US703098A - Wheeled scraper. - Google Patents

Wheeled scraper. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US703098A
US703098A US9252802A US1902092528A US703098A US 703098 A US703098 A US 703098A US 9252802 A US9252802 A US 9252802A US 1902092528 A US1902092528 A US 1902092528A US 703098 A US703098 A US 703098A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
pan
axle
draft
bar
hooks
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US9252802A
Inventor
James C Stubbs
Original Assignee
James C Stubbs
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by James C Stubbs filed Critical James C Stubbs
Priority to US9252802A priority Critical patent/US703098A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US703098A publication Critical patent/US703098A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F3/00Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines
    • E02F3/04Dredgers; Soil-shifting machines mechanically-driven
    • E02F3/64Buckets cars, i.e. having scraper bowls
    • E02F3/6454Towed (i.e. pulled or pushed) scrapers
    • E02F3/6463Towed (i.e. pulled or pushed) scrapers with rotatable scraper bowls for dumping the soil

Description

No. 703,098. Patented June 24, I902.
J c. STUBBS. WHEELED SCRAPEB.
' (Application filed Feb. 4, 1902.)
(No Model.)
:1 HI HUM 7 l 'y. 3.
6 2 2 c j/ j 02 wan/ems? Effigy/I262; ZZZ 5717f 3513A atta n tug, I
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
JAMES C. STUBBS, OF MOUNT PLEASANT, IOXVA.
WHEELED SCRAPER.
$PEGIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 703,098, dated June 24, 1902.
Application filed February 4, 1902. Serial No. 92,528. (No model.)
To all whom, it may concern:
Be it known that I, JAMES C. STUBBS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Mount Pleasant, in the county of Henry and State of Iowa, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Wheeled Scrapers, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to that class of earth excavating and transferring devices known as scrapers, my improvements being applicable more particularly to that type of scraper in which the pan is suspended from an axle supported by a pair of carrying-wheels, the pan being lowered to cutting and scooping position and subsequently raised to carrying position and tilted to effect the dump by means of a rearwardly-extending lever actuated by the operator. A fault hitherto inherent in devices of this type has resided in the severe burden imposed upon the operator and team in the act of breaking out of the ground the cutting edge of the scraper-pan after it has received its load and when broken out of the ground elevating the pan to its latching and carrying position. Most of these scrapers now in use have their draft-irons pivoted to the pan or to the axle, while the pan itself is suspended from the forward forked end of a rearwardly-extending operating-lever, termed the Johnson bar, fulcrumed on the axle. With this construction the entire onus of lifting the loaded pan from loading to carrying position is imposed on the operator, who accomplishes'it by a downward pull on the Johnson bar. Owing to the firmness with which the pan after taking its load is often embedded in the earth from which the excavations are being made, this elevation of the pan clear of the ground through the surrounding and superinoumbent earth to carrying position is,especially in thelcase of scrapers of large capacity, a severe strengthtaxing operation, often requiring the united efforts of two men.
My invention has for its object to obviate the fault hereinabove referred to by such a construction and connection of the draftirons to the axle as shall throw the principal onus of this operation upon the team, and that too at such a mechanical advantage as not to seriously add to the exertion and effort required of the latter.
To this end my invention consists in a combination of mechanical devices for effecting the result above stated in a highly efficient manner, substantially as hereinafter de scribed and claimed.
In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of myimproved scraper, one wheel being removed and the axle shown in transverse section for greater clearness, the full lines illustrating the loading position of the device and the dotted lines illustrating the carrying position; and Fig. 2 is a plan view of the scraper complete.
In the drawings, A designates the pan in the usual form. This pan is pivotally suspended at points slightly forward of its longitudinal center from the forward end of a forked operating-lever commonly known in this art as the Johnson bar. As shown, this J ohnson bar comprises a rearwardly-extending handle 13, connected at its inner end to a fork or bail 1', the parallel forwardly-extending arms of which are rigidly secured to the offset bends of an arched axle n, the pan being suspended from the forward ends of said forwardly-extending arms by means of hangers A. For the sake of greater rigidity a brace Z connects the forward or inner end of the handle 13 with the top of the central ofiset portion of the axle n. Pivoted to and pendent from the inner end of the handle B is the usual hook or latch 70, which when the bar is lowered engages a cooperating catch 7:. on the rear of the pan. A pair of rearwardly-extending handles 0, secured to the upper rear corners of the sides of the pan, enable the operator to correctly poise and guide the pan in the loading operation.
The parts as thus far described are old and well known in scrapers of this class. The outer ends of the axle n are journaled in a pair of carrying-wheels D, and those portions of the axle lying between the journals and the bends are conveniently formed of rectangular or other polygonal cross-section, as clearly shown at a, for a purpose that will hereinafter appear.
Referring next to those features which comprise the gist of my present invention, 1) represents a pair of crank-arms, the inner ends of which are apertured to pass over the journals of the axle and snugly fit the squared ICC portions of the latter above referred to. As will be seen by reference to Fig. 1, these crank-arms are positioned at substantially a right angle to the plane of the bends of the axle. These crank-arms are of considerable length, the forward ends thereof extending radially to a distance approximating one-third the radius of the carrying-wheels. To the forward ends of these crank-arms are pivotally connected at c the inner ends of the draft-irons d, the forward ends of which latter are connected to the usual pole e. Pivoted to and pendent from the draft-irons at asuitable point thereon are a pair of draft-hooksf, the lower ends of which are adapted to engage and disengage companion hooks h, fast on the sides of the pan near their lower forward ends. Links g, pivoted at one end to the forward ends of the Johnson bar at the pivotal connection of the latter with the hangers A and at their other end to the hooksfat intermediate points on the latter,serve to properly actuate said drafthooks simultaneously with the actuation of the Johnson bar and the raising and lowering of the pan. -Pivoted on the rear end of the pole e is the usual hooked link on, adapted to engage the bail or inner bifurcated portion of the Johnson bar when the latter is elevated.
When a load is to be taken, the handle of the Johnson bar is raised to or beyond the position shown in full lines in Fig. 1, the hook having been released from the rear of the pan. This operation permits the pan to drop, at the same time turning the axle in its bearings in the hubs of the wheels and throwing the arched portion of the axle downwardly and forwardly. This same operation also swings the crank-arms Z) from a substantially horizontal position to the downwardly-inclined position shown in Fig. 1 and simultaneously forces the draft-hooks f into engagement with their companion hooks h. The team is then started up and the load taken on, the draft being applied at the pivots cand the hooks h. The pan having been filled, the handle of the Johnson bar is pulled down, which operation raises the forward or cutting edge of the pan, While the bottom of the pan at its rear end still rests upon the ground. The raising of the forward portion of the pan elevates the hangers A, in the upper ends of which the rear ends of the links 9 are pivoted, which movement, through the links g, retracts the lower ends of the drafthooks f sufficiently to disengage the latter from the pan-hooks h. The draft of the team being at the same time applied at the pivotal points 0 on the extremities of the crank-arms b the latter are pulled forward and upward into longitudinal alinement with the draftirons. This produces a partial backward rotation of the axle in the hubs of the carryingwheels, which cooperates with the effort of the operator exerted on the Johnson bar in raising the pan clear of the ground to the extent of relieving the operator of the bulk of this labor. At the same time this initial forward movement of the draft-irons relatively to the axle and pan advances the upper ends of the draft-hooks f and so changes their pitch or inclination to the sides of the pan sufficiently to carry the lower ends of hooks f behind and fully clear of the hooks h, all as clearly illustrated by the dotted-line position of the parts shown in Fig. 1. The load having been carried to its destination is dumped in the manner usual to this class of scrapers, and on returning to the place of excavation the parts are again caused to assume the loading position by releasing the hook 7.: and elevating the handle of the Johnson bar, which operation throws down the crank-arms b to an angle with the draft-irons and at the same time effects the automatic reengagement of the draft-hooks f with the pan-hooks 72. The above-described cycle of operations is then repeated.
It will be evident that the liereinabove-described and illustrated embodiment of my invention might be varied and modified to some extent without departing from the principle and spirit thereof. I do not, therefore, limit myself to the exact details shown and described, except to the extent that they may be made the subject of specific claims.
I claim 1. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the axle'and its carryingwheels, the Johnson bar fulcrum ed on the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of draftirons united to the axle by a jointed connection which, on the application-of the draft, tends to partially rotate the axle backwardly in the wheels and thus elevate the pan, substantially as described.
2. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the arched axle and its carrying-wheels, the Johnson bar fulcrumed on the bends of the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of rigid projections on and extending forwardly of the axle substantially at a right angle to the bends of the axle, and draft-irons pivoted to the forward ends of said projections, substantially as and for the purpose described.
3. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the arched axle and its carrying-wheels, the Johnson bar fulcrumed on the bends of the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of a pair of forwardly-projecting crank-arms keyed fast on the axle between the journals and the bends of the axle, respectively, and disposed at substantially a right angle to the bends of the axle, and a pair of draft irons pivoted at their inner ends to the forward ends of said crank-arms, substantially as and for the purpose described.
4. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the arched axle and its carrying-wheels, the Johnson bar fulcrumed on IIO the bends of the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of a pair of crank-arms rigidly mounted on squared portions of the axle lying between the journals and the bends thereof, respectively,and projecting forwardly substantially into the transverse plane of the points of suspension of the pan from the Johnson bar, and a pair of draft-irons pivoted at their inner ends to the forward ends of said crankarms, the parts being so disposed that the application of the draft carries the crankarms from an angular position relatively to the draft-irons into longitudinal alinement therewith, at the same time turning backward the axle in its bearings and elevating the pan.
5. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the arched axle and its carrying-Wheels, the Johnson bar fulcrumed on the bends of the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of a pair of crank-arms keyed fast on the axle between the journals and the bends thereof,respectively, and extending forwardly substantially parallel and coextensive with the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, a pair of draft-irons pivoted at their inner ends to the forward ends of said crank-arms, a pair of draft-hooks pivoted to and depending from said draft-irons, cooperating catch-hooks on the pan, and means whereby said draft-hooks are automatically actuated by the movements of the Johnson bar and draft-irons, substantially as described.
6. In a scraper of the class described, the combination with the arched axle and its carrying-wheels, the Johnson bar fulcrumed on the bends of the axle, and the pan suspended from the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, of a pair of crank-arms keyed fast on the, axle between the journals and the bends thereof, respectively, and extending forwardly substantially parallel and coextensive with the overhanging end of the Johnson bar, a pair of draft-irons pivoted at their inner ends to the forward ends of said crank-arms, a pair of draft-hooks pivoted to and depending from said draft-irons, cooperating catch-hooks on the pan, and actuating-links for said draft hooks pivoted at their inner ends to the forward end of the Johnson bar and at their outer ends to the draft-hooks, substantially as described.
JAMES O. STUBBS.
Witnesses:
LE ROY A. PALMER, OHAs. A. MOFARLAND.
US9252802A 1902-02-04 1902-02-04 Wheeled scraper. Expired - Lifetime US703098A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US9252802A US703098A (en) 1902-02-04 1902-02-04 Wheeled scraper.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US9252802A US703098A (en) 1902-02-04 1902-02-04 Wheeled scraper.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US703098A true US703098A (en) 1902-06-24

Family

ID=2771627

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US9252802A Expired - Lifetime US703098A (en) 1902-02-04 1902-02-04 Wheeled scraper.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US703098A (en)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US703098A (en) Wheeled scraper.
US1697988A (en) Scraper
US711365A (en) Wheeled scraper.
US2503577A (en) Scoop reset mechanism
US332533A (en) eubbard
US470208A (en) Thomas e
US346147A (en) Wheeled scraper
US774431A (en) Excavating-bucket.
US282681A (en) Wheeled scraper
US1754976A (en) Wheeled scraper
USRE17044E (en) Scraper
US334497A (en) Excavator
US332531A (en) hubbard
US390374A (en) Wheeled dumping-scraper
US1560975A (en) Excavating and scraping machine
US1132917A (en) Drag-line bucket.
US316779A (en) Scraper
US866615A (en) Scraper.
US672798A (en) Wheeled scraper.
US925035A (en) Wheeled scraper.
US463571A (en) brooks
US366952A (en) Road-scraping attachment
US254485A (en) Thied to waldo a
US706343A (en) Wheeled scraper.
US827144A (en) Excavator-shovel.