US713209A - Process of duplicating phonograms. - Google Patents

Process of duplicating phonograms. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US713209A
US713209A US67265098A US1898672650A US713209A US 713209 A US713209 A US 713209A US 67265098 A US67265098 A US 67265098A US 1898672650 A US1898672650 A US 1898672650A US 713209 A US713209 A US 713209A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
matrix
blank
mold
record
phonogram
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US67265098A
Inventor
Thomas A Edison
Original Assignee
Thomas A Edison
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Thomas A Edison filed Critical Thomas A Edison
Priority to US67265098A priority Critical patent/US713209A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US713209A publication Critical patent/US713209A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/17Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C45/26Moulds
    • B29C45/263Moulds with mould wall parts provided with fine grooves or impressions, e.g. for record discs

Description

No. 78,209. Patented Nov. ll, I902.

T. A. EDISON.

-PROCESS 0F DUPUOATING PHONOGRAIIS.

- (Application filed Mar. 5. 1898.)

(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet l.

01/1/11 11111111 1 II I II I//// Witnesses Inventor zmaw 21%,, m 1 I1 Att'ys- THE uomus Pmns no, PHOTO-LYING wAsumsmmn. c.

No. 713,209. Paiented Nov. ll, I902.

T. A. EDISON.

PROCESS OF DUPLICATING PHONOGRAMS.

(Application flied Mar. 5. 1998.

(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 2.

Witnesses: Infentor I %4% q/aflwi W in? I V Miafi Attys.

No. 78,209; Patented Nov. ll, I902.

. A. EDISON.

PROCESS UPLIGATING PHONOGRMIS.

' (Application filed Mar. 5. 1898.; 7 (No Model.) I 3 Sheets-Sheet 3.

Witnesses Inventor -UNITED STATES PATENT- UF ICE.

THOMAS A. EDISON, OF LLEWELLYN PARK, NEW JERSEY.

PROCESS OF DUPLICATING PHONOGRAMS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 713,209, dated. November 11, 1902. Application filed March 5, 1898. Serial No. 672,650. (No specimens.)

T0 aZZ whom, it TIMI/710071106772,

Be it known that I, THOMAS A. EDISON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Llewellyn Park, in the county of Essex and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Processes of Duplicating Phonograms, (Case No. 994,) of which the following is a specification.

The object I have in view is to produce a practical process for the duplication of phono or mold.

By my process the duplicate phonogram or the surface thereof may be and preferably is constructed of a material too hard for the satisfactory cutting of an original repord therein by the usual phonographic recorder, whereby the duplicate phonograms may be made more durable than it is possible to make original records; but the duplicate phonograms may. obviously be made of a softer material.

My improved process can be carried out for the reproduction of phonographic records of any desired form, either fiat disks or hollow cylinders; but it has been specially devised for use in connection with the duplication of records of the latter type. For the duplication of cylindrical phonographic records from a tubular matrix my improved process also provides for the effective removal of the finished duplicate from the matrix without injury to the record-surface of the former.

In carrying my process into effect I first construct a matrix carrying a negative representation of the record, which matrix can be produced by any of the known processesas, for example, those indicated in my Patent No. 484,582, dated October 18, 1892. As I explained in this patent, an original phonographic record having a surface of the usual wax-like material is first secured and its surface coated with a coati of conducting material in order to permit the original record to be electroplated. This conducting coating can be and preferably is applied by a process of vacuous deposit, as I described in my Patent No. 517,147, dated September 18, 1894, by placing the record in a vacuum-chamber in which a metal is vaporized by an electric are produced between electrodes of the metal, the metallic vapor depositing as a thin uniform coating on the original record. I prefer to apply a preliminary coating by a process of vacuous deposit, for the reason that the highly-comminuted condition of the vaporized metal permits the coating to form as a uniform film, following accurately all the variations of the record, however minute. Instead of coating the original record with a vaporized metal it may be coated with a very thin layer of specially-prepared plumbago of exceedingly-great fineness, or instead thereof gold-leaf or silver salts reduced by chemical reagents to the metallic state may be used for the same purpose. very thin preliminary coating to the original record, the latter is immersed in an electroplating bath and electroplated with a metal to the desired thickness, thereby forming a shell inclosing the originalrecord, which shell carries on its bore an accurate negative representation of that record. Preferably this shell is suitably incased in a close-fitting cylindrical jacket, although if the electroplating is carried on long enough to form an electroplated coating of snfiicient thickness a jacket need not be used. The original record is removed from the electroplated matrix obtained as described either before or after the jacket, if used, is applied to the shell. This removal of the original record can be effected either by dissolving or melting the wax-like material or by contracting the original record radially and removing it by a direct longitudinal movement. In the case of cylindrical phonographic records the resulting matrix will be a hollow metal cylinder or tube or one internally faced with metal carrying the phonographic record in relief upon its inner surface.

While I have indicated convenient and well-known methods for producing the ma- Having thus applied a trix, it will be obvious that the matrix can be obtained in any other way familiar to those skilled in the art.

Having obtained a suitable matrix carrying a negative representation of the original phonographic record to be duplicated, I proceed with the duplication of the records as follows: The blanks which are to receive the duplicate records are preferably composed of a material having a higher coefficient of expansion than that of the matrix or mold, and said blanks are made sufficiently thick to maintain their shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix, as will be explained. The blank under normal temperatures is of a diameter very slightly less than the bore of the matrix or mold, whereby the blank may be inserted in the same. After the blank has been thus placed within the matrix or mold both the matrix and the blank contained therein are, or the blank alone is, brought to a higher temperature, whereby the blank will expand and will be brought into intimate contact with the record-surface of the matrix or mold, whereby the negative record thereof will be impressed with absolute accuracy upon the surface of the blank. The expansion of the blank into this intimate engagement with the interior of the matrix or mold may be effected in any suitable way, such as by maintaining the matrix or mold,with the blank contained therein, in a heated atmosphere. By making the blank of a material having a higher coefficient of expansion than the matrix or mold the blank will be properly expanded to receive the impression of the record, notwithstanding the fact that both the blank and the matrix or mold may be subjected to the same temperature.

In order to facilitate the operation and make the resulting duplicate record somewhat sharper, I prefer to introduce a tapering mandrel within the blank after the blank has been placed in the matrix or mold and heat applied to the blank, as explained, and to force the mandrel tightly within the blank after the latter has been expanded into engagement with the record, whereby the blank will be further expanded mechanically into absolute intimacy with the record, after which the mandrel will be immediately withdrawn.

With blanks made of sufficiently viscous material the entire expansion may be effected mechanically by forcing a tapering mandrel within the same.

After the blank has been expanded, so as to receive the impression of the matrix or mold, it is removed by first shrinking it radially in any suitable way, as in a refrigerating-chamber, and by then withdrawing the resulting duplicate record by a direct longitudinal movement. Owingtotheshallowness of the phonographic-record groove this radial shrinkage of the duplicate record effects a sufficient separation of the surfaces of the matrix and of the duplicate record to prevent injury to the surface of the duplicate record due to any longitudinal contraction thereof.

I find that by the process above described, and particularly when a matrix or mold is obtained by a process of vacuous deposit, as explained, duplicate phonographic records can be obtained which will be accurate reproductions of the original records and be free from extraneous noises and wherein the quality and intensity of the original vibrations will be reproduced with absolute faithfulness. I find, moreover, that since by this process there is little or no wear upon the matrix or mold a practically unlimited number of duplicates may be obtained from a single matrix or mold.

The degree of heat necessary to properly expand the blank will depend largely upon the material of which the blank is formed and upon the closeness of fit of the blank when inserted within the matrix or mold. For the same reasons the extent of the reduction of temperature in chilling and shrinking the duplicate record will vary to a considerable extent.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings for convenience in connection with a cylindrical phonogram.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a sectional view showing a matrix or mold with a blank introduced therein prior to the expansion of the blank into engagement with the recordsurface of the matrix; Fig. 1, a section through a part of the walls of the blank and matrix very greatly enlarged; Fig. 2, a view similar to Fig. 1, showing the blank expanded into engagement with the matrix and illustrating also a tapered mandrel forced into the blank; Fig. 2, a view corresponding to Fig. 1, showing a part of the walls of the matrix, blank, and mandrel of Fig. 2, very greatly enlarged; Fig. 3, a View corresponding to Figs. 1 and 2 with the tapered mandrel removed and illustrating the formed duplicate as having been contracted radially preparatory to being removed from the blank by adirectlongitudinal movement; and Fig. 3, a section, very greatly enlarged, corresponding to Figs. 1 and 2 and illustrating the relative relation between the duplicate and matrix prior to the removal of the former.

In the views corresponding parts are represented by the same letters of reference.

A represents the matrix or mold, carrying on its bore a negative representation of the record to be reproduced. I

B represents the blank to be duplicated, which is preferably provided with a tapered bore, as is now common, and which is of sufficient thickness to maintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix. This blank is turned down so that it may be inserted within the matrix or mold with' a close fit, as shown in Figs. 1 and l. The blank to be duplicated may be and prefer- 'as sealing-wax or shellac mixed with fine precipitates, like chalk, or polished ebonite,

vulcanized hard rubber, or celluloid may beused, or glue may be employed either alone or mixed with precipitates, such as chalk.

C, Figs. 2 and 2, represents a tapered mandrel,which maybeinserted' within theblank B.

D represents a support for the matrix or mold and for the blank within the same, said support having an opening E therein, Whereby the mandrel C may be moved longitudinally within the blank.

In carrying out the process I first introduce the blank within the matrix with as close a fit as practical, as shown in Figs. 1 and 1 after which the mandrel C is inserted within the blank. These parts are then subjected to heat, such as by being maintained in a heated atmosphere, whereby the blank will, by reason of its greater coeflicient of expansion than the matrix or mold, be expanded into intimate contact with the record-surface of the latter, and an impression of such record will be accurately received on the blank. When the blank has been thus expanded'into engagement. with the matrix or mold, the mandrel C is forced tightly within the blank,

so as to further expand it mechanically,-

whereby the blank will be forced into absolute intimacy with the record, and an impression will be received on the blank which will be clear, sharp, and an absolutely faithful reproduction of the original record. After the mandrel has been forced within the blank it is immediately withdrawn, and the blank is then chilled in any suitable way, such as by placing the matrix, with the blank contained therein, in a refrigerating-chainber. In this way the blank or duplicate will shrink or contract radially, as shown in Figs. 3 and 3, sufficiently to be removed from the matrix or mold by a direct longitudinal movement. Owing to the extreme shallowness of the phonographic-record groove, a sufiicient radial separation between the resulting duplicate and the matrix or mold will take place to prevent any longitudinal contraction of the duplicate from injuring the record-surface thereof.

Having now described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is as follows:

1. The process of duplicating sound-records that consists in impressing a plastic recordtablet against a suitable matrix by its own expansive force.

2. The method of producing hollow cylindrical phonograms, which consists in obtaining a mold having a reverse phonogram-record on the inner wall of a cylindrical opening, forming a hollow cylindrical plastic phonogram within said mold, releasing the phonogram from the mold by a radial contraction of the phonogram sufficient to entirely clear the surfaces, and removing the phonogram from the mold by directlongitudinal movement.

3. The method of producing hollow cylindrical phonograms which consists in obtaining a mold having a reverse phonogram-record on the inner wall of a cylindrical opening, forming a hollow cylindrical plastic phonogram Within said mold, releasing the phonogram from the mold by a reduction in temperature sufficient to entirely clear the surfaces, and removing the phonogram from the mold by direct longitudinal movement.

4. The method of producing phonographcylinders which consists in placing within a hollow cylindrical record mold or matrix, a hollow cylindrical phonograph-blank of sufficient thickness to maintain its shape during and after its engagement with the matrix,outwardly expanding such blank against said matrix, disengaging the impressed record-cylinder from the matrix, and withdrawing said record-cylinder from the matrix by direct longitudinal movement.

5. The method of producing phonograms which consists in placing within a hollow cylindrical record-matrix a hollow cylindrical phonograph-blank of sufficient thickness to maintain its form under normal conditions, softening said blank by heat and expanding the same while heated so as to take the record from the matrix, shrinking the phonogram so made by change of temperature, and withdrawing the same from the matrix by direct longitudinal movement.

6. The method of producing phonograms which consists in placing Within a hollow matrix a hollow body of plastic material, said body being a cylinder on its outer surface and having a tapering central longitudinal aperture, softening said body by heat and expanding it into the matrix by the longitudinal movement of a tapering plunger within the plastic body, shrinking the plastic material and withdrawing it from the matrix by direct longitudinal movement.

7. The process of duplicating phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in forming a matrix or mold wherein the original record will be reproduced in relief, in loosely engaging a blank phonogram with said matrix, and in finally intimately engaging the blank phonogram with said matrix or mold by changes in temperature, substantially as set forth. a

8. The process of duplicating phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal on said phonogram to form a matrix or mold wherein the original record will be reproduced in relief, and in intimately engaging a blank phonogram with the said matrix or mold by a change in temperature, substantially as set forth.

9. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal on said phonogram to form a matrix or mold wherein the original record will be reproduced in relief, in inserting the continuous cylindrical blank to be reproduced within said matrix or mold, in expanding the blank into intimate engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, the cylindrical blank being sufficiently thick to maintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix, and finally removing the cylinder by direct longitudinal movement, substantially as set forth.

10. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal upon the original phonogram so as to form a matrix or mold, in inserting the blank to be reproduced within said matrix or mold, in expanding the blank into intimate engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, in finally shrinking the blank to disengage it from the matrix or mold, the cylindrical blank being made sulficiently thick to maintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix, and finally removing the cylinder by direct longitudinal movement, substantially as set forth.

1]. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal on said phonogram to form a matrix or mold wherein the original record will be reproduced in relief, in inserting the blank to be repro-' duced within said matrix or mold, in heating the blank, whereby the same will be expanded into engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, and in finallysubjecting the expanded blank to pressure to more intimately engage it with said record, substantially as set forth.

12. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal on said phonogram to form a matrix or mold wherein the original record will be reproduced in relief, in inserting the blank to be reproduced within said matrix or mold, in heating the blank, whereby the same will be expanded into engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, in subjecting the expanded blank to pressure to more intimately engage it with such record, and in finally chilling the blank to remove it from the matrix or mold, substantially as set forth.

13. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal upon the original phonogram to form a matrix or mold, in covering said matrix or mold with a metal backing, in introducing the continuous cylindrical phonogram to be reproduced within said matrix or mold, in expanding said phonogram into intimate engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, the cylindrical blank being made sufficiently thick to maintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix, and finally removing the cylinder by direct longitudinal movement, substantially as set forth.

let. The method of producing phonograms, which consists in securing a hollow metallic mold or shell containing the reverse record, placing in said mold an expansible blank sufficiently thick to maintain its shape during and after its removal from the mold, expanding both by heat, impressing the record in the blank, contracting the phonogram so made by the withdrawal of heat, and removing the phonogram from the mold by a direct longitudinal movement, substantially as set forth.

15. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing a metal upon the original phonogram so as to form a matrix or mold, in inserting Within said matrix or mold a blank to be reproduced made of a material having a higher coeificient of expansion than said matrix or mold, and in heating the blank and matrix carried thereby, whereby the blank will be expanded into intimate engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, substantially as set forth.

16. The process of duplicating cylindrical phonograms having a phonographic record thereon, which consists in depositing in a vacuum a metal vapor upon the original phonogram, electroplating a metal thereon so as to form a matrix or mold, in inserting the continuous cylindrical blank to be reproduced within said matrix or mold, in expanding the blank into intimate engagement with the record in relief carried by the bore of said matrix or mold, the cylindrical blank being made sufficiently thick to maintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the matrix, and finally removing the cylinder by direct longitudinal movement, substantially as set forth.

17. The method of producing record-cylinders for phonographs, which consists in first forming a record on a cylinder of wax or other relatively soft material, rendering the surface of the wax cylinder electrically conductive, and electrolytically depositing metal thereon forminga matrix, and then outwardly ICC expanding under pressure Within the matrix a cylinder or'tube of softened material sufficiently thick tomaintain its shape during and after the act of disengagement from the ing the same against a suitable matrix by its 10 own expansive force, substantially as described.

This specification signed and witnessed this tube by direct longitudinal movement.

18. The herein-described process of molding sound-records in celluloid, which consists of softening a celluloid tablet and then forc- THOMAS A. EDISON. Witnesses:

J. F. RANDOLPH, RIOHD. N. DYER.

matrix, and finally removing the cylinder or i 21st day of February, 1898.

US67265098A 1898-03-05 1898-03-05 Process of duplicating phonograms. Expired - Lifetime US713209A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US67265098A US713209A (en) 1898-03-05 1898-03-05 Process of duplicating phonograms.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US67265098A US713209A (en) 1898-03-05 1898-03-05 Process of duplicating phonograms.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US713209A true US713209A (en) 1902-11-11

Family

ID=2781731

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US67265098A Expired - Lifetime US713209A (en) 1898-03-05 1898-03-05 Process of duplicating phonograms.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US713209A (en)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP0365552B1 (en) Optical storage disk and method of its manufacture
US6814898B1 (en) Imprint lithography utilizing room temperature embossing
US6117284A (en) Dual-layer DVD disc, and method and apparatus for making same
US6718799B2 (en) Die and glass material for forming glass substrate, method for manufacturing glass substrate, and magnetic disk glass substrate
US4790893A (en) Replication of information carriers
US5310333A (en) Roll stamper for molding substrate used for optical recording medium
US7294294B1 (en) Surface modified stamper for imprint lithography
US3901994A (en) Metallized video disc having a dielectric coating thereon
US3932148A (en) Method and apparatus for making complex aspheric optical surfaces
US4157931A (en) Process for producing information carrying discs
US4619804A (en) Fabricating optical record media
US3989436A (en) Apparatus for producing injection molded and centrally apertured disc records
US3943666A (en) Method and apparatus for burnishing flexible recording material
US2531539A (en) Apparatus for forming hollow thermoplastic containers by drawing
US5676983A (en) Tool for making a microstructured plastic mold
AU727634B2 (en) Compact disc tack curing assembly line
US4308224A (en) Reproduction process for oil paintings
US7105280B1 (en) Utilizing permanent master for making stampers/imprinters for patterning of recording media
US1400146A (en) Art of making hollow rubber articles
US6309496B1 (en) Method and apparatus for making dual layer DVD discs
JP2005071487A (en) Stamper for forming uneven pattern, method for forming uneven pattern, and magnetic recording medium
US5173313A (en) Roll-stamper for forming substrate of information-recording medium
US4211617A (en) Process for producing a stamper for videodisc purposes
US20120064188A1 (en) Replication Tools and Related Fabrication Methods and Apparatus
EP0047645A1 (en) A method of producing an information recording disk