US745951A - Cash-carrier. - Google Patents

Cash-carrier. Download PDF

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Publication number
US745951A
US745951A US13728402A US1902137284A US745951A US 745951 A US745951 A US 745951A US 13728402 A US13728402 A US 13728402A US 1902137284 A US1902137284 A US 1902137284A US 745951 A US745951 A US 745951A
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cord
carriage
catch
rod
cash
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US13728402A
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James L Baldwin
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING,¬†SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR¬†PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G9/00Apparatus for assisting manual handling having suspended load-carriers movable by hand or gravity

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  • This invention relates to that class of cashcarriers which are made to travel along a taut wire by a sufiicient impulse given the carriage to have its momentum carry it to the desired destination, and relates more particularly to the mechanism for giving the impulse to the carriage-t'. e., any kind of a carriage may be used.
  • the objects of my invention are, first, to construct the impulse mechanism in a much smaller space than heretofore; second, to pro# vide simple means whereby the force of the throw can be adj usted, and, third, to construct a device which is cheap and durable. I attain these objects by the construction illustrated by the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.
  • Figure 1 shows a side elevation of an impulse mechanism embodying my invention with the carriage in position to be thrown and the operating-cord partly pulled.
  • Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same with the parts in the same position, but with the carriage omitted.
  • Fig. 3 is a section on line 8 3 of Fig. 2.
  • Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 2.
  • Fig. 5 is a section on line 5 of Fig. 2, and
  • Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a modified form of my invention.
  • the taut wire 6 is held in position by being secured in any ordinary manner between two stations. I have shown it secured to the lower end of a ceiling-support 7. It will be understood while I have shown only one end of the wire 6 and only one impulse mechanism that a duplicate mechanism may be located at the other end of the wire 6 to return the carriage when desired.
  • Parallel with and a short distance above the wire 6 is secured a guide-rod 8, which is secured at one end to the bracket 9, which is pivotally secured to the collar 10 on the support 7.
  • the pivotal connection between the collar 10 and the bracket 9 permits the guide-rod 8 to be swung in a vertical plane, and the collar 10 being loose on the support 7 permits the rod 8 to be swung in a horizontal plane.
  • the other end of the rod 8 has secured thereto the bracket 11, to which one end of the brace-rod 12 is pivotally secured.
  • the upper end of the brace-rod 12 is preferably pivotally secured to another collar (not'shown) on the support 7, adapted to be fastened to the support 7 with a set-screw.
  • This manner of fastening and holding the guide-rod 8 permits it to be held in any desired position in a horizontal or vertical plane-7l. e., always parallel with the wire 6.
  • the entire mechanism to be described is supported by this guiderod 8.
  • a grooved wheel 13 is mounted in the bracket 9, over which the pull-cord 14 travels, the free end of which carries the handle 15.
  • the opposite end of the cord 14 is secured to the center of the cross-bar 1 6, which has the upwardly-projecting lug 17.
  • the cross-bar 16 is guided in its movement by the guide-rod 8, passing through la perforation in the lug 17.
  • the ends of an elastic cord or spring 18 are secured to the ends of the crossbar 16 and extend from the cross-bar 16 in an opposite direction from the cord 14 and thence around the grooved Wheels 19 and unite in the loop 20, which normally rests on the wire 6 when there is no carriage held by the device.
  • the wheels 19 are mounted in the bracket 11 on either side of the wire 6, so that a carriage coming in on the wire 6 will necessarily run against the loop 20 of the elastic cord.
  • the carriage has at either end above the wire 6 the hook 21, which catches over the loop 20, and it also has the catches 22 at either end below the wire 6.
  • the spring-catch 23 pivoted to the buffer-frame 24 and having the upwardlyprojecting fork 25, which straddles the cord 14 and guide-rod 8.
  • the coiled expanding spring 26 is interposed between the fork 25 and the ear 27 on the buffer-frame 24 to normally hold the catch 23 in the path of the catch 22.
  • Both catches 22 and 23 are slotted to allow the free passage of the wire 6.
  • the buffer-frame V24 preferably has the rubber buer 2S for the head of the catch 22 to strike against, and to further take up the jar on the mechanism the coiled expanding spring 29 is IOO interposed between the frame 24 and the buffer-arm 30, around the pin 31, which is rigidly secured to the frame 24 and loosely slides in a perforation in the lower end of the arm and has the head 32 to prevent it from passing through such perforation.
  • the frame 24 and arm 30 are provided with perforations to permit the free passage of the wire 6.
  • the arm 30 is also provided with a perforation just below the rod 8 for the uninterrupted passage ot' the cord 14 and is adjustably mounted on the rod 8 by means of the setscrew 33.
  • the operation of the device is as follows: To cause the carriage to leave the station, the operator pulls down on the handle 15, which pull is transmitted through the cord 14 to the cross-bar 16. The ends of the elastic cord 18 being attached to the cross-bar 16 and the loop 2O of such elastic cord being caught around the hook 21 on the carriage, which is held stationary by means of the catch 23, the cord 18 will be stretched, as shown in the drawings. A further pull on the handle 15 will cause the cross-bar 16 to move along on the rod 8 and release the catch 23 from the catch 22 by contacting with the fork 25 of the catch 23 and depressing the spring 26. As soon as the catch 23 is withdrawn from the catch 22 the carriage is released and will be given a sudden impulse by the contraction of the elastic cord 18.
  • the extent of the stretch on the cord 18 before the carriage is released can be varied by either setting the arm 30, which carries the catch 23, closer to or farther from the wheels 19 or by increasing or decreasing the length of the elastic cord 18.
  • the hook 2l on the carriage will contact with the loop 20 of the elastic cord 18 and carry it back toward the catch 23 until the head of the catch 22 contacts with the buffer 28 and the catch 23 snaps in behind the catch 22 and retains the carriage in position for another operation.
  • the momentum of the carriage when coming into the station carries back the loop 20, and thus returns the bar 16 to its normal position, which is adjacent to the frame 11.
  • the cord 14, with its handle 15, will also be brought to their normal positions, the cord 14 being attached to the bar 16.
  • Fig. 6 is shown a modified form of constrncting my improved impulse mechanism.
  • a forked auxiliary trip-arm 34 in place of the fork 25, which performs the same function as the fork 25 by being connected to a short arm of the catch 23 by a bar 35, around which the spring 26 is conveniently placed.
  • the lower end of the trip-arm 34 is perforated to admit the easy passage of the rod 31, and a pin 36 is secured in the rod 31 to serve as a shoulder for the buffer-spring 29, and this also serves as a fulcrum for the trip-arm 34 to rock upon.
  • the upper end of the triparm 34 is engaged by the cross-piece 16 the same way as the fork 25 is engaged in the construction shown in Fig. 1.
  • a cash-carrier impulse mechanism the combination of a pull-cord attached to the ends of an elastic cord which passes over wheels; an adjustable guide-rod; and adjustable carriage-catch controlled by the pullcord; and means for supporting the parts in position substantially as shown and described.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • Footwear And Its Accessory, Manufacturing Method And Apparatuses (AREA)

Description

lPATENTE) DBO. 1 1903.
J. L. BALDWIN. CASHv CARRIER.
APPLICATION FILED DB0. a1. 19o2.
mv 5mm .MS w
/ltrl No MODEL.
ivo. 745,951.
UNITED STATES Patented December 1,
JAMES L. BALDWIN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
CASH-CARRIER.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 745,951, dated December 1, 1903.
Application filed December 31. 1902. Serial No. 137,284. (No model.)
To @ZZ whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, JAMES L. BALDWIN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cash-Carriers, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to that class of cashcarriers which are made to travel along a taut wire by a sufiicient impulse given the carriage to have its momentum carry it to the desired destination, and relates more particularly to the mechanism for giving the impulse to the carriage-t'. e., any kind of a carriage may be used.
The objects of my invention are, first, to construct the impulse mechanism in a much smaller space than heretofore; second, to pro# vide simple means whereby the force of the throw can be adj usted, and, third, to construct a device which is cheap and durable. I attain these objects by the construction illustrated by the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.
Similar reference characters refer to iden tical parts throughout the several views.
Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 shows a side elevation of an impulse mechanism embodying my invention with the carriage in position to be thrown and the operating-cord partly pulled. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same with the parts in the same position, but with the carriage omitted. Fig. 3 is a section on line 8 3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 is a section on line 5 of Fig. 2, and Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a modified form of my invention.
The taut wire 6 is held in position by being secured in any ordinary manner between two stations. I have shown it secured to the lower end of a ceiling-support 7. It will be understood while I have shown only one end of the wire 6 and only one impulse mechanism that a duplicate mechanism may be located at the other end of the wire 6 to return the carriage when desired. Parallel with and a short distance above the wire 6 is secured a guide-rod 8, which is secured at one end to the bracket 9, which is pivotally secured to the collar 10 on the support 7. The pivotal connection between the collar 10 and the bracket 9 permits the guide-rod 8 to be swung in a vertical plane, and the collar 10 being loose on the support 7 permits the rod 8 to be swung in a horizontal plane. The other end of the rod 8 has secured thereto the bracket 11, to which one end of the brace-rod 12 is pivotally secured. The upper end of the brace-rod 12 is preferably pivotally secured to another collar (not'shown) on the support 7, adapted to be fastened to the support 7 with a set-screw. This manner of fastening and holding the guide-rod 8 permits it to be held in any desired position in a horizontal or vertical plane-7l. e., always parallel with the wire 6. The entire mechanism to be described is supported by this guiderod 8. A grooved wheel 13 is mounted in the bracket 9, over which the pull-cord 14 travels, the free end of which carries the handle 15. The opposite end of the cord 14 is secured to the center of the cross-bar 1 6, which has the upwardly-projecting lug 17. The cross-bar 16 is guided in its movement by the guide-rod 8, passing through la perforation in the lug 17. The ends of an elastic cord or spring 18 are secured to the ends of the crossbar 16 and extend from the cross-bar 16 in an opposite direction from the cord 14 and thence around the grooved Wheels 19 and unite in the loop 20, which normally rests on the wire 6 when there is no carriage held by the device. The wheels 19 are mounted in the bracket 11 on either side of the wire 6, so that a carriage coming in on the wire 6 will necessarily run against the loop 20 of the elastic cord. The carriage has at either end above the wire 6 the hook 21, which catches over the loop 20, and it also has the catches 22 at either end below the wire 6.
To cooperate with the catch 22 on the carriage is the spring-catch 23, pivoted to the buffer-frame 24 and having the upwardlyprojecting fork 25, which straddles the cord 14 and guide-rod 8. The coiled expanding spring 26 is interposed between the fork 25 and the ear 27 on the buffer-frame 24 to normally hold the catch 23 in the path of the catch 22. Both catches 22 and 23 are slotted to allow the free passage of the wire 6. The buffer-frame V24 preferably has the rubber buer 2S for the head of the catch 22 to strike against, and to further take up the jar on the mechanism the coiled expanding spring 29 is IOO interposed between the frame 24 and the buffer-arm 30, around the pin 31, which is rigidly secured to the frame 24 and loosely slides in a perforation in the lower end of the arm and has the head 32 to prevent it from passing through such perforation. The frame 24 and arm 30 are provided with perforations to permit the free passage of the wire 6. The arm 30 is also provided with a perforation just below the rod 8 for the uninterrupted passage ot' the cord 14 and is adjustably mounted on the rod 8 by means of the setscrew 33.
The operation of the device is as follows: To cause the carriage to leave the station, the operator pulls down on the handle 15, which pull is transmitted through the cord 14 to the cross-bar 16. The ends of the elastic cord 18 being attached to the cross-bar 16 and the loop 2O of such elastic cord being caught around the hook 21 on the carriage, which is held stationary by means of the catch 23, the cord 18 will be stretched, as shown in the drawings. A further pull on the handle 15 will cause the cross-bar 16 to move along on the rod 8 and release the catch 23 from the catch 22 by contacting with the fork 25 of the catch 23 and depressing the spring 26. As soon as the catch 23 is withdrawn from the catch 22 the carriage is released and will be given a sudden impulse by the contraction of the elastic cord 18. The extent of the stretch on the cord 18 before the carriage is released can be varied by either setting the arm 30, which carries the catch 23, closer to or farther from the wheels 19 or by increasing or decreasing the length of the elastic cord 18. When the carriage is returned to the station, the hook 2l on the carriage will contact with the loop 20 of the elastic cord 18 and carry it back toward the catch 23 until the head of the catch 22 contacts with the buffer 28 and the catch 23 snaps in behind the catch 22 and retains the carriage in position for another operation. The momentum of the carriage when coming into the station carries back the loop 20, and thus returns the bar 16 to its normal position, which is adjacent to the frame 11. Of course the cord 14, with its handle 15, will also be brought to their normal positions, the cord 14 being attached to the bar 16.
In Fig. 6 is shown a modified form of constrncting my improved impulse mechanism.
As shown in this view, it may be preferable at times to have a forked auxiliary trip-arm 34 in place of the fork 25, which performs the same function as the fork 25 by being connected to a short arm of the catch 23 by a bar 35, around which the spring 26 is conveniently placed. The lower end of the trip-arm 34 is perforated to admit the easy passage of the rod 31, and a pin 36 is secured in the rod 31 to serve as a shoulder for the buffer-spring 29, and this also serves as a fulcrum for the trip-arm 34 to rock upon. In operation the upper end of the triparm 34 is engaged by the cross-piece 16 the same way as the fork 25 is engaged in the construction shown in Fig. 1. To avoid the handle 15 being suddenlyjerked up to its normal position by the carrier engaging the loop 20, I may attach the pull-cord 14 to a separate sliding block 37, arranged to slide along on the guide-rod 8, and attach a small elastic cord 38 to the block 37 to always return the block 37 to a position adjacent to the frame 11 when the operators hold is released from the handle 15. I prefer to pass the elastic cord 38 around a wheel 39, pivoted in the frame 11, and conveniently secure the end adjustably to the rod 12.
I desire to be understood not to limit myself to the appended claims any more than is necessary by the prior state of the art, as the form of the parts and construction of some of the details are capable of modification without deviating from the scope of the invention.
What I claim, and desire to Secure by Letters Patent, isy 1. In a cash-carrier impulse mechanism, the combination of the guide-rod secured to avertical support, the pull-cord, the elastic cord passing over wheels supported by the guiderod,and forming a loop below the wheels substantially as described.
2. In a cash-carrier impulse mechanism the combination of an elastic cord passing over wheels, the cord put under tension by pulling on its ends, and forming a loop between the wheels and means for supporting the parts in position, substantially as and for the purpose described.
3. The combination in a cash-carrier impulse mechanism of a guide-rod secured to a Verticalsupport, a pull-cord an elastic cord passing over wheels supported by the guiderod, and forming a loop below the wheels, a
carriage-retaining catch operated by the pullcord, substantially as described.
4. The combination in a cash-carrier impulse mechanism of an elastic cord passing over wheels, the cord put under tension by pulling on its end, and forming a loop between the wheels, a carriage-catch operated by the pulling mechanism and means for supporting the parts in position, substantially as and for the purpose described.
5. In a cash -carrier impulse mechanism the combination of an elastic cord passing over wheels, and means whereby the elastic cord is stretched by a pull on the ends of the cord while the loop of said cord is held sta- IOC IIO
tionary by the carriage; and means whereby a certain pull on the elastic cord will release the carriage, substantially as described.
6. In a cash-carrier impulse mechanism .the combination of a pull-cord attached to the ends of an elastic cord which passes over wheels; an adjustable guide-rod; and adjustable carriage-catch controlled by the pullcord; and means for supporting the parts in position substantially as shown and described.
9. In a cash-carrier impulse mechanism, a spring passing over Wheels, forming a loop between the wheels and means for bringing the spring under tension bya pull on the ends of the spring substantially as shown and described.
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of the subscribing Witnesses.
' .I AMES L. BALDWIN.
Witnesses:
R. J. JAOKER, SAM DALEY, M. J. OKELLY.
US13728402A 1902-12-31 1902-12-31 Cash-carrier. Expired - Lifetime US745951A (en)

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