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High pressure water jet comminuting

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Publication number
US5582686A
US5582686A US08093531 US9353193A US5582686A US 5582686 A US5582686 A US 5582686A US 08093531 US08093531 US 08093531 US 9353193 A US9353193 A US 9353193A US 5582686 A US5582686 A US 5582686A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
broke
cutting
banks
sheet
nozzles
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Expired - Fee Related
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US08093531
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David E. Chupka
Peter Seifert
Christopher M. Vitori
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THERMO BLACK CLAWSON Inc A Corp OF DELAWARE
Bank One Dayton NA
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Black Clawson Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21FPAPER-MAKING MACHINES; METHODS OF PRODUCING PAPER THEREON
    • D21F7/00Other details of machines for making continuous webs of paper
    • D21F7/04Paper-break control devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/04Processes
    • Y10T83/0591Cutting by direct application of fluent pressure to work
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/364By fluid blast and/or suction

Abstract

Broke handling and reducing apparatus and method for comminuting a moving continuous sheet or web material such as paper broke in the dryer or converter section of a papermaking machine, includes a plurality of high pressure water jet cutting nozzles mounted in spaced-apart relation transversely to the direction of movement of the material and are mounted so as to direct high pressure cutting jets into the path of movement. The nozzles are mounted so that at least some of the nozzles are cyclically moved with respect to others of said nozzles to form a plurality of mutually intersecting jet cutter paths to reduce the material into a multiplicity of smaller discrete or easily separable pieces.

Description

RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a division of Ser. No. 07/649,104 filed Feb. 1, 1991 now U.S. Pat. No. 5,234,172.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for handling and cutting sheet or web-type materials, such as broke, on a papermaking machine, by high pressure liquid cutting jets.

For example, in broke handling, when a break occurs somewhere along the line in a papermaking machine, it is necessary to cut the sheet off and divert it for disposal. Typically, the newly formed paper web, at the wet end of the machine, may be broken up or disintegrated by a plurality of transversely positioned, low-pressure showers. Such stripper or shower arrangements for disintegrating a newly formed web as broke material are shown in Moore, U S. Pat. No.2,954,082 issued Sep. 27, 1960; Nelson, U.S. Pat. No. 3,245,872 issued Apr. 12, 1966; and Strempel, U S. Pat. No. 3,097,992 of Jul. 16, 1963. While low pressure knock-off showers have been successfully used at the wet end, they are not used at the dry end of the machine for handling broke due to the substantially increased strength of the paper web after one or more pressing and drying stages.

The prior art shows various broke handling apparatus between or at the end of dryer sections for receiving and sometimes cutting, or mechanically reducing the web before or after it is delivered through a hole in the floor to a basement receiving or conveying system. Thus, Ford, U S. Pat. No. 3,011,733 issued Dec. 5, 1961 illustrates a broke-receiving hole, otherwise known as broke hole, for receiving a leading edge of such broke, including apparatus intended to wind the broken web piece upon a temporary storage or cutting drum without further cutting or size reduction.

Corbin et al, U.S. Pat. No. 2,888,073 issued May 29, 1959 describes an arrangement for laterally conveying broke at the press section of a papermaking machine by delivering the paper to one side of the machine without the use of a broke hole. A water jet slitter positioned at the off-running end of the forming wire cuts the green broke as it leaves the wire and before it engages the transverse doctor, for removing the broke from the press section.

Stark, U S. Pat. No. 2,860,550 issued Nov. 18, 1958 illustrates a mechanical conveyor arrangement by which sheets of broke are delivered from the broke hole to a basement pulper.

Typically, when a break occurs in the press or dryer section, the web is first cut by a flying knife which traverses the web to separate it from the remaining web, and a deflector or doctor blade directs the now cut web toward a broke hole, or otherwise into slitting or conveying apparatus. A partially dried or green web has also been severed by a high pressure water jet arrangement as shown in Grupp, U.S. Pat. No. 4,182,170, where a pair of oppositely positioned water jets are pivotally mounted to move in a cutting direction transverse to the plane of the running web. The jets are moved to make a single cut across the web and to sever the web.

After the broke has been severed, it is desirable to cut it up into smaller pieces to assist in moving the broke out of the way and for further processing. An arrangement for mechanically shredding the broke into smaller chevron-shaped pieces immediately under the broke hole, and for hydraulic delivery to a pulper, is shown in Whiteside, U.S. Pat. No. 3,236,723 issued Feb. 22, 1966. In Whiteside, a rotary toothed cutter operates in conjunction with a bed knife to shred the broke sheet as it is delivered through the broke hole, for subsequent delivery to conveying and re-pulping apparatus.

Broke reducing or comminuting systems have not been widely adopted for handling broke the dryer sections of from board machines. More likely, the board is simply allowed to drop into a pit, or is pulled off to one side of the machine and then handled manually or with a fork lift truck for disposal. The stiffness of the material and its weight often require the application of extreme measures in removing the broke from the floor and disposing of the same.

The present systems of handling broke at the dryer section of a papermaking machine are generally characterized best by cumbersome mechanical apparatus. A need exists for a high speed, lightweight and effective broke cutting and size reducing apparatus and method, for dried or partially dry paper webs.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

This invention is directed to new concepts in web comminuting and handling, to reduce a sheet or web of material into small discontinuous pieces to facilitate disposal or further processing. One example is that of handling broke in all kinds of papermaking machinery.

The invention is directed to apparatus and methods by which a web or moving continuous sheet of such material is reduced. The material may be anything which is subject to liquid jet cutting such as paper, paperboard, fabric, felt, plastic or the like, and the preferred embodiments are described in terms of paper broke.

In a preferred embodiment, the broke is acted upon by a plurality of transversely spaced and oscillating cutting jets which reduce the broke into relatively small pieces. In this preferred embodiment, banks or arrays of water cutting nozzles are positioned at opposite sides of a broke pathway, and arranged for impingement of cutting jets at the opposite sides of the broke.

The web is directed into the water jet cutting path in a hanging, generally downward movement from the off-running side of a roll, and since it is acted upon by opposed banks of nozzles, the jets define, in effect, an open broke pathway therebetween. The impact energy of the jets is substantially equally divided between each side of the web, thereby guiding the broke in a free-fall manner between the banks of nozzles. Additionally, by angling the jets in the direction of broke travel, energy is imparted to the web, while, at the same time, it is shredded or cut, and this energy may be directed such that the web is literally pulled downwardly from the roll directed into a broke pit or a waiting container.

Since the broke is cut by opposed sets or groups of water jet nozzles, the required liquid or water pressure for cutting may be substantially reduced from that which is conventionally used in operating a water knife. For example, conventional water knives for slitting or cutting a dry web are typically be operated from a source of water pressure in excess of 30,000 psi, requiring the use of extraordinarily expensive and high technology pumping and fluid handling components. A much lower pressure is employed in the practice of this invention.

In another aspect of the invention, one of the nozzle banks may be replaced by an open face supporting or backing roll. A pair of groups of water jet cutting nozzles, mounted for mutual relatively reciprocating movement, direct cutting streams against the broke sheet supported on an open face roll, such as a grooved or wire mesh backing roll. The open face backing roll provides a pathway for the movement of the broke, and at the same time, provides passageways permitting the cutting jets to pass 10 through the broke so that the cutting efficiency is not impaired.

The broke handling arrangement of this invention effectively shreds the broke using water pressures of 5,000 psi or less, with effective results in slicing or cutting obtained at pressures at 1,500 psi or less. As a result, the pumping and fluid handling components may be made at much lower cost and with a substantially increased safety factor. One factor which permits the use of remarkably lower water pressures is believed to be the result of the use of opposed jets working against a sheet in a preferred form of the invention. Also, the use of jet orifices which are somewhat larger in diameter than those conventionally used in extreme high pressure cutting arrangements compensates for the loss of velocity by the increase in mass of the water jet.

In a broader aspect of the invention, a cutter for comminuting a moving continuous sheet of woven or felted material employs two or more sets of liquid jets which are arranged across the width of the sheet and are directed against or toward the sheet. At least one of the jet sets moves in fashion that a cutting path in the sheet is formed by the moving jets which cooperates with the paths cut the other jets so as to comminute or reduce the continuous sheet into discontinuous or easily separated pieces. Preferably, one or more of the sets of jets are mounted on a pipe which is caused to oscillate laterally at an amplitude such that the cutting paths of the jet sets cooperate to form the small discontinuous pieces. Where two such sets of jets are employed, the jets may be equal in number and spaced opposite each other with respect to a path of movement of the web and aimed toward each other, and both sets may be oscillated transversely 180° out of phase with amplitudes relating to the spacing whereby the combined amplitudes of oscillation is approximately equal to the nozzle spacing or is slightly less than the nozzle spacing, such as 0.9 S, where S is the nozzle spacing.

It is accordingly an object of this invention to provide apparatus and method by which a moving web of sheet material may be comminuted, by employing opposed liquid jet cutting nozzles defining a path therebetween, together with means for reciprocating, oscillating or moving at least one of the nozzles relative to the path for comminuting the web.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a system and method, as outlined above, in which opposed banks of cutting nozzles, in a reducing chest or box, are oriented to assist in the pulling of the broke from a dryer roll or the like.

A more particular object of the invention is the provision of a sheet or web cutting or handling arrangement and method which includes a plurality of high pressure jets positioned in spaced relation transversely of the moving sheet and mounted at least for mutually transverse or oscillating movement in relation to each other for shredding the sheet into small pieces, and providing for delivery of the pieces such as into a broke-receiving region, chest, or conveyor. The nozzles may be positioned at one side of a sheet supported by an open face backing roll, or the nozzles may be opposed to each other on opposite sides of a moving sheet.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a broke commuting apparatus and method, in which a plurality of cutting nozzles are operated at a relatively low water pressure, such as 5,000 psi or less.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ACCOMPANYING DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a broke cutter in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a transverse section through the cutter looking generally along the line 2--2 of FIG. 1 and showing two of the banks of cutting nozzles and the suspension arrangements therefor;

FIG. 3 is a vertical section through the cutter taken generally along the line 3--3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an end view of the cutter looking generally along the line 4--4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view looking generally along the line 5--5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 illustrates one of the water jet cutting nozzles mounted on the support conduit;

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing the disintegration and cutting of a sheet of broke as it passes between opposed banks of nozzles;

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic side view of an embodiment of the invention in which an open face backing roll supports the broke sheet;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3 showing a modified support arrangement for the conduit pipes; and

FIG. 10 is an enlarged sectional view through one of the modified support arrangements of FIG. 9, and showing in phantom the relative position of an adjacent conduit pipe.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to the figures of the drawing, which illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention as applied to the handling of paper broke, a cutter for receiving a moving continuous sheet of partially or fully dried broke from a roll, such as a dryer roll, is illustrated generally at 10 in FIGS. 1 and 2. It will be understood that the cutter 10 is positioned in a paper mill, in a dryer section for example, to receive a sheet of broke from the off-running side of a roll, such as a dryer roll. The effective lateral width of the cutter 10 is at least that of the web under which it is mounted.

For the purposes of this application, the cutter 10 is described in terms of receiving broke from the off-running side of a dryer roll, although it is within the scope of this invention to use the broke cutter and method in the press section or at a converter section, such as at a calendar or the like. The previously identified patent of Ford, U.S. Pat. No. 3,170,733 shows a broke handling arrangement at the last dryer roll of a dryer section, although a plurality of broke receiving positions may be defined on a paper machine, as shown in FIG. 16 of Whiteside, U.S. Pat. No. 3,236,723, and is well known and understood in the art.

The cutter 10 of this invention preferably includes a transversely positioned conduit section 11 which defines a path 15 (FIG. 3) of movement for the sheet therethrough. The conduit section 11 may be formed of sheet metal walls with an open top 16 which is adapted to receive broke from the off-running side of a roll, or the like, and an open bottom 17 in which the cut pieces of broke may fall or be delivered through a broke hole to a suitable container or conveyor for disposal or for further processing. The open top 16 may be surrounded by sloping side walls 18 which form a funnel or trough for guiding the free end of the broke sheet into the conduit section 11 of the cutter 10.

The details of the conduit section 11 may be further understood by reference to the end views of FIGS. 4 and 5 and the sectional view of FIG. 3. The conduit section 11 may advantageously be formed by a pair of mutually facing generally U-shaped or channel-shaped sheet metal sides 20 and 21, having inwardly turned lips 22 and with an open space defined between the lips. The channel members 20 and 21 support opposed pairs of banks of broke-cutting nozzles. Each bank includes a transversely elongated water pipe or conduit 30, and a plurality of individual jet-cutting nozzles 32 mounted in laterally and equally spaced relation along the conduit. Four banks are illustrated, an upper bank 33 and a lower bank 34, on one side of the pathway 15, and an upper bank 33a and a lower bank 34a on the opposite side.

Each bank includes an elongated conduit pipe 30 on which are mounted the jet nozzles 32, as shown in FIG. 6. The pipes 30 extend generally across the lateral width of the section 11. For convenience of construction, each bank may have the same number of nozzles at the same transverse spacings along the pipe 30.

A nipple 35 is secured by welding to the outer surface of the conduit 30, with a central opening therethrough leading into the interior of the conduit 30, and a cap 36 defines a round nozzle orifice 37 in alignment with the central opening. Such water jet cutting nozzles may be acquired from a number of known commercial sources for such nozzles. However, it is preferred to use nozzles with a central orifice diameter which is somewhat greater than that of conventional water jet cutting nozzles, for the purpose of increased mass of water at a lower water pressure, as described below.

Each of the nozzle banks may be more or less identical in construction with the other nozzle banks except that the upper pair of the banks 33, 33a are suspended from an upper wall 40 of one of the side channels 20 or 21 while the lower pairs of banks 34, 34a are suspended from the lower wall 41. The nozzle banks are independently suspended from each other for transverse oscillatory movement within the conduit section 11, such as by mounting the banks on suspension springs 45. As perhaps best shown in the sectional view of FIG. 2, each of the nozzle banks is mounted from either the upper wall 40 or the lower wall 41 on three identical suspension springs 45, although a fewer or larger number of such springs may be employed. The remote end of each spring 45 is connected to an internal bracket 46 which is fixed and stationary with the conduit section, while the opposite end of the suspension spring is carried on a block 48 mounted on the associated conduit 30. While the suspension springs 45 provide an effective and energy efficient means of supporting each of the nozzle banks for limited transverse oscillatory movement within the conduit section 11 of the cutter 10, the conduits may be otherwise suitably mounted, such as on simple slide bearings, with equally effective results. Further, it may be understood that the opposed support pipes or conduits defining the nozzle banks are oscillated at 180° out of phase. The amplitudes of oscillation need not be identical, but it is important that when the amplitudes are combined that they are at least equal to or exceed 0.9×S, where S is the spacing between the nozzles.

Means for supplying water, under pressure, to each of the nozzle support conduits or pipes 30 include a flexible connecting hose 50 connected at an end of a conduit as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. One end of the hose is joined by a coupler 52 to a conduit 30 while the other end of the hose 50 extends through an end wall 54 of the cutter 10, for connection to a suitable source of water under pressure. The pressure source may advantageously include a water pump and a pressure accumulator (not shown), the output of which may be connected to the coupling hoses 50, through a suitable manifold, and controlled by a solenoid valve, so that pressure may be admitted to each of the nozzle banks at the same time that the broke is deflected into the hopper for passage through the pathway 15.

The individual nozzles 32 of each of the banks are positioned with respect to the water conduit pipe 30 so as to spray cutting jets in relatively parallel aligned paths. These spray paths, as shown by the arrows 55 in FIG. 3, are directed diagonally across the pathway 15 of the conduit section 11. Preferably, the two top banks 33, 33a of nozzles are directed so as to form substantially intersecting spray paths, and trace the same or approximately the same cutting line from opposite sides of the pathway 15. The same condition is true for the spray paths defined by the lower banks 34, 34a of nozzles. Water pressures which are lower than those ordinarily found in water knives may be used since any particular region on the broke is impacted by a cutting spray coming from opposite sides, and since the water mass is increased by using nozzle orifices of increased diameters.

As explained above, it is not necessary that the jets directly impinge against each other, as this condition would be difficult to maintain due to the very narrow streams which are emitted by the nozzles. Rather, it is merely only necessary that the opposing streams pass fairly close to each other, so that it can be said that they trace substantially the same lines of cut. The opposing forces imparted upon the broke by an opposed pair of nozzles are substantially balanced on the sheet, even though these forces may be applied at slightly differing positions with respect to the plane of the web.

The nozzles 32 are preferably angled somewhat in the direction of movement of the broke, as shown by the arrows 55 of FIG. 3. Thus by angling the nozzles downwardly, a resultant downward force component provides a positive tension to the broke, tending to pull the broke off of the proper machine roll and through the slot defining the broke pathway 15, as shown by the arrow 58. Additionally, the focus of the opposed banks of nozzles generally causes the broke to assume a central or neutral position within the conduit section 11, as defined by the pathway 15, as the broke is being cut by the oscillating banks into small sections or pieces. The water sprays from the nozzle banks at one side are caught in the trough defined by the channel members 20 or 21 at the other side, and suitably drained away out of the basin or space formed by the lower walls 42 and the lips 22. The open space formed between the lips may be protected by or screening to prevent the accumulation of broke in the exposed interiors of the channels members 20, 21.

Means for oscillating the nozzle banks relative to each other on their suspension springs may include an eccentric mechanical drive as shown generally at 80 in FIGS. 1 and 2. The drive 80 may include a common shaft 82 on which are mounted four eccentric cranks 84. A motor 85 causes the shaft 82 to rotate. The cranks 84 have crank arms which are connected, respectively, to one of the nozzle banks through a connector strap 86 and a pipe clamp 87. Preferably, the strap 86 is somewhat flexible to allow the individual conduits defining the banks to ride on their respective suspension springs 45, while permitting some flexing between the banks and the cranks 84.

It will also be seen that two of the crank arms are positioned relatively in 180° location to the others such that the two top banks 33, 33a move in unison, together, in one oscillatory direction, while the two bottom banks 34, 34a are caused to move in unison in the opposite direction. It is however, within the scope of the invention to move fewer than all of the sets of banks to provide a cutting action, and to move them in a pattern other than one which is 180° from the other. The nozzle bank spring suspension and the drive 80 need only move the banks relatively a distance which substantially equals but need not exceed the lateral spacing distance between adjacent nozzles.

FIG. 7 diagrammatically illustrates the cutting action of the present invention employing for the purpose of illustration only single banks 88 of laterally spaced nozzles 32 at each side of the path of the broke. It will be seen since the nozzles reciprocate in a linear manner, in opposition to a corresponding reciprocation by the opposite bank, that the broke 90 is cut in more or less diamond-shaped individual pieces 92. The downward component of the nozzle paths 55, as shown in FIG. 3, provide a pulling effect on the sheet of broke, assuring it passage through the cutter and through the broke hole or into a container, as the case may be.

The start signal which operates the motor 85 may also be the signal which delivers high pressure cutting water to the manifold or inlet tubes connecting the fluid conduits. In appropriate cases, the motor 85 may also be the motor which could operate a water pressure pump of sufficient capacity to bring the pressure up to at least about 1,500 psi in the water conduits rapidly and providing for the rapid cutting and disintegration of the broke.

It will be understood that a preferred nozzle bank arrangement includes a pair of upper banks with nozzles which form mutually impinging streams which reciprocate and a pair of lower banks which likewise have nozzles arranged to provide mutually impinging streams. The transverse hydraulic forces are thus substantially balanced, one against the other, in the plane defined by the path of broke movement, again, while exerting a net downward force on the broke, as previously described.

Without limiting the scope of the invention, broke from the dryer section of a board machine, moving at between 500 and 1,000 feet per minute, may be cut by nozzles, as described herein, having orifices 37 of 0.020" diameter at 1,500 psi water pressure, and rotating the drive shaft 82 at 500 rpm to product 1,000 cutting strokes per minute, for each of the two pairs of banks. The cut pieces are of fairly uniform size and dimension, and freely out through the open bottom or outlet 17 of the conduit section 11. A further conduit may be attached, for delivery either gravitationally, pneumatically, or water assisted, to a remote location, for further processing or disposal.

As previously mentioned, the sheet 90 of broke material may be supported by an open face roll 100 as shown in FIG. 8 and acted upon by a pair of mutually or relatively reciprocating shower banks 105 and 106. The open face roll 100 may thus be positioned so that its outer surface defines the path of movement of the broke from an off-running roll of the paper machine as in the case of the conduit section 11 of the cutter 10 of the preceding embodiment. A typical open face roll is shown, for example, in the patent of Seifert et al, U.S. Pat. No. 4,106,980 issued Aug. 15, 1978 and assigned to the same assignee as this invention. Thus, the open face roll may be a typical honeycomb roll, a wire mesh roll, a grooved roll or a perforated screen roll as shown in the Seifert et al patent.

The nozzle banks 105 and 106 may be constructed with a rigid conduit section and flexible coupling, with individual laterally spaced nozzles directed essentially to a common peripheral region-on the open face roll 100 similarly to the nozzle bank 88 of the diagram of FIG. 7. The nozzle banks 105 and 106 are reciprocated one relative the other, with mutually impinging jet streams 110, as illustrated, against the sheet 90 on the open face roll 100. Since the jet cutting streams can penetrate the open face roll, the streams go through the sheet, and the sheet 90 is shredded into smaller pieces 92. The support and mounting for the shower banks 105 and 106 may be that which has been described in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, and the individual nozzles 32 may be as shown in FIG. 6.

FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate an alternative support arrangement by which the conduit pipes may be supported for oscillating movement within the conduit section 11 or otherwise. The apparatus and arrangement shown includes a low friction sliding support which may be used in lieu of the suspension springs 45.

Stand-off supports in the form of light-weight aluminum blocks 200 have base ends mounted to an inside surface of the side wall 202 of the conduit section 11 by bolts 203. Split polymeric bushings or bearings 205 are mounted on the opposite ends of the blocks 200, by bolts 206. The bushings have two parts, 205a and 205b, each defining one-half of a cylinder opening, which, together, form a close sliding fit about the outer circumference of one of the conduits 30. The bushings are formed of a high density, low friction material, such as nylon or polytetrafluoroethylene.

The stand-off supports are laterally staggered on each side of the conduit section 11, that is, one behind the other, for the upper and lower conduit pipe 30 respectively, and for the sake of clarity, only the relatively supported position of the upper pipe 30 and one its nozzles 32, are shown in broken outline form, on FIG. 10. It will be understood that identical supports may be used for the conduits 30 at each side of the conduit section 11, in lieu of the previously-described suspension springs, to provide for a straight-line or linear reciprocal cutting or shredding movement of the nozzles with respect to the path of movement of the sheet material therebetween.

The modified support of FIG. 9 and 10 further include provision for the reduction of friction and heat, by water lubrication of the bushings 205. Water or other cooling and lubricating liquid may be brought to the sliding surface of the bushing by a passage 208 through the support 200 and a communicating passage 210 in the bushing half 205b.

As previously mentioned, the method and apparatus of this invention, having particular utility as a broke cutter, may also be employed more generally for comminuting a moving continuous sheet of woven or felted web-type material, such as paper, paperboard, fabric, felt, and plastic, as examples, into small discontinuous pieces such as to facilitate disposal or to facilitate further processing of the material. Also, in instances where the moving sheet is relatively rigid or stiff, such as in the case of paper board, no backing or support may be needed, and the sheet may be comminuted by oscillating cutting jets impinging against the sheet at one side of the sheet only. In such instances, the stiffness of the sheet above is sufficient to define its path of movement.

While the forms of apparatus and method herein described constitutes preferred embodiments of this invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise forms of apparatus and method and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

Claims (6)

What is claimed is:
1. The method of handling and reducing a moving sheet of broke material capable of being cut by a high pressure water jet, comprising the steps of arranging a plurality of individual high pressure water jet cutting nozzles in a first bank transversely spaced in relation to the direction of movement of said broke material and positioning said nozzles to direct cutting stream jets against one surface of said broke material, arranging at least a second plurality of spaced individual high pressure water jet cutting nozzles in a second bank transversely of said direction of movement of said broke material and positioned to direct cutting stream jets against the opposite surface of said broke material, and moving at least one of said banks transversely with respect to the direction of movement of said broke material by a distance sufficient such that the paths of said cutting jet streams from said at least one of said banks intercept the paths of said cutting jet streams from the other of said banks for destroying said moving sheet of broke material and reducing the same into a plurality of smaller pieces for disposal.
2. The method of claim 1 in which the movement of one of said banks is 180° out of phase with the movement of the other of said banks, in which the amplitudes of movement of said one bank is A1 and of said other bank is A2 in which the sum of A1, A2 is equal to or exceeds 0.9 S where S is the spacing of individual said nozzles in said banks, one from the other.
3. The method of comminuting a sheet of broke moving in a given direction and capable of being cut by a high pressure water jet, comprising the steps of:
applying one bank of multiple individual high pressure water cutting jet streams, said jet streams being transversely spaced to said given direction, of movement of such broke, against one surface of such broke while simultaneously applying a second bank of individual high pressure water cutting jet streams, said jet streams being transversely spaced to said given direction, of movement of such broke, against the opposite surface of such broke, and
moving at least one said banks of jet streams transversely of said direction of movement of such broke to intersect the jet streams of the other of said banks, thereby reducing said sheet into a plurality of smaller pieces.
4. The method of claim 3 further comprising the step of directing said jet streams partially in said given direction of movement of such broke to provide a force component in said direction of movement.
5. The method of cutting a moving continuous sheet of broke, comprising the steps of:
directing such sheet of broke along a path of movement between opposed banks of spaced water cutting nozzles,
applying cutting streams from said opposed nozzle banks across said path of movement and causing said opposed streams to impact the opposite surfaces of such sheet of broke so that transverse forces of said cutting streams from one nozzle bank upon one surface of such sheet broke are balanced by opposed transverse forces from the opposed nozzle banks upon the opposite surface of such sheet of broke, and
causing the nozzles in at least one of said banks to reciprocate transversely of said path of movement to cut such sheet into small pieces.
6. The method of cutting a moving sheet of water jet cuttable material comprising the steps of:
supporting said moving sheet on the surface of a rotating open face roll, and
applying cutting streams from a pair of adjacently spaced nozzle banks having cutting jets directed to impinge against said moving sheet at a common peripheral location on said open face roll, and causing such nozzle banks to oscillate transversely one with respect to the other to cut said moving sheet into small pieces.
US08093531 1991-02-01 1993-07-16 High pressure water jet comminuting Expired - Fee Related US5582686A (en)

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US6135000A (en) * 1999-01-25 2000-10-24 Paprima Industries Inc. Web cutting apparatus for use in a papermaking machine
WO2002016693A1 (en) * 2000-08-22 2002-02-28 Upm-Kymmene Corporation Method and device for cutting the edge of paper web
US6358367B1 (en) * 2000-02-01 2002-03-19 Voith Sulzer Paper Technology North America, Inc. Pulping system for a paper machine
US20030230651A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2003-12-18 Colson Cameron M. Method and apparatus for hydromechanically disintegrating organic matter
WO2003103840A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-18 Thi, International, Llc Water jet waste reduction apparatus
EP1386998A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-04 Faper S.R.L. Pulper and method for the recovery of paper production waste
US6953303B1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2005-10-11 Waterwerks Inc. Substrate removal apparatus
US20060138262A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-06-29 Colson Cameron M Method and apparatus for hydromechanically disintegrating organic matter
GB2468481A (en) * 2009-03-06 2010-09-15 Vernacare Ltd Macerator using high pressure water jets to macerate
US20110253815A1 (en) * 2010-04-19 2011-10-20 Rolls-Royce Plc Method of producing a powder

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US20100180738A1 (en) * 2009-01-22 2010-07-22 Michael Tavger Liquid cutting device
US8895096B2 (en) 2011-06-22 2014-11-25 Frito-Lay North America, Inc. Continuous oven with a cascading conveyor
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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5934186A (en) * 1996-02-01 1999-08-10 Howden Food Equipment, Inc. Packaging system for dry lasagna noodle product
US6135000A (en) * 1999-01-25 2000-10-24 Paprima Industries Inc. Web cutting apparatus for use in a papermaking machine
US6358367B1 (en) * 2000-02-01 2002-03-19 Voith Sulzer Paper Technology North America, Inc. Pulping system for a paper machine
US6524443B2 (en) * 2000-02-01 2003-02-25 Voith Sulzer Paper Technology North America, Inc. Pulping system for a paper machine
WO2002016693A1 (en) * 2000-08-22 2002-02-28 Upm-Kymmene Corporation Method and device for cutting the edge of paper web
WO2003103840A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-18 Thi, International, Llc Water jet waste reduction apparatus
US20030230651A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2003-12-18 Colson Cameron M. Method and apparatus for hydromechanically disintegrating organic matter
US7032848B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-04-25 Colson Cameron M Method and apparatus for hydromechanically disintegrating organic matter
US20060138262A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-06-29 Colson Cameron M Method and apparatus for hydromechanically disintegrating organic matter
EP1386998A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-04 Faper S.R.L. Pulper and method for the recovery of paper production waste
US20040094276A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-05-20 Fabio Perini Pulper device for the recovery of paper production waste, plant comprising said device and associated method for recovery of the waste
US6953303B1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2005-10-11 Waterwerks Inc. Substrate removal apparatus
US7097383B1 (en) 2002-12-31 2006-08-29 Waterwerks Inc. Substrate removal apparatus
GB2468481A (en) * 2009-03-06 2010-09-15 Vernacare Ltd Macerator using high pressure water jets to macerate
US20100243776A1 (en) * 2009-03-06 2010-09-30 Vernacare Limited Device for reducing fibrous products
US20110253815A1 (en) * 2010-04-19 2011-10-20 Rolls-Royce Plc Method of producing a powder

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