US7610229B1 - System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score - Google Patents

System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US7610229B1
US7610229B1 US10452155 US45215503A US7610229B1 US 7610229 B1 US7610229 B1 US 7610229B1 US 10452155 US10452155 US 10452155 US 45215503 A US45215503 A US 45215503A US 7610229 B1 US7610229 B1 US 7610229B1
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
data
credit
score
consumer
server
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US10452155
Inventor
Adam T. Kornegay
Joseph L. Greenwald
Constance A. Elliott
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CONSUMERINFO COM Inc
Original Assignee
Experian Information Solutions Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/02Banking, e.g. interest calculation, credit approval, mortgages, home banking or on-line banking
    • G06Q40/025Credit processing or loan processing, e.g. risk analysis for mortgages
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/08Payment architectures
    • G06Q20/10Payment architectures specially adapted for electronic funds transfer [EFT] systems; specially adapted for home banking systems
    • G06Q20/102Bill distribution or payments
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/02Banking, e.g. interest calculation, credit approval, mortgages, home banking or on-line banking
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/04Exchange, e.g. stocks, commodities, derivatives or currency exchange

Abstract

A system and method is provided to allow a consumer to interactively explore his credit score by submitting hypothetical values based on his actual credit data. The system uses the consumer's real credit data and the submitted hypothetical values to calculate a simulated credit score based on a simulator scorecard. The consumer may then observe the changes in the resultant scores. The system and the scorecard may utilize fewer data elements than a complete credit-worthiness scorecard and may instead focus on the key elements affecting a consumer's credit score. The system may be implemented in part on a web server or as a stand-alone application. The system may also update the score dynamically as the consumer adjusts the hypothetical values or may require the consumer to affirmatively submit the new hypothetical data.

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority from U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/384,650 filed on May 30, 2002, entitled “System and Method for Interactively-Simulating a Credit-Worthiness Score.”

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a system and method for teaching consumers about the interaction of credit data elements in determining a credit risk score. More particularly, the present invention relates to a system and method for simulating a consumer's credit risk score and for providing the consumer the opportunity to adjust his credit data to hypothetical values in order to observe the changes in the simulated score.

2. Description of Background Art

The practice of predicting a consumer's credit-worthiness is well known. Conventional credit-worthiness, or credit risk, analysis focuses on a consumer's credit history and other factors to determine whether credit should be offered or granted to the consumer.

Conventional credit risk analysis utilizes a risk model, or scorecard, to give a relative weight to each data element in the credit history to provide a credit-worthiness score. These models vary from provider to provider depending on the needs of the financial institution requesting the credit score. The methodology behind creating a risk model is known in the art.

Financial institutions that request a consumer's credit-worthiness score do so for several reasons. First, institutions often pre-screen potential applicants to determine to whom they should mail an offer of credit and at what terms. Typically, an institution will provide a score cut-off or tiered system for providing various terms and rates to different credit-worthiness score brackets. Pre-screening is used primarily to generate new business for the institution. Second, businesses use the credit-worthiness score in granting real-time requests by a consumer for credit. This may include applying for a home mortgage, buying a car, or opening a new credit card account at the point of sale. In these instances, the credit score is requested and compared against the institution's credit risk policy to determine whether the new line of credit will be provided.

With creditors and lenders placing such a large emphasis on a consumer's credit-worthiness score, it is common for a consumer to want to improve his score. Typically, the scorecards utilize complex mathematical models and algorithms to arrive at a credit-worthiness score. The complexity of the scoring process is a stumbling block for consumers who want to understand how their scores were generated and how to improve their scores. Conventional attempts to educate consumers have failed to provide clear answers to consumers' questions. Most credit scoring vendors have deliberately withheld information on how credit scores are generated for fear of adding additional levels of confusion. Explanations and tutorials offered to consumers have been non-interactive and text-based. Furthermore, conventional solutions have not used the consumer's own credit data to illustrate the process.

Therefore there is a need for a system that (1) provides information to the consumer regarding score improvement, (2) uses the consumer's own credit data to illustrate the score generation process, and (3) allows the user to interact with the system and to experiment with different credit data in order to explore the hypothetical changes in his credit-worthiness score.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A system and method for simulating a consumer's credit-worthiness score based on both initial data and consumer-modified data is described. In one embodiment, the initial data is credit bureau data associated with a particular consumer. In another embodiment, the initial data is census bureau data based on the average consumer. In yet another embodiment, the initial data can be made more relevant to the particular consumer by refining the census bureau data based on certain factors such as location, age, and profession.

In one embodiment, the system includes a client terminal, a simulator server, a credit data server, and a scorecard data server. The client terminal and the data servers are each coupled to the simulator server. The client terminal and simulator server are configured to allow a consumer using the client terminal to communicate interactively with the simulator server to explore various aspects and factors comprising his credit-worthiness score. The simulator server calculates an initial credit-worthiness score by applying a simulator scorecard to data from the credit data server and then presents the consumer with options for modifying this data. The consumer is prompted to adjust the values of the initial data to produce modified data in order to observe the resultant change in his credit score. As the data is adjusted, the simulator server uses the simulator scorecard to recalculate the credit-worthiness score based on any unaltered initial data and the modified data.

In a preferred embodiment, the recalculation of the credit score is performed automatically by the simulator server and does not require an explicit submission of the modified data by the consumer.

In another embodiment, the simulator server utilizes a simulator scorecard that calculates the credit-worthiness score based on only a portion of the credit data commonly used to calculate credit scores. Since only a portion of the credit data is used, the resulting credit score is an approximation of what the credit score would be had all of the information been used. By using a smaller set of data elements, the system is able to respond more quickly to a consumer's submitted modified data, and the interface with the consumer is simpler. This allows the consumer to focus on the key data elements, which greatly affect his score, without having to worry about all the less important data elements, which only refine his score. The simulator server also analyzes the initial data to determine which subset of data elements most affect the consumer's score and calculates the simulated score based on the values of those elements. In one embodiment, those data elements are the only data elements presented to the consumer for the submission of modified data.

In yet another embodiment, the data values are presented in the form of graphical slider bars, first set to the initial data values. The consumer adjusts the data values by clicking and dragging the graphical slider bars to new values. In a preferred embodiment, as a graphical slider bar is dragged, the simulator score is updated. This allows the user to gain an understanding of how his credit data affects his score and helps the consumer to plan an effective path to better credit.

In the preferred embodiment, the client terminal, simulator server, scorecard data server, and credit data server are each coupled to a network in order to communicate with each other. In an alternate embodiment, the system is self-contained, with the client terminal, simulator server, scorecard data server, and credit data server all residing on one computer. The computer is a general-purpose computer or a computer specifically optimized to calculate the simulated scores.

In yet another embodiment, the client terminal is implemented as a web browser. In this embodiment, the client terminal is situated at a point across the network from the simulator server or is co-located with the simulator server. Additionally, in this embodiment the simulator server creates and serves a web page to the client terminal for interacting with the consumer.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention is illustrated by way of example, and not by way of limitation, in the figures of the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals refer to similar elements.

FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram overview of one embodiment of a system for simulating a credit-worthiness score based on initial and modified credit data.

FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of a preferred embodiment of the architecture of the simulator server.

FIG. 3 illustrates a more detailed block diagram of the contents of the memory unit in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 a illustrates how data gets into the working data memory.

FIG. 4 b illustrates how data gets into the scorecard memory.

FIG. 4 c is a diagram of the data flow through the simulated score generator.

FIG. 5 illustrates a flow chart of a preferred embodiment of a method for simulating a credit-worthiness score based on initial and modified credit data.

FIG. 6 a illustrates one embodiment of the user interface shown on a client terminal.

FIG. 6 b illustrates the embodiment depicted in FIG. 6 a showing modified data being entered.

FIG. 6 c illustrates the embodiment depicted in FIG. 6 a showing the resultant score simulation.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Financial risk scores, along with their associated risk models, are designed to predict future consumer financial behaviors such as delinquency, bankruptcy, and profitability. One example of a financial risk score is the credit-worthiness score. While the invention can be used in conjunction with any financial risk score, the embodiments described below address credit-worthiness scores in particular. Specifically, a system and method for simulating a credit-worthiness score based on initial and modified credit data is described.

In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the invention. It will be apparent, however, to one skilled in the art that the invention can be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, structures and devices are shown in block diagram form in order to avoid obscuring the invention.

Reference in the specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the invention. The appearances of the phrase “in one embodiment” in various places in the specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment.

Some portions of the detailed descriptions that follow are presented in terms of algorithms and symbolic representations of operations on data bits within a computer memory. These algorithmic descriptions and representations are the means used by those skilled in the data processing arts to most effectively convey the substance of their work to others skilled in the art. An algorithm is here, and generally, conceived to be a self-consistent sequence of steps leading to a desired result. The steps are those requiring physical manipulations of physical quantities. Usually, though not necessarily, these quantities take the form of electrical or magnetic signals capable of being stored, transferred, combined, compared, and otherwise manipulated. It has proven convenient at times, principally for reasons of common usage, to refer to these signals as bits, values, elements, symbols, characters, terms, numbers, or the like.

It should be borne in mind, however, that all of these and similar terms are to be associated with the appropriate physical quantities and are merely convenient labels applied to these quantities. Unless specifically stated otherwise, as apparent from the following discussion, it is appreciated that throughout the description, discussions utilizing terms such as “processing” or “computing” or “calculating” or “determining” or “displaying” or the like, refer to the action and processes of a computer system, or similar electronic computing device, that manipulates and transforms data represented as physical (electronic) quantities within the computer system's registers and memories into other data similarly represented as physical quantities within the computer system memories or registers or other such information storage, transmission, or display devices.

The present invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the operations herein. This apparatus is specially constructed for the required purposes, or it comprises a general-purpose computer selectively activated or reconfigured by a computer program stored in the computer. Such a computer program is stored in a computer readable storage medium, such as, but not limited to, any type of disk including floppy disks, optical disks, CD-ROMs, and magnetic-optical disks, read-only memories (ROMs), random access memories (RAMs), EPROMs, EEPROMs, magnetic or optical cards, or any type of media suitable for storing electronic instructions, and each coupled to a computer system bus.

The algorithms and displays presented herein are not inherently related to any particular computer or other apparatus. Various general-purpose systems are used with programs in accordance with the teachings herein, or more specialized apparatus are constructed to perform the required method steps. The required structure for a variety of these systems will appear from the description below. In addition, the present invention is not described with reference to any particular programming language. It will be appreciated that a variety of programming languages may be used to implement the teachings of the invention as described herein.

Overview

FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram overview of one embodiment of a system 101 for simulating a credit-worthiness score based on initial and modified credit data. Generally, system 101 includes a simulator server 110, a client terminal 120, a credit data server 130, and a scorecard data server 140. Client terminal 120 is a general-purpose computer capable of running a web browser or other user-interface program or it is a limited-function electronic device configured to communicate with the simulator server 110. The simulator server 110 is any general-purpose computer configured to serve web pages or communicate with the client terminal 120. It may be advantageous to utilize a general-purpose computer configured to be an information-server capable of handling communications with multiple client terminals 120. Likewise, credit data server 130 and scorecard data server 140 are general-purpose computers configured to provide remote access to stored data.

The client terminal 120 and the data servers 130 and 140 are each coupled to the simulator server 110. The client terminal 120 and simulator server 110 are configured to allow a consumer using the client terminal to communicate interactively with the simulator server 110. In a preferred embodiment, the client terminal 120 is communicatively coupled to the simulator server 110 via a communications network 150, such as the Internet. This facilitates the centralization and segmentation of the system 101 for ease of maintenance and accessibility.

System 101 operates as follows. A consumer who wishes to learn how credit data affects credit-worthiness scores uses client terminal 120 to communicate with simulator server 110. The simulator server 110 retrieves scorecard data from the scorecard data server 140 such as via a LAN 160. The scorecard data server 140 contains one or more simulator scorecards for use by the simulator server 110. Generally, each scorecard provides a metric for the simulator server 110 to weigh information contained in the retrieved credit data to simulate the credit-worthiness score. Scorecards represent these weights as coefficients. In a preferred embodiment, the simulator server 110 uses a simulator scorecard that simulates the scoring process of the credit industry's generic scoring method. In an alternate embodiment, the consumer is able to select which scoring method to simulate and thus the scorecard data server 140 includes additional simulator scorecards for each scoring method.

The simulator server 110 also communicates with the credit data server 130 to obtain credit data such as via a LAN 160. The credit data includes information related to a consumer's credit-worthiness. In a preferred embodiment, this information includes credit data that is generally collected by a credit bureau. However, one skilled in the art will recognize that other data may either replace or supplement the credit data in generating and simulating the credit-worthiness score.

In one embodiment, the credit data server 130 holds credit bureau data. In this embodiment, the consumer provides information sufficient to identify himself (hereinafter “consumer identification data”). In one embodiment, the consumer identification data includes the consumer's name, social security number, current address, or any other distinguishing data for ensuring that the correct credit data is associated with the consumer. In a preferred embodiment, the consumer identification data needs to be entered only once and is stored in a profile on the system 101. During subsequent uses, the consumer signs into the system 101 to have the profile provide the consumer identification data. The profile would be provided to only those users who possess the correct security credentials, such as passwords or access cards. In this embodiment, the profile would be stored on a computer-readable medium. The computer-readable medium could be stored in the client terminal 120, in the simulator server 110, or elsewhere in system 101.

The client terminal 120 transmits the consumer identification data to the simulator server 110. The simulator server 110 then transmits the consumer identification data to the credit data server 130. The credit data server 130 then returns credit data corresponding to the particular consumer. While this embodiment enables the consumer to experiment with his own actual credit data, it is not always the preferred embodiment because pulling actual credit data can cost money and adversely affect one's credit rating.

In another embodiment, the credit data server 130 holds census bureau data based on the average consumer. In this embodiment, the consumer does not provide any information about himself. Although credit data transmitted from the credit data server 130 to the simulator server 110 is not specific to the consumer, it provides a starting point for the consumer to explore the effect that credit data has on a credit-worthiness score.

In yet another embodiment, the credit data server 130 also holds census bureau data, but the consumer provides some information about himself. In one embodiment, the information corresponds to the categories of information stored by the census bureau, such as location, age, and profession. The client terminal 120 transmits this information to the simulator server 110. The simulator server 110 then transmits the information to the credit data server 130. The credit data server 130 then returns credit data based on the information. This embodiment allows the credit data returned to be more relevant to the specific consumer while not experiencing the disadvantages of pulling the consumer's actual credit report.

Once the simulator scorecard and credit data have been obtained, the simulator server 110 uses the simulator scorecard and credit data to calculate an initial simulated score. The simulator server 110 then outputs this score to the client terminal 120. In one embodiment, the score is a simple numerical value, such as is shown in FIGS. 6 a-6 c (described below). In another embodiment, the score is a value representing a characteristic of a financial transaction, such as a loan limit or a loan percentage rate. Many other forms of scores are also possible.

The consumer interactively adjusts the values of the initial credit data elements via the client terminal 120. The client terminal 120 then transmits the modified credit data to the simulator server 110. The simulator server 110 receives the modified credit data and substitutes the modified credit data for the corresponding initial credit data retrieved from the credit data server 130. The simulator server 110 then recalculates a credit-worthiness score based on the metric of the selected scorecard data and the modified credit data. In one embodiment, the recalculated score is output alongside the initial score to the client terminal 120 to allow the consumer to interactively compare the effect of the changes on the credit-worthiness score.

In a preferred embodiment, the simulator server 110 communicates with the client terminal 120 via a web page. This web page is served by the simulator server 110 and typically runs on the client terminal 120. The web page allows for user entry of the consumer identification data, the modified data, and the additional consumer information. The client terminal 120 also receives the simulated score from the simulator server 110 and displays it on the web page. In a preferred embodiment, the entry of the modified data is interactive, allowing the simulated score to be recalculated dynamically by the simulator server 110 responsive to changes in the initial data, without requiring the user to actually “submit” the changes to the simulator server 110. The user interface for the client terminal 120 will be discussed in greater detail below.

One skilled in the art will recognize that other communication topologies exist that fall within the spirit of the invention. For example, in an alternate embodiment, the simulator server 110, credit data server 130, scorecard data server 140, and client terminal 120 all reside or originate locally in one general-purpose computer system. Furthermore, the present invention advantageously simulates credit scoring methods currently used in the credit industry to aid the consumer in determining the best manner in which to improve his credit rating. As the credit industry changes scoring methods, the present invention may be adapted to these new methods as well.

Simulator Server

FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of a preferred embodiment of simulator server 110. Simulator server 110 preferably includes a processor 210, a main memory 220, a data storage device 230, and a network controller 280, all of which are communicatively coupled to a system bus 240.

Processor 210 processes data signals and comprises various computing architectures including a complex instruction set computer (CISC) architecture, a reduced instruction set computer (RISC) architecture, or an architecture implementing a combination of instruction sets. Although only a single processor is shown in FIG. 2, multiple processors may be included.

Main memory 220 stores instructions and/or data that are executed by processor 210. The instructions and/or data comprise code for performing any and/or all of the techniques described herein. Main memory 220 is preferably a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) device, a static random access memory (SRAM) device, or some other memory device known in the art.

Data storage device 230 stores data and instructions for processor 210 and comprises one or more devices including a hard disk drive, a floppy disk drive, a CD-ROM device, a DVD-ROM device, a DVD-RAM device, a DVD-RW device, a flash memory device, or some other mass storage device known in the art.

Network controller 280 links simulator server 110 to a network 150 that may include multiple processing systems. In a preferred embodiment, the credit data server 130, the scorecard data server 140, and the client terminal 120 are also connected to the network 150. The network 150 comprises a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN) (e.g., the Internet), and/or any other interconnected data path across which multiple devices may communicate.

System bus 240 represents a shared bus for communicating information and data throughout simulator server 110. System bus 240 represents one or more buses including an industry standard architecture (ISA) bus, a peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus, a universal serial bus (USB), or some other bus known in the art to provide similar functionality.

Additional components that may be coupled to simulator server 110 through system bus 240 include a display device 250, a keyboard 260, and a cursor control device 270. Display device 250 represents any device equipped to display electronic images and data to a local user or maintainer. Display device 250 is a cathode ray tube (CRT), a liquid crystal display (LCD), or any other similarly equipped display device, screen, or monitor. Keyboard 260 represents an alphanumeric input device coupled to simulator server 110 to communicate information and command selections to processor 210. Cursor control device 270 represents a user input device equipped to communicate positional data as well as command selections to processor 210. Cursor control 270 includes a mouse, a trackball, a stylus, a pen, cursor direction keys, or other mechanisms to cause movement of a cursor.

It should be apparent to one skilled in the art that simulator server 110 includes more or fewer components than those shown in FIG. 2 without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. For example, simulator server 110 may include additional memory, such as, for example, a first or second level cache or one or more application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). As noted above, simulator server 110 may be comprised solely of ASICs. In addition, components may be coupled to simulator server 110 including, for example, image scanning devices, digital still or video cameras, or other devices that may or may not be equipped to capture and/or download electronic data to/from simulator server 110.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of memory unit 220. Generally, memory unit 220 comprises several code modules for simulating a credit-worthiness score, responding to consumer identification data, and presenting the user interface for output on client terminal 120. Specifically, the code modules in memory unit 220 include: a main program 301, an initial credit data retriever 305, a scorecard retriever 310, a simulated score generator 315, a static data formatter 320, an interactive data formatter 325, a user interface server 330, a modified credit data retriever 335, a modified credit data parser 340, and a user information retriever 375.

Memory unit 220 also contains several memory storage areas for storing various bytes of data required by the operation of the code modules 301, 305, 310, 315, 320, 325, 330, 335 and 340. Specifically, memory unit 220 includes an initial credit data memory 350, a scorecard memory 355, an initial score memory 360, a modified score memory 365, and a working data memory 370.

All code modules and memories 305, 310, 315, 320, 325, 330, 335, 340, 350, 355, 360, 365, 370, and 375 are communicatively coupled with main program 301. Main program 301 centrally controls the operation and process flow of simulator server 110, transmitting instructions and data to as well as receiving data from each code module and memory 305, 310, 315, 320, 325, 330, 335, 340, 350, 355, 360, 365, 370, and 275. The operation of memories 350, 355, 360, 365, and 370 and code modules 301, 305, 310, 315, 320, 325, 330, 335, 340, and 375 in memory unit 220 is best shown in FIGS. 4 a-4 c.

FIG. 4 a illustrates how data gets into the working data memory 370. Initially, the data stored in working data memory 370 comes from the credit data server 130 as follows. The credit data server 130 is coupled to the initial credit data retriever 305. The credit data server 130 receives a query from the initial credit data retriever 305. Based on information in the query, the credit data server 130 transmits credit data to the initial credit data retriever 305.

In one embodiment, there is a user information retriever 375 that is coupled to the client terminal 120 and the initial credit data retriever 305. When the user enters information about himself at client terminal 120 (either information sufficient to identify himself or other information such as location or salary), client terminal 120 transmits this information to the user information retriever 375. The user information retriever 375 then transmits this information to the initial credit data retriever 305. The initial credit data retriever 305 uses this information to refine its query to the credit data server 130, as described above.

The initial credit data retriever 305 is coupled to the credit data server 130, the initial credit data memory 350, and the working data memory 370. Once the initial credit data retriever 305 has received credit data from the credit data server 130, the initial credit data retriever 305 transmits this credit data to the initial credit data memory 350 and the working data memory 370.

The initial credit data memory 350 is coupled to the initial credit data retriever 305. Once the initial credit data memory 350 has received credit data from the initial credit data retriever 305, the initial credit data memory 350 stores this credit data. The working data memory 370 is also coupled to the initial credit data retriever 305 (in addition to being coupled to the modified credit data parser 340, as described below). Once the working data memory 370 has received credit data from the initial credit data retriever 305, the working data memory 370 stores this credit data.

Since the working data memory 370 now has initial credit data, simulated score generator 315 (see FIG. 4 c) outputs the initial credit score. This score is then stored in initial score memory 360, as described in FIG. 4 c.

When a user modifies the initial credit data, the entire set of credit data (both modified data and initial data, if any) is stored in working data memory 370 as follows. The client terminal 120 is coupled to the modified credit data retriever 335. The user uses client terminal 120 to modify the initial credit data. The client terminal 120 transmits the modified credit data to modified credit data retriever 335.

The modified credit data retriever 335 is coupled to the client terminal 120 and the modified credit data parser 340. Once the modified credit data retriever 335 has received the modified credit data from the client terminal 120, it transmits the data to the modified credit data parser 340. The modified credit data parser 340 is coupled to the modified credit data retriever 335 and the working data memory 370. Once the modified credit data parser 340 has received the modified credit data from the modified credit data retriever 335, it transmits the modified credit data to the working data memory 370. The credit data values in working data memory 370 that the user modified are thereby set to the new (modified) values, while the unchanged data (if any) remains at the same initial values. Since the working data memory 370 now has modified credit data, simulated score generator 315 recalculates the credit score and outputs it. This score is then stored in modified score memory 365, as described in FIG. 4 c.

FIG. 4 b illustrates how data gets into the scorecard memory 355. The data stored in scorecard memory 355 comes from the scorecard data server 140 as follows. The scorecard data server 140 is coupled to the scorecard retriever 310. The scorecard data server 140 receives a request for a scorecard from scorecard retriever 310. Based on information in the request, scorecard data server 140 transmits scorecard data to scorecard retriever 310.

Scorecard retriever 310 is coupled to scorecard data server 140 and scorecard memory 355. Once scorecard retriever 310 has received scorecard data from the scorecard data server 140, the scorecard retriever 310 transmits this scorecard data to the scorecard memory 355.

The scorecard memory 355 is coupled to the scorecard retriever 310. Once the scorecard memory 355 has received scorecard data from the scorecard retriever 310, the scorecard memory 355 stores this scorecard data.

FIG. 4 c is a diagram of the data processing through the simulated score generator 315. Simulated score generator 315 is coupled to working data memory 370, scorecard memory 355, initial score memory 360, and modified score memory 365. Simulated score generator 315 takes as inputs data in the working data memory 370 and data in the scorecard memory 355. Simulated score generator 315 then calculates a credit-worthiness score using the scorecard data in the scorecard memory 355 and the credit data in the working data memory 370. This score is then transmitted to either initial score memory 360 or modified score memory 365, depending on whether the credit data in working data memory 370 was initial credit data or contained some modified credit data, respectively. Initial score memory 360 or modified score memory 365 then stores the received score.

Static data formatter 320 and interactive data formatter 325 prepare the user interface that is shown on client terminal 120 via user interface server 330. Static data formatter 320 is coupled to initial credit data memory 350, initial score memory 360, and modified score memory 365. Static data formatter 320 receives data from these three memories and formats that data. Interactive data formatter 325 is coupled to initial credit data memory 350 and working data memory 370. Interactive data formatter 325 receives data from these two memories and formats the data. User interface server 330 is coupled to static data formatter 320 and interactive data formatter 325. User interface server 330 receives as inputs formatted data from both the static data formatter 320 and the interactive data formatter 325 and transmits to client terminal 120 a single integrated user interface.

Start-Up/First Pass

The general method implemented by main program 301 is further illustrated in FIG. 5. A consumer accesses system 101 via client terminal 120 in order to learn how credit data affects credit-worthiness scores. The first pass of the system 101 provides the consumer with an initial simulated score. This score will be based on credit data and can vary depending on whether the credit data comes from a credit bureau, the census bureau, or another source. The system 101 then allows the consumer to submit modified credit data to view how changing credit data affect credit-worthiness scores.

In one embodiment, the consumer provides no information to the system. In another embodiment, he provides either consumer identification data or some information (but not enough to identify himself). If the consumer provides any information, the client terminal 120 transmits the information to the simulator server 110, and the information is received 505. Initial credit data retriever 305 then uses this information (if any) to obtain 510 initial credit data from credit data server 130. Credit data retriever 305 then stores 525 the initial credit data in working data memory 370 as described in FIG. 4 b.

Next, the scorecard retriever 310 retrieves 530 the simulator scorecard as described in FIG. 4 c. The simulated score generator 315 then applies the scorecard coefficients stored in scorecard memory 355 to the credit data stored in working data memory 370 to generate 545 an initial simulated credit-worthiness score.

In a preferred embodiment, the set of elements chosen for inclusion in the score calculation is smaller than the total set of elements present in the credit data. By working with a smaller set of data elements, the simulator server 110 more quickly calculates the simulated score, providing a response almost instantly. However, the returned score may not be absolutely accurate since it is based on a smaller subset of credit data. The simulator scorecard approximates an industry-standard credit score based on the full set of credit data while using a smaller subset of the data.

In the preferred embodiment, the set of elements is chosen to reflect the data that most strongly influences the consumer's credit score, thus providing the consumer with the best idea of which aspects of his credit data he should try to improve first. In one embodiment, these elements are predetermined and the set is constant across all consumers. In another embodiment, the system determines which elements are most influential in a particular consumer's credit score and selects those elements. One method for making such a determination includes examining the weighted value of all the received data elements and choosing a set including the highest valued elements. The system 101 may select only the elements already existing in the received credit data or, alternatively, may look for possible large swings in the modified score by introducing a new type of data element. Examples of such a data element include salary level and ownership of major assets. For example, the modified data might include ownership of a home, while the initial data did not. One skilled in the art will recognize other methods for determining the set of data elements to be included in the scoring procedure.

Once the score is generated 545, the simulated score generator 315 stores the simulated score in both the initial score memory 360 and in the modified score memory 365. By storing the score in both memories 360 and 365, the static data formatter 320 is able to operate in the same manner regardless of whether the system is in the first pass or another pass for any given consumer. This is done in the preferred embodiment so that the user interface may display a modified value and an initial value that are the same when the interface is first presented. However, in an alternate embodiment, the simulated score generator 315 could store the simulated score just in the initial score memory 360. This would result in the user interface displaying only an initial value until the user has input modified data and the credit score was recalculated for the modified data at least one time.

In subsequent passes, the simulated score generator 315 will apply the scorecard coefficients to a set of modified credit data. As discussed above, this will be a direct result of the consumer's submission of modified data. As will be discussed in further detail below, the data in working data memory 370 will be overwritten with the modified credit data, and the simulated score generator 315 will recalculate the credit-worthiness score. However, unlike in the first pass, the recalculated score will be stored only in the modified score memory 365, not in the initial score memory 360. This will preserve the initial score in the initial score memory 360 for output to the client terminal 120.

Static formatter 320 retrieves the credit data from initial credit data memory 350 and both scores from initial score memory 360 and modified score memory 365 and formats 550 the information for output to the consumer via user interface server 330 and the client terminal 120. Interactive data formatter 325 selects and formats 555 various elements from the initial credit data memory 350 and the working data memory 370 for inclusion in the user interface presented to the consumer via user interface server 330 to client terminal 120.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, the simulator server 110 utilizes only a subset of the available credit data for a consumer when calculating the simulated score. As discussed above, this helps the score simulator more quickly calculate the updated scores due to fewer possible variables. In another embodiment, the interactive data formatter 325 presents only a subset of the data to the consumer for modification. In this way, the consumer is presented with the most common factors affecting credit-worthiness, while the simulator server 110 bases its calculations on additional credit data that is not made available to the consumer for modification.

Once the scores, data, and user interface have been formatted 550 and the interactive data has been selected and formatted 555, the user interface server 330 combines the information and outputs 560 the combined user interface to the client terminal 120 for viewing and interaction by the consumer. Once the information has been output 560, the system waits 565 for the consumer to submit modified credit data via the user interface.

Processing Modified Data

Once the consumer submits the modified credit data, it is received 570 by the modified credit data retriever 335 and passed to the modified credit data parser 340. The modified credit data parser 340 merges 573 the received (modified) credit data with the credit data stored in working data memory 370 and stores the resulting data into the working data memory 370. In this embodiment, the data in initial credit data memory 350 remains unchanged once it is stored during the first pass. This allows the consumer to compare the initial credit data with the newly input modified credit data and see the resulting change in the credit score.

In an alternate embodiment, after the consumer submits modified credit data, but before the modified data is merged with the data in working data memory 370, the data in working data memory 370 is stored in initial credit data memory 350. In addition, the data in modified score memory 365 is stored in initial score memory 360. In this embodiment, the data in initial credit data memory 350 and initial score memory 360 is the data used in and calculated by the previous pass of the system 101, respectively. In other words, this embodiment allows the consumer to compare the previous pass credit data with the newly input modified credit data and see the resulting change in the credit score.

The scorecard retriever 310 retrieves 530 the simulator scorecard as described in FIG. 4 c. The simulated score generator 315 then applies the scorecard coefficients stored in scorecard memory 355 to the credit data stored in working data memory 370 to generate 545 a recalculated simulated credit-worthiness score. The recalculated score is then stored in modified score memory 365 for use by the static data formatter 320.

Static data formatter 320 formats 550 the initial score stored in initial score memory 360, the newly recalculated score stored in modified score memory 365, and the credit data stored in the initial credit data memory 350 in a similar fashion as during the first pass of the system. The interactive data formatter 325 likewise receives the new working data and the credit data from their respective memories 370 and 350 and formats 555 the user interface to reflect the consumer's latest submission of modified credit data as stored in the working data memory 370.

Once the user interface server 330 outputs 560 the information to the client terminal 120, the system 101 again waits 565 to see whether the consumer submits additional modified data. If new modified data is submitted, the system 101 begins the process again with the modified data retriever 335 receiving 570 the modified credit data.

FIGS. 6 a-6 c illustrate a preferred embodiment of the user interface transmitted to the client terminal 120. FIG. 6 a illustrates a preferred embodiment of the user interface 601 outputted 560 during the first pass of the system 101, before modified data has been submitted. The first pass user interface 601 includes a score comparison section 605 a and an interactive section 610 a.

The score comparison section 605 a includes bar graph 615 representing the range of possible credit scores. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 6 a-6 c, the score is a simple numerical value, and a higher score reflects a higher degree of credit-worthiness. In another embodiment, the score is a value representing a characteristic of a financial transaction, such as a loan limit or a loan percentage rate. Many other forms of scores are also possible.

Score comparison section 605 a also includes an indicator 620 showing the consumer's initial credit-worthiness, and a second indicator 625 a, which shows the consumer's recalculated credit-worthiness score based on submitted modified data. Note that during the first pass, the two indicators 620, 625 a point to the same value. As will be discussed below, once modified credit data has been submitted by the consumer, the second indicator 625 a will move to a different value allowing the consumer to both numerically and visually compare the effects of changing the data.

While the score comparison section 605 a has been illustrated as including a bar-graph 615 and two indicators 620, 625 a showing the relative positions of the scores, one skilled in the art will recognize that other graphical or textual methods exist by which to enable the consumer to compare his initial score with a recalculated score.

The interactive section 610 a includes several elements relating to selected data elements in the received credit data. As illustrated, these include the total revolving credit card balance owed 630 a, the total revolving credit card limit, the number of inquires from credit applications, and the number of accounts the consumer is currently late in paying. This discussion will focus on the first element 630 a, the total revolving credit card balance owed, when describing the operation of the preferred embodiment of the first pass display 601. It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the remaining elements in the interactive section 610 a may operate in a similar manner. Likewise, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that additional or different data elements may be included in the interactive section 610 a.

Element 630 a includes a legend 632 identifying the nature of the data element displayed and providing a scale by which to interpret the remaining parts of first element 630 a. First element 630 a also includes an initial value indicator 635, which reflects the value of the corresponding data from the retrieved credit data, and a graphical slider 640 a whose value initially matches the initial value indicator 635, but may subsequently be manipulated by the consumer to submit the modified credit data. Finally, first element 630 a includes an information point 645 where the consumer may access information or help regarding the associated data element or regarding the operation of the client terminal 120. While the preferred embodiment utilizes a graphical slider element, one skilled in the art will recognize that various methods may exist by which the consumer may be informed of their initial data values and may adjust the modified values. One such alternative includes a text-based system wherein the consumer simply types in a new value in for the element in order to submit the modified credit data.

FIG. 6 b illustrates the user interface 602 while the consumer is submitting modified data through client terminal 120. While the user interface 602 includes the same elements as the first pass display 601, the second indicator 625 b and the data element 630 b have been modified to reflect the changes submitted by the consumer.

As illustrated, the consumer is in the process of adjusting the value for element 630 b. The adjustment is accomplished by clicking on the graphical slider 640 b and dragging it in a horizontal direction, as indicated by arrow 650. It should be understood that any one of the multiple elements (e.g., total revolving credit card balance, total revolving credit card limit, number of credit applications, and number of late accounts) affecting credit could be modified in a similar manner. Note that arrow 650 is not part of the user interface; it is included in FIG. 6 b in order to show the movement of graphical slider 640 b. In a preferred embodiment, the second indicator 625 b will move in a vertical direction as indicated by arrow 660 (also not part of the user interface) in response to the movement in the graphical slider 640 b.

In another preferred embodiment, the score generation is optimized to allow for automatic updating of the second indicator 625 b even before a final modified value for element 630 b is chosen. More specifically, as the user selects and drags the modified value bar, the other elements of the user interface 601 are modified, updated and displayed before the user releases the selection of the value bar. As illustrated, the lower the value chosen for the modified credit data in element 630 b, the higher the credit score as indicated by the second indicator 625 b. In another embodiment, the consumer may adjust the modified value and then “submit” the value, by clicking on a button, for example, before the second indicator 625 b will update. However, it is advantageous to provide the near-instant update for the second indicator 625 b as it allows the consumer to quickly understand how changing credit data affects one's credit-worthiness score.

FIG. 6 c illustrates the user interface 603 after the consumer has selected final values for his modified data. As noted above, in one embodiment, user interface 603 reflects the user interface after the consumer has “submitted” the modified value. While the user interface 603 includes the same elements as the first pass display 601, the second indicator 625 c and data element 630 c have been modified to reflect the changes submitted by the consumer.

As illustrated, the consumer has adjusted the value of first element 630 c to explore the ramifications of a lower revolving balance owed on his credit cards. To this effect, the graphical slider 640 c has been dragged to the left to select a value of approximately $1,000. Compare this with the graphical slider's original position of approximately $20,000, which is also the position of the initial value indicator 635. As discussed with respect to FIGS. 4 and 5, once the value for the total debt is submitted as modified credit data, the modified score generator 345 recalculates the score and the static data formatter 320 prepares the new position for the second indicator 625 c for display in the user interface 603. As discussed above, the recalculation and display of the new score may have occurred in near-real time, reflecting the changes as the consumer dragged the graphical slider, or the recalculation may have required the consumer to affirmatively submit the newly selected modified data. As illustrated, the modified reduction in debt to $1,000 has raised the recalculated score indicated by second indicator 625 c to a higher value than the initial score indicated by indicator 620. Thus by selecting a lower debt value via first element 630 c, the consumer may learn that a score improvement may be had by paying off debt and lowering his actual total revolving credit card balance owed.

Although the invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain embodiments thereof, other embodiments are possible as will be understood to those skilled in the art. For example, other embodiments may address financial risk scores other than credit-worthiness scores. These financial risk scores can predict future consumer financial behaviors such as delinquency, bankruptcy, and profitability.

Claims (10)

1. A method for generating simulated credit scores, the method comprising:
executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to retrieve credit data associated with a consumer and maintained by a credit bureau;
executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to generate a first credit score using the retrieved credit data;
executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to receive hypothetical credit data input by a user, wherein the hypothetical credit data represents at least one change from the credit data maintained by the credit bureau;
executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to generate a simulated credit score based at least in part on the received hypothetical credit data;
executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to output for display the first credit score and the simulated credit score; and
at the user's option, iteratively receiving hypothetical credit data input by the user and generating a different simulated credit score each time that the user inputs hypothetical credit data;
wherein the simulated credit scores are generated using a credit scoring model that simulates but is not a commercially-available credit scoring model.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising executing computer-executable instructions on at least one computer processor to cause a computer to perform operations comprising:
displaying a range of possible scores;
displaying a first indicator for the first credit score proximate the range of possible scores; and
displaying a second indicator for the simulated credit score proximate the range of possible scores.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the position of the first indicator relative to the range of possible scores corresponds to a value of the first credit score, and the position of the second indicator relative to the range of possible scores corresponds to a value of the simulated credit score.
4. The method of claim 2, wherein the range is represented using a bar graph and the first indicator is located on an opposite side of the bar graph from the second indicator.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the first credit score is a credit score generated using a commercially-available credit scoring model.
6. A simulated credit score generator comprising computer hardware comprising at least one computer processor configured to retrieve and execute computer-executable instructions stored in computer storage, wherein execution of the instructions causes the computer hardware to perform operations comprising:
retrieving credit data associated with a consumer and maintained by a credit bureau;
generating a first credit score using the retrieved credit data;
receiving hypothetical credit data input by a user, wherein the hypothetical credit data represents at least one change from the credit data maintained by the credit bureau;
generating a simulated credit score based at least in part on the received hypothetical credit data;
outputting for display the first credit score and the simulated credit score; and
at the user's option iteratively receiving hypothetical credit data input by the user and generating a different simulated credit score each time that the user inputs hypothetical credit data;
wherein the simulated credit scores are generated using a credit scoring model that simulates but is not a commercially-available credit scoring model.
7. The simulated credit score generator claim 6, wherein execution of the instructions further causes the computer hardware to output for display the first credit score and at least a plurality of simulated credit scores for comparison by the user.
8. The simulated credit score generator of claim 6, wherein the first credit score is generated using a commercially-available credit scoring model.
9. The simulated credit score generator of claim 8, wherein the first credit score is a FICO score.
10. The simulated credit score generator of claim 6, wherein the simulated credit score is a simulated but not an actual FICO score.
US10452155 2002-05-30 2003-05-30 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score Active 2027-11-06 US7610229B1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US38465002 true 2002-05-30 2002-05-30
US10452155 US7610229B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2003-05-30 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score

Applications Claiming Priority (14)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10452155 US7610229B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2003-05-30 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US11150480 US7593891B2 (en) 2003-05-30 2005-06-10 Credit score simulation
US12563779 US7925582B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2009-09-21 Credit score simulation
US12606060 US8015107B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2009-10-26 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13041274 US8321334B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2011-03-04 Credit score simulation
US13225225 US8335741B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2011-09-02 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13326803 US9569797B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2011-12-15 Systems and methods of presenting simulated credit score information
US13620527 US8589286B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2012-09-14 Credit score simulation
US13718362 US20130173451A1 (en) 2002-05-30 2012-12-18 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13797278 US9400589B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2013-03-12 Circular rotational interface for display of consumer credit information
US13826118 US8930263B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2013-03-14 Credit data analysis
US14226499 US9058627B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2014-03-26 Circular rotational interface for display of consumer credit information
US14258789 US9710852B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2014-04-22 Credit report timeline user interface
US15429592 US20170228820A1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-02-10 Systems and methods of presenting simulated credit score information

Related Child Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11150480 Continuation-In-Part US7593891B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2005-06-10 Credit score simulation
US12606060 Continuation US8015107B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2009-10-26 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US7610229B1 true US7610229B1 (en) 2009-10-27

Family

ID=41211155

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10452155 Active 2027-11-06 US7610229B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2003-05-30 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US12606060 Active 2023-09-09 US8015107B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2009-10-26 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13225225 Active US8335741B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2011-09-02 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13718362 Abandoned US20130173451A1 (en) 2002-05-30 2012-12-18 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score

Family Applications After (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12606060 Active 2023-09-09 US8015107B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2009-10-26 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13225225 Active US8335741B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2011-09-02 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US13718362 Abandoned US20130173451A1 (en) 2002-05-30 2012-12-18 System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (4) US7610229B1 (en)

Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040158521A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-08-12 First Data Corporation Credit enhancement systems and methods
US20060267999A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set ii
US20060293979A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set i
US20060293932A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set iii
US20100169209A1 (en) * 2002-05-30 2010-07-01 Experian Information Solutions,Inc. System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US7860782B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set IV
US7925582B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2011-04-12 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Credit score simulation
US20120066106A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Evolution Finance, Inc. Systems and Methods for Monitoring and Optimizing Credit Scores
US8359278B2 (en) 2006-10-25 2013-01-22 IndentityTruth, Inc. Identity protection
US20130332339A1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2013-12-12 CreditXpert Inc. System and method for credit forecasting
US20140074689A1 (en) * 2012-09-12 2014-03-13 Kristian Lund Systems and Methods for Modifying Consumer Credit Data
US8738516B1 (en) 2011-10-13 2014-05-27 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Debt services candidate locator
US8775291B1 (en) * 2008-03-31 2014-07-08 Trans Union Llc Systems and methods for enrichment of data relating to consumer credit collateralized debt and real property and utilization of same to maximize risk prediction
US8799148B2 (en) 2006-08-31 2014-08-05 Rohan K. K. Chandran Systems and methods of ranking a plurality of credit card offers
US8819793B2 (en) 2011-09-20 2014-08-26 Csidentity Corporation Systems and methods for secure and efficient enrollment into a federation which utilizes a biometric repository
US20140304146A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2014-10-09 Jpmorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Systems and Methods for Performing Scoring Optimization
US8930263B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2015-01-06 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit data analysis
US8930262B1 (en) * 2010-11-02 2015-01-06 Experian Technology Ltd. Systems and methods of assisted strategy design
US9058627B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2015-06-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Circular rotational interface for display of consumer credit information
US9147042B1 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-09-29 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for data verification
US9235728B2 (en) 2011-02-18 2016-01-12 Csidentity Corporation System and methods for identifying compromised personally identifiable information on the internet
US9251541B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2016-02-02 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for automated detection of never-pay data sets
US9256904B1 (en) 2008-08-14 2016-02-09 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Multi-bureau credit file freeze and unfreeze
USD759689S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-21 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD759690S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-21 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD760256S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-28 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
US9406085B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-08-02 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. System and methods for credit dispute processing, resolution, and reporting
US9443268B1 (en) 2013-08-16 2016-09-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Bill payment and reporting
US9477737B1 (en) 2013-11-20 2016-10-25 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and user interfaces for dynamic access of multiple remote databases and synchronization of data based on user rules
US9542553B1 (en) 2011-09-16 2017-01-10 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and methods of identity protection and management
US9542682B1 (en) 2007-12-14 2017-01-10 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Card registry systems and methods
US9558519B1 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-01-31 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Exposing reporting cycle information
US9563916B1 (en) 2006-10-05 2017-02-07 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for generating a finance attribute from tradeline data
US9569797B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-02-14 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and methods of presenting simulated credit score information
US9654541B1 (en) 2012-11-12 2017-05-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Aggregating user web browsing data
US9665854B1 (en) 2011-06-16 2017-05-30 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Authentication alerts
US9690820B1 (en) 2007-09-27 2017-06-27 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Database system for triggering event notifications based on updates to database records
US9697263B1 (en) 2013-03-04 2017-07-04 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Consumer data request fulfillment system
US9710852B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-07-18 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit report timeline user interface
US9786132B2 (en) * 2015-08-05 2017-10-10 Nautilus Hyosung Inc. Display for automated teller machine and method for depositing money in a plurality of accounts by using same
US9830646B1 (en) * 2012-11-30 2017-11-28 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit score goals and alerts systems and methods
US9853959B1 (en) 2012-05-07 2017-12-26 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Storage and maintenance of personal data
US9870589B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-01-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit utilization tracking and reporting
US9892457B1 (en) 2014-04-16 2018-02-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Providing credit data in search results

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8433588B2 (en) * 2008-06-10 2013-04-30 Progressive Casualty Insurance Company Customizable insurance system
US8600894B2 (en) * 2011-03-04 2013-12-03 Mark S. Fawer Three-stage, double blind credit rating of securities
US20130138555A1 (en) * 2011-11-30 2013-05-30 Rawllin International Inc. System and method of interpreting results based on publicly available data
US8930217B2 (en) 2012-04-24 2015-01-06 Fmr Llc Method and system for optimizing savings benefits
US20140074688A1 (en) * 2012-09-13 2014-03-13 Rawllin International Inc. Behavioral based score
US20140156500A1 (en) * 2012-12-03 2014-06-05 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for providing a customizable credit report
US20140214648A1 (en) * 2013-01-31 2014-07-31 Zestfinance, Inc. Methods and systems for automatically generating high quality adverse action notifications
US20150350749A1 (en) * 2014-05-30 2015-12-03 David Andrew PYBUS Acute Care Display System
US9720953B2 (en) 2015-07-01 2017-08-01 Zestfinance, Inc. Systems and methods for type coercion

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6119103A (en) * 1997-05-27 2000-09-12 Visa International Service Association Financial risk prediction systems and methods therefor
US6311169B2 (en) 1998-06-11 2001-10-30 Consumer Credit Associates, Inc. On-line consumer credit data reporting system
US20010049672A1 (en) 1998-03-31 2001-12-06 Victor S. Moore Web commerce tool kit for distributed payment processing
US20020035511A1 (en) 2000-02-02 2002-03-21 Hisao Haji Management method for receiving orders and management system for receiving orders
US6405181B2 (en) 1998-11-03 2002-06-11 Nextcard, Inc. Method and apparatus for real time on line credit approval
US6405173B1 (en) 1998-03-05 2002-06-11 American Management Systems, Inc. Decision management system providing qualitative account/customer assessment via point in time simulation
US20020077964A1 (en) * 1999-12-15 2002-06-20 Brody Robert M. Systems and methods for providing consumers anonymous pre-approved offers from a consumer-selected group of merchants
US20030046223A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2003-03-06 Stuart Crawford Method and apparatus for explaining credit scores
US6567791B2 (en) 1998-11-03 2003-05-20 Nextcard, Inc. Method and apparatus for a verifiable on line rejection of an application for credit
US20040199456A1 (en) * 2000-08-01 2004-10-07 Andrew Flint Method and apparatus for explaining credit scores
US7076462B1 (en) 2000-03-02 2006-07-11 Nelson Joseph E System and method for electronic loan application and for correcting credit report errors
US7337133B1 (en) 1997-06-27 2008-02-26 Amazon.Com, Inc. Internet-based customer referral system

Family Cites Families (181)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3316395A (en) 1963-05-23 1967-04-25 Credit Corp Comp Credit risk computer
US3316396A (en) 1965-11-15 1967-04-25 E W Gilson Attachable signal light for drinking glass
US4305059A (en) 1980-01-03 1981-12-08 Benton William M Modular funds transfer system
US4578530A (en) 1981-06-26 1986-03-25 Visa U.S.A., Inc. End-to-end encryption system and method of operation
US4736294A (en) 1985-01-11 1988-04-05 The Royal Bank Of Canada Data processing methods and apparatus for managing vehicle financing
US4774664A (en) 1985-07-01 1988-09-27 Chrysler First Information Technologies Inc. Financial data processing system and method
US4926255A (en) 1986-03-10 1990-05-15 Kohorn H Von System for evaluation of response to broadcast transmissions
US4876592A (en) 1986-03-10 1989-10-24 Henry Von Kohorn System for merchandising and the evaluation of responses to broadcast transmissions
US4895518A (en) 1987-11-02 1990-01-23 The University Of Michigan Computerized diagnostic reasoning evaluation system
JPH01255993A (en) 1988-04-05 1989-10-12 Sharp Corp Cash register
US5025373A (en) 1988-06-30 1991-06-18 Jml Communications, Inc. Portable personal-banking system
US4947028B1 (en) 1988-07-19 1993-06-08 U S Order Inc
US5148365A (en) 1989-08-15 1992-09-15 Dembo Ron S Scenario optimization
US5220501A (en) 1989-12-08 1993-06-15 Online Resources, Ltd. Method and system for remote delivery of retail banking services
US5297031A (en) * 1990-03-06 1994-03-22 Chicago Board Of Trade Method and apparatus for order management by market brokers
US5262941A (en) 1990-03-30 1993-11-16 Itt Corporation Expert credit recommendation method and system
US5274547A (en) 1991-01-03 1993-12-28 Credco Of Washington, Inc. System for generating and transmitting credit reports
US5259766A (en) 1991-12-13 1993-11-09 Educational Testing Service Method and system for interactive computer science testing, anaylsis and feedback
US5640577A (en) 1991-12-30 1997-06-17 Davox Corporation Data processing system with automated at least partial forms completion
US5446885A (en) 1992-05-15 1995-08-29 International Business Machines Corporation Event driven management information system with rule-based applications structure stored in a relational database
US5336870A (en) 1992-05-26 1994-08-09 Hughes Thomas S System for remote purchase payment transactions and remote bill payments
US5345595A (en) 1992-11-12 1994-09-06 Coral Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for detecting fraudulent telecommunication activity
US5940811A (en) 1993-08-27 1999-08-17 Affinity Technology Group, Inc. Closed loop financial transaction method and apparatus
US5930776A (en) 1993-11-01 1999-07-27 The Golden 1 Credit Union Lender direct credit evaluation and loan processing system
US5611052A (en) 1993-11-01 1997-03-11 The Golden 1 Credit Union Lender direct credit evaluation and loan processing system
US5704029A (en) 1994-05-23 1997-12-30 Wright Strategies, Inc. System and method for completing an electronic form
US5590038A (en) 1994-06-20 1996-12-31 Pitroda; Satyan G. Universal electronic transaction card including receipt storage and system and methods of conducting electronic transactions
GB9416673D0 (en) 1994-08-17 1994-10-12 Reuters Ltd Data exchange filtering system
US5689651A (en) * 1994-10-13 1997-11-18 Lozman; Fane System for processing and displaying financial information
US5732400A (en) 1995-01-04 1998-03-24 Citibank N.A. System and method for a risk-based purchase of goods
US5696907A (en) 1995-02-27 1997-12-09 General Electric Company System and method for performing risk and credit analysis of financial service applications
US6070141A (en) 1995-05-08 2000-05-30 Image Data, Llc System and method of assessing the quality of an identification transaction using an identificaion quality score
US5774883A (en) 1995-05-25 1998-06-30 Andersen; Lloyd R. Method for selecting a seller's most profitable financing program
US6094643A (en) 1996-06-14 2000-07-25 Card Alert Services, Inc. System for detecting counterfeit financial card fraud
US5878403A (en) 1995-09-12 1999-03-02 Cmsi Computer implemented automated credit application analysis and decision routing system
US5966695A (en) 1995-10-17 1999-10-12 Citibank, N.A. Sales and marketing support system using a graphical query prospect database
US5875236A (en) 1995-11-21 1999-02-23 At&T Corp Call handling method for credit and fraud management
US6088686A (en) 1995-12-12 2000-07-11 Citibank, N.A. System and method to performing on-line credit reviews and approvals
US6038551A (en) 1996-03-11 2000-03-14 Microsoft Corporation System and method for configuring and managing resources on a multi-purpose integrated circuit card using a personal computer
US5793972A (en) 1996-05-03 1998-08-11 Westminster International Computers Inc. System and method providing an interactive response to direct mail by creating personalized web page based on URL provided on mail piece
US5950172A (en) 1996-06-07 1999-09-07 Klingman; Edwin E. Secured electronic rating system
US5844218A (en) 1996-07-16 1998-12-01 Transaction Technology, Inc. Method and system for using an application programmable smart card for financial transactions in multiple countries
US5956693A (en) 1996-07-19 1999-09-21 Geerlings; Huib Computer system for merchant communication to customers
JPH1131127A (en) * 1997-04-01 1999-02-02 Tumbleweed Software Corp Document delivery system
JP4092441B2 (en) 1997-02-24 2008-05-28 日産自動車株式会社 An exhaust gas purifying catalyst
US6064987A (en) 1997-03-21 2000-05-16 Walker Digital, Llc Method and apparatus for providing and processing installment plans at a terminal
US5940812A (en) 1997-08-19 1999-08-17 Loanmarket Resources, L.L.C. Apparatus and method for automatically matching a best available loan to a potential borrower via global telecommunications network
US6128603A (en) 1997-09-09 2000-10-03 Dent; Warren T. Consumer-based system and method for managing and paying electronic billing statements
US5995947A (en) 1997-09-12 1999-11-30 Imx Mortgage Exchange Interactive mortgage and loan information and real-time trading system
US6128599A (en) 1997-10-09 2000-10-03 Walker Asset Management Limited Partnership Method and apparatus for processing customized group reward offers
US6421653B1 (en) 1997-10-14 2002-07-16 Blackbird Holdings, Inc. Systems, methods and computer program products for electronic trading of financial instruments
DE69820391D1 (en) * 1997-10-31 2004-01-22 Sun Microsystems Inc Prepaid links to Netwerk server
US7016870B1 (en) 1997-12-02 2006-03-21 Financial Engines Identifying a recommended portfolio of financial products for an investor based upon financial products that are available to the investor
US6021397A (en) 1997-12-02 2000-02-01 Financial Engines, Inc. Financial advisory system
US5918217A (en) 1997-12-10 1999-06-29 Financial Engines, Inc. User interface for a financial advisory system
US6115690A (en) 1997-12-22 2000-09-05 Wong; Charles Integrated business-to-business Web commerce and business automation system
US6202053B1 (en) 1998-01-23 2001-03-13 First Usa Bank, Na Method and apparatus for generating segmentation scorecards for evaluating credit risk of bank card applicants
US6249770B1 (en) 1998-01-30 2001-06-19 Citibank, N.A. Method and system of financial spreading and forecasting
US6385594B1 (en) 1998-05-08 2002-05-07 Lendingtree, Inc. Method and computer network for co-ordinating a loan over the internet
WO2000011574A3 (en) 1998-08-20 2000-06-29 Equifax Inc System and method for updating a credit information database
US6324524B1 (en) 1998-11-03 2001-11-27 Nextcard, Inc. Method and apparatus for an account level offer of credit and real time balance transfer
EP1028401A3 (en) 1999-02-12 2003-06-25 Citibank, N.A. Method and system for performing a bankcard transaction
US6408282B1 (en) * 1999-03-01 2002-06-18 Wit Capital Corp. System and method for conducting securities transactions over a computer network
US6985887B1 (en) 1999-03-19 2006-01-10 Suncrest Llc Apparatus and method for authenticated multi-user personal information database
US6993504B1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2006-01-31 Trading Technologies International, Inc. User interface for semi-fungible trading
US7212999B2 (en) * 1999-04-09 2007-05-01 Trading Technologies International, Inc. User interface for an electronic trading system
US6748369B2 (en) 1999-06-21 2004-06-08 General Electric Company Method and system for automated property valuation
US6804346B1 (en) 1999-07-13 2004-10-12 Interactive Intelligence, Inc. Staged predictive dialing system
US20060155639A1 (en) 2000-06-03 2006-07-13 Joan Lynch System and method for automated process of deal structuring
US7742972B2 (en) 1999-07-21 2010-06-22 Longitude Llc Enhanced parimutuel wagering
US8126794B2 (en) 1999-07-21 2012-02-28 Longitude Llc Replicated derivatives having demand-based, adjustable returns, and trading exchange therefor
US6988085B2 (en) * 1999-10-19 2006-01-17 Shad Hedy System and method for real-time electronic inquiry, delivery, and reporting of credit information
US7085739B1 (en) 1999-10-20 2006-08-01 Accenture Llp Method and system for facilitating, coordinating and managing a competitive marketplace
US7401040B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2008-07-15 Accenture Llp Financial modeling and counseling system
US20030065563A1 (en) 1999-12-01 2003-04-03 Efunds Corporation Method and apparatus for atm-based cross-selling of products and services
CA2356371C (en) 1999-12-10 2007-09-25 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Mobile communication terminal and card information reading device
US6622131B1 (en) * 1999-12-23 2003-09-16 Rategenius, Inc. Method and system for auctioning loans through a computing system
US8078527B2 (en) * 1999-12-29 2011-12-13 The Western Union Company Methods and systems for actively optimizing a credit score and managing/reducing debt
US6901406B2 (en) 1999-12-29 2005-05-31 General Electric Capital Corporation Methods and systems for accessing multi-dimensional customer data
WO2001057720A3 (en) 2000-02-04 2002-02-14 America Online Inc Automated client-server data validation
US7418417B2 (en) 2000-02-11 2008-08-26 Goldman Sachs & Co. Credit index, a system and method for structuring a credit index, and a system and method for operating a credit index
US20020069122A1 (en) 2000-02-22 2002-06-06 Insun Yun Method and system for maximizing credit card purchasing power and minimizing interest costs over the internet
US6772132B1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2004-08-03 Trading Technologies International, Inc. Click based trading with intuitive grid display of market depth
US7389268B1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2008-06-17 Trading Technologies International, Inc. Trading tools for electronic trading
US6938011B1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2005-08-30 Trading Technologies International, Inc. Click based trading with market depth display
US7127424B2 (en) * 2000-03-02 2006-10-24 Trading Technologies International, Inc. Click based trading with intuitive grid display of market depth and price consolidation
US7228289B2 (en) * 2000-03-02 2007-06-05 Trading Technologies International, Inc. System and method for trading and displaying market information in an electronic trading environment
JP2001312586A (en) 2000-04-28 2001-11-09 Tokio Marine & Fire Insurance Co Ltd Support system for providing of ranking-related service and support method therefor
WO2001084281A3 (en) 2000-05-04 2008-03-27 Mighty Net Inc Card management system and method therefore
US7024386B1 (en) 2000-06-23 2006-04-04 Ebs Group Limited Credit handling in an anonymous trading system
US7711635B2 (en) * 2001-02-22 2010-05-04 Fair Isaac Corporation System and method for helping consumers understand and interpret credit scores
US7280980B1 (en) * 2000-08-01 2007-10-09 Fair Isaac Corporation Algorithm for explaining credit scores
US20050154664A1 (en) * 2000-08-22 2005-07-14 Guy Keith A. Credit and financial information and management system
US7395232B1 (en) 2000-08-30 2008-07-01 Traderisks, Inc. Method and system for providing financial functions
CA2356577A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-03-05 John Robertson Method and system of presenting data and analysis for use in stock market trading
JP2002092305A (en) * 2000-09-13 2002-03-29 Hitachi Ltd Score calculating method, and score providing method
US8209257B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2012-06-26 Peter K. Trzyna System for transfering an inbound communication to one of a plurality of credit-counseling agencies
US7827097B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2010-11-02 Peter K. Trzyna System for transferring an inbond communication to one of a plurality of credit-counseling agencies
US20100299251A1 (en) * 2000-11-06 2010-11-25 Consumer And Merchant Awareness Foundation Pay yourself first with revenue generation
US20030009418A1 (en) 2000-12-08 2003-01-09 Green Gerald M. Systems and methods for electronically verifying and processing information
US7529698B2 (en) 2001-01-16 2009-05-05 Raymond Anthony Joao Apparatus and method for providing transaction history information, account history information, and/or charge-back information
US20060014129A1 (en) 2001-02-09 2006-01-19 Grow.Net, Inc. System and method for processing test reports
US7356503B1 (en) 2001-02-21 2008-04-08 Fair Isaac And Company, Inc. ASP business decision engine
US7542993B2 (en) * 2001-05-10 2009-06-02 Equifax, Inc. Systems and methods for notifying a consumer of changes made to a credit report
US7028052B2 (en) 2001-05-10 2006-04-11 Equifax, Inc. Systems and methods for notifying a consumer of changes made to a credit report
US7249076B1 (en) * 2001-05-14 2007-07-24 Compucredit Intellectual Property Holdings Corp. Iii Method for providing credit offering and credit management information services
WO2002099589A3 (en) 2001-06-05 2003-09-04 Goldman Sachs & Co A system and method for determining the liquidity of a credit
US7403919B2 (en) 2001-06-05 2008-07-22 Goldman Sachs & Co., System and method for determining the liquidity of a credit
WO2002099598A3 (en) 2001-06-07 2004-03-25 First Usa Bank Na System and method for rapid updating of credit information
WO2002101617A1 (en) 2001-06-11 2002-12-19 Sony Corporation Electronic money system
US7580884B2 (en) * 2001-06-25 2009-08-25 Intuit Inc. Collecting and aggregating creditworthiness data
US20030004853A1 (en) * 2001-06-28 2003-01-02 Pranil Ram Graphical front end system for real time security trading
US20030009411A1 (en) * 2001-07-03 2003-01-09 Pranil Ram Interactive grid-based graphical trading system for real time security trading
JP2003016261A (en) * 2001-07-05 2003-01-17 Asahi Bank Ltd Total financing managing system, credit scoring deciding system and credit guarantee managing system
WO2003012594A3 (en) 2001-07-31 2003-07-24 American Express Travel Relate System and method for providing financial planning and advice
US20030028477A1 (en) * 2001-07-31 2003-02-06 Accredited Bankruptcy Services, Inc. Automated method and system for consumer financial counseling
US7366694B2 (en) 2001-08-16 2008-04-29 Mortgage Grader, Inc. Credit/financing process
US7783562B1 (en) 2001-11-21 2010-08-24 Clayton Fixed Income Services Inc. Credit risk managing loan pools
US7552086B1 (en) * 2001-12-03 2009-06-23 Oracle International Corp. Methods and systems for managing credit
US6950807B2 (en) * 2001-12-31 2005-09-27 Credit Acceptance Corporation System and method for providing financing
US7630932B2 (en) 2002-01-31 2009-12-08 Transunion Interactive, Inc. Loan rate and lending information analysis system
US20030154162A1 (en) * 2002-02-11 2003-08-14 Danaher John Thomas Credit report retrieval system including voice-based interface
US20030163435A1 (en) * 2002-02-22 2003-08-28 Payone Bernadino J. Credit repair services system
US7593891B2 (en) * 2003-05-30 2009-09-22 Experian Scorex Llc Credit score simulation
US7610229B1 (en) * 2002-05-30 2009-10-27 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US20040111359A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2004-06-10 Hudock John J. Business method for credit verification and correction
US20040030629A1 (en) * 2002-06-17 2004-02-12 Charles Freeman System and method for portfolio valuation using an age adjusted delinquency rate
US20040010458A1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-15 First Data Corporation Methods and systems for organizing information from multiple sources
US7945510B1 (en) 2002-07-31 2011-05-17 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (Freddie Mac) Systems and methods for providing a mortgage with a sliding credit line
US20040030621A1 (en) * 2002-08-07 2004-02-12 Cobb Keith B. Method of reconciling credit union corporate accounts
US7409369B1 (en) * 2002-09-05 2008-08-05 Capital One Financial Corporation Providing a customer one or more options for increasing a line of credit
US7792715B1 (en) 2002-09-21 2010-09-07 Mighty Net, Incorporated Method of on-line credit information monitoring and control
US20040138995A1 (en) * 2002-10-16 2004-07-15 Fidelity National Financial, Inc. Preparation of an advanced report for use in assessing credit worthiness of borrower
US20040111292A1 (en) * 2002-12-06 2004-06-10 Hutchins Patton A. Healthcare credit evaluation method
US20040158521A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-08-12 First Data Corporation Credit enhancement systems and methods
US7337468B2 (en) * 2003-02-13 2008-02-26 Truelink, Inc. Methods, apparatuses and systems facilitating seamless, virtual integration of online membership models and services
US6962336B2 (en) * 2003-02-25 2005-11-08 Mechel Glass Credit card debt management board game
US20040186807A1 (en) * 2003-03-21 2004-09-23 Nathans Michael G. Credit data collection method and apparatus
US7451113B1 (en) 2003-03-21 2008-11-11 Mighty Net, Inc. Card management system and method
WO2004114160A3 (en) 2003-06-13 2005-09-01 Equifax Inc Systems and processes for automated criteria and attribute generation, searching, auditing and reporting of data
WO2005022348A3 (en) 2003-08-27 2007-05-24 Thresa Dixon Application processing and decision systems and processes
US20050283415A1 (en) * 2004-06-22 2005-12-22 Chicago Mercantile Exchange System and method for displaying market data including last trade data
EP1626369A1 (en) 2004-08-13 2006-02-15 EBS Group limited Automated trading system
US7987124B1 (en) 2004-08-20 2011-07-26 Fannie Mae Method of and system for evaluating an appraisal value associated with a loan
US7904306B2 (en) 2004-09-01 2011-03-08 Search America, Inc. Method and apparatus for assessing credit for healthcare patients
WO2006036814A3 (en) * 2004-09-22 2007-05-18 Citibank Na Systems and methods for offering credit line products
US7814005B2 (en) 2004-10-19 2010-10-12 Apollo Enterprise Solutions, Inc. Dynamic credit score alteration
US20070016501A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2007-01-18 American Express Travel Related Services Co., Inc., A New York Corporation Using commercial share of wallet to rate business prospects
US7840484B2 (en) 2004-10-29 2010-11-23 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Credit score and scorecard development
US7792732B2 (en) 2004-10-29 2010-09-07 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Using commercial share of wallet to rate investments
US7814004B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2010-10-12 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Method and apparatus for development and use of a credit score based on spend capacity
US7788147B2 (en) 2004-10-29 2010-08-31 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Method and apparatus for estimating the spend capacity of consumers
US20070244732A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2007-10-18 American Express Travel Related Services Co., Inc., A New York Corporation Using commercial share of wallet to manage vendors
US7912770B2 (en) 2004-10-29 2011-03-22 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Method and apparatus for consumer interaction based on spend capacity
US8131614B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2012-03-06 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Using commercial share of wallet to compile marketing company lists
US20070016500A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2007-01-18 American Express Travel Related Services Co., Inc. A New York Corporation Using commercial share of wallet to determine insurance risk
US8204774B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2012-06-19 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Estimating the spend capacity of consumer households
US7822665B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2010-10-26 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Using commercial share of wallet in private equity investments
US8285613B1 (en) 2004-12-16 2012-10-09 Coulter David B System and method for managing consumer information
WO2006069199A3 (en) 2004-12-20 2007-03-15 Armorpoint Inc Personal credit management and monitoring system and method
US20060173772A1 (en) 2005-02-02 2006-08-03 Hayes John B Systems and methods for automated processing, handling, and facilitating a trade credit transaction
US20060178983A1 (en) 2005-02-07 2006-08-10 Robert Nice Mortgage broker system allowing broker to match mortgagor with multiple lenders and method therefor
WO2006099492A3 (en) 2005-03-15 2007-11-15 Bridgeforce Inc Credit scoring method and system
US20060233332A1 (en) * 2005-03-24 2006-10-19 Toms Alvin D Credit worthiness rating method
US7860782B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set IV
US20080222015A1 (en) 2005-10-24 2008-09-11 Megdal Myles G Method and apparatus for development and use of a credit score based on spend capacity
US20080222027A1 (en) 2005-10-24 2008-09-11 Megdal Myles G Credit score and scorecard development
US7801812B2 (en) 2006-03-10 2010-09-21 Vantagescore Solutions, Llc Methods and systems for characteristic leveling
US7711636B2 (en) 2006-03-10 2010-05-04 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for analyzing data
US8086523B1 (en) 2006-08-07 2011-12-27 Allstate Insurance Company Credit risk evaluation with responsibility factors
US8239250B2 (en) * 2006-12-01 2012-08-07 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Industry size of wallet
US7953627B2 (en) * 2006-12-12 2011-05-31 American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc. Identifying industry segments with highest potential for new customers or new spending for current customers
US7970676B2 (en) 2007-08-01 2011-06-28 Fair Isaac Corporation Method and system for modeling future action impact in credit scoring
US7653593B2 (en) 2007-11-08 2010-01-26 Equifax, Inc. Macroeconomic-adjusted credit risk score systems and methods
US8165940B2 (en) 2008-01-31 2012-04-24 Visa U.S.A. Inc. Non-credit account credit rating
US8744946B2 (en) 2008-06-09 2014-06-03 Quest Growth Partners, Llc Systems and methods for credit worthiness scoring and loan facilitation
US20100009320A1 (en) 2008-07-11 2010-01-14 Christopher Allen Wilkelis Credit management course
US20100082476A1 (en) 2008-10-01 2010-04-01 Bowman Eric A Comprehensive method for increasing credit scores
US8060424B2 (en) 2008-11-05 2011-11-15 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. On-line method and system for monitoring and reporting unused available credit
US8515842B2 (en) 2010-09-14 2013-08-20 Evolution Finance, Inc. Systems and methods for monitoring and optimizing credit scores
US8498930B2 (en) 2010-11-09 2013-07-30 Creditxpert, Inc. System and method for credit forecasting

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6119103A (en) * 1997-05-27 2000-09-12 Visa International Service Association Financial risk prediction systems and methods therefor
US6658393B1 (en) 1997-05-27 2003-12-02 Visa Internation Service Association Financial risk prediction systems and methods therefor
US7337133B1 (en) 1997-06-27 2008-02-26 Amazon.Com, Inc. Internet-based customer referral system
US20040107132A1 (en) 1998-03-05 2004-06-03 American Management Systems, Inc. Decision management system providing qualitative account/customer assessment via point in time simulation
US6405173B1 (en) 1998-03-05 2002-06-11 American Management Systems, Inc. Decision management system providing qualitative account/customer assessment via point in time simulation
US20010049672A1 (en) 1998-03-31 2001-12-06 Victor S. Moore Web commerce tool kit for distributed payment processing
US6311169B2 (en) 1998-06-11 2001-10-30 Consumer Credit Associates, Inc. On-line consumer credit data reporting system
US6567791B2 (en) 1998-11-03 2003-05-20 Nextcard, Inc. Method and apparatus for a verifiable on line rejection of an application for credit
US6405181B2 (en) 1998-11-03 2002-06-11 Nextcard, Inc. Method and apparatus for real time on line credit approval
US20020077964A1 (en) * 1999-12-15 2002-06-20 Brody Robert M. Systems and methods for providing consumers anonymous pre-approved offers from a consumer-selected group of merchants
US20020035511A1 (en) 2000-02-02 2002-03-21 Hisao Haji Management method for receiving orders and management system for receiving orders
US7076462B1 (en) 2000-03-02 2006-07-11 Nelson Joseph E System and method for electronic loan application and for correcting credit report errors
US20040199456A1 (en) * 2000-08-01 2004-10-07 Andrew Flint Method and apparatus for explaining credit scores
US20030046223A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2003-03-06 Stuart Crawford Method and apparatus for explaining credit scores

Non-Patent Citations (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"Equifax and FICO Serve Consumers", Mar. 2001.
CreditXpert Inc., CreditExpert 3-Bureau Comparison(TM), [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2002.
CreditXpert Inc., CreditXpert Credit Score & Analysis, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet <URL: http://www.creditxpert.com/CreditXpert%20Score%20&%20Analysis20and%20Credit%20Wizard%20sample.pdf>, 2002.
CreditXpert Inc., CreditXpert Essentials(TM) Advisor View, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ess-adv.pdf>, 2004.
CreditXpert Inc., CreditXpert Essentials(TM) Applicant View, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ess-app.pdf>, 2004.
CreditXpert Inc., CreditXpert What-If Simulator(TM), [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2002.
Experian Announces PLUS Score; Experian Press Release dated Oct 16, 2003; Experian Global Press Office.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Calculators: Credit Assessment, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Help: FICO Score Simulator, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Products: Suit Orman's FICO(R) Kit Platinum: Look for Errors, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Products: Suze Orman's FICO Kit Platinum, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Products: Suze Orman's FICO(R) Kit Platinum: FICO Score Check, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet , 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Products: Suze Orman's FICO(R) Kit Platinum: Your FICO Score, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 7, 2005] Retrieved from the internet 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet - ScoreSimulator.asp>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: "Max Out" Your Credit Cards, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?Simulation=4 &ReportID=1&ProductID=&Execute.x=105&Execute.y=23>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Miss Payments, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?miss-payment=radiobutton&Simulation=2&ReportID=1 &ProductID=&Execute.x=81&Execute.y=28>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Pay Down Delinquent Balances First, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?textfieldCC=750&Simulation=7&ReportID=1&ProductID=&PayDelinquent.x=78&PayDelinquent.y=30>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Pay Down the Balances on All Your Credit Cards, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?textfieldCC1=750&SelectMonths=1&PayOption=radiobutton&textfieldCC=750&Simulation=3&ReportID=1 &ProductID=&Execute.x=57&Execute.y=22>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Pay Your Bills on Time, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?select1=1&Simulation=1&ReportID=1&ProductID=PayBillsOnTime.x=93&PayBillsOnTime.y=23>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Seek New Credit, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?new-credit=radiobutton&textfield5A=3000&textfield5B=&textfield5C=&Simulation=5&ReportID=1&ProductID=&NewCredit.x=62&NewCredit.y=20>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Suggested Best Action, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?Simulation=111&ReportID=1&ProductID=&TopAction.x=66&TopAction.y=16>, 2005.
Fair Isaac Corporation, myFICO: Sample: FICO Score Simulator: Transfer Credit Card Balances, [online] [retrieved on Jun. 8, 2005] Retrieved from the internet -ScoreSimulatorResults.asp?textfield222=5000&Simulation=6&ReportID=1&ProductID=&TransferBalance.x=86&TransferBalance.y=24>, 2005.
PCT Form IB/326 with International Preliminary Report and Written Opinion with International Search Report mailed Aug. 29, 2007 listing above references.
Watts, Craig, "Consumers Now Can Know What Loan Rate Offers to Expect Based on Their FICO Credit Score at MyFICO.com", Mar. 6, 2002, -03-06.aspx>.
Watts, Craig, "Fair, Isaac and Equifax Give Consumers New Score Power Tools Offering Greater Insights for Managing Their Credit Health", May 21, 2002, -05-21.aspx>.
Yücesan et al., "Distributed web-based simulation experiments for optimization", Simulation Practice and Theory 9 (2001), pp. 73-90.
Zimmerman et al., "A web-based platform for experimental investigation of electric power auctions", Decision Support Systems 24 (1999), pp. 193-205.

Cited By (65)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8015107B2 (en) * 2002-05-30 2011-09-06 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US9710852B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-07-18 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit report timeline user interface
US8335741B2 (en) 2002-05-30 2012-12-18 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US9400589B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2016-07-26 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Circular rotational interface for display of consumer credit information
US20100169209A1 (en) * 2002-05-30 2010-07-01 Experian Information Solutions,Inc. System and method for interactively simulating a credit-worthiness score
US9569797B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2017-02-14 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and methods of presenting simulated credit score information
US9058627B1 (en) 2002-05-30 2015-06-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Circular rotational interface for display of consumer credit information
US20040158521A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-08-12 First Data Corporation Credit enhancement systems and methods
US7925582B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2011-04-12 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Credit score simulation
US8589286B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2013-11-19 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Credit score simulation
US8321334B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2012-11-27 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Credit score simulation
US8930263B1 (en) 2003-05-30 2015-01-06 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit data analysis
US8024778B2 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-09-20 CRIF Corporation System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set I
US20060293932A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set iii
US20060293979A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set i
US7860782B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-12-28 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set IV
US8019828B2 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-09-13 CRIF Corporation System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set III
US20060267999A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Magnum Communications, Limited System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set ii
US8019843B2 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-09-13 CRIF Corporation System and method for defining attributes, decision rules, or both, for remote execution, claim set II
US20140304146A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2014-10-09 Jpmorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Systems and Methods for Performing Scoring Optimization
US8799148B2 (en) 2006-08-31 2014-08-05 Rohan K. K. Chandran Systems and methods of ranking a plurality of credit card offers
US9563916B1 (en) 2006-10-05 2017-02-07 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for generating a finance attribute from tradeline data
US8359278B2 (en) 2006-10-25 2013-01-22 IndentityTruth, Inc. Identity protection
US9251541B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2016-02-02 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. System and method for automated detection of never-pay data sets
US9690820B1 (en) 2007-09-27 2017-06-27 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Database system for triggering event notifications based on updates to database records
US9542682B1 (en) 2007-12-14 2017-01-10 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Card registry systems and methods
US9767513B1 (en) 2007-12-14 2017-09-19 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Card registry systems and methods
US8775291B1 (en) * 2008-03-31 2014-07-08 Trans Union Llc Systems and methods for enrichment of data relating to consumer credit collateralized debt and real property and utilization of same to maximize risk prediction
US9489694B2 (en) 2008-08-14 2016-11-08 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Multi-bureau credit file freeze and unfreeze
US9792648B1 (en) 2008-08-14 2017-10-17 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Multi-bureau credit file freeze and unfreeze
US9256904B1 (en) 2008-08-14 2016-02-09 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Multi-bureau credit file freeze and unfreeze
US20130332340A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2013-12-12 Evolution Finance, Inc. Systems and Methods for Monitoring and Optimizing Credit Scores
US20120066106A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Evolution Finance, Inc. Systems and Methods for Monitoring and Optimizing Credit Scores
US8515842B2 (en) * 2010-09-14 2013-08-20 Evolution Finance, Inc. Systems and methods for monitoring and optimizing credit scores
US8930262B1 (en) * 2010-11-02 2015-01-06 Experian Technology Ltd. Systems and methods of assisted strategy design
US20130332339A1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2013-12-12 CreditXpert Inc. System and method for credit forecasting
US9147042B1 (en) 2010-11-22 2015-09-29 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for data verification
US9684905B1 (en) 2010-11-22 2017-06-20 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Systems and methods for data verification
US9710868B2 (en) 2011-02-18 2017-07-18 Csidentity Corporation System and methods for identifying compromised personally identifiable information on the internet
US9558368B2 (en) 2011-02-18 2017-01-31 Csidentity Corporation System and methods for identifying compromised personally identifiable information on the internet
US9235728B2 (en) 2011-02-18 2016-01-12 Csidentity Corporation System and methods for identifying compromised personally identifiable information on the internet
US9558519B1 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-01-31 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Exposing reporting cycle information
US9665854B1 (en) 2011-06-16 2017-05-30 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Authentication alerts
US9542553B1 (en) 2011-09-16 2017-01-10 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and methods of identity protection and management
US8819793B2 (en) 2011-09-20 2014-08-26 Csidentity Corporation Systems and methods for secure and efficient enrollment into a federation which utilizes a biometric repository
US9237152B2 (en) 2011-09-20 2016-01-12 Csidentity Corporation Systems and methods for secure and efficient enrollment into a federation which utilizes a biometric repository
US8738516B1 (en) 2011-10-13 2014-05-27 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Debt services candidate locator
US9536263B1 (en) 2011-10-13 2017-01-03 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Debt services candidate locator
US9972048B1 (en) 2011-10-13 2018-05-15 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Debt services candidate locator
US9853959B1 (en) 2012-05-07 2017-12-26 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Storage and maintenance of personal data
US20140074689A1 (en) * 2012-09-12 2014-03-13 Kristian Lund Systems and Methods for Modifying Consumer Credit Data
US9654541B1 (en) 2012-11-12 2017-05-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Aggregating user web browsing data
US9830646B1 (en) * 2012-11-30 2017-11-28 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit score goals and alerts systems and methods
US9916621B1 (en) 2012-11-30 2018-03-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Presentation of credit score factors
US9697263B1 (en) 2013-03-04 2017-07-04 Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Consumer data request fulfillment system
US9406085B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-08-02 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. System and methods for credit dispute processing, resolution, and reporting
US9870589B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-01-16 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Credit utilization tracking and reporting
US9697568B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-07-04 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. System and methods for credit dispute processing, resolution, and reporting
US9443268B1 (en) 2013-08-16 2016-09-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Bill payment and reporting
US9477737B1 (en) 2013-11-20 2016-10-25 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Systems and user interfaces for dynamic access of multiple remote databases and synchronization of data based on user rules
USD759689S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-21 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD759690S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-21 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD760256S1 (en) 2014-03-25 2016-06-28 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
US9892457B1 (en) 2014-04-16 2018-02-13 Consumerinfo.Com, Inc. Providing credit data in search results
US9786132B2 (en) * 2015-08-05 2017-10-10 Nautilus Hyosung Inc. Display for automated teller machine and method for depositing money in a plurality of accounts by using same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20120066116A1 (en) 2012-03-15 application
US8335741B2 (en) 2012-12-18 grant
US20130173451A1 (en) 2013-07-04 application
US20100169209A1 (en) 2010-07-01 application
US8015107B2 (en) 2011-09-06 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Duarte et al. Trust and credit: The role of appearance in peer-to-peer lending
US5991745A (en) Reverse mortgage loan calculation system and process
US7512561B2 (en) Method, apparatus and interface for trading multiple tradeable objects
US6064984A (en) Graphical user interface for a computer-implemented financial planning tool
US5727161A (en) Method and apparatus for graphic analysis of variation of economic plans
US20100241559A1 (en) Financial social networking
US20050010510A1 (en) Portfolio reconciler module for providing financial planning and advice
US20060089892A1 (en) Methods and apparatus for investment portfolio selection, allocation, and management to generate sustainable withdrawals
US20070055602A1 (en) Methods and systems for financial account management
US20020174056A1 (en) System and method for providing user-specific options trading data
US7165044B1 (en) Investment portfolio tracking system and method
US7676387B2 (en) Graphical display of business rules
US7076462B1 (en) System and method for electronic loan application and for correcting credit report errors
US20080154764A1 (en) Method and system for providing a simplified graphical user interface and integrated trading system for electronic trading
US20060031159A1 (en) Methods, apparatus and articles-of-manufacture for marketing mortgage and/or credit services over the web
US20090327120A1 (en) Tagged Credit Profile System for Credit Applicants
US20100023434A1 (en) Automated Credit/Debt Management Counsel By Isaiah Bond
US20020046145A1 (en) Method and system for analyzing performance of an investment portfolio together with associated risk
US20060080214A1 (en) Computer trading of interests
US20080059352A1 (en) Systems and methods of ranking a plurality of credit card offers
US5956691A (en) Dynamic policy illustration system
US20060248003A1 (en) Method of online pricing for mortgage loans from multiple lenders
US20020147618A1 (en) Online insurance sales platform
US20070027791A1 (en) Method of and apparatus for matching lenders of money with borrowers of money
US20020161630A1 (en) Loyalty reward program for reducing the balance of a loan obligation

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: EXPERIAN INFORMATION SOLUTIONS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:EXPERIAN-SCOREX, LLC;REEL/FRAME:023250/0574

Effective date: 20071231

CC Certificate of correction
AS Assignment

Owner name: CONSUMERINFO.COM, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:EXPERIAN INFORMATION SOLUTIONS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029747/0936

Effective date: 20130201

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: EXPERIAN-SCOREX, LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KORNEGAY, ADAM T.;SCHWAB, MATTHEW R.;DE ALMEIDA, MARCOS C.;REEL/FRAME:041363/0100

Effective date: 20050912

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8