transfer member. The inlet of the ion analysis device receives the ions transferred from the ambient ionization source.

The ion transfer member may be any connector that allows for production of a laminar flow within it and facilitates transfer of ions without significant loss of ion current. Exemplary ion transfer members include tubes, capillaries, covered channels, open channels, and others. In a particular embodiment, the ion transfer member is a tube. The ion transfer member may be composed of rigid material, such as metal or glass, or may be composed of flexible material such as plastics, rubbers, or polymers. An exemplary flexible material is TYGON tubing.

The ion transfer member may be any shape as long the shape allows for the production of a flow to prevent the ions from reaching the internal surfaces of the ion transfer member where they might become neutral. For example, the ion transfer member may have the shape of a straight line. Alternatively, the ion transfer member may be curved or have multiple curves.

The ion transfer member is coupled to a gas flow generating device. The gas flow generating device is such a device capable of generating a gas flow through the ion transfer member. The gas flow generating device facilitates transfer of the ions from the ambient ionization source to the inlet of the ion analysis device. In certain embodiments, the gas flow generating device is a pump with a high flow rate and a low compression ratio. An example of such a pump is that found in a shop vacuum or a small sample pump. The proper pumps used for the coupling are different from those used for a mass spectrometer, e.g. a rotary vane pump or a turbo molecular pump, which pumps have a high compression ratio. The high compression ratio pumps of a mass spectrometer cannot be connected to the atmosphere through an opening of the conductance described here. For example, Cotte-Rodríguez et al. (Chem. Commun., 2006, 2968-2970) describe a set-up in which the inlet of the mass spectrometer was elongated and gas flow generated by the pump inside a mass spectrometer was used to transfer ions over a distance up to 1 m. The ions were transferred from the atmosphere to a region at about 1 torr. A significant loss in signal occurred for the transfer of the ions using the set-up described in Cotte-Rodríguez , and ions generated over a large area could not be efficiently collected into the inlet.

In other embodiments, the gas flow generating device is the ambient ionization source. For example, a source used for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) generates a gas flow sufficient to produce a laminar flow through the ion transfer member, and thus produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions over a long distance to an inlet of the ion analysis device.

Numerous additional devices may be coupled with the ion transfer member to further facilitate transfer of the ions from the ambient ionization source to the inlet of the ion analysis device. For example, an electric lens may be used to focus the ions toward the center of the ion transfer member while the gas flow generating device pumps away neutral gases (See FIG. 9). In other embodiments, an electro-hydrodynamic lens system may be implemented to use the air dynamic effects to focus the heavier particles and to use the electric field to focus the charged particles toward the center of the ion transfer member (See FIG. 10).

In other embodiments, a distal end of the ion transfer member may include a plurality of inlets for transferring ions from multiple locations to the inlet of the ion analysis device. FIG. 8 is a schematic showing that ions generated from samples at multiple locations can be transferred to a mass spectrometer for analysis, in a simultaneous or sequential fashion.

In still other embodiments, the ion transfer member includes additional features to prevent ions from being adsorbed onto the inside wall. As shown in FIG. 11, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) tubing is made from a double stranded speaker wire. The insulator of the wire serves as the dielectric barrier and the DBD occurs when high voltage AC is applied between the two strands of the wire. The DBD inside the tube prevents the ions from adsorbing onto the wall and provide a charge-enriched environment to keep the ions in the gas phase. This DBD tube can also be used for ionizing the gas samples while transferring the ions generated to the inlet of the ion analysis device. The DBD tube can also be used for ion reactions while transferring the ions generated to the inlet of the ion analysis device.

Prior to entering the ion transfer member, ions of the sample are ionized using an ambient ionization source or an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Exemplary ambient ionization techniques include electrospray ionization (Fenn, J. B.; Mann, M.; Meng, C. K.; Wong, S. F.; Whitehouse, C. M. Science 1989, 246, 64-71; Yamashita, M.; Fenn, J. B. J. Phys. Chem. 1984, 88, 4451-4459), nano-electrospray ionization (Karas et al., Fresenius J Anal Chem, 366:669-676, 2000), atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (Laiko, V. V.; Baldwin, M. A.; Burlingame, A. L. Anal. Chem. 2000, 72, 652-657; and Tanaka, K.; Waki, H.; Ido, Y.; Akita, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Matsuo, T. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 1988, 2, 151-153), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (Carroll, D. L; Dzidic, L; Stillwell, R. N.; Haegele, K. D.; Horning, E. C. Anal. Chem. 1975, 47, 2369-2373), desorption electrospray ionization (Takats et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,335,897; and Takats, Z.; Wiseman, J. M.; Gologan, B.; Cooks, R. G. Science 2004, 306, 471-473), atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge ionization (Shiea, J.; Huang, M. Z.; Hsu, H. J.; Lee, C. Y.; Yuan, C. H.; Beech, L; Sunner, J. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005, 19, 3701-3704), atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma desorption ionization (Ouyang et al. International patent publication WO 2009/102766), and electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization (Shiea, J.; Huang, M. Z.; Hsu, H. J.; Lee, C. Y.; Yuan, C. H.; Beech, L; Sunner, J. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005, 19, 3701-3704). The ions of the sample then move through the ion transfer member.

After moving through the ion transfer member, the ions are then separated based on their mass/charge ratio or their mobility or both their mass/charge ratio and mobility. For example, the ions can be accumulated in an ion analysis device such as a quadrupole ion trap (Paul trap), a cylindrical ion trap (Wells, J. M.; Badman, E. R.; Cooks, R. G., Anal. Chem., 1998, 70, 438-444), a linear ion trap (Schwartz, J. C.; Senko, M. W.; Syka, J. E. P., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom, 2002, 13, 659-669), an ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) trap, an orbitrap (Hu et al., J. Mass. Spectrom., 40:430-433, 2005), a sector, or a time of flight mass spectrometer. Additional separation might be based on mobility using ion drift devices or the two processes can be integrated.

Systems of the invention can analyze samples in any state, e.g., solid phase, liquid phase, or gas phase. The sample may be of any origin, such as a biological origin or a non-biological origin. Exemplary samples include an industrial work piece, a pharmaceutical product or ingredient, a food or food ingredient, a toxin, a drug, an explosive, a bacterium, or a biological tissue or fluid.

A sample can be from a mammal, e.g. a human tissue or body fluid. A tissue is a mass of connected cells and/or extracellular matrix material, e.g. skin tissue, nasal passage tissue, CNS tissue, neural tissue, eye tissue, liver tissue, kidney tissue, placental tissue, mammary gland tissue, gastrointestinal tissue, musculoskeletal tissue, genitourinary tissue, bone marrow, and the like, derived from, for example, a human or other mammal and includes the connecting material and the liquid material in association with the cells and/or tissues. A body fluid is a liquid material derived from, for example, a human or other mammal. Such body fluids include, but are not limited to, mucous, blood, plasma, serum, serum derivatives, bile, phlegm, saliva, sweat, amniotic fluid, mammary fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), such as lumbar or ventricular CSF. A sample may also be a fine needle aspirate or biopsied tissue. A sample also may be media containing cells or biological material.

Incorporation by Reference

References and citations to other documents, such as patents, patent applications, patent publications, journals, books, papers, web contents, have been made throughout this disclosure. All such documents are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

Equivalents

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The foregoing embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects illustrative rather than limiting on the invention described herein. Scope of the invention is thus indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

EXAMPLES Example 1 Long Distance Ion Transfer

A Thermo Scientific LTQ was modified to allow long distance ion transfer via assisted vacuum from an external low temperature plasma (LTP) source. The modified Ion Max source (ion source for LTQ mass spectrometer, ThermoFisher, San Jose, Calif.) was used to guide the ions from long distances into the inlet of the LTQ mass spectrometer. A common shop vacuum was used as a vacuum device to provide the assisted flow to carry the ions over long distances. The setup used is shown in FIG. 2. An adjustable inlet tube that bridges the ion transfer tube to the MS inlet allowed for optimization of the ion signal. Both rigid tubing (metal conduit, and glass) as well as flexible (tygon tubing) were used in this example, all showing long distance ion transfer abilities.

The LTP probe was utilized as a desorption ionization source with helium as the discharge gas. This setup was initially used for ion transfer of drugs and explosives. 1.7 μg of cocaine and 2 μg of TNT were spotted onto separate glass slides and the slides were placed on a stage 4 ft from the inlet of the mass spectrometer. 4 ft of Tygon tubing was used as the ion transfer member to transfer ions from the LTP probe to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. Data herein show successful detection of the cocaine in the positive MS/MS mode, as shown in FIG. 3. Data herein also show successful detection of the TNT in the negative MS/MS mode, as shown in FIG. 4.

The cocaine sample was then used over several hours for tests with 10 ft of metal conduit (FIG. 5), 15 ft of Tygon tubing, and also 30 ft of Tygon tubing, all resulting in positive confirmation of cocaine in the positive MS/MS mode. It was also observed that the tubing did not have to be straight, i.e., curved tubing still successfully transferred the ions to the inlet of the mass spectrometer.

Example 2 Large Area and Long Distance Ion Transfer

Utilizing the apparatus shown in FIG. 2, large area analysis was done by using three LTP probes to sample a large area. FIG. 6 shows the setup of the three LTP probes utilizing 4 ft (1.2 m) of Tygon tube for long distance transfer. 1.7 μg of cocaine and 1 μg of atrazine were spotted onto a glass slide and analyzed via the LTP probe setup. The elliptical shape outlined in black marker on the cardboard box is the approximate area of detection for both 1.7 μg of cocaine and 1 μg of atrazine utilizing the long distance transfer apparatus, which is >>100 cm2. Positive mode tandem mass spectrometry was used to confirm the molecules transfer over the 4 ft distance.

An LTP large area funnel was coupled to the apparatus shown in FIG. 2 via the 4 foot tygon tubing. Utilizing helium as the discharge gas, 2 μg of TNT on a glass slide were analyzed, shown in the top of FIG. 7. The bottom of FIG. 7 shows the total ion current (TIC) of m/z 226 (deprotonated TNT) transferred through 4 ft of Tygon tubing, clearly showing the detection of TNT when the funnel was placed over the sample. When the funnel was removed away from the sample the TIC was close to zero. A distance of >1″ could be maintained between the surface and glass slide and successful detection could occur while the area of detection was limited by the funnel area (33 cm2).

Example 3 Ion Transport with Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

The transport of ionic species in DESI sources was achieved over a long distance (at least 1 m) by using a similar system as described in the Example above. However, the system was modified to remove the pump and use the DESI sources as the gas flow generating device due to the high flow rate of gas generated from the DESI source. The ejecting gas from a DESI source, after impact with the desorption surface, was allowed to pass through a long 0.25″ metal tube. The MS capillary was used to sample the ions at some suitable distance downstream of the gas flow. The schematic of this setup is shown ion FIG. 12. In comparison with a previously reported development using a pressure tight enclosure (Venter, A.; Cooks, R. G. Anal. Chem., 2007, 79 (16), pp 6398-6403; United States Patent Application 2008/0156985), a large opening at the distal end allows the DESI gas flow to exit to allow the formation of a laminar flow and to avoid the recirculation and turbulence inside the ion transfer member.

Example 4 Long Distance Ion Transfer—DESI

In a set-up in which the gas flow generating device was the DESI source, the gas jet ejected from the DESI source itself was used for ion transport, i.e., long distance ion transport was achieved by using an ion transport member without a pump. The gas jet emanating from DESI source was used to transport ions.

Rhodamine ink was used as the analyte. A red ink spot was made on a glass slide using Sharpie ink, and the TIC during analysis was plotted against signal intensity (FIG. 13). Initially, the capillary was close to the desorption surface (a few millimeters). As the distance between the sample surface and the MS inlet was increased, the signal drop rate was initially high, and the drop rate eventually slowed and then reached a stable level at which an approximately constant signal intensity was obtained irrespective of the distance between the sample and the MS inlet (FIG. 13).

Without being limited by any particular theory or mechanism of action, it is believed that the stable level was reached due to the inception of a fully developed laminar flow a certain distance downstream of the drift tube. Once the fully developed flow regime was achieved, the ions were focused to the center of the ion transfer member and were transmitted to the inlet of the mass spectrometer without any loss. Diffusion loss of ions was low. Hence, beyond a certain distance the loss of ions was very low. This technique of flow focusing using a 10 cm drift tube of 0.24″ ID was also demonstrated with the Mini 10 instrument (See FIG. 21). Using a commercial CFD package (Ansys CFX), the flow evolution in the drift tube due to the DESI spray was calculated. It was found that the fully developed laminar flow regime was achieved in the drift tube at about the same distance beyond which the signal fall of rate was found to be low. (See FIG. 14).

Different drift tube lengths were used to collect spectrum of cocaine and the corresponding peak intensities were compared. Signal intensities with 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 50 cm, and 100 cm transfer tubes were recorded using an LTQ mass spectrometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.). The peak signal intensity achieved with each of the transfer tube was plotted (See FIG. 20). These data show that the fall in signal with increased sampling distance was not very significant. This is due to laminar flow focusing of ions and consequent efficient transport. With a 10 cm transfer tube, a very good signal for 10 μg of cocaine on a glass slide was detected with potential for even a 10 times lower detection limit (FIG. 15). It was observed that the relative intensity of the background peaks were lower for longer transfer tubes (FIG. 16). It was concluded that a longer drift tube filtered out background ions more efficiently than a shorter drift tube, and thus a longer drift tube assisted in obtaining the ions of interest from the sample. This was akin to pre-concentration and selective analyte sampling (Cotte-Rodríguez et al, Chem. Commun., 2006, 2968-2970).

Example 5 Large Area

For the DESI configuration, a large area analysis was made by re-designing the drift tube and the sampling area. To increase the sampling area, a quarter inch tube was bent at a 45° angle at two sides, leaving a 4 cm central straight tube. The bottom of this portion was cut to create a sampling area. The schematic and drawing are shown in FIG. 17. The new sampling surface had a 4 cm×3.5 mm sampling area. A thin sampling area was used to allow for a confined area for gas flow. In the DESI configuration, as external pump was not used to assist transfer of ions, rather the DESI gas jet was used to transport the ions through a narrow area for ensuring laminar flow development.

The effect of position of analyte in the sampling region on signal intensity was tested. Two analytes, MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine), and cocaine were used. The cocaine position was fixed as shown by a circular shape and MDMA by triangle. Cocaine was closer to the DESI spray end. MDMA was closer to the MS sampling inlet. The pictorial representation of the experiment performed is shown in FIG. 18. Data show that the system was able to distinctly detect both the cocaine and the MDMA of 1.5 μg (See mass spectra of FIG. 19).

Example 6 Long Distance Ion Transfer—Low Temperature Plasma (LTP)

Mass spectrometers typically rely on the vacuum pumps of the system to generate a vacuum to pull ions into the system that are generated from an ambient ionization source. This is problematic with a miniature mass spectrometer because the vacuum pumps of such systems are much less powerful than those of standard mass spectrometer systems. It is particularly difficult to couple an ambient ionization source with a miniature mass spectrometer due to the decreased vacuum power of such an instrument. Systems of the invention generate an enlarged gas flow that increases efficiency of the movement of ions, and thus provides for efficient and focused transfer of ions generated from an ambient ionization source and transfer to an inlet of a miniature mass spectrometer.

A low temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization source, coupled with a portable mass spectrometer (Mini 10.5), was used for the determination of melamine contamination in whole milk and related products (FIG. 22). Thermally assisted desorption and ionization of the analyte was achieved with the LTP probe. The small size, low power consumption and capability for direct sampling without pretreatment, makes LTP an appropriate ionization method for use in conjunction with a handheld mass spectrometer. The standard discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface used to connect atmospheric pressure ion sources to mini mass spectrometers (Gao et al. Analytical Chemistry, 2008, 80, 4026-4032) was coupled with an ion transfer member with supplementary pumping to increase the ion transfer efficiency. Whole milk, fish, milk powder and other complex matrices spiked with melamine were placed on the glass slide close to the vacuum inlet and analyzed without sample pretreatment. Analysis rates of two samples per minute were achieved while levels of melamine as low as 250 ng/mL were detected in whole milk with a linear dynamic range of 0.5-50 μg/mL and a relative standard deviation of 7.6%-16.2% (FIG. 23).

Claims (6)

What is claimed is:
1. A system for analyzing a sample, the system comprising:
an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure;
an ion analysis device;
an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, wherein the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device; and
an air dynamic lens device operably coupled to the ion transfer member to facilitate focusing of heavy ions to the inlet of the ion analysis device.
2. A system for analyzing a sample, the system comprising:
an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure;
an ion analysis device;
an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, wherein the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device; and
an electro-hydrodynamic lens device operably coupled to the ion transfer member.
3. A system for analyzing a sample, the system comprising:
an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure;
an ion analysis device;
an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, wherein the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device, and wherein the ion transfer member is coupled with a dielectric barrier discharge to enhance ion transfer efficiency.
4. A system for analyzing a sample, the system comprising:
an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure;
an ion analysis device;
an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, wherein the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device, and wherein a distal end of the ion transfer member comprises a plurality of inlets for transferring ions from multiple locations to the inlet of the ion analysis device.
5. A system for analyzing a sample, the system comprising:
an ionizing source for converting molecules of a sample into gas phase ions in a region at about atmospheric pressure;
an ion analysis device;
an ion transfer member operably coupled to a gas flow generating device, wherein the gas flow generating device produces a laminar gas flow that transfers the gas phase ions through the ion transfer member to an inlet of the ion analysis device, and wherein the ion transfer member is a tube that is composed of a flexible material.
6. The system according claim 5, wherein the flexible material is selected from the group consisting of plastics, rubbers, and polymers.
US13122651 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis Active 2030-01-26 US8410431B2 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10479308 true 2008-10-13 2008-10-13
US61/104793 2008-10-13
PCT/US2009/059514 WO2010045049A1 (en) 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US13122651 US8410431B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13122651 US8410431B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2009/059514 A-371-Of-International WO2010045049A1 (en) 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13727840 Continuation US8592756B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2012-12-27 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110240844A1 true US20110240844A1 (en) 2011-10-06
US8410431B2 true US8410431B2 (en) 2013-04-02

Family

ID=42106830

Family Applications (9)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13122651 Active 2030-01-26 US8410431B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2009-10-05 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US13727840 Active US8592756B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2012-12-27 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US13937913 Active US8686351B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2013-07-09 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14180915 Active US8803085B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2014-02-14 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14454811 Active US8963079B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2014-08-08 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14594217 Active US9159540B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-01-12 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14880613 Active US9484195B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-10-12 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US15340355 Active US10008374B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2016-11-01 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US15988698 Pending US20180286651A1 (en) 2008-10-13 2018-05-24 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Family Applications After (8)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13727840 Active US8592756B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2012-12-27 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US13937913 Active US8686351B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2013-07-09 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14180915 Active US8803085B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2014-02-14 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14454811 Active US8963079B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2014-08-08 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14594217 Active US9159540B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-01-12 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US14880613 Active US9484195B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-10-12 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US15340355 Active US10008374B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2016-11-01 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US15988698 Pending US20180286651A1 (en) 2008-10-13 2018-05-24 Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (9) US8410431B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2338160A4 (en)
JP (1) JP5725620B2 (en)
CN (1) CN102232238B (en)
WO (1) WO2010045049A1 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8592756B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2013-11-26 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8729496B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2014-05-20 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling of confined spaces
US8754365B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2014-06-17 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US20150129762A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-05-14 Dh Technologies Development Pte. Ltd. Reducing interferences in isobaric tag-based quantification
US9105435B1 (en) 2011-04-18 2015-08-11 Ionsense Inc. Robust, rapid, secure sample manipulation before during and after ionization for a spectroscopy system
US9184038B2 (en) 2012-06-06 2015-11-10 Purdue Research Foundation Ion focusing
US9337007B2 (en) 2014-06-15 2016-05-10 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for generating chemical signatures using differential desorption
US20170103879A1 (en) * 2014-06-16 2017-04-13 Purdue Research Foundation Sample analysis systems and methods of use thereof
US9899196B1 (en) 2016-01-12 2018-02-20 Jeol Usa, Inc. Dopant-assisted direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

Families Citing this family (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7777181B2 (en) * 2006-05-26 2010-08-17 Ionsense, Inc. High resolution sampling system for use with surface ionization technology
EP2435814B1 (en) * 2009-05-27 2017-09-27 Micromass UK Limited System and method for identification of biological tissues
US20120205533A1 (en) * 2009-08-19 2012-08-16 Ariya Parisa A Methods and systems for the quantitative chemical speciation of heavy metals and other toxic pollutants
JP5622751B2 (en) * 2010-01-25 2014-11-12 株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ Mass spectrometer
US20120145676A1 (en) * 2010-12-01 2012-06-14 University Of North Texas Metal Ablation in Supersonic Expansion Gas Coupled to an Ion Mass Filter
US9024254B2 (en) 2011-06-03 2015-05-05 Purdue Research Foundation Enclosed desorption electrospray ionization probes and method of use thereof
GB201109414D0 (en) 2011-06-03 2011-07-20 Micromass Ltd Diathermy -ionisation technique
CN104254772B (en) 2011-12-28 2018-11-16 英国质谱有限公司 System and method for fast evaporation of the liquid sample ionization
US9287100B2 (en) 2011-12-28 2016-03-15 Micromass Uk Limited Collision ion generator and separator
US9087683B2 (en) * 2012-01-06 2015-07-21 Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne Electrostatic spray ionization method
CN103295873B (en) * 2012-03-01 2016-11-02 株式会社岛津制作所 A method of producing a method and apparatus for analysis of ions at low pressure
CN103871826B (en) * 2012-12-12 2015-12-09 中国科学院大连化学物理研究所 An additive reagent selective detection means dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry
JP2016511396A (en) * 2013-01-31 2016-04-14 スミスズ ディテクション モントリオール インコーポレイティド Surface ionization source
CN104282525A (en) * 2013-07-01 2015-01-14 中国科学院大连化学物理研究所 Ion focusing transmission lens under atmosphere pressure
US9842728B2 (en) * 2013-07-19 2017-12-12 Smiths Detection Ion transfer tube with intermittent inlet
US20160203966A1 (en) * 2013-08-26 2016-07-14 Protea Biosciences, Inc. Remote laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry
WO2015128652A3 (en) 2014-02-26 2018-04-12 Micromass Uk Limited Impactor spray atmospheric pressure ion source with target paddle
GB201403370D0 (en) * 2014-02-26 2014-04-09 Micromass Ltd Impactor spray atmospheric pressure ion source with target paddle
US20170084442A1 (en) * 2014-04-11 2017-03-23 The University Of Hong Kong Method and system of atmospheric pressure megavolt electrostatic field ionization desorption (apme-fid)
DE212014000271U1 (en) * 2014-08-04 2017-04-13 Surasak Surinphong Filter device for an arc ion evaporator of a cathodic arc plasma coating system
DE102014112649A1 (en) * 2014-09-03 2016-03-03 Up Umweltanalytische Produkte Gmbh Device of a laser ion mobility spectrometer for the fast detection of residues on samples
RU2613429C2 (en) * 2015-06-04 2017-03-16 Общество с ограниченной ответственностью "Альфа" (ООО "Альфа") Method of drop-free ion flow forming at analyzed electric spraying solutions in ions sources with atmospheric pressure
US20170154763A1 (en) * 2015-11-30 2017-06-01 Globalfoundries Inc. Mass spectrometry system and method for contaminant identification in semiconductor fabrication
US9953817B2 (en) 2016-04-22 2018-04-24 Smiths Detection Inc. Ion transfer tube with sheath gas flow
US9786477B1 (en) 2016-06-30 2017-10-10 Smiths Detection Inc. Gas flow assisted ion transfer system with improved transfer efficiency
CN106290546A (en) * 2016-08-03 2017-01-04 西安电子科技大学 Ion mobility spectrometry
JP6106864B1 (en) * 2016-09-21 2017-04-05 ヒューマン・メタボローム・テクノロジーズ株式会社 Ion source adapter
US9911588B1 (en) * 2017-03-10 2018-03-06 Thermo Finnigan Llc Methods and systems for quantitative mass analysis
US9911587B1 (en) * 2017-03-10 2018-03-06 Thermo Finnigan Llc Methods and systems for quantitative mass analysis

Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4121099A (en) * 1975-03-03 1978-10-17 The Governing Council Of The University Of Toronto Method and apparatus for focussing and declustering trace ions
US5412208A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-05-02 Mds Health Group Limited Ion spray with intersecting flow
US6649908B2 (en) * 2001-09-20 2003-11-18 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Multiplexing capillary array for atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry
US20040169137A1 (en) 2002-11-27 2004-09-02 Westphall Michael S. Inductive detection for mass spectrometry
US6818890B1 (en) * 2003-10-30 2004-11-16 Battelle Memorial Institute High performance ion mobility spectrometry using hourglass electrodynamic funnel and internal ion funnel
US6818888B2 (en) * 2002-04-04 2004-11-16 Varian, Inc. Vortex flow atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for mass spectrometry
US20050236374A1 (en) 2004-04-01 2005-10-27 Lincoln Global, Inc. Device for processing welding wire
US6967325B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2005-11-22 Battelle Memorial Institute High performance ion mobility spectrometry using hourglass electrodynamic funnel and internal ion funnel
US7091477B2 (en) * 2003-06-09 2006-08-15 Ionica Mass Spectrometry Group, Inc. Mass spectrometer interface
US7098452B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2006-08-29 Mds Sciex Atmospheric pressure charged particle discriminator for mass spectrometry
US7247495B2 (en) * 1998-11-23 2007-07-24 Aviv Amirav Mass spectrometer method and apparatus for analyzing a sample in a solution
US20080087812A1 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling system for containment and transfer of ions into a spectroscopy system
US20080156985A1 (en) 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Andre Venter Enclosed desorption electrospray ionization
US7462822B2 (en) * 2005-02-03 2008-12-09 Bruker Daltonik, Gmbh Apparatus and method for the transport of ions into a vacuum
US20090321655A1 (en) * 2006-11-07 2009-12-31 Alexander Makarov Ion Transfer Tube with Spatially Alternating DC Fields
US20100038533A1 (en) * 2006-11-07 2010-02-18 Makarov Alexander A Ion Transfer Arrangement with Spatially Alternating DC and Viscous Ion Flow
US7679053B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2010-03-16 Mds Analytical Technologies, A Business Unit Of Mds Inc. Multiple sample sources for use with mass spectrometers, and apparatus, devices, and methods therefor
US7700913B2 (en) 2006-03-03 2010-04-20 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling system for use with surface ionization spectroscopy
US7705297B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2010-04-27 Ionsense, Inc. Flexible open tube sampling system for use with surface ionization technology
US7838826B1 (en) * 2008-08-07 2010-11-23 Bruker Daltonics, Inc. Apparatus and method for parallel flow ion mobility spectrometry combined with mass spectrometry
US7910881B2 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-03-22 Bruker Daltoniks, GmbH Mass spectrometry with laser ablation
US8008617B1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2011-08-30 Science Applications International Corporation Ion transfer device
US20110240844A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2011-10-06 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8084736B2 (en) * 2008-05-30 2011-12-27 Mds Analytical Technologies, A Business Unit Of Mds Inc. Method and system for vacuum driven differential mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer interface with adjustable resolution and selectivity
US8242440B2 (en) * 2009-05-01 2012-08-14 Thermo Finnigan Llc Method and apparatus for an ion transfer tube and mass spectrometer system using same
US8309916B2 (en) * 2010-08-18 2012-11-13 Thermo Finnigan Llc Ion transfer tube having single or multiple elongate bore segments and mass spectrometer system

Family Cites Families (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4977320A (en) 1990-01-22 1990-12-11 The Rockefeller University Electrospray ionization mass spectrometer with new features
US6897439B1 (en) * 1994-02-28 2005-05-24 Analytica Of Branford, Inc. Multipole ion guide for mass spectrometry
DE19517507C1 (en) * 1995-05-12 1996-08-08 Bruker Franzen Analytik Gmbh High frequency ion transfer guidance system for transfer of ions into vacuum of e.g. ion trap mass spectrometer
DE19520319A1 (en) * 1995-06-02 1996-12-12 Bruker Franzen Analytik Gmbh Method and apparatus for the introduction of ions in quadrupole ion trap
DE19520276C2 (en) * 1995-06-02 1999-08-26 Bruker Daltonik Gmbh Device for the introduction of ions into a mass spectrometer
DE19523860A1 (en) * 1995-06-30 1997-01-02 Bruker Franzen Analytik Gmbh Ion trap mass spectrometer with vacuum-external ion generation
US5873523A (en) * 1996-02-29 1999-02-23 Yale University Electrospray employing corona-assisted cone-jet mode
US5756995A (en) 1997-07-09 1998-05-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Ion interface for mass spectrometer
US6753523B1 (en) 1998-01-23 2004-06-22 Analytica Of Branford, Inc. Mass spectrometry with multipole ion guides
US7066241B2 (en) * 1999-02-19 2006-06-27 Iowa State Research Foundation Method and means for miniaturization of binary-fluid heat and mass exchangers
CA2305071C (en) * 1999-04-12 2009-03-24 Mds Inc. High intensity ion source
US6359275B1 (en) * 1999-07-14 2002-03-19 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Dielectric conduit with end electrodes
DE10010204A1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2001-09-13 Bruker Daltonik Gmbh Conditioning ion beam for flight time mass spectrometer involves damping ion movements in conducting system with gas pules, feeding ions to system end and extracting ions via lens system
US7335897B2 (en) * 2004-03-30 2008-02-26 Purdue Research Foundation Method and system for desorption electrospray ionization
US7122789B2 (en) 2004-05-11 2006-10-17 Science & Engineering Services, Inc. Method and apparatus to increase ionization efficiency in an ion source
US7170051B2 (en) * 2004-05-20 2007-01-30 Science & Engineering Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for ion fragmentation in mass spectrometry
US7397029B2 (en) * 2005-05-11 2008-07-08 Science & Engineering Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for ion fragmentation in mass spectrometry
US20060054805A1 (en) 2004-09-13 2006-03-16 Flanagan Michael J Multi-inlet sampling device for mass spectrometer ion source
US7544933B2 (en) * 2006-01-17 2009-06-09 Purdue Research Foundation Method and system for desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization
EP2046488A4 (en) * 2006-06-29 2013-09-18 Ionwerks Inc Neutral/ion reactor in adiabatic supersonic gas flow for ion mobility time-of flight mass spectrometry
WO2008073146A3 (en) * 2006-07-06 2008-10-09 Univ Wyoming Method and apparatus for pyrolysis-induced cleavage in peptides and proteins
US7915579B2 (en) * 2008-09-05 2011-03-29 Ohio University Method and apparatus of liquid sample-desorption electrospray ionization-mass specrometry (LS-DESI-MS)
US8203117B2 (en) * 2008-09-30 2012-06-19 Prosolia, Inc. Method and apparatus for embedded heater for desorption and ionization of analytes
US8330119B2 (en) * 2009-04-10 2012-12-11 Ohio University On-line and off-line coupling of EC with DESI-MS
US8927940B2 (en) * 2011-06-03 2015-01-06 Bruker Daltonics, Inc. Abridged multipole structure for the transport, selection and trapping of ions in a vacuum system
US9184040B2 (en) * 2011-06-03 2015-11-10 Bruker Daltonics, Inc. Abridged multipole structure for the transport and selection of ions in a vacuum system
WO2012167183A1 (en) * 2011-06-03 2012-12-06 Perkinelmer Health Sciences, Inc. Direct sample analysis ion source
US8969798B2 (en) * 2011-07-07 2015-03-03 Bruker Daltonics, Inc. Abridged ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer

Patent Citations (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4121099A (en) * 1975-03-03 1978-10-17 The Governing Council Of The University Of Toronto Method and apparatus for focussing and declustering trace ions
US5412208A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-05-02 Mds Health Group Limited Ion spray with intersecting flow
US7247495B2 (en) * 1998-11-23 2007-07-24 Aviv Amirav Mass spectrometer method and apparatus for analyzing a sample in a solution
US6649908B2 (en) * 2001-09-20 2003-11-18 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Multiplexing capillary array for atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry
US6818888B2 (en) * 2002-04-04 2004-11-16 Varian, Inc. Vortex flow atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for mass spectrometry
US20040169137A1 (en) 2002-11-27 2004-09-02 Westphall Michael S. Inductive detection for mass spectrometry
US7078679B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2006-07-18 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Inductive detection for mass spectrometry
US7098452B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2006-08-29 Mds Sciex Atmospheric pressure charged particle discriminator for mass spectrometry
US7462826B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2008-12-09 Mds Sciex Atmospheric pressure charged particle discriminator for mass spectrometry
US7091477B2 (en) * 2003-06-09 2006-08-15 Ionica Mass Spectrometry Group, Inc. Mass spectrometer interface
US7405398B2 (en) * 2003-06-09 2008-07-29 Ionics Mass Spectrometry Group, Inc. Mass spectrometer interface
US6967325B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2005-11-22 Battelle Memorial Institute High performance ion mobility spectrometry using hourglass electrodynamic funnel and internal ion funnel
US6818890B1 (en) * 2003-10-30 2004-11-16 Battelle Memorial Institute High performance ion mobility spectrometry using hourglass electrodynamic funnel and internal ion funnel
US20050236374A1 (en) 2004-04-01 2005-10-27 Lincoln Global, Inc. Device for processing welding wire
US7462822B2 (en) * 2005-02-03 2008-12-09 Bruker Daltonik, Gmbh Apparatus and method for the transport of ions into a vacuum
US7700913B2 (en) 2006-03-03 2010-04-20 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling system for use with surface ionization spectroscopy
US7705297B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2010-04-27 Ionsense, Inc. Flexible open tube sampling system for use with surface ionization technology
US7679053B2 (en) * 2006-09-25 2010-03-16 Mds Analytical Technologies, A Business Unit Of Mds Inc. Multiple sample sources for use with mass spectrometers, and apparatus, devices, and methods therefor
US20080087812A1 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling system for containment and transfer of ions into a spectroscopy system
US8148680B2 (en) * 2006-11-07 2012-04-03 Thermo Fisher Scientific (Bremen) Gmbh Ion transfer arrangement with spatially alternating DC and viscous ion flow
US20090321655A1 (en) * 2006-11-07 2009-12-31 Alexander Makarov Ion Transfer Tube with Spatially Alternating DC Fields
US20100038533A1 (en) * 2006-11-07 2010-02-18 Makarov Alexander A Ion Transfer Arrangement with Spatially Alternating DC and Viscous Ion Flow
US8148679B2 (en) * 2006-11-07 2012-04-03 Thermo Fisher Scientific (Bremen) Gmbh Efficient atmospheric pressure interface for mass spectrometers and method
US7982183B2 (en) * 2006-11-07 2011-07-19 Thermo Fisher Scientific (Bremen) Gmbh Ion transfer tube with spatially alternating DC fields
US7910881B2 (en) * 2006-12-04 2011-03-22 Bruker Daltoniks, GmbH Mass spectrometry with laser ablation
US20080156985A1 (en) 2006-12-28 2008-07-03 Andre Venter Enclosed desorption electrospray ionization
US8008617B1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2011-08-30 Science Applications International Corporation Ion transfer device
US8084736B2 (en) * 2008-05-30 2011-12-27 Mds Analytical Technologies, A Business Unit Of Mds Inc. Method and system for vacuum driven differential mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer interface with adjustable resolution and selectivity
US7838826B1 (en) * 2008-08-07 2010-11-23 Bruker Daltonics, Inc. Apparatus and method for parallel flow ion mobility spectrometry combined with mass spectrometry
US20110240844A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2011-10-06 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8242440B2 (en) * 2009-05-01 2012-08-14 Thermo Finnigan Llc Method and apparatus for an ion transfer tube and mass spectrometer system using same
US8309916B2 (en) * 2010-08-18 2012-11-13 Thermo Finnigan Llc Ion transfer tube having single or multiple elongate bore segments and mass spectrometer system

Non-Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
International Preliminary Report on Patentability in corresponding PCT Application PCT/US2009/059514, issued Apr. 19, 2011.
International Search Report in corresponding PCT Application PCT/US2009/059524, mailed Mar. 23, 2010.
Takats, Z., ‘Ambient MS using desorption electrospray ionization.’ J. Mass. Spectrom., 2005, 40:1261-1275.
Takats, Z., 'Ambient MS using desorption electrospray ionization.' J. Mass. Spectrom., 2005, 40:1261-1275.
Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority in corresponding PCT Application PCT/US2009/059514, completed Feb. 23, 2010.

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150262803A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2015-09-17 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8686351B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2014-04-01 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8592756B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2013-11-26 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US20140158882A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2014-06-12 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US10008374B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2018-06-26 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8803085B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2014-08-12 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US8963079B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2015-02-24 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US9159540B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2015-10-13 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US20150014525A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2015-01-15 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US9484195B2 (en) * 2008-10-13 2016-11-01 Purdue Research Foundation Systems and methods for transfer of ions for analysis
US9633827B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2017-04-25 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for sampling of confined spaces
US9390899B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2016-07-12 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for sampling of confined spaces
US8729496B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2014-05-20 Ionsense, Inc. Sampling of confined spaces
US8895916B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2014-11-25 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for sampling of confined spaces
US10090142B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2018-10-02 Ionsense, Inc Apparatus and method for sampling of confined spaces
US8963101B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2015-02-24 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US8754365B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2014-06-17 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US9960029B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2018-05-01 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US8822949B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2014-09-02 Ionsense Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US9514923B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2016-12-06 Ionsense Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US9224587B2 (en) 2011-02-05 2015-12-29 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for thermal assisted desorption ionization systems
US9105435B1 (en) 2011-04-18 2015-08-11 Ionsense Inc. Robust, rapid, secure sample manipulation before during and after ionization for a spectroscopy system
US20150129762A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-05-14 Dh Technologies Development Pte. Ltd. Reducing interferences in isobaric tag-based quantification
US9164060B2 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-10-20 Dh Technologies Development Pte. Ltd. Reducing interferences in isobaric tag-based quantification
US9184038B2 (en) 2012-06-06 2015-11-10 Purdue Research Foundation Ion focusing
US10014169B2 (en) 2012-06-06 2018-07-03 Purdue Research Foundation Ion focusing
US9548192B2 (en) 2012-06-06 2017-01-17 Purdue Research Foundation Ion focusing
US10056243B2 (en) 2014-06-15 2018-08-21 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for rapid chemical analysis using differential desorption
US9824875B2 (en) 2014-06-15 2017-11-21 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for generating chemical signatures using differential desorption
US9558926B2 (en) 2014-06-15 2017-01-31 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for rapid chemical analysis using differential desorption
US9337007B2 (en) 2014-06-15 2016-05-10 Ionsense, Inc. Apparatus and method for generating chemical signatures using differential desorption
US20170103879A1 (en) * 2014-06-16 2017-04-13 Purdue Research Foundation Sample analysis systems and methods of use thereof
US9704700B2 (en) * 2014-06-16 2017-07-11 Purdue Research Foundation Sample analysis systems and methods of use thereof
US10079140B2 (en) 2014-06-16 2018-09-18 Purdue Research Foundation Sample analysis systems and methods of use thereof
US9899196B1 (en) 2016-01-12 2018-02-20 Jeol Usa, Inc. Dopant-assisted direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP2338160A4 (en) 2015-12-23 application
CN102232238B (en) 2015-08-05 grant
US9484195B2 (en) 2016-11-01 grant
JP5725620B2 (en) 2015-05-27 grant
US20150014525A1 (en) 2015-01-15 application
US20150262803A1 (en) 2015-09-17 application
US8963079B2 (en) 2015-02-24 grant
US20160118237A1 (en) 2016-04-28 application
US8592756B2 (en) 2013-11-26 grant
CN102232238A (en) 2011-11-02 application
US20130292564A1 (en) 2013-11-07 application
US20170154761A1 (en) 2017-06-01 application
WO2010045049A1 (en) 2010-04-22 application
EP2338160A1 (en) 2011-06-29 application
US10008374B2 (en) 2018-06-26 grant
US20140158882A1 (en) 2014-06-12 application
US8686351B2 (en) 2014-04-01 grant
US20130126723A1 (en) 2013-05-23 application
US8803085B2 (en) 2014-08-12 grant
US20180286651A1 (en) 2018-10-04 application
JP2012505519A (en) 2012-03-01 application
US20110240844A1 (en) 2011-10-06 application
US9159540B2 (en) 2015-10-13 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6717130B2 (en) Methods and apparatus for mass spectrometry
Buchanan et al. Fourier transform mass spectrometry of high-mass biomolecules
US7982183B2 (en) Ion transfer tube with spatially alternating DC fields
Gao et al. Breaking the pumping speed barrier in mass spectrometry: discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface
Downard Mass spectrometry: a foundation course
Fuerstenau et al. Molecular weight determination of megadalton DNA electrospray ions using charge detection time‐of‐flight mass spectrometry
US5750988A (en) Orthogonal ion sampling for APCI mass spectrometry
US6707037B2 (en) Atmospheric and vacuum pressure MALDI ion source
Van Berkel et al. Established and emerging atmospheric pressure surface sampling/ionization techniques for mass spectrometry
US6777672B1 (en) Method and apparatus for a multiple part capillary device for use in mass spectrometry
US20100301209A1 (en) Discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface
US5481107A (en) Mass spectrometer
US5811800A (en) Temporary storage of ions for mass spectrometric analyses
US6410914B1 (en) Ionization chamber for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry
Bereman et al. Direct high‐resolution peptide and protein analysis by desorption electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry
US7095019B1 (en) Remote reagent chemical ionization source
US5753910A (en) Angled chamber seal for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry
US20070084998A1 (en) Novel tandem mass spectrometer
US20040169137A1 (en) Inductive detection for mass spectrometry
US20060108539A1 (en) Ionization by droplet impact
US20080185511A1 (en) Tandem mass spectrometer
Kelly et al. The ion funnel: theory, implementations, and applications
US6943347B1 (en) Laminated tube for the transport of charged particles contained in a gaseous medium
US20050279931A1 (en) Mass spectrometer and reaction cell for ion-ion reactions
US20060289746A1 (en) Multi-beam ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry with multi-channel data recording

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: PURDUE RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INDIANA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CHARIPAR, NICHOLAS ALAN;COOKS, ROBERT GRAHAM;GARIMELLA, SANDILYA VENKATA;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20110610 TO 20110621;REEL/FRAME:026549/0925

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

SULP Surcharge for late payment