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Playing-ball.

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Publication number
US704748A
US704748A US1902104318A US704748A US 704748 A US704748 A US 704748A US 1902104318 A US1902104318 A US 1902104318A US 704748 A US704748 A US 704748A
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Prior art keywords
shell
material
ball
segments
plastic
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Expired - Lifetime
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Eleazer Kempshall
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Eleazer Kempshall
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/007Characteristics of the ball as a whole
    • A63B37/0077Physical properties
    • A63B37/0097Layers interlocking by means of protrusions or inserts, lattices or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls

Description

Patented luly I5, i902. E. KEMPSHALL.

PLAYmG BALL. {App1ication led Apr. 23, 1902.)

(No Modal.)

Inf/Venid? Eleazef Kem/95M Il,A

Witnesses fzdm.

V his dners/wg I i TH: yomgrs mms wom-Limo.. wHmGTon; o. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

PLAYING-BALL.

SPECXFICATIGN forming part of Letters Patent No. 704,748, dated July 15, 1902.

Application filed April 23, 1902. Serial No. 104,318 (No model.)

To @ZZ whom. it 11i/ay concern.-

Be it known that l, ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, a citizen of the United States, residing in Boston, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, Vhave invented certain new and useful Improvements in Playing-Balls, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to playing-balls, the object being to provide a ball of improved construction and quality especially adapted for use in the game of golf.

In the drawings accompanying and forming a part of this specification, Figure l illustrates l a complete hall partly broken away to disclose the construction. Fig. 2 is a view of the separated hemispherical metallic coresegments, showing the surface tongues or fins. Fig. 3 illustrates a preferred method of manufacturing the ball, and Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail showing the fabric layers of fibrous and plastic material. l Similar characters 4of reference designatelike parts in the figures. V

I produce a rigid hollow1 center piece or core (designated by A) of the required size and shape and preferably offslightly-leXilolc material, this being formed, preferably, of hernispherical segments, (designated in Fig. 2 by B and C, respectively.) Distributed over the outer surface of these segments are y struck-up fins or tongues 2, and these engage in and assist in the anchoring of the shell-segments D andD to the center piece A When the componentsof -the ball are as-v sembled. By striking up the'material of the core A,I form openings 3 in the surface vthereol",vvhereby the resilience of said core is` modified and somewhat increased, and these openings also form outlets into or through which some portion of the material of the shell will be forced when the latter is pressed into shape by the heating and forming dies. The extent to which the shell material will ilow into or through the openings 3 will depend, of course, upon the consistency of the shell material and the size and number of the openings.

The tongues 2 of the spherical metallic core are so struck up that they will all point toward the equator of the sphere, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 2, 3, and et. By this arrangement the shellsegments D and D are not only more vpernfianently anchored to the core,

butthe segments are held together at their weld or edges and are less liable to be separated.V v v In the present instance, and preferably so, the metallic center piece or core is formed of hemispherical segments, and4 one lof these is providedat its edge with a reduced circumferential portion or shoulder E, which registers with theicircumferential edge of the correspondinghemisphericalsegments,thereby forming a reinforcing lap -joint F, and these segments are preferably permanently joined before the shell is placed thereon.

Upon the metallic center piece or filling A, which is somewhat too bulky for the capacity of the finished shell, I compress thel hemispherical shell-segments D D' of previouslyformed layers 7 ande of a suitable substance or material, such as gutta-percha or celluloid, intermediate of which is a layer 5 of fabric or brous material or permeable cloth of. open mesh. When the ball is subjected -to the compression between v'the finishingdies, part of thelsemiplastic material of the innerlayer 4 of the, outer shell is forced through the openings 3 and forms keys on the interior of the hollow` sphere, thereby locking the shell to the'core. The fabric layer .5, forming a foundation for the outer shell layer 7, will prevent said` outer layer from collapsing or'bec'oming ,indented at the particular point of flowage ofthe-inner layer into the opening when said-shell-'segments D and D [are pressed upon ,the metallic core A between the forming andheating dies G and H.

The edge of v theoriginal shell-segments may vbe somewhat full, Ythereby furnishing matelrial lfor properly forming the joint between themas they are subjected to the inal compression, during which the ball is finally shaped, andat thesame time .the center of IOO lic center piece also forms a cushion, which l receives the blow imparted `to the shell," and by reason of the resisting force of said core the dying qualities ofthe ball are materially increased.

The outer shell is preferably compacted and welded together upon the inner springy shell. Preferably each of the'shells is thin, and the outer is softer and materially thicker than the inner, as well as having a springy quality. The parts are preferably assembled between heating-dies G and H,Which are brought together with great force, so as to effect the weld. By reason of the pressure portions of the-plastic celluloid are caused to protrude into the openings 3 in the inner shell and may form keys 6 on the interior of the latter. The tongues or barbs 2 penetrate and clench the celluloid segments together, the barbs upon one of the hemispheres pointing toward those on the other, so that it becomes impossible to separate the segments.

lt will be understood that the extent to which the material of the inner layer of the shell will ow into or through the perforations of a hollow core will depend, of course, upon the consistency of the material of such inner layer and the size and number of the perforations of the core.

It is to be understood that While the core herein shown is made of hemispherical segments of metal with struck-up tongues or fins and which is provided with openings for receiving the surplus material of the shell when the latter is compressed upon the core a continuous hard-material shell which is provided with distributing-perforations and projections or anchoring devices of any form for the purpose set forth may be employed within the scope and spirit of this invention and also that the shell may be built up of a plurality of layers of plastic or springy material and a plurality of layers of fabric.

Having described my invention, I claiml. A hollow playing-ball consisting entirely of two thin shells,whereof the inner shell is of hard,springymaterial,and the outeris thicker than the inner and consists of hard, plastic material reinforced by fibrous material; said inner shell having perforations through which the material of the outer shell protrudes.

2. A playing-ball consisting entirely of a thin, springy, perforated metal shell, and a thicker shell thereon formed of hard, springy, plastic material incorporated with fabric.

3. A playing-ball consisting entirely of a thin, springy, perforated metal shell, and a thicker shell thereon formed of hard, springy, plastic material and fabric, the fabric being in the form of a layer between two layers ofthe plastic material, and the material of the inner plastic layer protruding into the perforations in said metal shell.

4. A hollowplaying-ball consisting wholly of two thin shells, whereof the inner is thinner than the outer, and consists of springy metal provided with perforations, said outer shell consisting of a plurality of layers of plastic material and a reinforcing layer offabric; the material of said outer shell protruding into said perforations.

5. Aplaying-ball comprising a thin shell of springy metal, said shell being provided throughout with perforations, and a hard springy cover for said shell; said cover consisting of plastic material and fabric.

G. A playing-ball comprising a thin shell of metal provided with perforations, and a shell of Celluloid and fabric compacted upon said shell, portions of the Celluloid protruding into said perforations.

7. A playing-ball comprising a complete shell having perforations, and a shell thereon consisting of segments ofplastic material and fabric, saidsegments being welded together at their edges; portions of the plastic material entering said perforations and locking said shells together.

each consisting of plastic material and fabric; said barbs being embedded in said plastic material and preventing separation of said segments.

9. A playing-ball comprising a thin perforated metal shell having barbs, and a shell formed of welded segments of plastic material IOO ll. A playing-ball comprising a shell hav- I ing barbs, and a shell formed of joined segments of plastic material and fabric; said IOS barbs being embedded in said plastic material; l

the barbs in one hemisphere pointing toward those in the other hemisphere, thereby to clench said segments together.

ELEAZER KEMPSHALL. Witnesses:

F. NV. BARNACLO, B. C. STICKNEY.

US704748A 1902-04-23 1902-04-23 Playing-ball. Expired - Lifetime US704748A (en)

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US704748A US704748A (en) 1902-04-23 1902-04-23 Playing-ball.

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US704748A US704748A (en) 1902-04-23 1902-04-23 Playing-ball.

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2510215A (en) * 1947-02-17 1950-06-06 Albert F Pityo Method of forming hemispherical globe sections
US5820485A (en) * 1997-02-10 1998-10-13 Ilya Co. Ltd. Multilayer golf ball having projections on the surface or its inner cover
US5836834A (en) * 1996-04-24 1998-11-17 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf balls
US5882567A (en) * 1996-02-16 1999-03-16 Acushnet Company Method of making a golf ball having multiple layers
US6103166A (en) * 1998-01-12 2000-08-15 Acushnet Company Method for improving adhesion between golf ball layers
US6120393A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-09-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle having a hollow interior
US6126560A (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-10-03 Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd. Method of making hollow golf ball
US6142887A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-11-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6244977B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2001-06-12 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6293877B1 (en) 1998-12-29 2001-09-25 Acushnet Company Golf ball
US6309312B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2001-10-30 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US20020006837A1 (en) * 1997-05-27 2002-01-17 Dalton Jeffrey L. Wound golf ball having cast polyurethane cover
US6432000B1 (en) 1993-06-01 2002-08-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6485378B1 (en) 1999-11-23 2002-11-26 Acushnet Company Golf ball
US6500076B1 (en) 2001-05-01 2002-12-31 Acushnet Company Wound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US6595874B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2003-07-22 Acushnet Company Selectively weighted golf ball
US6638184B2 (en) 1993-06-01 2003-10-28 The Top-Flite Golf Company Three piece golf ball with a metal center
US6648776B1 (en) 1997-05-27 2003-11-18 Acushnet Company Multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US20040053710A1 (en) * 2001-12-13 2004-03-18 The Top-Flite Golf Company Golf ball
US6749789B1 (en) 1997-05-27 2004-06-15 Acushnet Company Method of forming a multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US6773363B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2004-08-10 Acüshnet Company Hollow layered golf ball
US6893361B2 (en) 2001-04-25 2005-05-17 Acushnet Company Multilayer golf ball with hoop-stress layer
US20050197211A1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2005-09-08 Sullivan Michael J. Golf ball having visible non-spherical insert

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2510215A (en) * 1947-02-17 1950-06-06 Albert F Pityo Method of forming hemispherical globe sections
US6193618B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2001-02-27 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6561927B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2003-05-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Methods of making low spin golf ball utilizing a mantle and a cellular or liquid core
US6435985B1 (en) 1993-04-28 2002-08-20 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6638184B2 (en) 1993-06-01 2003-10-28 The Top-Flite Golf Company Three piece golf ball with a metal center
US6432000B1 (en) 1993-06-01 2002-08-13 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6663509B2 (en) 1993-06-01 2003-12-16 Callaway Golf Company Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US5882567A (en) * 1996-02-16 1999-03-16 Acushnet Company Method of making a golf ball having multiple layers
US5836834A (en) * 1996-04-24 1998-11-17 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf balls
US6142887A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-11-07 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6244977B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2001-06-12 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6120393A (en) * 1996-09-16 2000-09-19 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle having a hollow interior
US6309312B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2001-10-30 Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6612939B1 (en) 1996-09-16 2003-09-02 The Top Flite Golf Company Golf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US5820485A (en) * 1997-02-10 1998-10-13 Ilya Co. Ltd. Multilayer golf ball having projections on the surface or its inner cover
US6812317B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2004-11-02 Acushnet Company Wound golf ball having cast polyurethane cover
US20020006837A1 (en) * 1997-05-27 2002-01-17 Dalton Jeffrey L. Wound golf ball having cast polyurethane cover
US6749789B1 (en) 1997-05-27 2004-06-15 Acushnet Company Method of forming a multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US7314587B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2008-01-01 Acushnet Company Method of forming a multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US6648776B1 (en) 1997-05-27 2003-11-18 Acushnet Company Multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US20040227269A1 (en) * 1997-05-27 2004-11-18 Hebert Edmund A. Method of forming a multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US6342019B1 (en) 1998-01-12 2002-01-29 Acushnet Company Golf balls having improved adhesion between layers
US6103166A (en) * 1998-01-12 2000-08-15 Acushnet Company Method for improving adhesion between golf ball layers
US6126560A (en) * 1998-07-17 2000-10-03 Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd. Method of making hollow golf ball
US6293877B1 (en) 1998-12-29 2001-09-25 Acushnet Company Golf ball
US6485378B1 (en) 1999-11-23 2002-11-26 Acushnet Company Golf ball
US20030228935A1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2003-12-11 Sullivan Michael J. Selectively weighted golf ball
US7211007B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2007-05-01 Acushnet Company Golf ball having visible non-spherical insert
US6595874B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2003-07-22 Acushnet Company Selectively weighted golf ball
US6773363B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2004-08-10 Acüshnet Company Hollow layered golf ball
US20050197211A1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2005-09-08 Sullivan Michael J. Golf ball having visible non-spherical insert
US7435192B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2008-10-14 Acushnet Company Golf ball having visible non-spherical insert
US6929567B2 (en) 1999-11-23 2005-08-16 Acushnet Company Selectively weighted golf ball
US6893361B2 (en) 2001-04-25 2005-05-17 Acushnet Company Multilayer golf ball with hoop-stress layer
US6986717B2 (en) 2001-05-01 2006-01-17 Acushnet Company Wound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US6500076B1 (en) 2001-05-01 2002-12-31 Acushnet Company Wound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US20030114248A1 (en) * 2001-05-01 2003-06-19 Morgan William E. Wound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US6846249B2 (en) * 2001-12-13 2005-01-25 Callaway Golf Company Golf ball
US20040053710A1 (en) * 2001-12-13 2004-03-18 The Top-Flite Golf Company Golf ball

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