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Fuel gas stripping of rich amine to remove hydrocarbons

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US5625117A
US5625117A US08517004 US51700495A US5625117A US 5625117 A US5625117 A US 5625117A US 08517004 US08517004 US 08517004 US 51700495 A US51700495 A US 51700495A US 5625117 A US5625117 A US 5625117A
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Prior art keywords
hydrocarbon
amine
absorption
zone
absorbent
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Expired - Fee Related
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US08517004
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Gerald O. Henderson
William M. Rice
Ric T. Zima
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Marathon Petroleum Co LP
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Ashland Inc
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10GCRACKING HYDROCARBON OILS; PRODUCTION OF LIQUID HYDROCARBON MIXTURES, e.g. BY DESTRUCTIVE HYDROGENATION, OLIGOMERISATION, POLYMERISATION; RECOVERY OF HYDROCARBON OILS FROM OIL-SHALE, OIL-SAND, OR GASES; REFINING MIXTURES MAINLY CONSISTING OF HYDROCARBONS; REFORMING OF NAPHTHA; MINERAL WAXES
    • C10G21/00Refining of hydrocarbon oils in the absence of hydrogen, by extraction with selective solvents
    • C10G21/06Refining of hydrocarbon oils in the absence of hydrogen, by extraction with selective solvents characterised by the solvent used
    • C10G21/12Organic compounds only
    • C10G21/20Nitrogen-containing compounds

Abstract

Minor amounts of C3 -C4 hydrocarbons from amine absorbents used in removing H2 S liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon are recovered. The process features recovery of the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon in a hydrocarbon gas from a second absorption zone where H2 S is removed from the hydrocarbon gas, the hydrocarbon gas functioning as a stripping gas.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

I. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to a process for recovering C3 -C4 components absorbed by or entrained in amine absorbents during absorption removal of H2 S from liquid C3 -C4 streams.

II. Background of the Invention

Hydrocarbon streams containing or comprising significant quantities of C3 -C4 components are common process streams in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Crude processing, for example, produces a stream of mostly saturated C3 -C4 distillate, while fluid catalytic cracking units produce a byproduct which comprises mostly C3 -C4 unsaturates. These C3 -C4 streams typically contain minor amounts, e.g., 0.5 to 10 percent by weight, or less, of H2 S, a contaminant which can seriously interfere with further processing or use of the streams. Accordingly, treatment of C3 -C4 streams to remove H2 S or reduce its concentration to a level tolerated by conversion catalysts or subsequent users is standard practice.

Commonly, the H2 S is removed from such streams by procedures in which the C3 -C4 stream is intimately contacted, under pressure sufficient to maintain the stream as a liquid, with an "absorbent" or solution comprising an amine, such as an alkanolamine. The "absorption" of the H2 S from the liquid C3 -C4 is considered to occur by a mechanism in which the H2 S purportedly forms a compound with the amine at lower temperatures, this compound being readily dissociated at higher temperatures, thereby allowing "desorption" of the H2 S and its further processing. Whatever the validity of the supposed mechanism, absorbency or absorption terminology has become firmly established and employed with respect to amine H2 S removal, and is so employed herein. As indicated, prior art absorption of H2 S from liquids and gases is well known, as exemplified in U.S. Pat. No. 4,278,621, U.S. Pat. No. 4,297,329, both by Sigmund et al, and in the literature, such as in Gas and Liquid Sweetening, by R. N. Maddox, Campbell Petroleum Series, 1974.

During the amine absorption treatment of liquid C3 -C4 streams to remove H2 S, the slight but significant solubility of the liquid C3 -C4 composition(s) in the amine absorbent at the pressures employed and the possible physical entrainment of the C3 -C4 liquid in the amine may pose significant problems. A minor amount, e.g., 20 to 250 ppm, by weight, of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon is commonly found in the amine exiting the absorber for regeneration, resulting in a significant amount of the hydrocarbon in the amine recovery system. In at least one conventional processing scheme, C3 -C4 components in the amine have simply been allowed to flash at reduced pressure in a flash zone or drum before regenerating the amine, the flashed C3 -C4 gas simply being sent to flare. This procedure, however, represents a net loss of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon and increases the volume of material which must be handled by the flare. Accordingly, a need has existed for procedure for dealing with C3 -C4 values in the rich amine that avoids the necessity for significant flaring. The invention addresses this need.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION General Statement of the Invention

According to the invention, minor amounts of C3 -C4 hydrocarbons from amine absorbents used in removing H2 S from liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon am recovered. The process features recovery of the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon in a hydrocarbon gas from a second absorption zone where H2 S is removed from the hydrocarbon gas, the hydrocarbon gas functioning as a stripping gas. The invention relates to a process in which a liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon containing H2 S is contacted with a lean amine absorbent in a first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S and produce a purified C3 -C4 liquid hydrocarbon, i.e., having reduced H2 S content, and a rich amine absorbent containing H2 S and a minor portion of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, rich amine absorbent produced being processed in a novel manner to recover the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon. As used herein, and well understood by those skilled in the art, the terms "lean" and "rich", with respect to the amine employed, are relative, merely implying, respectively, a lesser or greater degree or extent of loading or content of H2 S, and do not necessarily indicate or require, respectively, either that the amine is totally devoid of H2 S, or that it is incapable of absorbing more H2 S. In fact, it is preferred, as will be evident hereinafter, that the socalled "rich" amine produced in this first absorption zone retains significant or substantial residual absorptive capacity. Conversely, a "lean" amine will be understood to be capable of substantial absorption, but may have some H2 S content; those skilled in the art will be aware, for example, that a regenerated "lean" absorbent will contain a quite minor concentration of H2 S. The terms "partially loaded" and "loaded", utilized hereinafter, are also to be understood in a similar relative sense.

Accordingly, in one embodiment of the invention, rich amine absorbent forwarded from the first absorption zone is fed to a second absorption zone, and, upon entry of rich amine absorbent into this second zone, the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon therein is stripped therefrom by contact with a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S. If the rich absorbent, upon entry, has H2 S absorptive capacity remaining and H2 S absorption conditions are maintained in this second zone, H2 S is absorbed from the hydrocarbon gas, and depending, inter alia, on the absorptive capacity remaining and the H2 S content of the gas, the rich absorbent may absorb a portion or all of the H2 S in the hydrocarbon gas. If the rich amine absorbent has little or no remaining absorptive capacity, the H2 S in the hydrocarbon gas may be absorbed or removed by addition of lean amine absorbent to this second zone. A purified hydrocarbon stream, i.e., one having little or no H2 S content, but containing C3 -C4 stripped from the rich absorbent, is produced, as well as a loaded absorbent containing H2 S recovered in the first and second absorption zones. The loaded absorbent may be regenerated, such as by heating in a separate regeneration zone to release the H2 S, to permit reuse as lean absorbent in either, or both, the first absorption zone and the second absorption zone.

In an alternate embodiment, a portion of the rich amine absorbent from the first absorption zone is combined with lean amine absorbent, forming a partially or lightly loaded amine absorbent, and the partially loaded absorbent then contacts, in the second absorption or contact zone, along with at least another portion of rich amine from the first absorption zone, separately supplied to the second absorption zone, a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S, under conditions to absorb H2 S. The contacting serves to remove the H2 S from the hydrocarbon gas, while, simultaneously, the hydrocarbon gas strips the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon from the amine absorbent(s) in the second absorption zone. Regeneration procedure in this case is similar to that of the first embodiment. In either case, the C3 -C4 values in the hydrocarbon stream may be recovered, or, if the hydrocarbon stream is used as a fuel, the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon may simply be used for its fuel value.

Finally, in a third option, all or substantially all of the rich amine forwarded from the first absorption zone is combined or blended with lean amine to form a partially loaded amine absorbent, the partially loaded amine absorbent being supplied to the second absorption zone where it contacts the hydrocarbon gas, forming a purified hydrocarbon gas containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon and a loaded amine absorbent which is regenerated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The drawing is a schematic illustration of the process flow type.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As used herein, the term C3 -C4 hydrocarbon is understood to include compositions comprising or consisting of any isomer within the specified carbon range, as well as mixtures, in all proportions, of such isomers. Thus, propane, propylene, n-butane, isobutane, butadiene, etc., either as individual streams, or normally, as mixture of such compositions, may be processed according to the invention. The C3 -C4 hydrocarbon stream may contain a minor but significant quantity or quantities of other component(s), including compositions not classed as a hydrocarbon, provided such component(s) do not interfere with the absorption of the H2 S to any substantial extent or significantly affect the amine absorbent.

The particular hydrocarbon gas utilized for stripping in the second absorption zone is largely a matter of choice, but much preferred is a fuel gas, e.g., natural gas, refinery off,gas or gases, or synfuel, or mixtures of such, which is available in a refinery or petrochemical plant. Generally, a C3 -C4 hydrocarbon gas would not be used, but may be if the pressure of the second absorption zone is sufficiently low. The hydrocarbon stripping gas may contain, as in the case of the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, other gaseous components not classified as "hydrocarbon" so long as they do not interfere significantly with the H2 S absorption process, degrade the amine to any great extent, or interfere with the uses to which the hydrocarbon gas and C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, or recovered C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, might be put.

The amine absorption process techniques and conditions employed in the respective absorption zones may be selected by those skilled in the art, and per se form no part of the invention. As mentioned, amine absorption of H2 S from liquids and gases is well known in the art, and amply illustrated, for example, in the aforementioned U.S. Pat. No. 4,278,621, U.S. Pat. No. 4,297,329, and the Gas and Liquid Sweetening summary.

Accordingly, those skilled in the art can adjust temperatures, pressures, gas velocities, contact times, and concentrations of amine to provide the desired degree of H2 S removal in each absorption zone. By way of example only, a temperature of from 5° C. to 90° C. may be utilized in either zone, with a range of from about 10° C. to about 70° C. being preferred. In many applications, such as the removal of H2 S from natural gas, absorption at ambient temperatures is preferred since the cost of refrigeration would exceed the benefits obtained due to increased absorption at the lower temperature. Total contact times for the hydrocarbon gas will vary but preferably will range from about 1 second to about 30 minutes, with contact times of 5 seconds to 50 seconds being preferred. Total contact times for the C3 -C4 liquids will preferrably range from 20 to 30 minutes.

Similarly, in the, amine regeneration or H2 S stripping zone, temperatures may be varied widely. In general, temperatures of from about 90° C. to 130° C., preferably from 100° C. to 120° C., may be employed.

Pressure conditions in both absorption zones may vary substantially, with the provision that pressures in the first absorption zone are sufficient to maintain the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon treated in the liquid phase. In the second absorption zone, pressures may vary from one atmosphere up to 100 atmospheres. Pressures of from one atmosphere to about 75 atmospheres are preferred. In the amine regeneration zone, pressures will range from about one atmosphere to about three atmospheres. As noted, the pressuretemperature relationships involved are well understood by those skilled in the art, and need not be further detailed herein.

Again, the particular amine or amines employed, generally supplied as an aqueous, amine solution, may readily be selected by those skilled in the art. Although a wide variety of amines may be employed, preferred amines are alkanolamines such as methyldiethanolamine, triethanolamine, or one or more dipropanolamines, such as dinpropanolamine or diisopropanolamine. Aqueous methyldiethanolamine, triethanolamine and dipropanolamine solutions are preferred absorbents, particularly aqueous methyldiethanolamine and diisopropanolamine solutions. Either high purity amines or technical mixtures of the amines may be used. Concentrations of aqueous alkanolamine solutions may vary widely, and those skilled in the art can adjust solution concentrations to achieve suitable absorption levels. In general, the concentration of alkanolamine in aqueous solutions will be from 5 to 60 percent, more preferebly 25 to 30 percent, by weight. The solutions may comprise a variety of additives or other components, in amounts, for example, of from 2 to 50 percent by weight. Unless otherwise specified or inconsistent with the context, all percentages by weight specified herein are based on the total weight of the mixture involved.

EXAMPLE

In order to illustrate the invention more fully, reference is made to the accompanying drawing. All values set forth hereinafter are calculated or exemplary, and the procedure illustrated is to be understood as being operated on a continuous basis.

Accordingly, a liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, typically from the overhead of a distillation unit, in line 1, enters absorption zone or scrubber 2 where it is contacted with an alkanolamine absorbent, for example, a 25 percent by weight aqueous solution of methyldiethanolamine. In this case the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon might comprise a propane/butane mixture, e.g., 50 percent by weight of each or some similar composition. As shown, the alkanolamine absorbent is supplied to the upper level of scrubber 2 by line 3, and pressure in the scrubber is maintained at, e.g., 8.5 atm (150 psig) to 17 atm (250 psig). In scrubber 2, the H2 S is absorbed tom the liquid C3 -C4, perhaps according to the mechanism mentioned previously, and a purified liquid C3 -C4 stream, i.e., one from which H2 S, and any COS possibly present, have been removed, exits the scrubber via line 4. Aqueous alkanolamine absorbent containing H2 S (rich amine absorbent) and solubilized and possibly entrained C3 -C4 hydrocarbon is removed from the bottom of scrubber 2 via line 5 and is sent, according to the invention, to second absorption zone or scrubber 6. The withdrawal rate of rich amine absorbent is regulated so that the rich amine has an H2 S loading of about 0.25 mole of H2 S per mole of the MDEA, indicating additional H2 S absorptive capacity remaining in the draw.

Preferably, scrubber 6 is a large scrubbing unit which is employed, for example, in scrubbing fuel gas, e.g., natural gas, for a large chemical or refine complex. The advantage of the choice of such a unit is threefold: first, pressure differential between the two scrubbing units may insure good stripping of the C3 -C4 ; second, the size differential between the units may be such that a relatively small rich amine stream may be stripped by a large volume of hydrocarbon gas in a large contacting zone; and, third, if the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon stripped is to be used as fuel, it is thus combined with a fuel stream. Moreover, if the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon is to be recovered, it may be readily recovered from a fuel stream by known procedures.

In any event, the rich amine in line 5 may be fed wholly to scrubber 6 via line 5a, or it may optionally be partly blended with lean alkanolamine in line 7. In the latter case, part of the rich amine stream may be fed into the scrubber via line 5a, and part may be blended with lean amine in line 7 via line 5b (dotted line) and fed to scrubber 6. Alternately, all of the rich amine in line 5 may be blended with lean alkanolamine in line 7 via line 5b to form a partially loaded stream which is preferably fed to the top of scrubber 6. Whatever the case, alkanolamine having some residual absorptive capacity and containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon enters scrubber 6 where it is stripped by a hydrocarbon gas, such as natural gas or refinery fuel gas, supplied via line 8, to remove the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon. Flow rates, pressure, and temperatures in absorber 6 are set such that they enable good H2 S removal and also permit the desired stripping of the C3 -C4 hydrocarbon. Typically, pressure may be 4 to 6 atomspheres (60 to 90 psig), and the temperature at or about 52°C. The relatively small volume of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon stripped does not significantly affect the H2 S absorption in scrubber 6. A gas stream comprised of the purified hydrocarbon gas and the stripped C3 -C4 hydrocarbon is removed from scrubber 6 via line 9. The C3 -C4 hydrocarbon may optionally be recovered, e.g., by cooling, in an optional cooling zone or heat exchanger 10, or preferably may be simply be used as fuel.

Loaded amine which contains H2 S from the first and second absorption zones is removed from the lower portion of the second absorption zone (scrubber 6) and forwarded via line 11 to a flash zone or drum 12 where any very slight remaining hydrocarbons absorbed in scrubber 6 are flashed off at reduced pressure (e.g., 0.1 to 2 atm or 3 to 30 psig). Alternately, the loaded amine may be sent without flashing directly to regeneration. Flashed mixture is sent to flare via line 13. The loaded amine is removed from zone 12 via line 14 and sent to regenerating zone 15 where the H2 S is stripped from the aqueous amine absorbent according to known procedures and then removed via line 16. Regenerated or lean amine is removed from regenerator 15 via line 17, and forwarded for reuse. Line 17 supplies both line 3 and line 7 to provide lean alkanolamine for absorption of H2 S in both scrubber 2 and scrubber 6.

Modifications

Specific compositions, procedures, and embodiments described are intended to be only illustrative of the invention disclosed by this specification. Variation on these compositions, methods, or embodiments are readily apparent to a person of skill in the art based on the teachings of this specification and are therefore intended to be included as pan of the invention disclosed herein. The terms "zone" or "zones", as employed in the specification and claims, include, where suitable, the use of segmented equipment operated in series, or the division of one unit into multiple units because of size constraints, etc. For example, an absorption column might comprise two separate columns in which the solution from the lower portion of the first column would be introduced into the upper portion of the second column, the gaseous material from the upper portion of the first column being fed into the lower portion of the second column. Specification herein that a component is supplied or forwarded to a zone does not imply a random trans tier; those skilled in the art can introduce the liquids and hydrocarbon gas at the appropriate loci in the particular units to achieve proper contacting. For example, in most situations, lean or partially loaded amine will be introduced in the upper level of an absorption zone or tower, while a rich amine would normally be introduced at a lower level. Parallel operation of units is, of course, well within the scope of the invention.

Reference to documents made in the specification is intended to result in such patents or literature being expressly incorporated herein by reference insofar as consistent with the disclosure herein, including any patents or other literature references cited within such documents.

Claims (17)

What is claimed is:
1. A process comprising:
a. contacting liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon containing H2 S with lean amine absorbent in a first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S, and producing a purified C3 -C4 liquid hydrocarbon and rich amine absorbent containing H2 S and a minor amount of C3-C 4 hydrocarbon, said rich amine having residual H2 S absorptive capacity;
b. contacting a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S in a second absorption zone with rich amine absorbent from said first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S; and
c. stripping C3 -C4 hydrocarbon from the rich amine with said hydrocarbon gas, forming a purified hydrocarbon gas containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, and a loaded amine absorbent containing H2 S removed in the first absorption zone and in the second absorption zone.
2. The process of claim 1 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone.
3. The process of claim 1 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone and the second absorption zone.
4. The process of claim 2 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
5. The process of claim 3 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
6. A process comprising:
a. contacting liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon containing H2 S with lean amine absorbent in a first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S and producing a purified C3 -C4 liquid hydrocarbon, and a rich amine absorbent containing H2 S and a minor amount of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon;
b. contacting a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S in a second absorption zone with rich amine absorbent from said first absorption zone and with lean amine absorbent under conditions to absorb H2 S; and
c. stripping C3 -C4 hydrocarbon from the rich amine absorbent with said hydrocarbon gas, forming a purified hydrocarbon gas containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon, and a loaded amine absorbent containing H2 S removed in the first absorption zone and in the second absorption zone.
7. The process of claim 6 wherein the rich amine fed to the second absorption zone has residual absorptive capacity.
8. The process of claim 7 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone.
9. The process of claim 7 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone and the second absorption zone.
10. The process of claim 8 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
11. The process of claim 9 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
12. A process comprising:
a. contacting liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon containing H2 S with lean amine absorbent in a first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S and producing a purified C3 -C4 liquid hydrocarbon, and a rich amine absorbent containing H2 S and a minor amount of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon;
b. combining rich amine absorbent from said first absorption zone with lean amine absorbent, forming a partially loaded absorbent containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon;
c. contacting a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S in a second absorption zone with partially loaded absorbent under conditions to absorb H2 S, and removing H2 S from said hydrocarbon gas while simultaneously stripping C3 -C4 hydrocarbon from said partially loaded absorbent with said hydrocarbon gas, forming a purified hydrocarbon gas containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon and a loaded amine absorbent containing H2 S removed in the first absorption zone and in the second absorption zone.
13. The process of claim 12 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone and the second absorption zone.
14. The process of claim 13 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
15. A process comprising:
a. contacting liquid C3 -C4 hydrocarbon containing H2 S with lean amine absorbent in a first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S and producing a purified C3 -C4 liquid hydrocarbon, and a rich amine absorbent containing H2 S and a minor amount of C3 -C4 hydrocarbon;
b. combining rich amine absorbent from said first absorption zone with lean amine absorbent, forming a partially loaded absorbent containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon;
c. contacting a hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S in a second absorption zone with partially loaded absorbent and with rich amine from said first absorption zone under conditions to absorb H2 S, and removing H2 S from said hydrocarbon gas while simultaneously stripping C3 -C4 hydrocarbon from said partially loaded absorbent and said rich amine with said hydrocarbon gas, forming a purified hydrocarbon gas containing C3 -C4 hydrocarbon and a loaded amine absorbent containing H2 S removed in the first absorption zone and in the second absorption zone.
16. The process of claim 15 wherein the loaded amine absorbent is regenerated to produce lean amine absorbent which is returned to the first absorption zone and the second absorption zone.
17. The process of claim 16 wherein the hydrocarbon gas containing H2 S is a fuel gas.
US08517004 1995-08-18 1995-08-18 Fuel gas stripping of rich amine to remove hydrocarbons Expired - Fee Related US5625117A (en)

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