US789272A - Musical instrument. - Google Patents

Musical instrument. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US789272A
US789272A US13595402A US1902135954A US789272A US 789272 A US789272 A US 789272A US 13595402 A US13595402 A US 13595402A US 1902135954 A US1902135954 A US 1902135954A US 789272 A US789272 A US 789272A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
cord
strings
sounding
board
string
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US13595402A
Inventor
Walter E Fox
Original Assignee
Walter E Fox
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Walter E Fox filed Critical Walter E Fox
Priority to US13595402A priority Critical patent/US789272A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US789272A publication Critical patent/US789272A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D1/00General design of stringed musical instruments
    • G10D1/12General design of stringed musical instruments of zithers, e.g. autoharp

Description

.No. 789,272. PATENTED MAY 9, 1905. W. E. POX.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

APPLIOATION FILED 1330.20, 1902.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

[1.52226 05: I I nvniar: av a a,

No. 789,272. PATE'NTED MAY 9, 1905. W. E. FOX.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

APPLICATION FILED DEG. 20, 1902 6 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

122276 afar:

No. 789,272. PATENTED MAY 9, 1905. W. E. FOX.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

APPLICATION FILED 1936.20, 1902.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

No. 789,272. PATENTED MAY 9, 1905. W. E. FOX.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

APPLIOATION FILED 13110.20; 1902.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

\ Jgvezzfar:

No. 789,272. I PATENTED MAY 9, 1905. W. E. FOX.

' MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. 20, 1902.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

[line 559,5: v fzzvezzfor': M M 4:? F

PATENTED MAY 9, 1905.

W. E: FOX.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. APPLICATION FILED DEC. 20, 1902.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 6.

Patented May 9, 1905.

PATENT OFFICE.

WALTER E. FOX, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 789,272, dated May 9, 1905.

Application filed December 20,1902. Serial No. 185,954.

To It, whom, it 'mwg concern.-

Be it known that LVVALTERE. Fox, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Musical Instruments, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

My invention relates to musical instruments, and has for its object to provide an improved musical instrument by which by the operation of keys similar to the keys of a piano musical sounds resembling those of a violin, Violoncello, and double bass may be produced.

To this end my invention consists, broadly, in the generic features hereinafter described and claimed, as well as in the more specific structural features set forth in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of my improved musical instrument. Fig. 2 is a front elevation, the front portion of the case being removed. Fig. 3 is a horizontal section on line3 3 of Fig. 4. Fig. 4 is an end view, the case being in section. Fig. 5 is a vertical section on line 5 5 of Fig. 2. Fig. 6 is a detail, being an end view of certain of the operating parts. Fig. 7 is a plan View of the parts shown in Fig. 6, and Fig. 8 is a viewtaken at right angles to that shown in Fig. 6.

Referring to the drawings, 10 indicates the case, 11 the keyboard, and 12 the pedals by which certain parts of the mechanism are operated. The keyboard 11 is preferably the same as that of a piano, and the case also is similar in design to that of a piano; but it may be varied, if desired.

13 indicates vibratory strings, which are in general similar to those of a piano, although preferably there are not so many of them, the heavier bass strings and the higher treble strings being omitted. The strings 13 are secured at their ends in a frame 14, which is of proper shape to serve as a support for them. As best shown in Fig. 2, the frame 14 is somewhat triangular in outline, so as to accommodate different lengths of strings.

15 16 indicate the two side plates of the sounding-board, which is best shown in Fig. 5. As shown in said figure, the upper edges I the side plates 15 16 are secured at opposite sides of an upper bar 17, extending diagonally from one side of the frame 14 to the other, as shown in Fig. 2. The lower edges of said side plates are secured to opposite sides of the lower beam 18 of the frame 14, as shown in Fig. 5. I thus provide a hollow soundingboard which extends between the strings in a diagonal direction from one side of the instrument to the other, as best shown in Fig. 2. The side plates 15 16 are made of strawboard, by which I secure a softer and more mellow effect and a sweeter tone than could be secured by the use of wood. The side plates 15 16 are supported by a series of ribs 19, which extend from the bar 17 to the beam 18, as shown in Fig. 5. They are preferably set about eight inches apart. The bar 17 is secured in position by means of bolts 20, which pass through it and into or through the beam 18, as shown in Fig. 5. A series of said bolts 20 is provided at suitable intervals to give the requisite strength and rigidity to the sounding-board.

I As best shown in Fig. 5, a series of strings 13 is provided at each side of the frame 14 and sounding-board 15 16, said strings being secured at their upper ends to the usual pegs 21 and at their lower ends to suitable pegs 22, so that they may be adjusted and tuned in the same way as are piano-strings. Upper and lower bridges 8 9 are provided at opposite sides of the instrument, over which the strings 13 are stretched, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5. The lower bridges 9 rest upon the side plates of the sounding-board and serve the same purpose as the bridge of a violin. The strings at one side of the frame 14 correspond exactly with those at the other side and the strings at opposite sides of the frame are substantially in alinement, so that the two strings representing any given tone may be sounded together.

23, 24, and 25 indicate three cylinders arranged in triangular form and extending longitudinally of the instrument in the upper portion thereof, as shown in Fig. 5. Said cylinders have their surfaces grooved to receive the operating-cord 26, which is made of catgut, silk, or other suitable material and is in the form of an endless cord. The cord 26 passes spirally around the three cylinders 23 24 25 in succession, as many loops being formed as there are vibratory strings 13 in the instrument, as best shown in Fig. 2. It will be observed from an inspection of Fig. 5 that the lower cylinders 24 and 25 lie at opposite sides of the frame 14 and extend parallel therewith, so that as the cord 26 passes from the cylinder 24 to the cylinder 25 it passes between the different strings 13 of the instrument. The grooves in the cylinders 24 and 25 are so placed, however, that normally the cord 26 is out of contact with said strings 13. Said grooves are also so arranged that the portions of the cord 26 lying between the cylinders 24 and 25 lie in planes parallel with the planes of the adjacent strings 13. This is best shown in Fig. 7. The proper tension is maintained on the cord 26 by mounting the cylinders 24 and 25 in the upper ends of arms 27 28, respectively, carried in brackets 29 30, as shown in Fig. 5. A spring 31 connects the lower ends of the arms 27 28 and acts to draw said lower ends together, thereby moving the cylinders 24 and 25 away from each other and yieldingly holding them in such position. The brackets 29 30 are suitably secured to the ends of cross-bars 32, which are secured to the frame 14, as shown in Fig. 2. The cylinder 23 is journaled in suitable brackets 33 34, supported at the upper portion of the frame 14, as best shown in Fig. 2, and carries at one end a grooved pulley 35. (Best shown in Figs. 2 and 5.) The pulley 35 is employed for the purpose of driving the operating-cord 26 and is itself driven from a pulley 36 by a belt or cord 37, as best shown in Fig. 2. The pulley 36 is mounted upon a double crank-shaft 38, suitably journaled in the lower part of the instrument and operated from the pedals 12 by pitmen 39 40. A balance-wheel 41 is mounted on the shaft 38, as shown in Fig. 2, and serves to give smoothness to the operation of the instrument.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that by operating the pedals 12 the cylinder 23 may be rotated, consequently driving the operating-cord 26, which preferably moves in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 5. As has been explained, the operating-cord 26 is endless and passes spirally around the different cylinders 23, 24, and 25. In order to permit of a continuous operation of the operating-cord 26, after reaching the right-hand ends of said cylinders said cord passes down around pulleys 42 43, (best shown in Fig. 2,) thence across to the left-hand side of the instrument and up around a pulley 44, and thence up to the left-hand end of the cylinder 23. The pulley 44 is supported in a bracket 45, carried by the frame 14, and is provided with a felt-covered surface adapted to contain resin, so that as the cord 26 passes around said pulley resin is applied to it.

As has been explained, the operating-cord 26 is normally out of contact with the strings 13. In order to operate said strings, the operating-eord 26 while in motion is pressed laterally against said strings and causes them to vibrate in the same manner as if they were operated on with a bow. This lateral movement of the cord 26 is effected by means of rollers 46 47, arranged to rotate on vertical axes and carried by a rocking bar 48, the ends of which are supported upon pivots 49 50, which are fitted in suitable rails 51 52, secured to the bars 32 at opposite sides of the instrument, as shown in Figs. 5 and 7. The arrangement is such that by rocking the bars 48 the rollers 46 47 may be thrown against the cord 26 to carry the cord against the strings 13, and thereby efi'ect their vibration. The different bars 48 are arranged to be rocked by the depression of the ditferentkeys of the instrument, each key having its appropriate bar 48, so that any desired string may be vibrated by depressing the appropriate key. To this end the pivot 49 of each bar 48 is provided with an arm 53, bent preferably at right angles and connected with a vertically-movable rod 54, fitted in the upper end of a support 55, which rests upon the rear end of the key 11, as best shown in Fig. 8. The keys 11 are mounted in the manner common in pianos, so that by depressing any key its rear end is thrown up. Consequently by operating the proper key any desired bar 48 may be rocked and the corresponding strings sounded. As will be obvious, the operating-cord 26 will remain in contact with the strings 13 as long as the appropriate key is depressed, but will move out of contact with the strings as soon as the key is released. The weight of the rod 54 is ordinarily sufiicient to restore the rocking bar 48 to its normal position and carry the rollers 46 47 out of contact with the cord 26; but to insure sueh operation I provide a spring 56, which bears against the bar 48 and tends to hold the rollers 46 47 in their normal or upright position. As soon as the cord 26 is released its tension restores it to inoperative position. It will be understood also that staccato effects may be secured in the same manner as with piano-keys.

Dampers 57 ,such as are eommonl y employed in pianos, are used to secure similar effects in my improved instrument. They are carried by cross-bars 58, supported by rods 59, depending from the rocking bars 48, as shown in Figs. 6 and 8.

In operation the operating-cord 26 is set in motion by operating the pedals and is moved constantly while the instrument is in use. The operator may then perform, em 'iloying the keys in the same manner as 1 )iano-keys, the result being that the different strings are vibrated to produce effects corresponding with those of the violin, Violoncello, or double bass. If desired, instead of employing foot-power to drive the operating-cord 26 any other suitable motive power may be used.

1 wish it to be understood that while 1 have described in detail the embodiment of my invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings my invention is not restricted to the specific construction described except in so far as such construction is particularly claimed. 1 wish it to be understood, further, that in lieu of a single operating-cord a plurality of such cords or a cord made up of a number of separate strands after the manner of a violin-bow may be employed.

That which I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, a plurality of vibratory strings at opposite sides of the soundingboard, means adapted to move across and frictionally engage a plurality of said strings simultaneously to set them in vibration, and keys for controlling the operation of the strings, substantially as described.

2. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, a plurality of vibratory strings at opposite sides of the soundingboard, means movable transversely of the sounding-board and adapted to frictionally engage a plurality of said strings simultaneously to set them in vibration, and keys for controlling the operation of the strings, substantially as described.

3. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a sounding-board, an endless cord adapted to move transversely of the sounding-board across said string to set it in vibration, means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for supporting said cord, a key for controlling the operation of said string, and means actuated by said key for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said string, substantially as described.

A. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, a plurality of vibratory strings at opposite sides of the soundingboard, an endless traveling cord adapted to move across and engage said strings to set them in vibration, and keys for controlling the operation of said strings, substantially as described.

5. A musical instrument, comprising a series of vibratory strings, a sounding-board, an endless traveling cord adapted to move transversely of the sounding-board across said strings to set them in vibration, means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for supporting said cord, keys for controlling the operation of said strings, and means actuated by said keys for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said strings, substantially as described.

6. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a sounding-board, an endless cord normally out of engagement with said string and adapted to move transversely of the sounding-board across said string to set it in vibration, means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for supporting said cord, a key for moving said cord into engagement with said string, means actuated. by said key for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said string, and means for driving said cord, substantially as described.

7. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a sounding-board, an endless cord normally out of engagement with said string and adapted to move transversely of the sounding-board across said string to set it in vibration, means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for supporting said cord, a key "for moving said cord into engagement with said string, means actuated by said key for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said string, means for driving said cord, and means for applying resin to said cord, substantially as described.

8. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, a plurality of Vibratory strings, an endless cord adapted to move transversely and longitudinally of the soundingboard between successive strings, means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for supporting said cord, and means for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board to engage the different strings, substantially as described.

9. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, a series of vibratory strings, an endless cord, means for guiding said cord longitudinally and transversely of the sounding-board between different strings of a series, a plurality of independent keys, means actuated by said keys for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said strings, and means for driving said cord, substantially as described.

10. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, a series of vibratory strings, an endless cord, means for guiding said cord longitudinally and transversely of the sounding-board between different strings of the series, a plurality of independent keys, means actuated by said keys for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said strings, means for driving said cord, and tension devices for said cord, substantiall y as described.

11. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, a series of vibratory strings, an endless cord, means for guiding said cord longitudinally and transversely of the sounding-board between diiferent strings of the series, a plurality of independent keys, means actuated by said keys for moving said cord longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with said strings, means for driving said cord, and spring-operated tension devices for said cord, substantially as described.

12. A musical instrument, comprising a se ries of vibratory strings, cylinders at opposite sides of said strings, an endless cord mounted on said cylinders and extending transversely of' said strings, said cord being spirally arranged so as to pass successively between the different strings of the series, means for driving said cord, and keys for moving different sections of said cord into engagement with the different strings, substantially as described.

13. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, a series of vibratory strings, cylinders at opposite sides of said strings, cord mechanism mounted on said cylinders and adapted to travel longitudinally and transversely of the sounding-board between different strings of the series, independent keys, and means operated by said keys for moving said cord mechanism longitudinally of the sounding-board into contact with different strings, substantially as described.

14:. A musical instrument, comprising a series of vibratory strings, cylinders at opposite sides of said strings, an upper cylinder above said first-mentioned cylinders, an endless cord spirally arranged and supported upon said cylinders, different portions of said cord extending between the different strings of the series, means for driving said cord, and keyoperated mechanism for moving the diflerent sections of said cord to vibrate any desired string, substantially as described.

15. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, a plurality of vibratory strings arranged in pairs, at opposite sides of the sounding-board, means movable across and adapted to frictionally engage the different pairs of strings, and key mechanism controlling the operation of the different pairs of strings, substantially as described.

16. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding board, strings stretched at opposite sides of said sounding-board, cord mechanism adapted to move transversely of said sounding-board, means for driving said cord mechanism, means for moving said cord mechanism into contact with strings at opposite sides of said sounding-board simultaneously, and key mechanism for controlling the operation of said strings, substantially as described.

17. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, strings stretched at opposite sides of said sounding-board, bridges at opposite sides of said sounding-board supporting said strings, cord mechanism adapted to move transversely of said sounding-board, means for driving said cord mechanism, means for moving said cord mechanism into contact with strings at opposite sides of said sounding-board simultaneously, and key mechanism i'or controlling the operation of said strings, substantially as described.

18. A musical instrument, comprising a hollow soumling-board, strings stretched at opposite sides of said sounding-board, bridges at opposite sides of said sounding-board supporting said strings, keys for controlling the operation of said strings, and frictionallyacting means movable transversely of the soundingboard operated by said keys for vibrating strings at opposite sides of said soundingboard simultaneously, substantially as described.

19. A musical instrument, comprising a hollow sounding-board, strings stretched at opposite sides of said sounding-board, bridges at opposite sides of said sounding-board supporting said strings, keys for controlling the operation of said strings, and frictionally-acting means movable transversely of the sounding board operated by said keys for vibrating strings at opposite sides of said sounding board simultaneously, the sides of said sounding-board being composed of strawboard, substantially as described.

20. A musical instrument, comprising a series of vibratory strings, an endless cord adapted to move between the diflerent strings of the series and engage said strings to set them in vibration, and independent keys for controlling the operation of said strings by said cord, substantially as described.

21. A musical instrument, comprising a plurality of vibratory strings, a cord adapted to move across and engage said strings to set them in vibration, means for moving said cord spirally, and keys for controlling the operation of said strings, substantially as described.

22. A musical instrument, comprising a se ries of vibratory strings, a spirally-moving endless cord adapted to engage a plurality of said strings to set them in vibration, and means for controlling the operation of said strings by said cord, substantially as described.

23. A musical instrument, comprising a plurality of strings, and means adapted to move successively between different pairs of strings to set them in vibration, substantially as described.

Q t. A musical instrument, comprising a plurality of' vibratory strings, means adapted to move at opposite sides of a plurality of said strings, and means for controlling the operation of said strings, substantially as described.

25. A musical instrument, comprising a \ibratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, and means at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into contact therewith, substantially as described.

26. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a cord movable transversely of' said string, means at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into contact therewith, and a key for operating said moving means, substantially as described.

27. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, a vibrato'ry string, a cord movable transversely of said sounding-board and string, and means at opposite sides of said sounding-board for moving said cord into contact with said string,substantiall y as described.

28. A musical instrument, comprising a sounding-board, vibratory strings at opposite sides thereof, a cord movable transversely of said strings, and means at opposite sides of said strings for moving said cord into contact therewith.

29. A musical instrument, comprising a vvibratory string, a cord movable transversely thereof, a rock-shaft, means carried by said rock-shaft at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into engagement therewith, and means for rocking said shaft, substantially as described.

30. A musical instrument, comprisinga vibratory string, a cord movable transversely thereof, a rock-shaft, means carried by said rock-shaft at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into engagement therewith, and a key for rocking said shaft, substantially as described.

31. A musical instrument, comprisinga vibratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, rollers at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into contact therewith, and means for actuating said rollers to move said cord into engagement with said string, substantially as described.

32. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, rollers at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into contact therewith, a rock-shaft on which said rollers are mounted, and a key for rocking said shaft to move the cord into engagement with said string, substantially as described.

33. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, means at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into contact therewith, and a damper for said string, substantially as described.

34. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, rocking means for moving said cord into engagement with said string, and a damper carried by said rocking means and arranged to engage said string when said cord is out of engagement therewith, substantially as described.

35. A musical instrument, comprising a vibratory string, a cord movabletransversely of said string, a rocking support, means mounted on said support at opposite sides of said string for moving said cord into engagement therewith, and a damper oppositely disposed on said rocking support for engaging said string when said cord is out of engagement therewith, substantially as described.

36. A musical instrument, comprising a vi bratory string, a cord movable transversely of said string, a rocking support, rollers mounted on said support at opposite sides of said string and adapted to move said cord into engagement therewith, and a damper carried by said support and oppositely disposed with reference to said rollers, said damper being adapted to engage said string, substantially as described.

37. A musical instrument, comprising a double sounding-board, vibratory strings at opposite sides thereof, a cord movable transversely of said strings, and means at opposite sides of said strings for moving said cord into contact therewith, substantially as described.

VALTER E. FOX.

lVitnesses:

J OHN L. JACKSON, JULIA M. BRISTOL.

US13595402A 1902-12-20 1902-12-20 Musical instrument. Expired - Lifetime US789272A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13595402A US789272A (en) 1902-12-20 1902-12-20 Musical instrument.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13595402A US789272A (en) 1902-12-20 1902-12-20 Musical instrument.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US789272A true US789272A (en) 1905-05-09

Family

ID=2857764

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13595402A Expired - Lifetime US789272A (en) 1902-12-20 1902-12-20 Musical instrument.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US789272A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110235923A1 (en) * 2009-09-14 2011-09-29 Weisenburger Shawn D Accurate digitization of a georeferenced image

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110235923A1 (en) * 2009-09-14 2011-09-29 Weisenburger Shawn D Accurate digitization of a georeferenced image

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Singer et al. LEMUR's Musical Robots.
Conklin Jr Design and tone in the mechanoacoustic piano. Part II. Piano structure
US3038363A (en) Electronic piano
US4019A (en) Pianoforte
US3680423A (en) Combined drum-guitar musical instrument
US5235892A (en) Celesta promptly responsive to high speed keying-in
US1010240A (en) Guitar.
US3585893A (en) Foot operated electronic musical instrument
US4462295A (en) Beam and cylinder sound instrument
CN100378799C (en) Keyboard structure
US2352438A (en) Musical instrument
US2187251A (en) Electrical musical instrument
Rossing Acoustics of percussion instruments: Recent progress
US134679A (en) Improvement in guitars
Bilhuber et al. The influence of the soundboard on piano tone quality
US1259062A (en) Stringed musical instrument.
US2194545A (en) Musical instrument
US2658421A (en) Bass drum with rhythm beaters and pedal
US1935215A (en) Musical instrument
US2672781A (en) Vibratory reed electronic musical instrument
US3981219A (en) Practice violin and bow
US2459103A (en) Musical instrument
US4149444A (en) Rhythm instrument
US621061A (en) Musical toy
US636692A (en) Stringed musical instrument.