Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Elastic, soft and punctiformly bound non-woven fabric provided with filler particles and method for production and the use thereof

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US8114794B2
US8114794B2 US11994071 US99407106A US8114794B2 US 8114794 B2 US8114794 B2 US 8114794B2 US 11994071 US11994071 US 11994071 US 99407106 A US99407106 A US 99407106A US 8114794 B2 US8114794 B2 US 8114794B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
fibers
nonwoven
fibrous
fabric
web
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US11994071
Other versions
US20090100565A1 (en )
Inventor
Peter Grynaeus
Hans Rettig
Oliver Staudenmayer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Freudenberg Carl KG
Original Assignee
Freudenberg Carl KG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/14Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic yarns or filaments produced by welding
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/44Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling
    • D04H1/50Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling by treatment to produce shrinking, swelling, crimping or curling of fibres
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/58Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives
    • D04H1/60Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in dry state, e.g. thermo-activatable agents in solid or molten state, and heat being applied subsequently
    • D04H1/62Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in dry state, e.g. thermo-activatable agents in solid or molten state, and heat being applied subsequently at spaced points or locations
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/58Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives
    • D04H1/64Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in wet state, e.g. chemical agents in dispersions or solutions
    • D04H1/66Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in wet state, e.g. chemical agents in dispersions or solutions at spaced points or locations
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/12Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with filaments or yarns secured together by chemical or thermo-activatable bonding agents, e.g. adhesives, applied or incorporated in liquid or solid form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D2400/00Functions or special features of garments
    • A41D2400/10Heat retention or warming
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2915Rod, strand, filament or fiber including textile, cloth or fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2922Nonlinear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2922Nonlinear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T428/2924Composite
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/20Coated or impregnated woven, knit, or nonwoven fabric which is not [a] associated with another preformed layer or fiber layer or, [b] with respect to woven and knit, characterized, respectively, by a particular or differential weave or knit, wherein the coating or impregnation is neither a foamed material nor a free metal or alloy layer
    • Y10T442/2418Coating or impregnation increases electrical conductivity or anti-static quality
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/20Coated or impregnated woven, knit, or nonwoven fabric which is not [a] associated with another preformed layer or fiber layer or, [b] with respect to woven and knit, characterized, respectively, by a particular or differential weave or knit, wherein the coating or impregnation is neither a foamed material nor a free metal or alloy layer
    • Y10T442/2861Coated or impregnated synthetic organic fiber fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/601Nonwoven fabric has an elastic quality
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/601Nonwoven fabric has an elastic quality
    • Y10T442/602Nonwoven fabric comprises an elastic strand or fiber material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T442/629Composite strand or fiber material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T442/632A single nonwoven layer comprising non-linear synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material and strand or fiber material not specified as non-linear
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T442/632A single nonwoven layer comprising non-linear synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material and strand or fiber material not specified as non-linear
    • Y10T442/633Synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material is of staple length
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T442/635Synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/627Strand or fiber material is specified as non-linear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T442/635Synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material
    • Y10T442/636Synthetic polymeric strand or fiber material is of staple length
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/637Including strand or fiber material which is a monofilament composed of two or more polymeric materials in physically distinct relationship [e.g., sheath-core, side-by-side, islands-in-sea, fibrils-in-matrix, etc.] or composed of physical blend of chemically different polymeric materials or a physical blend of a polymeric material and a filler material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/697Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/699Including particulate material other than strand or fiber material

Abstract

The invention relates to a nonwoven fabric which is bonded at selected points by use of a binder containing particles composed of filler material (a phase change material, among others) and which is not bonded at other selected points. The nonwoven fabric is characterized by a soft touch and good flexibility, and may be used as an interlining material or an intermediate layer.

Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a nonwoven fabric which is suited in particular as an interlining material, a method for producing same, and use thereof for production of interlinings.

BACKGROUND

Textile fabrics provided with fillers, in particular fillers having heat-regulating properties, are known.

EP-A-178 372 discloses a drapable microporous multilayer nonwoven fabric for medical applications. The middle layer is composed of microfibers, and is covered on both sides with nonwoven fabrics. The individual layers are joined by use of a binder paste, a paraffin emulsion, for example, imprinted in a pattern.

EP-A-190 788 describes nonwovens which contain microspheres, preferably foamed, which are arranged in patterns and which may be used as reinforcement materials for plastics.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,366,801 or EP-A-611 330 describe the coating of a woven fabric with a binder and microcapsules distributed therein which contain a phase change material.

A nonwoven fabric having temperature-regulating properties is known from WO-A-02/12607. In one embodiment described therein, the nonwoven fabric is impregnated with a binder containing a dispersed microencapsulated phase change material. The material which imparts heat-regulating properties is distributed throughout the interior of the nonwoven fabric. In addition to embodiments in which the entire inner volume is filled with this material, variants are described in which the material is present only at the intersection points of the fibers, and the interstices are filled with air. However, in this cited embodiment the entire nonwoven fabric is impregnated with the material. This is achieved by saturating the provided nonwoven fabric with the binder. Nonwoven fabrics, i.e., mechanically stabilized/bonded materials, are used as starting materials.

WO-A-02/59414 describes a coated material having temperature-regulating properties and improved flexibility and air permeability. The coated material is composed of a substrate which is provided on a portion of its surface with binder dots or with layers of binders containing temperature-regulating materials. The binders may be applied to the surface, or may penetrate into the interior of the substrate and partially or completely permeate same. In any case, a portion of the surface is not impregnated with binder. Various coated substrates such as woven fabrics, nonwoven fabrics, films, foams, and papers are described.

Substrates having improved temperature-regulating properties are also known from WO-A-02/95314. According to the cited document, polymer dispersions containing phase change materials are applied in a napped pattern to a textile surface by screen printing. In addition to metal foils and textile surfaces, nonwoven fabrics, i.e. mechanically stabilized materials/bonded fibrous webs, are mentioned as possible substrates.

The substrates used heretofore in the prior art with regard to textile surfaces are structures which after production are stabilized (bonded, consolidated) to allow ease of handling. Thus, for example, nonwoven fabrics are manufactured by providing a fibrous web with a surface which is still mechanically unstable (“fleece formation”), then performing nonwoven bonding (see, for example, Vliesstoffe [Nonwoven Fabrics], edited by W. Albrecht, H. Fuchs, and W. Kittelmann, Wiley-VCH (2000), Part II, Manufacturing Methods for Nonwoven Fabrics, Chapter 6, Nonwoven Bonding). Typical processes for nonwoven bonding include chemical methods, such as application of a binder, or physical methods (mechanical and/or thermal methods), such as needling, interlacing, treatment with heated air, or calendering. These processes directly follow the nonwoven fabric formation process in order to convert the mechanically very unstable fibrous web to a manipulable form.

In the sense of the present description, “nonwoven fabrics” are understood to mean processed layers, fleeces, or fibrous webs composed of directionally or randomly oriented fibers which are bonded by friction and/or cohesion and/or adhesion (as defined in ISO 9092 or EN 29 092).

Attempts have also been made to apply the binder by screen printing directly after formation of the nonwoven fabric by applying paste-like binder liquids to the still unstable fibrous web, using a rotary screen printing machine (see, for example, Vliesstoffe, edited by W. Albrecht, H. Fuchs, and W. Kittelmann, Wiley-VCH (2000), Chapter 6.5, Chemical Methods, page 381). These methods have thus far not become established in the art due to the technical problem of uniformly binding a fibrous web using “adhesive” binders. The loose fibers of the fibrous web tend to adhere to the printing screen, and after a short time impede the printing process. This phenomenon may be counteracted by subjecting the fibrous web to intense compression or pressure (over the entire surface or at selected points), but the resulting products are therefore very flat and have less of a textile quality; in addition, the binder bleeds through heavily.

DE-A-29 14 617 describes a method for uniform, continuous imprinting of pastes onto the front and back sides of textile fabrics. According to the example, a fibrous web produced by carding is led through a calender and prebonded. A binder dispersion is then applied in a pattern to both sides of this textile fabric, using rollers, and drying is then performed to crosslink the binder.

Heretofore, nonwoven fabrics having heat-regulating properties have been produced by aftertreatment of nonwoven fabrics, i.e., bonded, mechanically stabilized textile surfaces, with heat-regulating materials. As a result of the prior bonding step, in many cases the elasticity and softness of these nonwoven fabrics leave much to be desired.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

On the basis of the above-described prior art, the object of the present invention is to provide a nonwoven fabric which contains filler material, and which has high elasticity as well as a high degree of softness. It is thus possible to produce textiles having improved fit and wear comfort.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved manufacturing method for nonwoven fabrics containing filler materials, wherein the prior step of nonwoven fabric bonding may be omitted, thereby allowing nonwoven fabrics to be produced with less expenditure of effort.

The present invention relates to a nonwoven fabric having crimped and uncrimped fibers and/or filaments and which is bonded at selected points using a binder containing particles composed of filler material and which is not bonded at other selected points.

As the result of applying and optionally curing the binder containing filler material directly on the unbonded fleece, i.e., on the fibrous web directly after placement on a backing, a fabric is produced which is not bonded in selected surface regions, i.e., has not been subjected to fleece formation in these surface regions. The permeability, elasticity, and hand of the nonwoven fabric are improved by the presence of nonbonded regions.

In the present invention, heat-crimpable fibers or filaments are used in the production of the fibrous web. The fibrous web also preferably contains fibers or filaments which are uncrimped and noncrimpable, or which under the processing conditions are noncrimpable.

Thus, the nonwoven fabric according to the invention contains crimped fibers and/or filaments, and preferably also contains uncrimped fibers and/or filaments.

Within the scope of the present description, “fibers” are understood to mean threads of finite length (staple fibers), i.e., threads having lengths down to the decimeter range.

Within the scope of the present description, “filaments” are understood to mean threads of essentially continuous length, i.e., threads having lengths above the decimeter range.

Bicomponent fibers or filaments may be used as heat-crimpable fibers or filaments to avoid the problems of the products currently known from the prior art.

Bicomponent fibers or filaments have been used for quite some time in the manufacture of nonwoven fabrics. In the form of core-sheath fibers or filaments containing low-melting sheath components they may be used as binder fibers in the thermal bonding of nonwoven fabrics (over the entire surface or at selected points) (see, for example, Vliesstoffe, edited by W. Albrecht, H. Fuchs, and W. Kittelmann, Wiley-VCH (2000), Chapter 1.2, Chemical Fibers—Bicomponent Fibers, page 63).

The bicomponent fibers or filaments are not used in the nonwoven fabric according to the invention because of the adhering/binding properties of low-melting components. Bicomponent fibers or filaments composed of polymer components having similar melting points may be used; these are structured, for example, in a side-by-side arrangement or in an asymmetrical core-sheath arrangement in such a way that during heat treatment a different shrinkage is induced along the fiber or filament axis. Instead of or in addition to the bicomponent fibers or filaments, homopolymer fibers or filaments may be used which during production have been subjected to asymmetrical cooling of the fiber/filament over their cross section.

During manufacture of the nonwoven fabric, the portion of these crimpable fibers or filaments used causes an in situ contraction of the fibrous web when acted on by heat prior to the printing unit. The crimping fibers or filaments result in an improvement of the interior composition of the fibrous web, thereby greatly facilitating printing of the nonwoven fabric. The nonwoven fabric also acquires volume and elasticity. The temperature profile for the heat treatment is selected such that the treatment temperature is below the melting or softening temperature of the lower-melting or softening polymer of the multicomponent fibers, so that the heat treatment induces crimping but not adhesion.

As the result of inducing crimping during manufacture of the nonwoven fabric according to the invention, the imprinted binder dots also acquire volume and softness, since the crimping fibers or filaments do not form compact points in the fiber matrix. The binder dots may be foamed, although this is not necessary.

To achieve a particularly soft and elastic product, nonwoven fabrics containing two- or three-dimensionally crimped fibers and/or filaments are preferred.

The fibrous webs used according to the invention may be composed of any given fiber types of various titer ranges, for example a titer of 0.5 to 10 dtex, preferably 0.8 to 6.7 dtex, in particular 1.3 to 3.3 dtex. The fiber mixture should contain at least 5% by weight, preferably at least 20% by weight, of crimping fibers or filaments. These may be heterofil fibers/bicomponent fibers or specialized homofil fibers (or the corresponding filaments). The remaining fibers may be staple fibers or filaments commonly used in nonwoven fabric manufacture.

The fibrous webs used according to the invention may be produced using various fleece formation techniques. These primarily involve carded, dry-laid fibrous webs. Direct fiber-laying techniques using the spunbonded nonwoven fabric process or melt-blown process are also possible.

Fibrous webs composed of staple fibers are particularly preferably used.

The fibers of the fibrous webs used may be laid isotropically or in a preferred direction, i.e., anisotropically. The fibrous web may be composed of the same or different titers of the same fiber. The fibers forming the fibrous web may be composed of various types of fibers, for example homofil fibers, or also from 100% bicomponent fibers or a blend of bicomponent fibers and homofil fibers. Mixtures of synthetic fibers and natural fibers may also be used.

Polyester homofil fibers, for example 1.7 dtex/38 mm or 3.3 dtex/51 mm homopolyester fiber in a mixture with polyester bicomponent fibers such as polyester side-by-side bicomponent fibers, are preferably used. Polyamide fibers composed of 3d/1.5″ PA 66, for example, may also be used in the mixture. A proportion of at least 5%, preferably at least 20%, heterofil fibers, preferably bico fibers, is necessary.

The fibrous webs used according to the invention may be shrunk by up to 50% under the manufacturing conditions for the nonwoven fabric, depending on the quantity of heterofil fiber added. However, in the subsequent work steps the nonwoven fabric is stabilized, preferably with low shrinkage, for example −3.0% in the machine direction and −1.5% in the transverse direction.

The fibrous webs used typically have a mass per unit area of 15 to 210 g/m2.

Carded fibrous webs having a mass per unit area of 35 to 140 g/m2 are particularly preferably used.

Examples of fiber materials include polyolefins, preferably polypropylene or polypropylene-ethylene copolymers, polyesters, polyamides, or polyacrylonitrile, in addition to natural fibers, in particular cellulose fibers, cotton fibers, or mixtures thereof.

The binder containing finely dispersed filler material may be of any given type, provided that it is capable of bonding the fibrous web in selected surface regions.

Examples of binders include chemically crosslinking plastics, in particular in the form of dispersions, for example a mixture of ethyl and butyl acrylates with the customary crosslinker groups. However, thermoplastic polymers containing finely dispersed filler material may also be used. These materials act as hot-melt adhesives, and thus result in bonding of the fibers in the treated regions of the fibrous web. Examples of this type of thermoplastic polymer binder include polyolefin powders, in particular polyethylene or polypropylene powders, preferably copolyester powders having a melting range>150° C. Further examples of binders are found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,366,801, WO-A-02/12607, WO-A-02/59414, and WO-A-02/95314.

Any given fine-particle material which is designed to impart a desired property when added to the nonwoven fabric may be used as filler material.

Examples of filler materials include particles having absorbent or adsorbent properties, ion exchangers, mineral fillers, reinforcement materials, electrically and/or thermally conductive materials/particles, and in particular phase change materials.

Expanding microcapsules, activated carbon particles, metal particles, particles composed of superabsorbent materials, or short fibers are particularly preferably used.

Substances known as such may particularly preferably be used as phase change materials. Examples of such are contained in the documents cited above.

Microencapsulated hydrocarbons, in particular microencapsulated paraffins, are very particularly preferably used as phase change materials.

Examples of phase change materials are listed in the following table.

Melting point
Compound Number of carbon atoms (° C.)
n-Decane 10 −32
n-Undecane 11 −26
n-Dodecane 12 −11
n-Tridecane 13 −5.5
n-Tetradecane 14 5.9
n-Pentadecane 15 10.0
n-Hexadecane 16 18.2
n-Heptadecane 17 22.0
n-Octadecane 18 28.2
n-Nonadecane 19 32.1
n-Eicosane 20 36.8
n-Heneicosane 21 40.5
n-Docosane 22 44.4
n-Tricosane 23 47.6
n-Tetracosane 24 50.9
n-Pentacosane 25 53.7
n-Hexacosane 265 [sic; 26] 56.4
n-Heptacosane 27 59.0
n-Octacosane 28 61.4
n-Nonacosane 29 63.4
n-Triacontane 30 65.4
n-Hentriacontane 31 68.0
n-Dotriacontane 32 70.0
n-Tritriacontane 33 71.0
n-Tetratriacontane 34 72.9
n-Hexatriacontane 36 76.1

The weight ratio of fiber material to binder and filler material in the nonwoven fabrics according to the invention is typically 90:10 to 10:90, preferably 50:50 to 30:70.

The binder and filler material are applied to loose fibrous web in predetermined regions using a printing technique, preferably screen printing. The majority of the applied material should penetrate the fibrous web and permeate same to the greatest extent possible. Some of the binder remains on the surface. However, as the result of applying the mixture of binder/filler material at selected points, regions of the fibrous web in which no binder/filler material is present remain in the finished product.

The coverage of the surface with binder/filler material may encompass a broad range, typically greater than 20% and up to 95% of the surface. More than 35% and up to 80% of the surface of the fibrous web is preferably covered with binder/filler material.

The binder/filler material may be applied to the fibrous web in various predetermined patterns. These patterns may be formed from linear, hexagonal, circular, or punctiform surface regions. Dot patterns such as regular or irregular dot patterns are preferred.

The invention further relates to a method for manufacturing the nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, comprising the following measures:

a) Producing a fibrous web by laying heat-crimpable fibers and/or heat-crimpable filaments and optionally non-heat-crimpable fibers and/or non-heat-crimpable filaments in a manner known as such on a laying machine,

b) Optionally prebonding the fibrous web using heated rollers, the temperature of which is selected such that crimping of the crimpable fibers and/or filaments is induced,

c) Applying binder containing particles composed of filler material to selected locations on the fibrous web in a manner known as such, and

d) Heating the fibrous web treated in step c) to completely induce crimping of the crimpable fibers and/or filaments and to join fibers of the fibrous web by means of the binder, and optionally crosslinking the binder.

The fibrous web may be produced as described above, using various methods.

The binder/filler material may likewise be applied to the surface of the fibrous web using any given method. Screen printing methods, in particular using rotary screen printing machines, are preferred.

Therefore, a method is preferred in which the binder is applied using a rotary screen printing machine, which immediately after production of the nonbonded fibrous web and optionally after prebonding of same acts on the surface thereof.

After the binder/filler material is applied, the fibrous web treated in this manner is stabilized by heating. This may be achieved in a manner known as such.

The treated fibrous web is preferably heated by hot rolling, thereby inducing crimping of the fibrous web.

In one preferred embodiment, step a) is carried out by carding and laying fibers on a backing tape.

In a further preferred embodiment, step b) is carried out by passing the fibrous web between heated rollers with little or no pressure so that the treatment does not influence the thickness of the fibrous web, and the temperature of the rollers is selected to be below the melting temperature of the lowest-melting polymer component of the fiber-forming material.

In a further preferred embodiment, step c) is carried out by applying binder containing particles composed of filler material, preferably phase change material, in a punctiform manner, using a template at selected points on the surface of the fibrous web.

The nonwoven fabric according to the invention may be used for many different purposes, for example as interlining material or as an intermediate layer. Examples of uses include clothing, bedding, gloves, or shoes. The nonwoven fabric is used in particular as an interlining material.

These uses likewise constitute subject matter of the present invention.

The following examples explain the invention without limiting the invention thereto.

Example

A fibrous web composed of a mixture of 40% 3.0 dtex/60 mm polyester side-by-side bicomponent fibers, 30% 3.3 dtex/60 mm polyester homofil fibers, and 30% 1.7 dtex/38 mm polyester homofil fibers was produced on a carding machine. This fibrous web had a mass per unit area of 50 g/m2. The carded fibrous web was passed between two hot rollers at 125° C., with no pressure. A 40% mixture composed of a soft acrylate binder and mPCM phase change material in a 1:2 ratio was applied to the fibrous web in a dot pattern, using a rotary screen printing machine. The application rate was 90 g/m2. 82.5% of the surface was imprinted. After the application, the imprinted fibrous web was dried in a multiband dryer at 150° C. and the binder was crosslinked. The product is referred to below as “40% bico, punctiform.”

The following tables show the elastic properties of the manufactured nonwoven fabrics as a function of the quantity and type of crimpable bicomponent fibers used.

In the tables, “CTV, full-surface” means a fibrous web that is impregnated over its entire surface with binder/mPCM.

“100% bico, punctiform” refers to a nonwoven fabric according to the invention which has been manufactured analogously to the above-described “40% bico, punctiform,” except that 100% bicomponent fibers were used.

“MTF” means maximum tensile force, and “EAB” means elongation at break. The modulus values were measured for various elongation values. The measurements were carried out according to EN 29073-3.

The lower the modulus at low elongation, the more easily the material is stretched.

Tables

5% 10% 15% 25%
MTF, EAB, modulus modulus modulus modulus
Weight longitud. longitud. longitud. longitud. longitud. longitud.
(g/m2) (N/5 cm) (%) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm)
CTV, 140 54 34 17.4 28.2 36.4 49.4
full-surface
100% bico, 130 14 58 2.2 5.6 8.5 11.9
punctiform
40% bico, 140 13 48 3.0 5.9 8.4 10.8
punctiform

5% 10% 15% 25%
MTF, EAB, modulus modulus modulus modulus
Weight transv. transv. transv. transv. transv. transv.
(g/m2) (N/5 cm) (%) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm) (N/5 cm)
CTV, 140 55 75 4.1 8.5 12 18.1
full-surface
100% bico, 130 38 76 0.3 1.1 2.7 8.1
punctiform
40% bico, 140 31 69 0.6 2.1 4.2 9.7
punctiform

Claims (18)

What is claimed is:
1. Elastic nonwoven fabric containing crimped fibers and/or crimped filaments including bicomponent fibers or filaments and homopolymer fibers or filaments and optionally uncrimped fibers and/or optionally uncrimped filaments, and wherein said bicomponent fibers or filaments are comprised of polymer components having similar melting points which bicomponent fibers do not provide bonding which is bonded at selected points by use of a binder containing particles composed of filler material, and which is not bonded at other selected points, wherein the weight ratio of the fibers or filaments to the binder and filler material is 50:50 to 30:70.
2. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that said nonwoven fabric contains crimped fibers and/or filaments as well as uncrimped fibers and/or filaments.
3. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that said nonwoven fabric contains 20% by weight crimped fibers and/or crimped filaments.
4. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that said nonwoven fabric is a crimped staple fiber nonwoven fabric.
5. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that said nonwoven fabric contains, in addition to crimped polyester bicomponent fibers, uncrimped polyester homofil fibers and optionally uncrimped polyamide fibers.
6. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that said nonwoven fabric contains two- or three-dimensionally crimped fibers.
7. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that the binder contains a chemically crosslinking plastic.
8. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that the binder contains a thermoplastic polymer which joins the fibers of the fibrous web by means of hot-melt adhesion.
9. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that particles having absorbent or adsorbent properties, ion exchangers, mineral fillers, reinforcement materials, electrically and/or thermally conductive materials/particles, and phase change materials are used as filler material.
10. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 9, characterized in that expanding microcapsules, activated carbon particles, metal particles, particles composed of superabsorbent materials, or short fibers are used as filler material.
11. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 9, characterized in that the phase change material is a microencapsulated hydrocarbon.
12. Nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, characterized in that the filler containing binder is applied in the form of a regular or irregular dot pattern which permeates the fibrous web.
13. Method for manufacturing the nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, comprising the following measures:
a) producing a fibrous web by laying heat-crimpable fibers and/or heat-crimpable filaments including bicomponent fibers or filaments and homopolymer fibers or filaments and wherein said bicomponent fibers or filaments are comprised of polymer components and optionally non-heat-crimpable fibers and/or non-heat-crimpable filaments in a manner known as such on a laying machine,
b) optionally prebonding the fibrous web using heated rollers, the temperature of which is selected such that crimping of the crimpable fibers and/or filaments is induced,
c) applying binder containing particles composed of filler material to selected locations on the fibrous web, wherein the weight ratio of the fibers or filaments to the binder and filler material is 50:50 to 30:70, and
d) heating the fibrous web treated in step c) to completely induce crimping of the crimpable fibers and/or filaments and to join fibers of the fibrous web by means of the binder, and optionally crosslinking the binder and wherein said heating of said bicomponent fibers does not provide adhesion.
14. Method according to claim 13, characterized in that step a) is carried out by carding and laying fibers on a backing tape.
15. Method according to claim 13, characterized in that step b) is carried out by passing the fibrous web between heated rollers with little or no pressure so that the treatment does not influence the thickness of the fibrous web, and the temperature of the rollers is selected to be below the melting temperature of the lowest-melting polymer component of the fibrous web.
16. Method according to claim 13, characterized in that step c) is carried out by applying binder containing particles composed of filler material in a punctiform manner, using a template at selected points on the fibrous web.
17. Method according to claim 16, characterized in that the binder is applied using a rotary screen printing machine, which immediately after production of the nonbonded fibrous web and optionally after prebonding of same acts on the surface thereof.
18. Use of the nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 as interlining material or as an intermediate layer, in one or more of the following clothing, bedding, gloves, or shoes.
US11994071 2005-06-28 2006-04-28 Elastic, soft and punctiformly bound non-woven fabric provided with filler particles and method for production and the use thereof Active 2028-06-07 US8114794B2 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE102005030484 2005-06-28
DE102005030484.2 2005-06-28
DE200510030484 DE102005030484B4 (en) 2005-06-28 2005-06-28 Elastic non-woven fabric, a process for its preparation and its use
PCT/EP2006/003954 WO2007000206A1 (en) 2005-06-28 2006-04-28 Elastic, soft and punctiformly bound non-woven fabric provided with filler particles and method for ptoduction and the use thereof
EPPCT/EP2006/003954 2006-04-28

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090100565A1 true US20090100565A1 (en) 2009-04-23
US8114794B2 true US8114794B2 (en) 2012-02-14

Family

ID=36691787

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11994071 Active 2028-06-07 US8114794B2 (en) 2005-06-28 2006-04-28 Elastic, soft and punctiformly bound non-woven fabric provided with filler particles and method for production and the use thereof

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (1) US8114794B2 (en)
JP (1) JP4779014B2 (en)
KR (2) KR101052376B1 (en)
CN (1) CN101213333B (en)
DE (1) DE102005030484B4 (en)
EP (1) EP1937886B1 (en)
ES (1) ES2394517T3 (en)
WO (1) WO2007000206A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102008024945B4 (en) * 2007-08-22 2016-02-25 Eswegee Vliesstoff Gmbh A method of making a stretchable, elastic nonwoven fabric
DE102007062865B4 (en) * 2007-11-09 2009-10-15 Carl Freudenberg Kg Textiles fixable sheet
JP2011503372A (en) * 2007-11-09 2011-01-27 カール・フロイデンベルク・カー・ゲー Heat-fusible fabric
KR101025445B1 (en) * 2008-07-25 2011-03-30 한국바이린주식회사 Method for preparing nonwoven fusible interlining using pattern printing
DE102009009589A1 (en) * 2009-02-19 2010-09-02 Deichmann Se Shoe, has air-permeable sole comprising reinforced textile flat structure that is made from fibers e.g. mineral fibers or chemical fibers, where flat structure is arranged between running surface and insole
DE102009013028A1 (en) 2009-03-16 2010-10-14 Carl Freudenberg Kg Non-woven fabric with a carrier layer of melt-spun thermoplastic polyester, bonded with a binder applied as an aqueous dispersion in a pattern of discrete dots over the fabric surface
US8436506B2 (en) 2010-04-13 2013-05-07 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Electric motor assemblies and systems and methods associated with joining wires of electric motor assemblies
CN102616726A (en) * 2012-03-20 2012-08-01 张小能 Process for producing rubber-free ultra-thick mattress
KR101446729B1 (en) * 2012-12-07 2014-10-06 도레이케미칼 주식회사 A elastic nonwoven fabric having pcm and its preparation method
DE102014002060B4 (en) 2014-02-18 2018-01-18 Carl Freudenberg Kg Volume nonwovens, uses thereof and methods for their preparation
DE202014001563U1 (en) * 2014-02-24 2014-12-05 STS Textiles GmbH & Co. KG transport packaging

Citations (68)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1127320B (en) 1958-03-26 1962-04-12 Carlyle Harmon Bonded nonwoven textile pulp
US3427250A (en) 1963-03-25 1969-02-11 Polaroid Corp Microscopic capsules and process for their preparation
US4056478A (en) 1973-10-04 1977-11-01 Sargent Industries, Inc. Bearing material employing frangible microcapsules containing lubricant
US4152784A (en) 1978-02-01 1979-05-08 Mcgalliard James D Nylon hose treated with microencapsulated hair dissolving solution
US4201822A (en) 1979-06-13 1980-05-06 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Novel fabric containing microcapsules of chemical decontaminants encapsulated within semipermeable polymers
DE2914617A1 (en) 1979-04-11 1980-10-16 Freudenberg Carl Fa A method of simultaneous, continuous printing of a porous and flexible flaechengebildes
GB2073613A (en) 1980-04-16 1981-10-21 Freudenberg Carl Kg Binder-coated textiles
JPS57128248A (en) 1980-12-24 1982-08-09 Freudenberg Carl Simultaneous and continuous fixation and lamination of fleece material
US4446177A (en) 1982-03-12 1984-05-01 Munoz George L Reinforced plastic product
US4464271A (en) 1981-08-20 1984-08-07 International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. Liquid or solid fabric softener composition comprising microencapsulated fragrance suspension and process for preparing same
EP0123794A2 (en) 1983-03-31 1984-11-07 Firma Carl Freudenberg Method of making a non woven stretch filler fabric
CA1182068A (en) 1980-12-24 1985-02-05 Walter Fottinger Process for simultaneous and continuous consolidation and coating of a non-woven textile
US4504402A (en) 1983-06-13 1985-03-12 Pennwalt Corporation Encapsulated phase change thermal energy _storage materials
US4524529A (en) 1982-08-27 1985-06-25 Helmut Schaefer Insole for shoes
US4556439A (en) 1981-09-25 1985-12-03 The Boeing Company Method of sealing and bonding laminated epoxy plates
EP0178372A2 (en) 1984-10-10 1986-04-23 Firma Carl Freudenberg Microporous multilayered non-woven fabric for medical applications, and method for making it
US4600605A (en) 1984-08-20 1986-07-15 Japan Vilene Co., Ltd. Method of producing stretchable wadding
EP0190788A1 (en) 1985-01-29 1986-08-13 Lantor B.V. Process for making a non woven web provided with expanded micro-spheres
US4623575A (en) 1981-08-17 1986-11-18 Chicopee Lightly entangled and dry printed nonwoven fabrics and methods for producing the same
EP0222399A2 (en) 1985-11-15 1987-05-20 Klaus Kurt Kölzer Reinforcing material and method for its production
JPS6335865A (en) 1986-07-24 1988-02-16 Nard Institute Ltd Reinforced fiber accumulated molded body
US4748044A (en) 1980-12-24 1988-05-31 Rma Carl Freudenberg Method for the simultaneous, continuous binding and coating of a nonwoven fabric
US4756958A (en) 1987-08-31 1988-07-12 Triangle Research And Development Corporation Fiber with reversible enhanced thermal storage properties and fabrics made therefrom
USRE32713E (en) 1980-03-17 1988-07-12 Capsule impregnated fabric
US4774133A (en) 1985-02-08 1988-09-27 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Article containing microencapsulated materials
US4871615A (en) 1984-07-02 1989-10-03 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture Temperature-adaptable textile fibers and method of preparing same
US4882220A (en) 1988-02-02 1989-11-21 Kanebo, Ltd. Fibrous structures having a durable fragrance
EP0361338A2 (en) 1988-09-30 1990-04-04 Lohmann GmbH & Co. KG Shoe insole
US4939020A (en) 1987-06-24 1990-07-03 Toyo Coth Co., Ltd. Core member for fabrication of shaped plastic
JPH03213556A (en) 1990-01-12 1991-09-18 Toyobo Co Ltd Stretchable nonwoven cloth
US5126061A (en) 1989-02-27 1992-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Microcapsules containing hydrophobic liquid core
US5156843A (en) 1989-03-20 1992-10-20 Advanced Polymer Systems, Inc. Fabric impregnated with functional substances for controlled release
JPH05156570A (en) 1991-12-10 1993-06-22 Kanebo Ltd Fibrous structure having heat storage ability and its production
US5232769A (en) 1989-08-01 1993-08-03 Kanebo, Ltd. Microcapsule, treating liquids containing the same, and textile structure having microcapsules adhering thereto
CA2137554A1 (en) 1992-05-29 1993-12-09 Yvonne G. Bryant Fabric with reversible enhanced thermal properties
JPH073596A (en) 1993-06-14 1995-01-06 Japan Vilene Co Ltd Nonwoven fabric and production thereof
JPH0770943A (en) 1993-07-06 1995-03-14 Toyobo Co Ltd Cloth having heat-absorbing and generating property
JPH0770902A (en) 1993-08-30 1995-03-14 Kanebo Ltd Stretchable nonwoven cloth
WO1995034609A1 (en) 1994-06-14 1995-12-21 Gateway Technologies, Inc. Energy absorbing fabric coating and manufacturing method
US5532039A (en) 1994-04-25 1996-07-02 Gateway Technologies, Inc. Thermal barriers for buildings, appliances and textiles
DE19510793C1 (en) 1995-03-24 1996-08-01 Sandler C H Gmbh Elastic nonwoven features bonding agent lines
US5637389A (en) 1992-02-18 1997-06-10 Colvin; David P. Thermally enhanced foam insulation
US5677049A (en) 1994-12-27 1997-10-14 Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. Heat transfer printing sheet for producting raised images
US5722482A (en) 1992-07-14 1998-03-03 Buckley; Theresa M. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus
DE69316027T2 (en) 1992-11-18 1998-05-14 Hoechst Celanese Corp A process for producing a fibrous structure with immobilized particulate material
US5851338A (en) 1996-03-04 1998-12-22 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Skived foam article containing energy absorbing phase change material
GB2334428A (en) 1998-02-23 1999-08-25 Centre Tech Cuir Chaussure Heat or cold insulating insole
US6077597A (en) 1997-11-14 2000-06-20 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Interactive thermal insulating system having a layer treated with a coating of energy absorbing phase change material adjacent a layer of fibers containing energy absorbing phase change material
WO2000056940A1 (en) 1999-03-24 2000-09-28 Acushnet Company Leather impregnated with temperature stabilizing material and method for producing such leather
WO2001006054A1 (en) 1999-07-19 2001-01-25 Avantgarb, Llc Nanoparticle-based permanent treatments for textiles
US6197415B1 (en) 1999-01-22 2001-03-06 Frisby Technologies, Inc. Gel-coated materials with increased flame retardancy
US6207738B1 (en) 1994-06-14 2001-03-27 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Fabric coating composition containing energy absorbing phase change material
WO2001092010A1 (en) 2000-05-31 2001-12-06 Idemitsu Technofine Co., Ltd. Heat-storing dotted sheet, heat-storing cotton wadding, heat-storing fiber structure, heat-storing laminate and heat-storing cloth product
WO2002012607A2 (en) 2000-08-05 2002-02-14 Freudengerg Viesstoffe Kg Thermal control nonwoven material
US20020034910A1 (en) 2000-08-05 2002-03-21 Johnson Susan Gwynneth Material for shoe insole and lining and method of making the same
WO2002059414A2 (en) 2001-01-25 2002-08-01 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Coated articles having enhanced reversible thermal properties and exhibiting improved flexibility, softness, air permeability, or water vapor transport properties
WO2002092911A1 (en) 2001-05-11 2002-11-21 Texon Uk Limited Paper or paperboard comprising thermal control material
WO2002095314A1 (en) 2001-05-18 2002-11-28 Schoeller Textil Ag Method for producing temperature-regulating surfaces with phase change material
US6517648B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2003-02-11 Appleton Papers Inc. Process for preparing a non-woven fibrous web
WO2003056088A1 (en) 2001-12-21 2003-07-10 Invista Technologies S.À.R.L. Method for preparing high bulk composite sheets
WO2003056086A1 (en) 2001-12-21 2003-07-10 Invista Technologies S.À.R.L. Stretchable multiple-component nonwoven fabrics and methods for preparing
US6613704B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2003-09-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Continuous filament composite nonwoven webs
US6685746B1 (en) 1999-04-27 2004-02-03 Pittards Public Limited Company Impregnation of leather with micro-encapsulated material
WO2005005704A2 (en) 2003-06-30 2005-01-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Particulates in nanofiber webs
US6981341B2 (en) 1996-11-12 2006-01-03 Solid Water Holdings Waterproof/breathable moisture transfer composite capable of wicking moisture away from an individual's body and capable of regulating temperature
US20070212967A1 (en) 2000-08-05 2007-09-13 Peter Grynaeus Thermal control nonwoven material
KR100820034B1 (en) 2000-08-05 2008-04-08 녹셋 유케이 리미티드 Thermal control nonwoven material
JP5156570B2 (en) 2008-10-06 2013-03-06 株式会社森精機製作所 Automatic programming apparatus and nc machine tool control apparatus including the

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6909028B1 (en) * 1997-09-15 2005-06-21 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Stable breathable elastic garments
US7201816B2 (en) * 2001-12-21 2007-04-10 Invista North America S.A.R.L. High bulk composite sheets and method for preparing

Patent Citations (85)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3059313A (en) 1958-03-26 1962-10-23 Chicopee Mfg Corp Textile fabrics and methods of making the same
DE1127320B (en) 1958-03-26 1962-04-12 Carlyle Harmon Bonded nonwoven textile pulp
US3427250A (en) 1963-03-25 1969-02-11 Polaroid Corp Microscopic capsules and process for their preparation
US4056478A (en) 1973-10-04 1977-11-01 Sargent Industries, Inc. Bearing material employing frangible microcapsules containing lubricant
US4152784A (en) 1978-02-01 1979-05-08 Mcgalliard James D Nylon hose treated with microencapsulated hair dissolving solution
US5000090A (en) 1979-04-11 1991-03-19 Firma Carl Freudenberg Method for the continuous printing of a planar structure
DE2914617A1 (en) 1979-04-11 1980-10-16 Freudenberg Carl Fa A method of simultaneous, continuous printing of a porous and flexible flaechengebildes
US4201822A (en) 1979-06-13 1980-05-06 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Novel fabric containing microcapsules of chemical decontaminants encapsulated within semipermeable polymers
USRE32713E (en) 1980-03-17 1988-07-12 Capsule impregnated fabric
GB2073613A (en) 1980-04-16 1981-10-21 Freudenberg Carl Kg Binder-coated textiles
US4748044A (en) 1980-12-24 1988-05-31 Rma Carl Freudenberg Method for the simultaneous, continuous binding and coating of a nonwoven fabric
JPS57128248A (en) 1980-12-24 1982-08-09 Freudenberg Carl Simultaneous and continuous fixation and lamination of fleece material
CA1182067A (en) 1980-12-24 1985-02-05 Walter Fottinger Process for simultaneous consolidation and coating of a non-woven textile
CA1182068A (en) 1980-12-24 1985-02-05 Walter Fottinger Process for simultaneous and continuous consolidation and coating of a non-woven textile
US4623575A (en) 1981-08-17 1986-11-18 Chicopee Lightly entangled and dry printed nonwoven fabrics and methods for producing the same
US4464271A (en) 1981-08-20 1984-08-07 International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. Liquid or solid fabric softener composition comprising microencapsulated fragrance suspension and process for preparing same
US4556439A (en) 1981-09-25 1985-12-03 The Boeing Company Method of sealing and bonding laminated epoxy plates
US4446177A (en) 1982-03-12 1984-05-01 Munoz George L Reinforced plastic product
US4524529A (en) 1982-08-27 1985-06-25 Helmut Schaefer Insole for shoes
EP0123794A2 (en) 1983-03-31 1984-11-07 Firma Carl Freudenberg Method of making a non woven stretch filler fabric
US4504402A (en) 1983-06-13 1985-03-12 Pennwalt Corporation Encapsulated phase change thermal energy _storage materials
US4871615A (en) 1984-07-02 1989-10-03 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture Temperature-adaptable textile fibers and method of preparing same
US4600605A (en) 1984-08-20 1986-07-15 Japan Vilene Co., Ltd. Method of producing stretchable wadding
US4618524A (en) 1984-10-10 1986-10-21 Firma Carl Freudenberg Microporous multilayer nonwoven material for medical applications
EP0178372A2 (en) 1984-10-10 1986-04-23 Firma Carl Freudenberg Microporous multilayered non-woven fabric for medical applications, and method for making it
EP0190788A1 (en) 1985-01-29 1986-08-13 Lantor B.V. Process for making a non woven web provided with expanded micro-spheres
US4774133A (en) 1985-02-08 1988-09-27 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Article containing microencapsulated materials
US4820575A (en) 1985-11-15 1989-04-11 Koelzer Klaus K Reinforcing material
EP0222399A2 (en) 1985-11-15 1987-05-20 Klaus Kurt Kölzer Reinforcing material and method for its production
JPS6335865A (en) 1986-07-24 1988-02-16 Nard Institute Ltd Reinforced fiber accumulated molded body
US4939020A (en) 1987-06-24 1990-07-03 Toyo Coth Co., Ltd. Core member for fabrication of shaped plastic
JPS6485374A (en) 1987-08-31 1989-03-30 Toraianguru Res & Dev Corp Fiber excellent in heat stability
US4756958A (en) 1987-08-31 1988-07-12 Triangle Research And Development Corporation Fiber with reversible enhanced thermal storage properties and fabrics made therefrom
US4882220A (en) 1988-02-02 1989-11-21 Kanebo, Ltd. Fibrous structures having a durable fragrance
US4917920A (en) 1988-02-02 1990-04-17 Kanebo, Ltd. Fibrous structures having a durable fragrance and a process for preparing the same
EP0361338A2 (en) 1988-09-30 1990-04-04 Lohmann GmbH & Co. KG Shoe insole
US5126061A (en) 1989-02-27 1992-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Microcapsules containing hydrophobic liquid core
US5156843A (en) 1989-03-20 1992-10-20 Advanced Polymer Systems, Inc. Fabric impregnated with functional substances for controlled release
US5232769A (en) 1989-08-01 1993-08-03 Kanebo, Ltd. Microcapsule, treating liquids containing the same, and textile structure having microcapsules adhering thereto
JPH03213556A (en) 1990-01-12 1991-09-18 Toyobo Co Ltd Stretchable nonwoven cloth
JPH05156570A (en) 1991-12-10 1993-06-22 Kanebo Ltd Fibrous structure having heat storage ability and its production
US5637389A (en) 1992-02-18 1997-06-10 Colvin; David P. Thermally enhanced foam insulation
US5366801A (en) 1992-05-29 1994-11-22 Triangle Research And Development Corporation Fabric with reversible enhanced thermal properties
CA2137554A1 (en) 1992-05-29 1993-12-09 Yvonne G. Bryant Fabric with reversible enhanced thermal properties
EP0611330A1 (en) 1992-05-29 1994-08-24 Triangle Research And Development Corporation Fabric with reversible enhanced thermal properties
WO1993024241A1 (en) 1992-05-29 1993-12-09 Triangle Research And Development Corporation Fabric with reversible enhanced thermal properties
US6004662A (en) 1992-07-14 1999-12-21 Buckley; Theresa M. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage
US5722482A (en) 1992-07-14 1998-03-03 Buckley; Theresa M. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus
DE69316027T2 (en) 1992-11-18 1998-05-14 Hoechst Celanese Corp A process for producing a fibrous structure with immobilized particulate material
JPH073596A (en) 1993-06-14 1995-01-06 Japan Vilene Co Ltd Nonwoven fabric and production thereof
JPH0770943A (en) 1993-07-06 1995-03-14 Toyobo Co Ltd Cloth having heat-absorbing and generating property
JPH0770902A (en) 1993-08-30 1995-03-14 Kanebo Ltd Stretchable nonwoven cloth
US5532039A (en) 1994-04-25 1996-07-02 Gateway Technologies, Inc. Thermal barriers for buildings, appliances and textiles
US6514362B1 (en) 1994-06-14 2003-02-04 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Fabric coating containing energy absorbing phase change material and method of manufacturing same
JPH10502137A (en) 1994-06-14 1998-02-24 アール・エイチ・ワイナー・アソシエイツ・インコーポレーテッド The energy absorption of the fabric coating and a method for manufacturing
WO1995034609A1 (en) 1994-06-14 1995-12-21 Gateway Technologies, Inc. Energy absorbing fabric coating and manufacturing method
US6207738B1 (en) 1994-06-14 2001-03-27 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Fabric coating composition containing energy absorbing phase change material
US5677049A (en) 1994-12-27 1997-10-14 Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. Heat transfer printing sheet for producting raised images
DE19510793C1 (en) 1995-03-24 1996-08-01 Sandler C H Gmbh Elastic nonwoven features bonding agent lines
US5851338A (en) 1996-03-04 1998-12-22 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Skived foam article containing energy absorbing phase change material
US6981341B2 (en) 1996-11-12 2006-01-03 Solid Water Holdings Waterproof/breathable moisture transfer composite capable of wicking moisture away from an individual's body and capable of regulating temperature
US6077597A (en) 1997-11-14 2000-06-20 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Interactive thermal insulating system having a layer treated with a coating of energy absorbing phase change material adjacent a layer of fibers containing energy absorbing phase change material
GB2334428A (en) 1998-02-23 1999-08-25 Centre Tech Cuir Chaussure Heat or cold insulating insole
US6197415B1 (en) 1999-01-22 2001-03-06 Frisby Technologies, Inc. Gel-coated materials with increased flame retardancy
WO2000056940A1 (en) 1999-03-24 2000-09-28 Acushnet Company Leather impregnated with temperature stabilizing material and method for producing such leather
US6685746B1 (en) 1999-04-27 2004-02-03 Pittards Public Limited Company Impregnation of leather with micro-encapsulated material
WO2001006054A1 (en) 1999-07-19 2001-01-25 Avantgarb, Llc Nanoparticle-based permanent treatments for textiles
US6607994B2 (en) 1999-07-19 2003-08-19 Nano-Tex, Llc Nanoparticle-based permanent treatments for textiles
US6613704B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2003-09-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Continuous filament composite nonwoven webs
WO2001092010A1 (en) 2000-05-31 2001-12-06 Idemitsu Technofine Co., Ltd. Heat-storing dotted sheet, heat-storing cotton wadding, heat-storing fiber structure, heat-storing laminate and heat-storing cloth product
WO2002012607A2 (en) 2000-08-05 2002-02-14 Freudengerg Viesstoffe Kg Thermal control nonwoven material
KR100820034B1 (en) 2000-08-05 2008-04-08 녹셋 유케이 리미티드 Thermal control nonwoven material
US20070212967A1 (en) 2000-08-05 2007-09-13 Peter Grynaeus Thermal control nonwoven material
US20020034910A1 (en) 2000-08-05 2002-03-21 Johnson Susan Gwynneth Material for shoe insole and lining and method of making the same
WO2002059414A2 (en) 2001-01-25 2002-08-01 Outlast Technologies, Inc. Coated articles having enhanced reversible thermal properties and exhibiting improved flexibility, softness, air permeability, or water vapor transport properties
WO2002092911A1 (en) 2001-05-11 2002-11-21 Texon Uk Limited Paper or paperboard comprising thermal control material
US20050227047A1 (en) 2001-05-18 2005-10-13 Simon Sutter Method for producing temperature-regulating surfaces with phase change material
WO2002095314A1 (en) 2001-05-18 2002-11-28 Schoeller Textil Ag Method for producing temperature-regulating surfaces with phase change material
US6517648B1 (en) 2001-11-02 2003-02-11 Appleton Papers Inc. Process for preparing a non-woven fibrous web
WO2003056086A1 (en) 2001-12-21 2003-07-10 Invista Technologies S.À.R.L. Stretchable multiple-component nonwoven fabrics and methods for preparing
US7036197B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2006-05-02 Invista North America S.A.R.L. Stretchable multiple-component nonwoven fabrics and methods for preparing
WO2003056088A1 (en) 2001-12-21 2003-07-10 Invista Technologies S.À.R.L. Method for preparing high bulk composite sheets
KR100890322B1 (en) 2001-12-21 2009-04-06 인비스타 테크놀러지스 에스.에이.알.엘. Stretchable multiple-component nonwoven fabrics and methods for preparing
WO2005005704A2 (en) 2003-06-30 2005-01-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Particulates in nanofiber webs
JP5156570B2 (en) 2008-10-06 2013-03-06 株式会社森精機製作所 Automatic programming apparatus and nc machine tool control apparatus including the

Non-Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Abstract of Knitting International, 99(1184), pp. 42-43, 1992.
Abstract of Lennox-Kerr, Technical Textiles International, 7(6), pp. 25+2, 1998.
Communication from corresponding EPO Application No. 01 964 553.0 dated Jul. 28, 2008.
English translation of Office Action from corresponding Japanese Application No. 2002-517882 dated Feb. 22, 2011.
Final Office Action from related U.S. Appl. No. 11/799,551 dated Jun. 29, 2010.
International Search Report dated Sep. 8, 2006 issued in related International Patent Application No. PCT/EP2006003954.
Office Action from corresponding Canadian Application No. 2,417,876 dated Oct. 10, 2006.
Office Action from related U.S. Appl. No. 11/799,551 dated Dec. 28, 2010.
Office Action from related U.S. Appl. No. 11/799,551 dated Mar. 15, 2010.
Papers from Outlast v. Frisby, Civil Action No. 01-N-1882 (CBS)(BNB) (District of Colorado), related to certain above-cited US patent documents, including: Order on Cross Motions for Partial Summary Judgment, Filed Jan. 14, 2004; Brief in Support of Defendant's Motion Under Rule 56, FRCP, for Partial Summary Judgment of Non-Infringement and in Opposition to Plaintiff's Motion for a Preliminary Injunction; Frisby's Reply Brief in Support of its Motion for Partial Summary Judgment on Non-Infringement; Declaration of Rory A. Holmes; Deposition of Dr. Peter J. Hauser; Plaintiff's.
Smith, Textile World, 145(10), pp. 69+3, 1995.
Supplementary European Search Report from corresponding EPO Application No. 01 964 553.0 dated Apr. 10, 2008.

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE102005030484B4 (en) 2007-11-15 grant
CN101213333B (en) 2012-05-23 grant
WO2007000206A1 (en) 2007-01-04 application
KR20100101700A (en) 2010-09-17 application
DE102005030484A1 (en) 2007-01-04 application
KR101172600B1 (en) 2012-08-08 grant
US20090100565A1 (en) 2009-04-23 application
JP4779014B2 (en) 2011-09-21 grant
EP1937886B1 (en) 2012-10-10 grant
EP1937886A1 (en) 2008-07-02 application
ES2394517T3 (en) 2013-02-01 grant
KR101052376B1 (en) 2011-07-28 grant
CN101213333A (en) 2008-07-02 application
JP2008546927A (en) 2008-12-25 application
KR20080022214A (en) 2008-03-10 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3595731A (en) Bonded non-woven fibrous materials
US5283106A (en) Nonwoven material of two or more layers, in particular with long-term filter properties and manufacture thereof
US4035219A (en) Bonding of structures
US2910763A (en) Felt-like products
US5204165A (en) Nonwoven laminate with wet-laid barrier fabric and related method
US6087279A (en) Textile material for cleaning applications
US6729807B1 (en) Integral lofty polymer grid and fiber web matrix turf reinforcement mats
US5691036A (en) High pressure high temperature cushioning material
US4154885A (en) Nonwoven fabric of good draping qualities and method of manufacturing same
US5284704A (en) Non-woven textile articles comprising bicomponent fibers and method of manufacture
US4876128A (en) Stitchbonded nonwoven fabric
US3676288A (en) Low-density bonded nonwoven fabrics and process therefor
US6093665A (en) Pattern bonded nonwoven fabrics
US5604009A (en) Non-adhesive bonded tufted carpet and method for making the same
US4451314A (en) Method for the manufacture of a fluffy, light-weight, soft nonwoven fabric
US4908263A (en) Nonwoven thermal insulating stretch fabric
US5310590A (en) Stitchbonded articles
US5874159A (en) Durable spunlaced fabric structures
US6086984A (en) Elastic nonwoven fabric
US3856602A (en) Method of producing non-woven textile fiber products having a relief-like structure
US4514455A (en) Nonwoven fabric for apparel insulating interliner
US4310594A (en) Composite sheet structure
US4350727A (en) Synergistic textile composite
US3704191A (en) Non-woven process
US3516899A (en) Bonded nonwoven fabric

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CARL FREUDENBERG KG, GERMANY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GRYNAEUS, PETER;RETTIG, HANS;STAUDENMAYER, OLIVER;REEL/FRAME:021782/0178;SIGNING DATES FROM 20081010 TO 20081013

Owner name: CARL FREUDENBERG KG, GERMANY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GRYNAEUS, PETER;RETTIG, HANS;STAUDENMAYER, OLIVER;SIGNING DATES FROM 20081010 TO 20081013;REEL/FRAME:021782/0178

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4