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Ventilating air-heater

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US574271A
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air
chamber
box
casing
tubes
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS
    • F24B1/00Stoves or ranges
    • F24B1/18Stoves with open fires, e.g. fireplaces
    • F24B1/1808Simulated fireplaces

Description

(N0 Mom.) C. vV..ROBERIS.

VENTILATING AIR HEATER.

No. 574,271. K Patented Dc, 29, 1896.

THE Ncnms Ptrzns co., PHorn.L|ma, wAsmNmon, n. c.

l UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CLARENCE V. ROBERTS, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

VENTILATING AIR-HEATER..

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 574,271, dated December 29, 1896.

Application filed January 31, 1895. Serial No. 536,840. (No model.)

.To all whom zit may concern:

Beit known that I, CLARENCE V. ROBERTS, a citizen of the United States, residing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, have invented certain Improvements in Ventilating Air- Heaters, of which the following is a specification.

The object of my inventionis to construct an air heating and Ventilating device for rooms or apartments in such manner that gas may be effectively used as a fuel with the maximum of heating effect and without any vitiation of the air in said room or apartment, the gas flames, on the contrary, serving as an efficient aid in effecting the proper ventilation of the room by the withdrawal of air therefrom,while the hot air projected into the room is prevented from coming into direct contact with the gas flames.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure l is a vertical sectional view of a heating and ventilatin g device constructed in accordance with my invention and adapted for use in an ordinary fireplace. Fig. 2 is a sectional plan view of the same, taken on the line 2 2, Fig. l. Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view on the line 3 3, Fig. l. Fig. 4 is a sectional plan view on the line 4 4, Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a diagram illustratingva modification of my invention; and Fig. 6 is a sectional view, on a reduced scale, illustrating another modification.

A represents a casing constructed for application to a fireplace, or it may be designed as an outstanding stove, to be connected by means of a smoke-pipe with a chimney-flue, the fireplace form of the device which I have selected for illustration being used simply for convenience.

Extending laterally across the bottom of vthe casing A is a box B, and across the top of the casing extends a box D, and the casing has a double back divided byvertical partitions a into four iiues b, b', d, and f, the last being separated from the flue cl by av horizontal partition a and communicating with the combustion-chamber of the casing through an opening f above said horizontal partition a. The flue d communicates with the chamber D Within the box D through a flue d', and said chamber is also in communication through a series of tubes F with a chamber B within the box B at the base of the casing, the latter chamber communicating through a pipe B2 With the outside air, and said pipe B2 having a valve or damper g provided with a suitable operating-rod g', so that the supply of air to the chamber B' can be readily regulated. The chamber B is also incommunication with the lower end of the flue d. Hence the air from said chamber B can gain access to the chamber D boththrough the pipes or tubes F and through theiiue d.

The tubes E are of concave form, as repre sented in Figs. 3 and 4:, and in the concave front of each tube is located a burner pipe G, these burner-pipes being closed at the upper ends, but communicating at their lower ends with a gas-supply pipe G', which extends transversely across the cham ber B' and is provided on the outside of the casing A with a suitable valve G2 for regulating the iiow of gas.

Each of the burner-pipes G has one` or more rows of openings, preferably arranged on the inner side of the pipe, as shown in Fig. 3, so that the jets of gasescaping from these openings strike the concave faces of the tubes F as soon as ignited, the iiame then passing around the front of each tube and the products of combustion escaping through the spaces between the tubes so as to lap the sides of the same,

After leaving the tubes F the products of combustion strike the front Wall of the rear flue d and then pass around the casing of the iue d and escape into the discharge-flue f through the opening f. The tubes F and the casing of the flues d d thus become highly heated. Hence the cold air ascending from the chamber B to the upper chamber D through said tubes and flues likewise becomes heated and escapes from the open front of the'boX D into the room or apartment, an inclined deflector h within said box D serving to direct the heated air outward.

On a shelf I in front of the box D is a Water-pan I', which is, screened from view by means of a perforated casing J, preferably made in the form of opposite halves hinged at J and susceptible of being readily separated in order to permit access to the Waterpan, the contents of the latter serving, by

TOO

evaporation, to meisten the heated air as the latter flows over the pan before escaping through the perforations of the casing J.

At each end of the lower box B is a casing i, inclosing a passage i', communicating with the corresponding side flue l) or b', this passage t" receiving air from the room or apartment through a perforated or grated front t2 and discharging said air into the flues Z) b', in which it ascends to the chimney, it being understood that these flues extend to the top of the heater alongside of the flue f.

The positive withdrawal of considerable volumes of air from points near the floor of the room or apartment is thus provided for in addition to the large volumes of air which are drawn inward and upward by the gas flames. Hence the thorough ventilation of the room or apartment is insured, and any vitiation of the air in said room or apartment by the gas flames is effectually prevented, as all of the air which comes into direct contact with said flames is caused to pass with the other products of combustion up through the fluef and into the chimney.

The tubes F are by preference inclined forwardly from bottom to top, so that the heat reflected thereby is thrown downwardly as well as outwardly, and said tubes are also inclined laterally, so as to provide wider spaces between the same at the top than at the bottom, in order to insure a free passage for the products of combustion in the upper portion of the combuStien-chamber.

rlhere can be no direct downflow of the volumes 0f heated air issuing from the box D, for the entire volume of air in front of the eombustion-chamber is so highly heated by radiation and reflection that it has a const-ant tendency to rise. Hence there is a continuous flow of air from distant portions of the room toward the open front of the combustionchamber, a portion of this air, as it rises in front of the combustion chamber, being drawn inward to support the combustion of the gas flames and to supply the draft created by the chimney.

\\Thi1e it is preferred in all eases to provide for an inflow of external air directly to the basc-chamber B', this is not absolutely essential to the broadest embodiment of my invention, as cold air may, if desired, be drawn directly from the roem near the Iioor into the chamber B through suitable openings in the front of the box ll, and although I prefer to use the concave form of heating-tube F partially embracing the burncrpipe, as shown and described, I can in some cases locate a burner-pipe Gi between adjoining tubes F, as shown, for instance, in Fig. 5, and the tubes alone or the ilues d d may alone, if desired, be used as the agency for heating the air, although, of course, the use of both sets of airducts is to be preferred. The hot-air box D may also be dispensed with, if desired, and

the air-ducts permitted to discharge directly into the room.

In Fig. G I have shown a form of outstanding stove embodying my invention and having a series of tubes F2 projecting upwardly from a perforated base B, which incloses thc cold-air chamber, the tubes being heated by jets from upright burnertubes Gf4 and the structure being sul-mounted by a perforated cap or hood D2.

lla-ving thus described my invention, I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patentl.. The combination of the cold-air box, a series of upright air-ducts communicating therewith and open at their upper ends for the discharge of heated air therefrom, said airwducts being separated laterally one from another with upright gas-burner tubes located in proximity to said air-ducts and discharging their jets toward the front. of the same, whereby the products of combustion pass from front to rear of the air-ducts through the vertical spaces between the latter, substantially as specified.

2. The combination of the lower cold-air box and the upper hot-air box, upright airducts connecting the same and providing for the flow of air from one to the other, said airducts being separated laterally one from another, and upright gas-burners discharging jets in front of said upright air-ducts, whereby the products of combustion can escape through the vertical spaces between the latter, substantially as specified.

The combination of the cold-airbox, and the concave air-ducts communicating therewith, projecting upwardly therefrom, and open at their upper ends for the discharge of heated air, with perforated gas-burner pipes disposed in the concave fronts of said ducts, substantially as specified.

4. The combination of the bottom cold-air box, the top casin g inclosing the hot-air chamber, a hollow rear casing projecting upwardly from the cold-air box and inclosing a duct which communicates at the lower end with said cold-air box and at the upper end with the hot-air chamber, a series of upright air ducts located in front of said casing and likewise communicating with said cold-air box at the bottom and discharging into the hot-air chamber at the top, and upright gas-burner pipes discharging their jets in proximity to said upright air-ducts, substantially as specified.

5. The combination of the casing inclosing the combustion-chamber and having a coldair box at the bottom and a hot-air chamber at the top, the double back partitioned to form an air-duct in the lower portion and a discharge-flue in the upper portion, said air-duct communicating with the cold-air box at the bottom and with the hot-air chamber at the top, and said discharge-flue communicating with the combustion-chamber, upright air- IOO IIO

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ducts communicating with the cold-air box and discharging into the hot-air chamber, and upright gas-burner pipes disharging their jets in proximity to said ducts, substantially as specified.

6. The combination of the casing having a cold-air box at the bottom, upright air-ducts communicating therewithl and open at their upper ends for the escape of heated air, npright gas-burner pipes discharging their jets in proximity to said ducts, a discharge-flue communicating with the combustion-charnber, and air-exhaust fines anking the discharge-Hue, said air-exhaust fines communieating at their upper ends with the chimney and at their lower ends with air-inlets at the lower portion of the casing, substantially as specified.

'7. A casing having an air-box at the bottom and a hollow back partitioned so as to divide the chamber within it into three parts, namely, an air-duct communicating with said air-box, a discharge-flue com ninnicatin g with the combustion-charnber, and Ventilating-fines conlmunicating with the chimney and with the roorn or apartment at the bottom of the casing, in combination with upright air-ducts communicatin g with the cold-air box, and open at their upper ends for the discharge of heated air, and upright burner-tubes discharging their jets in proximity to said upright airducts, substantially as specified.

In testimony whereof I have signed my naine to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CLARENCE V. ROBERTS.

Witnesses:

FRANK E. BEOHTOLD, JOSEPH H. KLEIN.

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2705488A (en) * 1949-07-07 1955-04-05 Harry T Wright Fireplace heat exchanger
US4291670A (en) * 1980-07-08 1981-09-29 Hyatt Everett C Gas fired fireplace insert with heat extractor
US20050087185A1 (en) * 2003-10-24 2005-04-28 Rumens Kurt W.F. Fireplace assembly with aromatherapy system
US9803888B2 (en) 2012-03-12 2017-10-31 Maximum Air Llc HVAC base and return air system

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2705488A (en) * 1949-07-07 1955-04-05 Harry T Wright Fireplace heat exchanger
US4291670A (en) * 1980-07-08 1981-09-29 Hyatt Everett C Gas fired fireplace insert with heat extractor
US20050087185A1 (en) * 2003-10-24 2005-04-28 Rumens Kurt W.F. Fireplace assembly with aromatherapy system
US9803888B2 (en) 2012-03-12 2017-10-31 Maximum Air Llc HVAC base and return air system

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