US749958A - Steam-engine - Google Patents

Steam-engine Download PDF

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US749958A
US749958A US749958DA US749958A US 749958 A US749958 A US 749958A US 749958D A US749958D A US 749958DA US 749958 A US749958 A US 749958A
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steam
valve
cylinders
ports
engine
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01BMACHINES OR ENGINES, IN GENERAL OR OF POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT TYPE, e.g. STEAM ENGINES
    • F01B9/00Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by connections between pistons and main shafts and not specific to preceding groups
    • F01B9/02Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by connections between pistons and main shafts and not specific to preceding groups with crankshaft
    • F01B9/026Rigid connections between piston and rod; Oscillating pistons
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L7/00Rotary or oscillatory slide valve-gear or valve arrangements
    • F01L7/02Rotary or oscillatory slide valve-gear or valve arrangements with cylindrical, sleeve, or part-annularly shaped valves

Description

H0. 749,958 PATENTED JAN. 19, 1904;
G. GRO'MPTON.
STEAM ENGINE.
APPLIOA'I'IUI FILED HA3. 3. 1900.
3 SHEETS-8HEET 1'.
10 MODEL.
Ho. 749,958. PATENTED JAN. 19,1904 0. GROMPTON. STEAM ENGINE.
LPPLIUA'IIOH FILED MAB. 3. 1900.
1010mm. 3 sums-sum 2 PATENTED JAN. 19 1904.
G. CROMPTON. STEAM ENGINE.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII All. a. 1900.
10 IODELL view.
UNITED STATES Patented January 19, 1904.
CHARLES CROMPTON, OF WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.
STEAM-ENGINE.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters.Patent No. 749,958, dated January 19, 1904.
Application filed March 8, 1900: Serial No. 7,171. (No nodel.)
To (1Z5 whom it may concern:
Be it l :.nown that I, CHARLES CROMPTON, a citizen of the United States, residing at V\ orcester, in the county of Worcester and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, have invented a new-and useful Improvement in Swain-Engines, of which the following is a specification accompanied by drawings, forming a part of the same, in which Figure 1 represents a side elevation of an engine embodying my invention, with the stearmchest and cylinders shown in central sectional view. Fig. 2 is anend view of the engine represented in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is an end view of a rotating valve-stem, showing the gearing hy which it is rotated, with a hub of one of the gears shown in central sectional Fig. 4 represents a transverse sectional view of the steam-chest and rotating valve on line 4 4, Fig. 1, showing the position of the rotating valve and its steam-ports for admitting steam to the cylinder 1 when its piston is in the position shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 5 represents the, same transverse sectional view of the steam-chest and rotating valve as shown in Fig. 4, but with the steamports of cylinder 1 in their position when the rotating valve has been moved forward in or der to reverse the engine. Fig. 6 isa transverse sectional view of the steam-chest and rotating valve, with its exhaust-ports in position to exhaust the steam from cylinder 3 when its piston is in position shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 7 is a similar transverse sectional view to that shown in Fig. 6, but with their exhaust-ports in their position when the rotating valve has been moved forward to reverse the engine. Fig. 7" is a top view of a portion of the rotating valve, the upper half having been rcmovcd, that portion of the valve being shown which extends from one end across the exhaust-ports of cylinders l and 2. Fig. 7 is a detached view of the lever 56 and connected latch h which the englue is reversed. Figs. h toil, inclusive, are diagrammatic sketches which show the rela tive position of the sown-ports for each of thrcylindcr l, 2, 3. and 1" when their pistons are in thr position represented in Fig. 1, Figs. 12, H and 2H showing the position 01 the admission-ports and Figs. 9, 13, 17, and21 showing the position of the exhaustports; and Figs; 10 to 23, inclusive, are simi lar diagrammatic figures which show the position of the steam-ports for each of the four cylinders when the rotating valve has been moved forward in order to reverse the engine.
Similar reference-figures refer to similar parts in the different views.
The object of my invention is to provide a steam-engine adapted to be used as a motor for the propulsion of automobiles, yachts, and for such uses as require a prime mover in a compact form; and it consists in certain novel details of construction and arrangement of parts, as hereinafter described, and set forth in the annexed claims. a The engine represented in the accompanying drawings as embodying my invention comprises four single-acting cylinders provided with a common valve mechanism and having their pistons connected with a common crank-shaft.
Referringto the drawings, 1, 2, 3, and 4 denote the four cylinders of the engine, provided with: pistons 5, G, 7, and 8, connected by piston-rods 9, 10, 11, and 12 with a common crank-shaft 13 in the manner usual in engines of this class. One end of each of the cylinders is supported in a concentric socket or circular recess 14 in one side of the rectangular steam-chest 15, and the opposite ends of the cylindersare supported by a plate 16, which is connected with the steam-chest 15 by means of screw-threaded tie-rods 17, and the journal-boxes 18 of the crank-shaft are connected with a plate 16 by similar screwthreaded tie-rods 19. The ends of the cylinders are inserted in the concentric sockets 14 and are clamped between the steani-chcstl and the plate 16 by means of the screw-th readed tie-rods 17. The steam-chest 15 is provided with a concentric hole to receive and form a hearing fora hollow cylindrical rotating valve 20. The hollow cylindrical rotating valve 20 is reduced at each end to form journals 21 and 22, the former rotating in a journalbearing 23 and the latter rotating in a journal-bearing 24, by which the valve is held from endwise movement. he hearing 24 consists of a stufiing-oox provided with a follower and an in ternally-screw-threaded cap 26, fitting an external thread on the s'tuifingbox. by which the follower is crowded against the packing 27. The steam-chest is provided with chambers 28, 29, and 30, which communicate with each other by steam-passages 31 in the corners of the steam-chest, as represented in Figs. 6 and 7. hen the rotating cylindrical valve 20 is inserted in the steamchest, it passes through the chambers 28, 29, and 30, foriningsteam-spacesbetween the in nor walls of the steam-chest and the outside of the valve. Steam is admiuc-d to the central steam-space 28 by a pipe 32 and from the steanrspace 28 steam passes through the passages 31 to the steam-spaces 29 and 30. The journal 22 is solid, but the journal 21 is hollow andcommunicates with the interior of the cylindrical valve 20 and constitutes an exhaust-pipe through its open end. The rotating valve 20 is provided with openings 33, which communicate with the interior and periodicaiiy register as the valve rotates with exhaustports 34, leading from the cylinders, thereby permitting the exhaust-steamtttpass into the center of the cylindrical valve 20 and he exhausted through the open end of the journal 22. The position of the openingin the valve relatively to the exhaust-port of the cylinder during the period of exhaust is represented in Fig. 6, which is a transverse sectional view of the steam chest and valve on the line 6 6, Fig. 1, showing the position of thevalve relative to the exhaust-port of cylinder 3,when its piston is in the position shown in Fig. 1. The rotating valve 20 is also provided with a series of short cylindrical recesses'35, which as the valve rotates periodically connect the steam spaces 28,29, and 30 with steam-ad mission ports which communicate with the cylinders 1,. 2, and 3.
'lhearrangcm'ent of the steam-admission ports are the same in each of the four cylininders, and Fig. 4 represents a transverse sectional view of the steam chest-and valve on line 4 4, Fig. 1, showing the steam-admission ports 36 and 36" of cylinder 1 and the position of the valve audits recesses when the piston of thecylinder is in theposition shown in Fig. i. The steanrchest bears againstthe rotating valve at 37 and 38 upon each side of he ports 31% and 36, so as to cut off the communication between the steam-spaces and the admission-ports, except as communication is established between them through the cylindrical recesses 35 in the valve. The bearings 37 are slightl greater than the width of the ['l'i'jtSMS 3.5, and the bearings 38 are narrower than thewidth of the recesses 35, asshown in so that whenever the recesses 35 span l i narrow bearings 38 as the valve rotates mnnnunication is established between the [('2lIl1-\[HUjU and the admissioirports, thereby :nhnit'ing swam to the cylinders. 'lhc admeets mission-port 36 is connected by a recess35 in the valve directly with the steam-space 29, and the steam-chest provided witha recess 39 beneath the valve in, which communicates at one end with the steam-space to provide a passage for steam through the admissionport 36*. The recesses 35 and the exhaustopenings 33 are arranged on the rotating valve 20 to admit exhaust-steam at regular intervals successively to each of the cylinders 1, 2, 3, and 4 by a continuous rotary movement of the valve as it driven from the crankshaft 13 by means of connecting mechanism, consisting of an intermediate shaft 40, journaled in bearings 41 i2 and carrying a bevelgear 43 at one end. which engages a pinion 44 on the crank-shaft 13 and having a pinion 45 atthe opposite end which engagcsa lcuevel-gear 46, attached to the journal 22 of the valve 20, by which a rotary movement is given to the valve in the same direction as the rotation of the crank-shaft 13. The pinion 45 is provided with a hollow hub 47, which incloses a collar 48, attached to the shalt 10, which serves with the journal-henring 1; to hold the pinion 45 from longitudinal movement. lnclosed within the hollow hub 4? ol the pinion 45 is a sleeve 49, which is rupalih; of sliding on the shaft 4.0 and having a spline connwtion there with by means of splines .50. The sleeve 49 carries on diametrically oppo ite sides short studs 51,,provided with roll 52. which are inclosed in spiral-shaped slots 53 in the hub of the pinion "1-5,l| Y which a rotary motion of the shaft lO is comlnunicatcd to the pinion. The sleeve 49 is provided with a neck 5; to receive a fork 55, pivotally connected with a l ver :36, which is pivoted to a bracket 57 and is pro vided with a latch .58, adapted to engage notches 59 ahrackct attached to the framework and b i t-in the arc of a circle concentric with a pivot of the lever 56. The latch 58 is thrown into engagemcnhvith the notches 59 by aspring 61 acting against a pivoted lcver 62, by which the latch iswithdrawn from the notches in the usual manner in tl(\'i(f8. of this class. In Fig. l of the drawing the sleeve 49 is shown in its highest position. holding the driving stud .31 at {innpner end oi the spiral slots 53. The drprr sion oi the handle 56 will-move the sleeve down and rnrr v the studs 51 to the lower end of tin; piral slots 53, causing the pinion 4.3 to be turned forward a short distance or in the direction of its movement when the engine is runl'nng. therein slightly turning the valve 2') forv. ard
and changing the position of its opening 33 and recesses 35 relatively to do train "Willission and exhaust ports. The adi :Hli'i'll movement of the valve 20, caused by the downwardlv-slidingmovcineni of the l 414. n ill move the recess s 22.3, by whh-h \n i- .5- initted to the ovlindrr No. 1 when in ihe position shown in Fig. -l, to 1hr po iti n hown in Fig. and the exhau t-port oi Tin- \nlvc.
by which steam is exlhausted from cylinder 3 when in the position shown in Fig. 6, will be moved to the position shown in Fig-.17, thereby closing the steam-admission ports of cylinder No. 1 and the steam-exhaust ports of cylinder 3, which had before been open.
Referring to the diagrammatic drawings Figs. 8 to 23, inclusive, Fig. 20 represents the position of the rotating valve 20 with reference to the steam-admission ports of cylinder No. 1 when its piston is in the position shown in Fig. l, with the rotating cylinder moving in the direction of the arrow (1, with steam passing through the ports in the direction indicated by the arrows b I). Fig. 21 represents the position of the rotating valve with reference to the exhaust-ports of cylinder No. 1. Figs. 16 and 17 show the relative position of the rotating valve to the admission and exhaust ports of cylinder 2: Figs. 12 and 13, the position of the valve with reference to the admission and exhaust ports of cylinder 3, and Figs. 8 and 9 the position of the valve to the admission and exhaust ports of cylinder 4:, the arrows upon these figures showing, like those in Fig. 20. the direction of the rotary movement of the valve and the movement of the steam through the ports. The recesses 35 are preferably slightly shorter than the admissionports, and steam is admitted from the steamspaces of the steam-chest through the recesses 35 to the adm ission-ports by a movement transversely to the axis of the valve and not in a direction parallel with the axis of the valve-- that is, the movement of steam as the valve begins to open is. through a narrow crack be.- tween the edge of the steam-chest bearing and the edge of the recess, which is not the case in rotating valves provided with annular steamspaces formed in the rotating valve itself. In that class of valves the movement of steam is from the annular steamspace lengthwise the recess. If it is desired to reverse the engine, the valve is moved preferably slightly forward by the depression of the lever 56, changing the position of the recesses on the rotating valve from those shown in Figs. 8, 12, 16, and 20 to their position shown in Figs. 10, 14, 18, and 22, so that steam will be admitted into cylinders 3 and 4 and eizhaustcd from cylinders 1 and 2, which will reverse the engine, cause the crank-shaft and connected rotating valve to turn in the opposite direction. as indicated by the arrows 1. When the engine is to be again run in a forward direction, the lever 56 is raised, thereby sliding the studs 51 upwardly in the spiral slots 53 and slightly rotaiingthe valvezil by the independent movement of the pinion 4.3 relatively to the rotating shaft in.
The framework in which the operative parts of the engine are contained, compri ing the stcanrchest I1 plate H3. iournal ioxes' in, and connecting (iv-rods 17 and 11!, can be supported y (-onnri'ling the steam-chest 1:3 and plate 16 in any desired manner with a supporting-stand or with an inclosing framework, (not shown in the drawings.) according to the use to which the engine is put, and the engine can be placed in anydesired position with the cylinders in a horizontal, vertical, or oblique po sition. I have shown four cylinders; but I do not confine myself to any specific number of cylinders or valves. Neither do I wish to confine myself to the specific method shown of driving the rotating valve or to'the specific position of the valve relatively to the cvlinders.
What I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
1. In an engine, the combination of a hollow bar forming a steam-chest and having a series of sockets to receive the cylinders, a series of cylinders held in said sockets, said bar having a series of steam-spaces communicating with said cylinders and a valve contained in said hollow bar, whereby the flow of steam to said cylinders is controlled, substantially as de scribed.
2. In an engine, the combination of a hollow bar forming a steam-chest and having sockets to receive the ends of the cylinders, cylinders held in said sockets, a. plate bearing against the opposite ends of said cylinders, tie-rods by which the cylinders are clamped between said hollow bar and said plate, and a valve contained in said hollow bar to control the flow of steam to said cylinders, substantially as described.
3. In an engine, the combination of a hollow bar forming a steam-chest and having sockets to receive the ends of the cylinders, cylinders held in said sockets, a plate bearing against the opposite ends of said cylinders, tie-rods between said plate and said hollow bar, journals for a crank-shaft and tie-rods connecting said plate and said journals and a valve for controlling the distribution of steam from said hollow bar to said cylinders, substantially as described.
4. In an engine, a steam-chest having admission-ports leading to the cylinders, a cylindrical rotating valve journaled in said steamchest and having a series of recesses in its. periphery shorter than said admission-ports, a bearing-surface on the steam-chest at the side of the admission-ports bearingagainst said cylindrical valve, said bearing-surface being of less width than the width of said recess, substantially as described.
5. In an engine, thi-mnibination oi a steamchest having a longitudinal. cvlindriral opening to receive a rotating cylinder journalcd therein and having recesses in its pcriplnl'y. annular chambers in said stdain-rhest around said cylinder and forming strain-spares, a passage in said steam-chest l-adingio a sourcrof steanrsupply, admission-ports leading from said annular steam-spares tothc (gvlindrrs, the recesses in said rotating cylinder beingshorter than said admission-wins and arranged to periodically connect said steam-spaces and said against said valve on one side of thesteanr' rons, greater than the Width of said recesses and having :1. bearing-surface against said vai've the opposite side of said ports, less than th wid h of said recesses, whereby said re caused to fieriodically span said ring-surfaces and thereby connect pace with said ports, substantially as do. Ill) ,1.
'4'. in a engine, the eornbination with a series of sing-loading cylinders, of a common s am-chest extending across the ends of said 'iders and provided Witha longitudinal, indrioal opening for a rotating cylindrical valve with recesses in the sides of said opening, acylindrical valile journaled in said stea1nchest and closing said recesses to form annular steam'spaces around said valve, a passage in said steam-chest connecting said annular steam-spaceswith a source of steam-supply, admission-ports leading from said annular steam-spaces to said cylinders, recesses in the periphery of said valve by which the flow of steam to said cylinders is controlled, a longitudinal exhaust-passage through said valve, exhaust-ports in said steamchest and openings in said valve by which said exhaust-ports and said exhaust-passage are periodically connected, substantially as described.
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of twosuhscribing Witnesses, this lstday of arch, 1900.
CHARLES UROMllUN.
Vl'itnesses: I
CHARLES M. THAYER, J. FRED Homes.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4122756A (en) * 1976-01-29 1978-10-31 Volkswagenwerk Aktiengesellschaft Vapor engine
US5953914A (en) * 1997-07-07 1999-09-21 Frangipane; Richard Steam powered head device for producing a high RPM engine
US20090217904A1 (en) * 2007-01-24 2009-09-03 Lee Dae-Hee Crankless reciprocating steam engine
US20170022811A1 (en) * 2014-02-28 2017-01-26 Air Surf Inc. Fluid rotary machine

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4122756A (en) * 1976-01-29 1978-10-31 Volkswagenwerk Aktiengesellschaft Vapor engine
US5953914A (en) * 1997-07-07 1999-09-21 Frangipane; Richard Steam powered head device for producing a high RPM engine
US20090217904A1 (en) * 2007-01-24 2009-09-03 Lee Dae-Hee Crankless reciprocating steam engine
US7765803B2 (en) * 2007-01-24 2010-08-03 Inje University Industy-Academic Cooperation Foundation Crankless reciprocating steam engine
US20170022811A1 (en) * 2014-02-28 2017-01-26 Air Surf Inc. Fluid rotary machine
US10253630B2 (en) * 2014-02-28 2019-04-09 Air Surf Marketing Inc. Fluid rotary machine

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