US5939645A - Vane anemometer having a modular impeller assembly - Google Patents

Vane anemometer having a modular impeller assembly Download PDF

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Publication number
US5939645A
US5939645A US09102888 US10288898A US5939645A US 5939645 A US5939645 A US 5939645A US 09102888 US09102888 US 09102888 US 10288898 A US10288898 A US 10288898A US 5939645 A US5939645 A US 5939645A
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Prior art keywords
temperature
casing
anemometer
probe
impeller
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Expired - Lifetime
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US09102888
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Richard Kellerman
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Nielsen Kellerman Inc
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Nielsen Kellerman Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01PMEASURING LINEAR OR ANGULAR SPEED, ACCELERATION, DECELERATION, OR SHOCK; INDICATING PRESENCE, ABSENCE, OR DIRECTION, OF MOVEMENT
    • G01P1/00Details of instruments
    • G01P1/04Special adaptations of driving means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/05Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using mechanical effects
    • G01F1/10Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using mechanical effects using rotating vanes with axial admission
    • G01F1/115Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using mechanical effects using rotating vanes with axial admission with magnetic or electromagnetic coupling to the indicating device
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01PMEASURING LINEAR OR ANGULAR SPEED, ACCELERATION, DECELERATION, OR SHOCK; INDICATING PRESENCE, ABSENCE, OR DIRECTION, OF MOVEMENT
    • G01P1/00Details of instruments
    • G01P1/02Housings
    • G01P1/026Housings for speed measuring devices, e.g. pulse generator
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01PMEASURING LINEAR OR ANGULAR SPEED, ACCELERATION, DECELERATION, OR SHOCK; INDICATING PRESENCE, ABSENCE, OR DIRECTION, OF MOVEMENT
    • G01P5/00Measuring speed of fluids, e.g. of air stream; Measuring speed of bodies relative to fluids, e.g. of ship, of aircraft
    • G01P5/02Measuring speed of fluids, e.g. of air stream; Measuring speed of bodies relative to fluids, e.g. of ship, of aircraft by measuring forces exerted by the fluid on solid bodies, e.g. anemometer
    • G01P5/06Measuring speed of fluids, e.g. of air stream; Measuring speed of bodies relative to fluids, e.g. of ship, of aircraft by measuring forces exerted by the fluid on solid bodies, e.g. anemometer using rotation of vanes
    • G01P5/07Measuring speed of fluids, e.g. of air stream; Measuring speed of bodies relative to fluids, e.g. of ship, of aircraft by measuring forces exerted by the fluid on solid bodies, e.g. anemometer using rotation of vanes with electrical coupling to the indicating device
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01WMETEOROLOGY
    • G01W1/00Meteorology
    • G01W1/17Catathermometers for measuring "cooling value" related either to weather conditions or to comfort of other human environment

Abstract

A vane anemometer is disclosed in which a modular vane assembly is removably mounted within the case of the instrument. Within the modular vane assembly is a rotatably mounted impeller shaft. The impeller assembly preferably can be removed and inserted into a cavity of the anemometer without the use of tools. Consequently, if the impeller, bearings or other components of the impeller assembly should become damaged, the modular impeller assembly can be quickly and easily replaced. The modular impeller assembly is preferably mechanically insulated from the anemometer casing. This minimizes the effect of dynamic forces on the bearings and other components of the impeller assembly. A method of and the structure for precisely and reproducibly adjusting the axial clearance between a shaft and a bearing assembly is also disclosed. The vane anemometer of this invention may also measure the temperature and the wind chill of the ambient air. In order to accurately and quickly measure these parameters the vane anemometer may have a temperature probe that is disposed external to the casing of the anemometer. Preferably, the casing has an opening defined by a plurality of walls of the casing in which the temperature probe is disposed. The temperature probe may be coupled to a microprocessor by an electrical connector that extends from the casing. In order to thermally isolate the probe from the casing, the connector may be wound about itself.

Description

RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/837,376 filed on Apr. 17, 1997, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,783,753 and claims the benefit of the filing date of this application.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to portable vane anemometers intended for making air speed measurements in a variety of applications and locations with high accuracy and over a wide range of speeds. In particular, this invention relates to portable vane anemometers that have replaceable, modular impeller assemblies. This invention also relates to vane anemometers that can also determine the wind chill of the ambient air.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Conventionally, a vane anemometer has an impeller mounted on a shaft. Flow of air through the impeller produces rotation of the shaft; the speed of rotation of the shaft is indicative of the air speed. Rotation of the shaft is then measured by a known mechanical or electrical means. In many applications, vane anemometers are required to be highly accurate. If significant frictional forces are present, such as between the shaft and its bearings, some of the work produced by the air flow will be used to overcome this frictional force. Work used to overcome frictional forces will not be converted into shaft rotation. Such that, the measured speed will be less than the true air speed. Since frictional forces may be more pronounced at low speeds, the usefulness of an anemometer at low air speeds may be limited if the effects of friction are not minimized.

Typically, the effects of frictional forces are minimized by mounting the rotatable shaft in precision bearings. Since precision bearings minimize friction, the speed of rotation of the impeller shaft more closely approximates the true air speed. Frictional forces may be reduced employing sapphire "V" bearings in conjunction with hardened steel shafts having small spherically shaped tips at either of its axial ends. When the proper axial clearance is provided between the axial ends of the shaft and the bearings, the spherical tips roll around the V of the jeweled bearing and thereby reduce friction between these components. As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, if the axial clearance is not set properly, the effects of friction will not be minimized because the shaft tips will contact the respective bearings excessively. Examples of vane anemometers using such bearings are the "TurboMeter" manufactured by Davis Instruments of Hayward, Calif., and the "Sky Watch Fun," available from Flytec USA, of Miami, Fla.

Although jewel bearings reduce friction, they have several disadvantages. For instance, one disadvantage of sapphire bearing assemblies is the tendency for the tip of the impeller shaft to suffer wear in response to the forces generated by the various loads imposed upon it. At higher wind speeds, wear can be significant and can lead to a significant degradation in accuracy. A further disadvantage of jewel bearing assemblies is vulnerability to damage caused by mechanical shock. For this reason, some companies provide such bearings with cushioned supports in order to limit shock loads. Bearings of this type are available from Bird Precision, of Waltham, Mass.

Yet another disadvantage of jewel bearings is the requirement to provide a precise axial clearance between the ends of the shaft and the bottom of the V jewel, and the necessity to provide a means to set and hold this clearance. Typically, jewel bearings are adjustable and the axial clearance is set by a skilled operator. For instance, the bearings may be threaded to the anemometer, so that, the position of the bearings relative to the shaft can be either retracted or advanced as needed. Adjustable jewels of this type are also available from Bird Precision.

One more disadvantage of jewel bearings is their susceptibly to contamination, which can also give rise to a loss of accuracy. For example, if a contaminant enters the area between the shaft end and the bearing, it will interfere with rotation of the shaft and damage the bearing. The disadvantages listed above are not limited to anemometers having jewel bearings. Ball or needle bearings are also subject to contamination, wear and damage.

If a jewel bearing or other type of bearing should fail due to either wear, mechanical shock, interference by contaminants or other causes, it will have to be either repaired or replaced. In most instances, these bearings are housed within the anemometer and are not easily accessible. Consequently, if the bearings should fail, typically the entire anemometer must be replaced. This can be expensive. Furthermore, even if the bearings are accessible, they typically cannot be replaced by the average user because replacing them involves setting the proper axial clearance as described above and requires particular skill.

The advantages of a durable vane anemometer, the disadvantage of bearings employed in anemometers and the need for an anemometer that can be relatively easily repaired is well known. For example, in U.S. Pat. No. 3,823,611 issued to Rudow, the advantage of an anemometer that is economically assembled and easily serviced is noted. Furthermore, in U.S. Pat. No. 4,078,426 issued to Cassini, the patentee describes a vane anemometer intended to address the problem of bearing wear and the necessity to replace the bearing one or more times during the desired useful life of the instrument.

Accordingly, it is desirable for a vane anemometer to have a bearing assembly that can easily be replaced. Furthermore, a vane anemometer that can be constructed without requiring a skilled operator to set the proper axial clearance between the bearings and the shaft is needed. An improved vane anemometer that mechanically insulates the bearings from shock loads or dynamic forces is also needed.

Devices have also been developed for determining the wind chill of the ambient air. As is known, the wind chill is a function of the wind speed and the temperature of the ambient air. Therefore, in order to determine the wind chill an instrument must detect both of these parameters.

Portable instruments, such as a portable vane anemometer, typically have a temperature sensing probe for measuring the temperature of the ambient air. One difficulty that in encountered is designing portable vane anemometers is that the temperature sensing probe is typically relatively fragile, and susceptible to damage from either static or dynamic loads. In order to protect the temperature sensing probe, prior art instruments have disposed the temperature sensing probe within the casing of the instrument. Such a device is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 5,008,775 (Schindler et al.).

Although disposing the temperature sensing probe within the casing of the instrument may function to protect the probe from various loading conditions, it presents other drawbacks as well. For example, portable vane anemometers are typically transported or stowed in a person's pocket, hand or other locations. Therefore, while being transported or stowed, portable vane anemometers are not at equilibrium with the ambient temperature, but rather, the temperature of the place where they are being transported or stowed, such as a person's pocket. Depending on the climate, the difference in temperature between the ambient and the storage or transporting location may be significant, and as much as 60° F. Because of this difference in temperature, when a portable instrument is removed from its storage location to the ambient, it may take a considerable amount of time for the temperature probe to reach equilibrium with the ambient. Thus, it may take a relatively long period of time to obtain an accurate temperature measurement and thus, an accurate wind chill measurement.

This invention also includes a portable vane anemometer that has a temperature sensing probe that is external to the casing of the anemometer so that it can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly. The vane anemometer of this invention is also constructed so as to minimize the potential of damage to the temperature probe.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the present invention, a vane anemometer includes a casing and a modular impeller assembly. The modular impeller assembly may be quickly and simply removed from the anemometer casing and replaced with a new impeller assembly without the aid of tools. In this manner, any loss in accuracy due to bearing wear, or other damage to the impeller assembly, such as the ingestion of contaminants, can be quickly and simply remedied.

Preferably, the modular impeller assembly has a rotatable shaft upon which is mounted an impeller. The shaft and the impeller may be mounted in a cage assembly. More particularly, the shaft may be mounted in a bearing at either of its axial ends, preferably jewel bearings. Within the casing of the anemometer may be a cavity into which the impeller assembly can be inserted and removed without the use of tools.

In order to insulate the impeller from mechanical shock and dynamic forces, the impeller assembly preferably has an elastomeric or other shock absorbing material running around its periphery. Within the cavity of the casing may be a groove upon which the elastomeric material can be mated. By mating the impeller assembly to the casing in this fashion, the elastomeric material provides mechanical insulation from dynamic forces. For example, if the anemometer is dropped, the sensitive components of the impeller assembly, such as the jewel bearings, are protected from mechanical shock.

In a preferred embodiment of this invention, the impeller assembly has a magnet mounted on the shaft and an inductor and a microprocessor disposed within the casing. As wind causes rotation of the impeller, the shaft and its attached magnet rotate in relation to the wind speed. Rotation of the magnet and its associated magnetic field induces a current in the inductor that is indicative of the wind speed. The current produced by the inductor is then sent to the microprocessor. Within the microprocessor, the wind speed is calculated. The wind speed may be displayed in an LCD display disposed on the casing. Furthermore, the anemometer may have a key pad arranged on the casing to control the operation of the microprocessor.

The impeller assembly may have two cages that can be mated, so that, the axial clearance between the impeller shaft and the bearings can be properly and easily established. One of the two cages may have a plurality of protrusions that can be mated with recesses on the other cage. Upon mating the protrusions with the recesses, there is little or no axial clearance between the shaft and the bearings. After mating the cages, the cages are rotated relative to one another. This causes the protrusions to exit their respective recesses. As they exit the recesses, the protrusions push against a mating surface of the other cage and thereby cause the cages to separate by a distance equal to the length of the protrusions. Upon separating the cages by the length of the protrusions, the shaft is also separated from the bearings at either end by a distance that is approximately equal to the length of the protrusions. More particularly, the sum of the distance each end is separated from its respective bearing is equal to the length of the protrusions. Thus, by selecting the proper length of the protrusions, the proper axial clearance between the ends of the shaft and the bearings can be set without the use of a skilled operator and an adjustable bearing.

The vane anemometer of this invention is also preferably portable and may have a temperature probe that is coupled to the microprocessor by electrical connectors. By measuring the temperature of the ambient with the temperature probe, the microprocessor can determine the wind chill. The temperature probe is preferably external to the casing of the vane anemometer, so that it can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively easily when the vane anemometer is moved from a storage location to the ambient.

In order to protect the temperature probe from static and dynamic loads, the casing may have an opening defined within the body of the casing. The body of the casing preferably has an opening that is defined by a plurality of walls. The opening is preferably open on two sides so that ambient air can freely flow through the opening. By exposing the temperature probe to a flow of air, the temperature probe can achieve equilibrium with the environment relatively quickly. The temperature probe preferably extends from one of the walls that defines the opening. Preferably, the opening is small enough, so that it is difficult for objects to enter the opening and contact the probe and damage it. However, the opening is also preferably large enough so that a sufficient amount of air can enter the opening and contact the probe, so that it can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly.

Although the opening may be any of a variety of shapes, the opening is preferably of such a shape that it is difficult to place objects into the opening. For instance, the opening may be defined by five walls. Four of these walls, may by straight and the fifth may be curved to connect two of the straight shaped walls. Because this shape is irregular, this type of shape makes it relatively difficult to place an object into the openings and damage the temperature probe. Preferably, the temperature probe extends from about the midpoint of one of the walls that defines the opening so that it is the furthest distance from either of the openings. This also helps in minimizing the likelihood of damage to the probe through insertion of an object into the opening.

The electrical connectors that connect the temperature probe to the microprocessor preferably extend from the casing to the temperature probe. In one embodiment, the electrical connectors extends substantially straight from a wall of the casing. In order to further isolate the temperature probe from the casing, so that it will reach equilibrium with the ambient quicker when the vane anemometer is moved from a storage location to the ambient, the electrical connectors may be wound about themselves so that they have a greater length. By increasing the length of the electrical connectors, the probes are further thermally isolated from the casing, so that the probe can obtain equilibrium with the ambient quicker.

Other features of the invention are described below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front view of a vane anemometer according to a preferred embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged section view through line 2--2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of one component of the preferred embodiment depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken along line 4--4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of one aspect of the component depicted in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a front view of the vane anemometer of FIG. 1 with the modular impeller assembly removed;

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of a component depicted in FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view of one aspect of the cross section depicted in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram of the anemometer depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is another preferred embodiment of the vane anemometer of this invention;

FIG. 11 is a cross-section taken along line 11--11 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 12 is a cross-section taken along line 12--12 of FIG. 10.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate corresponding structure throughout the views, and referring in particular to FIG. 1, there is shown a vane anemometer 15. The vane anemometer 15 is preferably small enough so that it is portable and can be held in a single hand. In a preferred embodiment, the vane anemometer 15 includes a casing 20 and a removable modular impeller assembly 1. Preferably, the casing 20 is manufactured using a molding process. However, other known techniques of manufacturing may be employed. Additionally, the casing 20 is preferably constructed from plastic. Again other suitable materials may be used. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the casing 20 has a cavity 17 for receiving the modular impeller assembly 1. FIG. 1 depicts the modular impeller assembly 1 mounted in the cavity 17. Preferably, the cavity 17 and the impeller assembly 1 are substantially cylindrical in shape.

Housed within the casing may be a microprocessor and its associated electrical circuits. The microprocessor functions, as described in further detail below, to compute wind speed. Disposed within the casing may be an output display 3 and a keypad 24. The display may be of the digital variety and even more specifically of the LCD type. As is typical, the keypad communicates with the microprocessor to input signals from the user. For example, the mode of operation of the anemometer may be controlled with the keypad 24. Such modes may include, among others, calculation and display of a maximum wind speed, an instantaneous wind speed and/or an average wind speed.

FIGS. 2-4 identify the principal parts of the impeller assembly 1. These components preferably include a first cage 5, a second cage 6, a rotatably mounted impeller 7, two V-jewel bearings 8, a shaft 9, and a magnet 10. In a preferred embodiment, the shaft 9 is constructed from hardened steel. Additionally, the magnet 10 and the impeller 7 are mounted on the shaft 9. They may be press fit onto the shaft 9 or attached by other known methods, such as with use of an adhesive. The shaft 9 may have spherical shaped tips 32 at either of its axial ends as is conventional with many impeller shafts.

Disposed within each cage is a bearing 8 upon which either axial end of the shaft 9 is mounted. Preferably, these bearings are jewel bearings with a V-groove 34. The spherical shaped tips 32 of the shaft roll in the V-groove 34 of the bearings to minimize friction between the shaft and the bearings. Bearings of this type are well known in the art. For example, as mentioned above they are produced by Bird Precision of Waltham, Mass. Since the speed of rotation of the shaft 9 is used to convert air speed into an electrical current so that it can be quantified, ideally there would be no friction between the shaft and the bearings. Any friction between these components causes the measured air speed to differ from the actual air speed. Since as is known in the art, the amount of friction between a jewel bearing and the shaft is relatively low, jewel bearings are typically employed to minimize the effects of friction.

As depicted in FIG. 2, disposed within the casing 2 is an inductor 12. The inductor 12 is in electrical communication with the microprocessor. In one preferred embodiment the inductor 12 is a pick up coil. The magnet 10 is preferably cylindrical in shape and magnetized across its diameter. In operation, as depicted schematically in FIG. 9, the impeller 7 rotates in response to airflow. Since the shaft 9 is rotatably mounted in the bearings 8 and attached to the impeller 7, it rotates in relation to the air flow. Moreover, the magnet 10 rotates with the shaft 9. Rotation of the magnet 10 causes the magnetic field received by the inductor 12 to vary in magnitude. This induces an electrical current in the inductor 12 that is transmitted by electrical conductors to the microprocessor. Prior to being received by the microprocessor, the current may be amplified by a conventional amplifier. After receiving the output of the amplifier, the microprocessor computes the air speed. The processor also drives a digital display 3, allowing the user to read the wind speed. The details of the amplifier, processor and display units will be familiar to anyone skilled in the art.

Since the magnet rotates in relation to the wind speed, the variation in the magnetic field produced by the rotation of the magnet is indicative of the wind speed. Furthermore, since the electrical current induced in the inductor is proportional to the variation in the magnetic field, the electrical current sent to the microprocessor is indicative of the wind speed. The induced current is proportional to the variation in the magnetic field. As used here, the term proportional does not signify a linear or fixed relationship. Rather, this term indicates that as the time rate of change of the magnetic field increases the magnitude of the current induced increases.

The anemometer of the present invention can be manufactured without the use of adjustable jewel bearings and the axial clearance of the bearings can be set without the aid of a skilled manufacturer. In order to accomplish these features, one of the cages, which in the preferred embodiment shown is the first cage 5, has a plurality of protrusions 14 extending from its mating surface, as is best shown in FIGS. 5 and 8. Additionally, the other cage, which in the preferred embodiment is the second cage 6, has a plurality of recesses 16 in its mating surface 28, as is also best shown in FIGS. 5 and 8. Although only one protrusion and one recess is shown in these figures, it will be appreciated that the impeller assembly 1 may have a plurality of protrusions and recesses. In a preferred embodiment, the impeller assembly has three protrusions and recesses.

To begin the manufacturing process, a jewel bearing 8 is press fitted into one of the cages, which in the preferred embodiment is the first cage 5. Although the preferred method of attaching the jewel bearings 8 is an interference fit, other known methods of attaching the jewel bearing, such as an adhesive may be used. One axial end of the shaft 9 with the impeller 7 and the magnet 10 mounted around its circumference is then inserted into the attached jewel bearing 8 in the first cage 5. Prior to mounting the shaft 9, the impeller 7 and the magnet 10 are mounted around the circumference of the shaft 9. The first cage 5 is then assembled to the second cage 6, but not yet secured to it. More specifically, the three protrusions 14 extending from the first cage 5 are mated with the three recesses 16 in the second cage 6, as is best seen in FIGS. 7 and 8. The second jewel 8 is then seated on the other axial end of the shaft 9 so that there is essentially zero axial clearance between the ends of the shaft 9 and the bearings 8. Through the use of an adhesive, the second jewel 8 is then rigidly affixed to the second cage 6.

The first and the second cages are then rotated in opposite directions relative to each other. As the cages 5,6 are rotated, the three protrusions 14 come out of their respective recesses 16 and contact the mating surface 28 of the second cage 6. When this occurs, the cages 5,6 are driven apart by the distance "d," which is the distance the protrusions extend from the first cage. The arrangement of the cage at this stage of the assembly is shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. As the cages are separated by the distance "d," it will be appreciated that the shaft 9 becomes separated from the bearings by the distance "d." Since the distance "d" the protrusions 14 extend from the first cage 5 corresponds to the proper axial clearance between the shaft and the bearings, the clearance is set when the cages 5,6 are separated by the protrusions 14. Alternatively stated, the distance "d" that the cages 5,6 are driven apart corresponds to the sum of the axial clearance between each bearing and its respective end of the shaft 9. After the shaft has been separated from the bearings by the distance "d," no further adjustment of the bearings is needed in order to provide the proper axial clearance. Thus, in this invention the axial clearance can be set without the use of an adjustable bearing and a skilled operator is not needed to set the requisite axial clearance.

Following the setting of the axial clearance, the cages 5,6 are affixed to each other by preferably either adhesive bonding or solvent welding. However, other similar means may be employed. An elastomeric material 11 is then placed around the circumference of the assembly. In the preferred embodiment illustrated, the elastomeric material 11 is shaped in the form of an o-ring that runs around a channel 18 between the first cage and the second cage, as best seen in FIG. 2. The o-ring may be affixed to the channel 18 with an adhesive. With the o-ring installed, the modular impeller assembly 1 can be inserted into the cavity 17 of the casing 20.

As best seen in FIG. 2, the diameter of the impeller assembly 1 at the point where the o-ring is installed is greater than the diameter of the impeller assembly 1 at other locations. The diameter of the impeller assembly 1 in areas other than where the o-ring is installed is small enough relative to the diameter of the cavity 17, so that, the walls of the cages 5,6 either do not contact the walls of the cavity 17 when the impeller assembly is placed in the cavity 17 or contact the walls only slightly (not enough contact to create an interference fit). However, the diameter of the impeller assembly 1 at the point where the o-ring is installed is larger than the diameter of the cavity 17. Consequently, when the impeller assembly 1 is inserted into the cavity 17, the o-ring is compressed and an interference fit between the impeller assembly 1 and the casing 20 is provided.

In the preferred embodiment depicted in FIG. 2, the casing 20 may have a chamfered edge 26 along the top and the bottom of the cavity 17 for receiving the impeller assembly 1, as best shown in FIG. 2. Additionally, the casing 20 may have a groove, which is preferable a "v" shaped groove 30, running around the cavity 17. As the impeller assembly 1 is inserted, the o-ring is compressed along the sides of the cavity 17. Eventually, upon insertion, the o-ring reaches the groove 30 and is compressed in the groove 30. At this point, the impeller assembly has been inserted into the casing 20. The fit between the impeller assembly 1 and the casing 20 is tight enough, so that, the impeller assembly cannot be removed from the casing unless direct pressure is applied to the impeller assembly. More specifically, if the impeller assembly 1 is dropped or shaken the impeller assembly 1 will not become separated from the casing 20. However, the amount of pressure required to insert and remove the impeller assembly 1 is low enough that the impeller assembly 1 can be inserted and removed by hand without the use of tools.

Because the O-ring is compliant, it provides some mechanical isolation between the casing 2 and the impeller assembly 1. More specifically, the o-ring provides some mechanical isolation, so that, in the event a dynamic force is applied to the casing, for instance if the anemometer is dropped, the dynamic force will be dampened by the o-ring and the force transmitted to the bearings and the shaft will be significantly less. Since as described above jewel bearings are very sensitive and any damage to either the bearings or the shaft can effect the performance of the anemometer, this is one, but certainly not the only significant feature of the invention.

As mentioned above, some prior art vane anemometers have adjustable bearings and even more particularly adjustable jewel bearings. The bearings are adjustable so that the precise axial clearance between each bearing and the respective axial end of the shaft can be maintained. For example, jewel bearings manufactures by Bird Precision of Waltham, Mass. are adjustable. These adjustable bearings are threaded to the anemometer and require a skilled operator to adjust them and set the proper clearance. Since as described above, the axial clearance of the vane anemometer of this invention can be set without a skilled operator having to adjust the bearings to set the proper axial clearance, the anemometer of this invention has a distinct advantage over those of the prior art.

The vane anemometer 15 of this invention may also have the capacity to measure the wind chill of the ambient air. In order to measure the wind chill, the vane anemometer 15 may have a temperature probe 40 and a connector or connectors 42. (The vane anemometer may have a plurality of connectors and the term connector is used herein to refer to one or more connectors.) A first embodiment of this vane anemometer 15 is displayed in FIG. 1. As shown, the temperature probe 40 is external to the casing and extends from the casing 20 into the ambient air. By disposing the temperature probe 40 in the ambient, as opposed to within the casing 20, the temperature probe 40 can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly.

The temperature probe 40 may be disposed within an opening 44 defined within the casing 20 of the vane anemometer 15. This opening 44 may be defined by a plurality of walls within the casing 20. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the opening is defined by five walls 46a, 46b, 46c, 46d, 46e. Four of these walls 46a, 46b, 46c and 46d are straight, and one 46e of them is curved. Because the five walls 46a, 46b, 46c, 46d, 46e define an irregular shape (not a standard shape such as a circle or a square), the five walls 46a, 46b, 46c, 46d, 46e form a shape that makes it difficult to place objects into the opening 44 and damage the relatively sensitive temperature probe 40. The temperature probe 40 preferably extends from an aperture 46 in the casing 20, that is disposed at about the midpoint of one of the walls 46a, that defines the opening 44. By placing the temperature probe 40 at the midpoint of one of the walls 46a and by defining the opening 44 in an irregular shape (not a standard shape such as a square or a circle) the likelihood of contacting the probe 40 and damaging the probe 40 by inserting an object into the opening 44 is decreased.

The opening 44 is preferably open to the ambient on at least two sides 48a, 48b, so that ambient air can flow through the opening 44. By exposing the temperature probe 40 to a flow of ambient air, the temperature probe 40 can achieve equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly, and thus the vane anemometer 15 can determine both the temperature and the wind chill of the ambient relatively quickly. The size of the opening 44 is chosen so as to obtain an adequate amount of air flow to achieve equilibrium with the environment relatively quickly and to minimize the likelihood of damaging the probe 44.

Although FIG. 1 illustrates the shape and size of one opening 44 that may be used in a preferred embodiment of this invention, the invention is not limited to this precise shape, size or the combination of this shape and size. Rather, the shape and size may be selectively chosen so as to obtain an adequate amount of air flow, while at the same time minimizing the likelihood of damage to the temperature probe 40.

Since the temperature probe 40 is external to the casing 20 of the vane anemometer 15, the temperature probe 40 will achieve equilibrium when it is moved from one mass of air at a certain temperature to another mass of air at another temperature. In addition, the temperature probe 40 will respond quicker to changes in temperature in a given mass of air than a probe that is housed within the casing. The vane anemometer 15 also protects the external temperature probe 40 by selecting the proper size and shape of the opening 44 into which the temperature probe 40 extends.

The connector 42 places the temperature probe 40 into electrical communication with the microprocessor. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the connector 42 extends from the casing 20 without any curves. In this embodiment the connector 42 may extend perpendicular or at an angle to a wall 44a of the casing 20 form which it extends.

A second embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 12. In this embodiment, the temperature probe 40 is also coupled to the microprocessor by a connector 42. Similarly, the temperature probe 40 also extends into an opening 44 defined by walls 46a, 46b, 46c, 46d, 46e of the vane anemometer casing 20. The opening 44 is open on two sides to expose the temperature probe 40 to ambient air. The difference between the first embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 11 and the second embodiment of FIGS. 10 and 12 is the length and the shape of the connector 42. As described above, in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 11 the connector 42 extends in substantially a straight line from a wall 46a of the casing 20. In contrast, in the embodiment depicted in FIGS. 10 and 12, the connector 42 is wound about itself. By winding the connector 42 about itself, the length of the connector 42 in the second embodiment is longer than that of the first embodiment. Increasing the length of the connector 42 has the advantage of further thermally isolating the temperature probe 40 from the casing 20, so that the temperature probe is less likely to be in thermal equilibrium with the casing 20. This is important because the casing 20 will often be at a higher than ambient temperature. For example, when the vane anemometer 15 is stored in a person's pocket, the casing 20 of the vane anemometer 15 will achieve equilibrium with the temperature of the pocket, which may be quite different from the ambient temperature. If the temperature of the temperature probe is equivalent to the temperature of the casing 20, this can cause the time for the probe 40 to obtain equilibrium with the ambient to increase and therefore, the time to obtain an accurate temperature reading to increase. By increasing the length of the connector 42, the temperature probe 40 is further removed from the casing, so that the temperature probe is less likely to be in thermal equilibrium with the casing 20 when the temperature probe 40 is placed in the ambient. Thus, the temperature of the probe 40 when it is stored is more likely to be closer to ambient temperature, and when the temperature probe 40 is employed, (i.e. removed from the storage location), it will obtain equilibrium with the ambient quicker, thereby enabling the vane anemometer 15 to determine the temperature and the wind chill of the ambient quicker.

The connector 42 as shown in FIGS. 10 and 12 is preferably wound so that it achieves a large length, yet fits within the relatively small opening 44, that is designed to achieve enough air flow to provide an accurate temperature reading and to minimize the likelihood of damage to the temperature probe. The temperature probe may be wound in a variety of ways. The preferred embodiment of FIGS. 10 and 12 is shown by way of illustration and not by way of limitation. In this embodiment, the connector 42 is wrapped in a helical manner to provide two helical loops 48 and is wound back through the loops. The connector 42 may be wound into other shapes and designs, but this design permits the connector to be long enough to provide the requisite thermal isolation from the casing 20, yet short enough so that the connector 42 and the probe 40 can be contained within the opening 44 described above and have the advantage including its size and shape that the opening 44 provides.

In order to determine the wind speed, the temperature probe 40 inputs the temperature to the microprocessor as is best illustrated in FIG. 9. The microprocessor calculates the wind chill from the temperature and the wind speed determined from the rotation of the impeller, as described above.

As mentioned above, the vane anemometer 15 may have an output display 3 and a keypad 24. This output display 3 may be used to display the wind chill and the temperature. The keypad 24 may be used to select the desired output, windchill, temperature or wind speed.

In summary, by providing a vane anemometer 15 with an external temperature probe 40, the vane anemometer 15 can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly when the vane anemometer is placed in the ambient. In order to protect the temperature probe 40 from damage, the temperature probe 40 may extend into an opening 44 defined within the casing 20 of the vane anemometer 15. The opening 44 is preferably open on two sides so that the air flow is great enough to relatively quickly and accurately determine the temperature of the ambient. In addition, the opening 44 is preferably of a size and shape that minimizes the likelihood of damage to the temperature probe 40. The electrical connector 42 that couples the temperature probe 40 to the microprocessor may be wound about itself within the opening to increase the length of the connector 42. By increasing the length of the connector 42, the temperature probe 40 is further thermally isolated from the casing 20 so that the temperature probe 40 can obtain equilibrium with the ambient relatively quickly.

Although a certain embodiment of the present invention has been illustrated above, that embodiment is for the purposes of illustration only and is not meant to limit the scope of the present invention. Upon review of the forgoing specification those of ordinary skill will immediately realize numerous adaptations and modifications of the disclosed system. Therefore, in order to ascertain the scope of the present invention, attention is directed to the appended claims.

Claims (46)

What is claimed:
1. A vane anemometer, comprising:
a casing that encloses a microprocessor that calculates wind speed, calculates wind chill and determines air temperature;
a temperature probe that is coupled to the casing and that is external to the casing, the temperature probe being in electrical communication with the microprocessor, so that the microprocessor can determine the temperature of the air; and
a modular impeller assembly, removably inserted into the casing, comprising a periphery, an elastomeric material running around the periphery, an impeller and a magnet mounted on a rotatable shaft, such that wind causes rotation of the impeller, the magnet and the shaft, said rotation of the magnet producing an electrical signal proportional to the wind speed and the electrical signal being receivable by said microprocessor so that the microprocessor can calculate the wind speed in response to the electrical signal and the wind chill in response to the electrical signal and the temperature probe.
2. The vane anemometer of claim 1 wherein the modular impeller assembly further comprises a first cage sealed to a second cage and the shaft is rotatably mounted within the first and second cages.
3. The vane anemometer of claim 1, further comprising a display mounted to the casing for indicating the wind speed as calculated by the microprocessor.
4. The vane anemometer of claim 1 wherein the shaft has a first and a second axial end each mounted in a jewel bearing.
5. The vane anemometer of claim 1 wherein the modular impeller assembly can be inserted into and removed from the casing without the aid of tools.
6. The vane anemometer of claim 1 wherein the casing further comprises an inductor that the magnet induces a current into when it rotates with the shaft.
7. The vane anemometer of claim 1 wherein the casing further comprises a cavity for receiving the impeller assembly and the cavity has a groove for receiving the elastomeric material running around the periphery of the impeller assembly.
8. The vane anemometer of claim 1, wherein the impeller assembly further comprises a first and a second cage, the first cage having a plurality of protrusions seperating the first cage from the second cage by a length of the protrusions and wherein a sum of a first axial clearance between a first bearing and a first end of the shaft and a second axial clearance between a second bearing and a second end of the shaft approximately equals the length of the protrusions.
9. The vane anemometer of claim 1, wherein the casing has a plurality of walls that define an opening into which the temperature probe extends.
10. The vane anemometer of claim 9, wherein the casing comprises five walls that define the opening.
11. The vane anemometer of claim 1, further comprising an electrical connector that electrically couples the temperature probe to the microprocessor.
12. The vane anemometer of claim 11, wherein the connector is wrapped around itself to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
13. A portable vane anemometer, comprising:
a casing that has a plurality of walls that define an opening through which air can flow;
a temperature probe that is coupled to the casing and that extends into the opening, so that the temperature probe is external to the casing;
a microprocessor, disposed in the casing, that calculates wind chill in response to the temperature probe; and
an electrical connector that electrically couples the temperature probe to the microprocessor, the connector being wrapped around itself to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
14. The portable vane anemometer of claim 13, wherein the opening is defined by five walls.
15. A vane anemometer, comprising:
a casing that encloses a microprocessor that calculates wind speed, calculates wind chill and determines air temperature;
a temperature probe that is coupled to the casing and that is external to the casing, the temperature probe being in electrical communication with the microprocessor, so that the microprocessor can determine the temperature of the air; and
a modular impeller assembly, removably inserted into the casing, comprising first cage sealed to a second cage, a shaft rotatably mounted to the first cage and the second cage, an impeller mounted to the shaft and a magnet mounted to the shaft, so that air flow causes rotation of the impeller, the magnet and the shaft, the rotation of the magnet producing an electrical signal that is indicative of the wind speed and that is receivable by the microprocessor, so that the microprocessor can calculate the wind speed in response to the electrical signal and the wind chill in response to the temperature probe and the electrical signal.
16. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the modular impeller assembly further comprises an elastomeric material running around a periphery of the modular impeller assembly.
17. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the casing further comprises a cavity for receiving the modular impeller assembly and the cavity has a groove for receiving an elastomeric material that runs around a periphery of the impeller assembly.
18. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the first cage has a plurality of protrusions separating the first cage from the second cage by a length of the protrusions and wherein a sum of a first axial clearance between a first bearing and a first end of the shaft and a second axial clearance between a second bearing and a second end of the shaft approximately equals the length of the protrusions.
19. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the casing further comprises an inductor that the magnet induces a current into when the magnet rotates with the shaft.
20. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the casing has a plurality of walls that define an opening into which the temperature probe extends.
21. The vane anemometer of claim 20, wherein the casing comprises five walls that define the opening.
22. The vane anemometer of claim 15, further comprising an electrical connector that electrically couples the temperature probe to the microprocessor.
23. The vane anemometer of claim 15, wherein the connector is wrapped around itself to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
24. A portable hand held vane anemometer that can measure wind speed and wind chill relatively quickly when moving from a first thermal mass to a second thermal mass, comprising:
a casing that has a plurality of walls that define an opening through which air can flow;
a temperature probe coupled to the casing and extending into the opening so that the temperature probe is external to the casing but protected by the plurality of walls, the temperature probe being thermally isolated from the casing so that the vane anemometer can obtain thermal equilibrium relatively quickly when moving from the first thermal mass to the second thermal mass;
an impeller assembly, mounted to the anemometer, the impeller assembly comprising an impeller and a magnet mounted on a rotatable shaft, the impeller, the magnet and the shaft rotating in response to ambient air flow; and
a microprocessor, disposed in the casing, that is in electrical communication with the temperature probe and the magnet, so that the microprocessor can determine air speed and wind chill when moved from the first thermal mass to the second thermal mass.
25. The portable vane anemometer of claim 24, further comprising a connector that electrically couples the temperature probe to the microprocessor, the connector extending from the casing and into the opening and be of sufficient length to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
26. The vane anemometer of claim 25, wherein the connector is wrapped around itself to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
27. The portable vane anemometer of claim 24, wherein the casing further comprises a cavity and wherein the impeller assembly can be inserted into and removed from the cavity without the use of tools.
28. The portable vane anemometer of claim 24, wherein the impeller assembly further comprises an elastomeric material running around a periphery of the impeller assembly.
29. The portable vane anemometer of claim 28, wherein the casing further comprises a cavity, disposed within the casing, and a groove running around the cavity, the elastomeric material that runs around the periphery of the impeller assembly being insertable into the groove when the impeller assembly is inserted into the cavity and thereby retaining the impeller assembly within the cavity.
30. The portable vane anemometer of claim 24, wherein the impeller assembly further comprises a first cage and a second cage that are mated together to house the impeller assembly and wherein the shaft is rotatably mounted within the first cage and the second cage.
31. The portable vane anemometer of claim 30, wherein the first cage has a plurality of protrusions that separate the first cage form the second cage by a length of the protrusions, and wherein a sum of a first axial clearance between a first bearing and a first end of the shaft and a second axial clearance between a second bearing and a second end of the shaft approximately equals the length of the protrusions.
32. The vane anemometer of claim 24, wherein the casing further comprises an inductor that the magnet induces a current into when the magnet rotates with the shaft.
33. A portable vane anemometer, comprising:
a casing that encloses a microprocessor that calculates wind speed, the casing having a cavity, and
a modular impeller assembly that can be inserted into and removed from the cavity without the use of tools, the impeller assembly comprising an impeller and a magnet mounted on a rotatable shaft, such that air flow causes rotation of the impeller, the magnet and the shaft, said rotation of the magnet producing an electrical signal that is indicative of the wind speed and that is receivable by said microprocessor so that the microprocessor can determine wind speed.
34. The portable vane anemometer of claim 33, wherein the impeller assembly further comprises a first cage and a second cage that are mated together to house the impeller assembly.
35. The portable vane anemometer of claim 34, wherein the first cage has a plurality of protrusions that separate the first cage form the second cage by a length of the protrusions, and wherein a sum of a first axial clearance between a first bearing and a first end of the shaft and a second axial clearance between a second bearing and a second end of the shaft approximately equals the length of the protrusions.
36. The portable vane anemometer of claim 33, wherein the impeller assembly further comprises an elastomeric material running around a periphery of the impeller assembly.
37. The portable vane anemometer of claim 36, wherein the casing further comprises a groove running around the cavity for receiving the elastomeric material that runs around the periphery of the impeller assembly.
38. The portable vane anemometer of claim 33, wherein the casing further comprises an opening defined by a plurality of walls and wherein the vane anemometer further comprises a temperature probe coupled to the casing and disposed in the opening, the probe being in electrical communication with the microprocessor, so that the microprocessor can determine the temperature in response to the temperature probe and calculate the wind chill in response to the temperature probe and the rotation of the magnet.
39. The portable vane anemometer of claim 38, wherein the probe is thermally isolated from the casing.
40. The protable vane anemometer of claim 39, further comprising a connector extending from the casing to the probe, the connector being of sufficient length to thermally isolate the probe from the casing.
41. The portable vane anemometer of claim 40, wherein the connector is wrapped around itself to thermally isolate the temperature probe from the casing.
42. A vane anemometer, comprising:
a casing that encloses a microprocessor that calculates wind speed; and
a modular impellar assembly, removably inserted into the casing, comprising a first cage sealed to a second cage, a shaft rotatably mounted to the first cage and the second cage, an impeller and a magnet mounted on the shaft, so that rotation of the magnet with the shaft and the impeller produces an electrical signal that is indicative of the wind speed and that is receivable by the microprocessor.
43. The vane anemometer of claim 42, wherein the modular impeller assembly further comprises an elastomeric material running around a periphery of the modular impeller assembly.
44. The vane anemometer of claim 42, wherein the casing further comprises a cavity for receiving the modular impellar assembly and the cavity has a groove for receiving an elastomeric material that runs around a periphery of the impeller assembly.
45. The vane anemometer of claim 42, wherein the first cage has a plurality of protrusions separating the first cage from the second cage by a length of the protrusions and a sum of a first axial clearance between a first bearing and a first end of the shaft and a second axial clearance between a second bearing and a second end of the shaft approximately equals the length of the protrusions.
46. The vane anemometer of claim 42, wherein the casing further comprises an inductor that the magnet induces a current into when the magnet rotates with the shaft.
US09102888 1997-04-17 1998-06-23 Vane anemometer having a modular impeller assembly Expired - Lifetime US5939645A (en)

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WO2002083252A1 (en) * 2001-04-11 2002-10-24 Jdc Electronics S.A. Device for measuring speed, in particular instantaneous speed and impact speed of a golf club
US6923079B1 (en) 2001-10-31 2005-08-02 Scott S. Snibbe Recording, transmission and/or playback of data representing an airflow
US20050200417A1 (en) * 2002-10-08 2005-09-15 Impinj, Inc., A Delaware Corporation Use of analog-valued floating-gate transistors for parallel and serial signal processing
EP1596062A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2005-11-16 Flytec AG Thermal stabilisation of a wind mill
US20060193369A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2006-08-31 Quartex, A Division Of Primex, Inc. Wind velocity measuring apparatus
US20080066560A1 (en) * 2006-09-19 2008-03-20 Mattel, Inc. Electronic Device With Speed Measurement and Output Generation
US20090049927A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2009-02-26 Rosemount Aerospace Inc. Force balanced impeller flow meter for mass flow rate control
DE202010011573U1 (en) 2010-08-19 2010-11-11 Lin, Dong-Chang Improved construction of the mounting of an impeller blade of a wind
EP2336787A2 (en) 2009-12-01 2011-06-22 Flytec AG Anemometer
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6257074B1 (en) * 1997-04-17 2001-07-10 Nielsen-Kellerman Co. Vane anemometer with thermally isolated sensors
WO2002083252A1 (en) * 2001-04-11 2002-10-24 Jdc Electronics S.A. Device for measuring speed, in particular instantaneous speed and impact speed of a golf club
US6923079B1 (en) 2001-10-31 2005-08-02 Scott S. Snibbe Recording, transmission and/or playback of data representing an airflow
US20050200417A1 (en) * 2002-10-08 2005-09-15 Impinj, Inc., A Delaware Corporation Use of analog-valued floating-gate transistors for parallel and serial signal processing
US20060193369A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2006-08-31 Quartex, A Division Of Primex, Inc. Wind velocity measuring apparatus
US7427157B2 (en) 2003-09-04 2008-09-23 Quartex, Inc. Wind velocity measuring apparatus
EP1596062A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2005-11-16 Flytec AG Thermal stabilisation of a wind mill
US7637172B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2009-12-29 Mattel, Inc. Electronic device with speed measurement and output generation
US20080066560A1 (en) * 2006-09-19 2008-03-20 Mattel, Inc. Electronic Device With Speed Measurement and Output Generation
US7603915B2 (en) * 2007-08-23 2009-10-20 Rosemount Aerospace Inc. Force balanced impeller flow meter for mass flow rate control
US20090049927A1 (en) * 2007-08-23 2009-02-26 Rosemount Aerospace Inc. Force balanced impeller flow meter for mass flow rate control
EP2336787A2 (en) 2009-12-01 2011-06-22 Flytec AG Anemometer
EP2336787A3 (en) * 2009-12-01 2012-05-30 Flytec AG Anemometer
DE202010011573U1 (en) 2010-08-19 2010-11-11 Lin, Dong-Chang Improved construction of the mounting of an impeller blade of a wind
US20120048010A1 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-03-01 Dong-Chang Lin Impeller assembly mounting structure of vane anemometer
US8327701B2 (en) * 2010-08-27 2012-12-11 Dong-Chang Lin Impeller assembly mounting structure of vane anemometer

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