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US801227A - Paint-tube. - Google Patents

Paint-tube. Download PDF

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Publication number
US801227A
US801227A US1905247712A US801227A US 801227 A US801227 A US 801227A US 1905247712 A US1905247712 A US 1905247712A US 801227 A US801227 A US 801227A
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Prior art keywords
tube
paint
metal
stem
piece
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Isaac W Drummond
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Isaac W Drummond
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D35/00Pliable tubular containers adapted to be permanently or temporarily deformed to expel contents, e.g. collapsible tubes for toothpaste or other plastic or semi-liquid material; Holders therefor
    • B65D35/02Body construction
    • B65D35/12Connections between body and closure-receiving bush

Description

PATENTED OG T. 10, 1905.

I. W. DRUMMOND.

PAINT TUBE.

APPLwATIoN FILED rss. 2a. 190s.

UNITED ST ATES ISAAC WV. DRUMMOND, OF NFI/V YORK, N. Y.

PAINT-TUBE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 10, 1905.

Application ined retruary 28,1905. serai Mamma in which- Figure l illustrates a vertical sectional view of a paint-tube embodying my invention. Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate modiiied forms thereof.

Heretofore paint-tubes have been made with threads formed in the metal at the mouth of the tube, with which corresponding threads cut in the interior of a suitable metallic cap engaged, whereby the cap was screwed down to close the mouth of the tube, and a wafer or thin piece of material-cork, for example-has been sometimes employed in the bottom of the cap to additionally seal the joint. It frequently happens, however, that notwithstanding the stated construction and attempt to effectively seal the tube the oils from the paint or other material inclosed within the tube will in course of time, owing to atmospheric or other conditions, exude from the tube, soiling the outside thereof, thus badly defacing the goods and making them more or less unsalable.

Tubes for containing adhesive material having a thin easily-perforated disk or film of metal over the mouth or opening have also been constructed, the thin plate of metal being perforated or punctured at the time of usc, so that after the mucilage or equivalent material has been expelled from the tube at each use by suitable pressure thereon the material remaining just at the perforation or opening quickly dries, which again seals the device, so that further escape of the contents is impossible, and it is maintained in suitable condition for subsequent use.

The tubes last described are unsuited for the paint trade, because the paint will not dry within sufficient time to rcseal the package after it has been once opened. On the contrary, it remains soft in some instances for days together, and during the interim the material will exude spontaneously in many cases, and also the tube will be subjected to more or less pressure during its handling, thus increasing the exudation, whereupon not only is the paint or other material wasted, but all surrounding objects smeared and defaced therewith. Moreover, the orifice made by merely puncturing the soft-metal diaphragm or sealing-piece is apt to be too small for effective use by artists or other users of paints.

rIhe purpose of my present invention, therefore, is to so construct a tube as that it shall possess all the advantages and none of the disadvantages above referred to.

Referring to Fig. l, A represents the body of the tube, which is of the kind universally made of a single piece of homogeneous and ductile metal, as is well known, and which is closed at the bottom B in the usual manner. C is the threaded stem or upper extremity of the tube. D is the usual threaded cap. E is an outwardly or upwardly projecting part of the metal forming the tube, which may be made somewhat thinner than the rest of the metal composing the stem C, so that when it is desired to use the contents of the tube this upwardly-projecting part E may be readily removed wholly or partly by any suitable cutting instrument-aa for instance, the blade of a penknife, a pair of shears, or its equivalent--so that an opening substantially as large as that through the stem C may be afforded for the egress of the paint.

In Fig. QI show a construction substantially the same as that of Fig. 1, except instead of being dome-shaped the upwardly-extending lthin metal (shown at F) is cylindrical in out- In Fig. 3 I show still another modification in which the sealing-strip Gr does not project upwardly above the upper edge of the threaded part of the stem C, but, on the contrary, is hori- Zontal therewith.

I prefer the construction shown in the other two drawings because, owing` to the upward projection of the thin removable sealing-piece, it is more easy to remove it; but the form shown in Fig. 3 is nevertheless useful, because the point of a knife-blade or one blade of a pair of shears will readily cut out the thin sealing-piece when it is desired to use the contents of the tube.

. It will be observed that under my construction, during storage and while in the store of the merchant and also while in the users hands, unopened, the tube is absolutely, indeed hermetically,sealed, so that no possibility exists of exudation of any of the contents thereof. Therefore the article remains clean, sightly, and attractive. When desired, however, the sealing-piece may be wholly or partly removed in an instant and an opening of sufiicient area to best serve the purpose is af- IOO IIO

foi-ded, and from that time forward the contents of the can will be securely retained by replacing the cap as heretofore. Should slight eXudation of the contents of the tube occur while in use in the hands of the artist or artisan, no harm will result, for such exudation will be exceedingly slight, if any, because of the presence of the cap, and a slight smearing of the mouth or upper part of the tube is of no consequence to the users thereof for they are accustomed to more or less smearing of their utensils with paints, oils, @6o.

My tubes are preferably made of tin, but may be made of any other suitable metal or material. For large tubes, which would be expensive if made of tin, l make up a tin and lead alloy and sometimes make them entirely of lead.

rlhe cap, as shown, is preferably threaded to the stem; but obviously other means of attaching the two suitably together may be substituted for the threads.

It will be obvious to those who are familiar with this art that modifications may be made in the details of construction without departing from the essentials thereof. I therefore do not limit myselfl to the details described and illustrated.

l. A paint-tube embodying a body part, a stem, a removable sealing-piece which projects Voutwardly beyond the stem proper and independently seals the structure, all composed of a single homogeneous piece of metal, and a cap for the stem.'

Q. A paint-tube embodying,` a body part, an exteriorly-threaded stem, a removable sealing-piece which projects beyond the stem, all of said parts being composed of a single homogeneous piece of metal, and a threaded cap adapted to engage with the stem.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

lSAAC W. DRUMMOND. i/Vitnesses:

FLORA M. DoUsBAoH, Louis LAZARowiTZ.

US801227A 1905-02-28 1905-02-28 Paint-tube. Expired - Lifetime US801227A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US801227A US801227A (en) 1905-02-28 1905-02-28 Paint-tube.

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US801227A US801227A (en) 1905-02-28 1905-02-28 Paint-tube.

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2671579A (en) * 1948-08-30 1954-03-09 Fyr Fyter Co Collapsible tube and protective jacket therefor
US2881953A (en) * 1956-01-24 1959-04-14 Kuschel Max Tubes of any suitable material
US2882902A (en) * 1955-03-23 1959-04-21 Novo Terapeutisk Labor As Ampule for sterile storage of liquid medicaments
US2947653A (en) * 1956-05-28 1960-08-02 Oerlikon Buehrle Ag Method of producing containers from thermoplastic material
US2995214A (en) * 1958-02-24 1961-08-08 Shibaura Kyodo Kogyo Kabushiki Lubricant supply device
US4598839A (en) * 1983-02-01 1986-07-08 Peerless Tube Company Tamper evident squeeze tube

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2671579A (en) * 1948-08-30 1954-03-09 Fyr Fyter Co Collapsible tube and protective jacket therefor
US2882902A (en) * 1955-03-23 1959-04-21 Novo Terapeutisk Labor As Ampule for sterile storage of liquid medicaments
US2881953A (en) * 1956-01-24 1959-04-14 Kuschel Max Tubes of any suitable material
US2947653A (en) * 1956-05-28 1960-08-02 Oerlikon Buehrle Ag Method of producing containers from thermoplastic material
US2995214A (en) * 1958-02-24 1961-08-08 Shibaura Kyodo Kogyo Kabushiki Lubricant supply device
US4598839A (en) * 1983-02-01 1986-07-08 Peerless Tube Company Tamper evident squeeze tube

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