US830931A - Printed frieze for walls. - Google Patents

Printed frieze for walls. Download PDF

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US830931A
US830931A US1905250689A US830931A US 830931 A US830931 A US 830931A US 1905250689 A US1905250689 A US 1905250689A US 830931 A US830931 A US 830931A
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Prior art keywords
section
sections
frieze
end
design
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Hugo M Schmitz
William Horning
Warren R Cox
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Hugo M Schmitz
William Horning
Warren R Cox
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/16Two dimensionally sectional layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24934Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.] including paper layer

Description

No. 830,931. PATENTED SEPT. 11, 1906.

H. M. SGHMITZ, W. HORNING & W. R. COX. PRINTED FRIEZE FOR WALLS.

APPLICATION FILED MAR.17,1905.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

MW ggv'd/mmammd/ mmrec fi rue NORRIS PETERS cc, WASHINGTON, u. c.

N0. 830,931. PATENTED SEPT. 11, 1906. H. M. SGH MITZ, W. HORNING & W. R. COX.

PRINTED FRIEZE FOR WALLS.

APPLICATION FILED MAR.17,1906.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

rn: unxms PEI-xx. cm, WASNINGTON, n. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

R. COX, OF

CLEVELAND, OHIO.

PRINTED FRIEZE FOR WALLS- Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Sept. 11, 1906.

Application filed March 17. 1905. Serial No. 250.689.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, HUGO M. SCHMITZ, l/VILLIAM'HORNING, and WARREN R. Cox, citizens of the United States, residing at Cleveland, in the county of Cuyahoga and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Printed F riezes for Walls; and we do declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, which will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to an improvement in printed friezes for walls, which may be otherwise papered, painted, or decorated in any practical way.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a fperspective view of a portion of the interior a room decorated with our new and improved frieze. Fig. 2 is a face view of a matching or union section which is specially designed for terminal uses, and Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of an edge section of Fig. 2. Figs. 4, 5, and 6 represent different fulllength" sections, so called, of the frieze, the same being preferably of a standard length say five feet.

Heretofore it has been the universal practice, so far as we know and believe, to make all printed friezes uniformly twenty-four feet in length and provided with a set design or pattern usually a bout eighteen to twenty inches in length and repeated from end to end of the frieze. This is the frieze which is carried in stock by all decorating establishments and which is generally placed upon the wall in the same pattern and without any attempt to break the monotony or to change the appearance which such a frieze may give to the room, because there has been no really satisfactory way known to effect a change. The only exception to this way is a modification thereof, which, however, proceeds on identically the same principle, but seeks relief in several different designs or patterns successively instead of one alone. Under this plan the regulation twenty-four-foot paper has been retained in each and all cases and has been the only known length; but different pieces or stripshave had each theirown designs printed thereon with repetition every eighteen or twenty inches throughout its length, as before. Now assuming that we have, say, three such printed strips or pieces with a different design in each and indicated, say,

b A, B, and C, (not shown,) the papenhange f proceeds with these by first cutting ofl', say, a twenty-inch section from piece A and pasting it upon the wall. Then he cuts a section of twenty inches from piece B, giving him a different design, and then proceeds in like manner with piece C. He now has three pieces of twenty-inches length each on the wall and with three different designs supposed to harmonize in color and general effect. After this he begins again with piece A and continues through pieces B and C in rotation, as before, and so on in repetition until the entire distance around the room has been compassed. This rotation is of course an arbitrary one, as the patterns are designed to match only in sequence and it would be impossible to obtain harmony or uniformity by interchange of sections. Indeed, interchange is prohibited by reason of having patterns printed to use only in rotation, and when the decorator has worked his way around the room to the first section A he is liable to come there with A, B, or C as last or next in order and with room, say, for a fraction of a section; but sections of the same kind will not harmonize, nor will sections out of sequence, and thus the decorator finds himself in a position where it is impossible to make harmonious union, and he is compelled to patch out as best he can and let it go. The result of this scheme is a frieze in which the design repeats itself every sixty to eighty inches around the room, and the only difference between it and the first above-described frieze or single-design pattern is that in this instance the repetition is by threes instead of by the same design over and over again and with the inevitably faulty connection at the terminals.

According to our own invention we have a frieze which is printed to form sections of convenient and preferably, but not necessarily, of uniform length say about five feetand all of which are adapted to match at their ends with any other section without regard for the order in which they may be placed on the wall or the length of a section or design. For example, there may be, say, two to twenty different designs on as many sections employed in a single room, according to its size, and no two be alike, so that there will be no repetition of design, and yet any one of making all the sections interchangeable and yet with a design of its own and different from any and all others as a design or pattern, but of course in harmony with all so far as scenic and color efiects are concerned.

The number "of such sections may run on through'the alphabet and beyond, and there is room for infinite variety and stylewithout really forfeiting the privilege of selection from all: fora single'room of ordinary size andupon-which there is room for only a comparatively few of the entire number of sect-ions.

Another and important feature of this invention isthe provision for harmoniously uniting" the'-- terminals of the frieze when laced on-theroom: It will followalmost invariably that therewillbe a space less than a full-section length between said terminals. In some instances it may be' only i a few inches and' i'n others more; but by means of our specially-designed matching ;or union section'Z we are enabled to make a union whichwillharmonize and match with both terminals Whatever its length in feet or inches: 7

Toillus-trateylet us assume a room the di-' mensionsof which are fourteen feet six inches by seventeen feet three inches, requiring sixty-three feet six inchesof frieze to complete the decoration." The decorator will ststudy the room-as to its'shape, light, and shade, doors,'windows, and's'ashes. He may begin-at any point he desires-with the section whichhe thinks the most efiective in that position -say section Dwhich is putin place. Nexthis-choice may be'section E or any other-suitable section which follows section D, ands'o on aroundthe room. When, say, the twelfth section is put in place, leaving three feet six inches of wall still to be covered, he takes section Z, the terminal or union section, and by cutting out one foot six inches from the center of section Z he will have left the re uired length of three feet six inches, which w en put into place completes the frieze "with a perfect match at the inter' secting ends-and as it is between the other sections all-around the room. The result is a frieze which-presents a harmonious design made up' of units having each a design in itself,-bu't provided with terminals having their complement in the ends of the adjoining sect-ions'and'helping to make thedesign of the whole frieze. No part "is repeated in itself and, owing to'the interchangeable 'character ofthe parts thereof, the decorator is afiorded an infinite latitude of choice in the Each section is sdei arrangement of the partsor sections to suit the conditions of light, arrangements for opening of the doors, and the like. In these and other essentialparticulars our frieze is differentiated from all other printed friezes known to us, and it has such manifest variety and elasticity that it gives to the public practically the equivalent of the fresco-painters art Without the attendant expense.

To carry out the invention on the lines indicated, the immediate end edges of all the sections or lengths of the designs or patterns must be exactly alike, so as to perfectly match one with another and the same of the union-section Z. Then as this section is shortened by cutting out an equal distance from both ends from its middle both ways according to the space to be filled its outer ends are matched with the connecting terminals of the frieze, while its severed ends match with each other. This is accomplished by carefully constructing each half of said section exactly like the other half, measured from either the middle or the ends, and

the scales 2 along the edges of said section facilitate the making of the measurements for severing the same on different cross-lines as may be required. V I

The portion of each design or section employed herein as the end and matching portion thereof is a tree or portionof a tree or cluster of trees, which is in the foreground of the picture and works into the entire scheme with such harmony as to lose all stiffness in effect. However, any other detail may be chosen, according to the general plan of the design, and said detail may regularly reappear at the end of each section and yet be inconspicuous and unnoticeable when all the varying scenes are in view.

If preferred, the scale 2 for taking or making measurements on the face of the unionsection Z may be only along one edge or a portion of one edge, if preferred, but having the same scale on both edges assists materially in getting the measurements at both edges exactly alike preparatory to cutting out such as a given union space may require.

It is immaterial whether the frieze be painted by printing or hand decorating.

It will be noticed that the ends of the section or frieze shown in Fig. .2 are designated by numerals 4 and 5, respectively, and that the ends of the sections shown in Figs. 4, 5,

and 6 are indicated by numerals 6 to 11, in

elusive, the ends of section 4 being indicated by 6 and 7, the ends of section 5 by 8 and 9, and the ends of section 6 by 10and 11, respectively;

In Figs. 4, 5, and 6 the sections shown therein bear different designs, and hence have difierent' numerals indicating the immediate end edges thereof but in placing the sections upon a wall the said several sections are arranged endto end according-to tastesay with end 8 matching on end 7 in section 0 I and end 10 matching on end 9 of section B, and so on and at last the ends 4 and 5 of the union-section are matched with the respective ends of the frieze which it is adapted to unite and complete.

What we claim is- 1. A frieze consisting of a plurality of sections having each a different complete design from the other sections and the end portions of the designs of all the sections substantially alike, whereby the said designs match across the meeting edges of the sections one with any other, and the end edges of each section identical one with the other and with all the end edges of all the sections of the frieze.

2. A frieze consisting of a plurality of sections having different complete designs in each, and each of said sections having the end portions of the design thereon substantially alike at each end and provided with identical end edges, and all the end edges of the frieze alike, whereby said sections are made to match at their ends and form a complete design across the meeting edges thereof, and all said sections become interchangeable throughout the frieze.

3. A frieze consisting of a plurality of sec tions having each a different complete design from the other sections and. the end portions of the designs of all the sections substantially alike and the end edges thereof identical, whereby the said designs match across the meeting edges of the sections one with the other, in combination with a union-section having a complete design thereon with end portions substantially like the end portions of the other sections.

' 4. A frieze consisting of a plurality of sections of predetermined lengths having their end edges patterned to match with the end edges of all the other sections, in combination with a union-section having one half like the other half in design measuring from its middle to its ends and its end edges identical with the end edges of the other sections, whereby the said union-section is adapted to be cut out between its ends and made to match the terminals of the sections which it unites.

5. A frieze comprising a series of sections having different designs and matching ends, in combination with a union-section having a design between its ends and one half of said design symmetrical with the other half meas uring from the center to each end and having the designs at itsends matching the ends of the connecting sections.

In testimony whereof We sign this specification in the presence of two witnesses.

HUGO M. SCHMITZ. WILLIAM HORNING. WARREN R. 002;.

Witnesses:

O. A. SELL, R. B. MosnR.

US830931A 1905-03-17 1905-03-17 Printed frieze for walls. Expired - Lifetime US830931A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030093964A1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2003-05-22 Bushey Richard D. Floor grid system

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030093964A1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2003-05-22 Bushey Richard D. Floor grid system

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