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US706600A - Carbureter. - Google Patents

Carbureter. Download PDF

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Publication number
US706600A
US706600A US1901048929A US706600A US 706600 A US706600 A US 706600A US 1901048929 A US1901048929 A US 1901048929A US 706600 A US706600 A US 706600A
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Prior art keywords
air
gasolene
pipe
perforations
tank
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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John Rush
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John Rush
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL, WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M5/00Float-controlled apparatus for maintaining a constant fuel level
    • F02M5/12Other details, e.g. floats, valves, setting devices or tools

Description

No. 700,000. Patenied Aug. 12, I902.

OABBU RETER.

(Applicnfin; filed I'ob. ac, 1001.5 (No Model.)

WITNESSES m v5 r00 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN RUSH, OF WATERLOO, IOWA.

CARBURETER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 706,600, dated August 12, 1902. Application filed February 28,1901. Serial No. 48,920. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, J QHN RUSH, a citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of Waterloo, Blackhawk county, Iowa, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Carbureters for Gas-Machines, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in carbureters in which float-valves are used to regulate the supply of oil; and the object of my improvement is to thoroughly mix the vapor or gasolene with air by passing the air in minute quantities beneath the surface of the gasolene, which insures its being sufficiently carbureted. I attain this object by the means illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a view in perspective of the carbureter having the top and part of the side removed in order to show the relative positions of the air-supplypipes and the floata valve. Fig. 2 is a vertical section of the carbureter, showing its parts in operative position when a proper supply of gasolene has been placed Within it. tion of the float-valve, showing its manner of connection with the gasolene-supply pipe; and Fig. 4 is a detail of the air-supply pipe, showing the perforated distributing-tube in section.

Similar letters refer to similar parts through out the several views.

The mixing-tank a is provided with the inthrougha T t, with a circular or ring-shaped distributer-pipe I), placed near the top cover of the carburetor. Anysufticient number of small tubes 0 are set within the under part of the pipe 1), depending therefrom and communicating with the interior thereof, and these tubes 0 are provided with one or more minute perforations in their sides at a point or points very near their lower ends, as at p.

A valve 0 is placed within the inner portion of the gasolene-supply pipe f, and the admission of gasolene is regulated by means of the float cl. This float is suspended on a bracket-lever g, pivoted to the lower part of a U-shaped bearing Z, the latter extending on both sides of the levers 7c and g. This bearing Z is hung on the crank-lever 7.. about Fig. 3 is a side eleva midway of its length. A set-screw h is placed to WOI'k through the outer end of the lever 76 and is used in adjusting the position of the levers g and to each .other, and hence the limit of play vertically of the float cl. The valve 0, which may be constructed in any usual manner, is operated by the movement of the crank-lever 7t, said lever It being restrained from sidewise movement by the pieces 971, one of said pieces opposite thereto not being shown in the drawings. A gas-vent S is provided in the top of the tank a.

The valve 0 remains open until sufficient gasolene (supplied under the pressure of gravity from a tank above, which is not here shown) is furnished to buoy up the float d to aposition where its connected crank-lever Zr shuts the valve 0 in the inlet-pipe n. The float is usually arranged to shut off the supply of oil when the surface of the latter has reached but a slight elevation above the perforations p in the lower. ends of the air-tubes c. When the consumption of the oil has proceeded to such an extent as to uncover the valve 0, and enough more gasolene is admit- 'ted to the tank a to again cover the perforations to the requisite depth.

As air is admitted under pressure through the air-inlet pipe c itpasses around within the circular pipeb and is distributed to the tubes 0, whichdepend from the ring and are open at their lower ends to permit dirt, scales, and dust to fall through the tubes past their side openings and out of such lower ends, thereby preventing clogging of the ring orthe tubes and preventing stoppage of the perforations in the latter. Such perforations are perhaps an inch from the lower ends of the tubes, and when there are several perforations the lowermost one is about an inch from such lower end. The air is supplied only at such pressure that under normal conditions it will depress the column of liquid within each tube to such point that it permits the air to escape through the perforation or through the uppermost of several perforations, though under abnormal or eXtraordinary conditions the column might be .further depressed and additional perforations exposed. Occasionally a strong blast of air might be directed through the tubes to blow accumulations therein out through their lower ends. The air tends to escape through the perforations p, which are of a minute bore and which permit but small particles or quantities of the air to issue. As these minute quantities of air pass out and rise to the surface of the gasolene they become thoroughly carbureted with gasolene vapor and enter the upper part of the mixer in a proper condition for combustion. The passing of the air in such small quantities through the gasolene prevents its bubbling and consequentimperfect carburization. Its distribution through a number of small perforations also permits of equalizing the gas-supply to the demands made upon the carbureter through combustion. It is estimated that the air suppliedthrough one of these perforations suffices for the operation of one gas-lamp, and the air-tubes and perforations may be increased to any number desired to within the tank above the liquid will ofier a certain pressure on the surface of the latter, which will prevent more liquid from coming in, and whenever the liquid level falls the valve will automatically open to admit more gasolene.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. In a carbureter for gas-machines, the combination with a mixing-tank having an oilinlet and gas-outlet; of an air-inlet pipe entering the tank above the level of the gasolene, and a number of small tubes communicating with and depending from said pipe into the gasolene and each pierced with minute perforations.

2. In a carbur'eter for gas-machines, the combination with a mixing-tank having anoilinlet and gas-outlet; of an air-inlet pipe entering the tank above the gasolene, a ringshaped distributer-pipe communicating with said inlet-pipe and also standing above the level of the gasolene, and a number of small tubes communicating with and depending from said distributer into the gasolene and each pierced with minute perforations.

3. In a carbureter for gas-machines, the combination with a mixing-tank having an oilinlet and gas-outlet; of an air-inlet pipe ontering the tank, a distributer-pipe communicating with said inlet-pipe and standing within the tank above the level of the gasolene, and a number of small tubes leading from the distributer downward below the level of the gasolene and each pierced with a number of minute perforations in its side walls, as and for the purpose set forth.

4. In a carbureter for gas-machines, the combination with a mixing-tank, the gas-outlet and air and oil inlet pipes, a valve in the latter, a float, and adjustable connections between the float and valve stem whereby the float operates the valve at varying levels of the oil; of a distributer-pipe connected with the air-inlet, and a series of small tubes depending from said pipe beneath the normal level of the oil and there provided with minute perforations, all as and for the purpose set forth.

Signed at Waterloo, Iowa, this 23d day of February, 1901.

JOHN RUSH. Witnesses:

HALCON G. TURNER, CHAS. E. OsMoN.

US706600A 1901-02-26 1901-02-26 Carbureter. Expired - Lifetime US706600A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3279178A (en) * 1963-04-16 1966-10-18 Kemenczky Establishment Hydrodynamic valve structure
US20050067724A1 (en) * 2001-11-01 2005-03-31 Cheng Alan Tat-Yan Method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into fermentation processes

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3279178A (en) * 1963-04-16 1966-10-18 Kemenczky Establishment Hydrodynamic valve structure
US20050067724A1 (en) * 2001-11-01 2005-03-31 Cheng Alan Tat-Yan Method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into fermentation processes
US7048262B2 (en) * 2001-11-01 2006-05-23 Praxair Technology, Inc. Method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into fermentation processes
US7279319B2 (en) * 2001-11-01 2007-10-09 Praxair Technology, Inc. Method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into fermentation processes

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