US5574882A - System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage - Google Patents

System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US5574882A
US5574882A US08397817 US39781795A US5574882A US 5574882 A US5574882 A US 5574882A US 08397817 US08397817 US 08397817 US 39781795 A US39781795 A US 39781795A US 5574882 A US5574882 A US 5574882A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
parity
block
data
group
disk
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
US08397817
Inventor
Jaishankar M. Menon
James C. Wyllie
Geoffrey A. Riegel
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
International Business Machines Corp
Original Assignee
International Business Machines Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F11/00Error detection; Error correction; Monitoring
    • G06F11/07Responding to the occurrence of a fault, e.g. fault tolerance
    • G06F11/08Error detection or correction by redundancy in data representation, e.g. by using checking codes
    • G06F11/10Adding special bits or symbols to the coded information, e.g. parity check, casting out 9's or 11's
    • G06F11/1076Parity data used in redundant arrays of independent storages, e.g. in RAID systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F2211/00Indexing scheme relating to details of data-processing equipment not covered by groups G06F3/00 - G06F13/00
    • G06F2211/10Indexing scheme relating to G06F11/10
    • G06F2211/1002Indexing scheme relating to G06F11/1076
    • G06F2211/1009Cache, i.e. caches used in RAID system with parity

Abstract

A system and method are provided that is used by software implemented Redundancy Array of Inexpensive Disk (RAID) arrays to achieve adequate performance and reliability, as well as to improve performance or low cost hardware Raids. The enhancements to the basic RAID implementation speeds up recovery time for software RAIDS. A method is provided for storing data in an array of storage devices. A plurality of block locations on the storage devices are logically arranged as a parity group wherein a parity block stored in a block location as part of a parity group is logically derived from the combination of data blocks stored in the parity group, and each block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device. A plurality of parity groups are grouped into a parity group set. A request is received to write a new data block location on a storage device. The old data block stored at the block location is read. The new data block is written to the block location. When the parity set is in an unmodified state prior to the current write, an indicator is written to the storage device that the parity group set is in a modified state. In a preferred embodiment, this enhancement uses a bit map stored on disk, called Parity Group Set, (PGS) bit map, to mark inconsistent parity groups, replacing the Non-Volatile Random Access Memory, (NVRAM) used for similar purposes by hardware RAIDs. Further enhancements optimized sequential input/output, (I/O) data stream.

Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to data storage systems and more particularly relates to a system and method for storing data in a software or low cost hardware implemented storage array system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) is a set of disk drives which can regenerate user data when a drive fails by using redundant data stored on the drives. There are five levels of RAID commonly recognized as described by Patterson, D., Gibson, G. and Katz, R. H., Reliable Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID), June 1988, ACM SIGMOD Conference 1988, pp. 109-116. The RAID Level 5 disk array uses a parity technique to achieve high reliability and availability. A parity block protects the data blocks within its parity group. The parity block is the result of exclusive OR (XOR) operations of the data blocks in its parity group. Each block in a parity group is stored on a different disk drive of the array. In RAID 5, the parity blocks are stored on all the disks (with data blocks from other parity groups).

A RAID 5 disk array is robust against single disk crashes. If a disk fails, data on the disk can be recreated by reading data from the remaining disks in the array and performing the appropriate exclusive OR operations.

Whenever a request is made to update a data block, the corresponding parity block must also be updated to maintain consistency. Since the parity must be altered each time the data is modified, RAIDs require four disk accesses to update a data block: (1) Read the old data; (2) Read the old parity; (3) Write the new data; and (4) Write the new parity. The need for four disk accesses per update is often referred to as the RAID-5 update penalty. Following the required four disk accesses, the completion of the update is presented to the host system.

RAID is typically implemented in disk controllers having specialized hardware. XOR hardware performs the XOR operation to compute parity. Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) also referred to as a cache improves RAID performance and reliability. These RAID implementations are referred to as hardware RAIDs. Some low cost hardware RAIDs do not have an NVRAM or have a small NVRAM. A software RAID is implemented purely in software running on a host computer. Software RAIDs do not have access to special hardware, so they often need to use specialized algorithms. In particular, software RAIDs do not have access to NVRAM often used by hardware RAIDs to mark inconsistent parity groups and recover from power failures.

More sophisticated hardware RAIDs use NVRAM to improve write performance by implementing write caching (maintaining the write in the cache for easier access by the system) and fast write (considering a write operation to be complete when it is written in the NVRAM). Other hardware RAIDs use NVRAM solely for the purpose of marking inconsistent parity groups (parity groups where the new data has been written but the new parity has not yet been written) and recovering from power failures in the middle of update requests.

An example of a software RAID is the Paragon system from Chantal/BusLogic Corporation or the Corel RAID system from the Corel corporation. Both of these systems are for the Novell Netware servers.

Current software implementations of RAID 5 require a complete scan of all disk blocks following a power failure or a system crash to find and fix inconsistent parity groups. Long recovery times are unacceptable for most practical implementations.

A disk failure during recovery can cause data loss. The data on the broken disk would normally be reconstructed using the data from the other disks. However, if the parity group was inconsistent the data can not be accurately reconstructed. A related problem with having to scan all parity groups during recovery is that if one of the data blocks in a parity group cannot be read (uncorrectable ECC error on the disk block, for example), there is a data loss situation, since the parity group may be consistent. The more the parity groups that have to be scanned, the more likely a data loss situation will occur. Another secondary problem is that parity groups are locked for too long of a time, since the data and parity are written sequentially and the lock is held until both are written to disk.

In Chen, P. M. et. al., RAID: High-Performance, Reliable Secondary Storage, ACM Computing Surveys, June 1994, vol 26 (2); pp 145-186, a system is proposed where every time a write is made to a parity group, an indicator is written to the disk that the parity group has been modified. Such a write requires six disk accesses: (1) Write indicator that the parity group is modified; (2) Read the old data; (3) Read the old parity; (4) Write the new data; (5) Write the new parity; and (6) Write indicator that parity group is not modified. Chen proposes keeping a fixed-size list of parity sectors that might be inconsistent. This list is maintained on disk and in memory. Chen reduces the number of disk I/Os needed to maintain this list by using a group commit mechanism. This improves throughput at the expense of increased response time.

In general, previous software RAID proposals have not included discussion of concurrency and locking issues related to RAIDs. To the extent such discussion has existed, the assumption has been that locking is used to prevent more than one update concurrently executing against a parity group. It is also desirable to optimize concurrent processing of multiple updates against a parity group.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of this invention to provide a system that can be used by software RAID-5 arrays to achieve adequate performance and reliability, as well as to improve performance of low cost hardware RAIDs.

It is an object of the invention to provide an enhancement to the basic RAID algorithm which speeds up recovery time for software RAIDs. In a preferred embodiment, this enhancement uses a bit map stored on disk, called a PGS bit map, to mark inconsistent parity groups, replacing the NVRAM used for similar purposes by hardware RAIDs. A further enhancement is provided to optimize sequential I/O data stream. These optimizations may be used by software RAIDs or hardware RAIDs. Among hardware RAIDs, these systems and methods are particularly applicable to RAIDs that do not employ an NVRAM for fast write operations.

A method is provided for storing data in an array of storage devices. A plurality of block locations on the storage devices are logically arranged as a parity group wherein a parity block stored in a block location as part of a parity group is logically derived from the combination of data blocks stored in the parity group, and each block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device. A plurality of parity groups are grouped into a parity group set. A request is received to write a new data block to a block location on a storage device. The old data block stored at the block location is read. The new data block is written to the block location. When the parity group set is in an unmodified state prior to the current write, an indicator is written to the storage device that the parity group set is in a modified state.

In one embodiment, a change parity is calculated for the parity group from the old data block and the new data block. The old parity block for the parity group to which the block location belongs is read. A new parity block is calculated from the change parity and the old parity. The new parity is written to the location on the storage device of the old parity block. After writing the new parity, for each parity group set in an unmodified state, an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state is written to the disk.

In a preferred embodiment, each parity group set is represented in a bit map having a bit set when the parity group set is in a modified state. Each parity group set has a set counter of the number of writes operations currently modifying a parity group set and when a set counter becomes zero, the bit for the parity group set is changed.

The system recovers from a failure by first identifying modified parity group sets. For each parity group in a modified parity group set, any parity groups having an inconsistent parity block is updated based on the data blocks of the parity group.

In a further preferred embodiment, specifically for handling sequential data streams, a determination is made whether a new data block is in a sequential data stream. A change parity for the parity group is calculated from the old data block and the new data block. Processing of the sequential data stream continues until a new data block to be written is not in the preceding sequential data stream. Then, the old parity block is read for each parity group to which a block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs. A new parity block is calculated for each of these parity groups based on the change parity for the parity group and the old parity block for the parity group. The new parity block for each of these parity groups is written to a location on the storage device of the old parity block for the parity group. The indicator that a parity group set is in a modified state is set when a new data block crosses a boundary into a new parity group set. After writing the new data, for each parity group set in an unmodified state, an indicator is written that the parity group set is in an unmodified state.

In a preferred embodiment, the block location for the new data is locked before the old data is read. The block location is un-locked after the new data is written. The block location of the old parity block is locked before the old parity is read and unlocked after the new parity is written.

In a preferred embodiment a storage array system is provided. The storage array comprises a plurality of storage device, wherein each storage device comprises a plurality of block locations. A plurality of parity groups is logically organized from a plurality of block locations on the storage devices, the parity groups comprise a parity block stored in a parity group block location, where the parity block is logically derived from the combination of data blocks stored in the parity group and where each block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device. A plurality of parity group sets are organized each from a plurality of parity groups. Means are provided for writing a new data block to a block location on a storage device, and reading an old data block stored at the block location. Means are provided for writing to a storage device, an indicator that a parity group set is in an unmodified state. Means are provided for reading an old parity block for a parity group, calculating new parity for a parity group from the old data block, the old parity block and the new data block and writing the new parity to the location on the storage device of the old parity block. Means are also provided for writing to the storage device an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a storage array system;

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of parity group sets in a storage array system;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of a process for writing data to a storage array system;

FIG. 4 is a diagram of a parity group set bit map representation stored on storage devices;

FIG. 5 is flow chart of a process for writing data to a storage array system having data blocks organized into parity group sets;

FIG. 6 is a flow chart of a process of recovering from a failure in a storage array system;

FIG. 7 is a flow chart of a process for writing data to a storage array system organized into parity group sets and having a non-volatile cache; and

FIG. 8 is a flow chart of a further embodiment of a process for writing data to a storage array system organized into parity group sets and having a non-volatile cache.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to FIG. 1, a software implemented RAID system has a host computer 10 having a random access memory (RAM) 12 connected to a central processing unit (CPU) 14 and an interface to an I/O bus 16. The host system is in communication with an array of disk drives 20 through a micro channel or other communication link 21. The disk drives 20 are controlled by a SCSI adapter 22 comprising a RAM 23 and a CPU 24. The adaptor may also include a non-volatile cache (called an NVRAM or a nonvolatile store NVS) 18.

In a software implemented RAID, the RAID functions are not controlled by the disk adapter or a separate controller, but, by the host system 10 using software loaded into the RAM 12.

An application program running on the host system 26 issues requests to read and write data stored on the drives 20. The data is located using a file system 27 and a logical volume manager 28 through the device adapter 30. Software RAIDs are typically implemented below the file system, either as an operating system device driver or in the logical volume manager (LVM) of an operating system.

Referring to FIG. 2, a set of five disk drives 20 labeled 1 through 5 is organized as a 4+P array. Each vertical column 32 of numbers represents a disk drive. Each reference number 33 represents data blocks and each horizontal row 34 represents a parity group. The number of consecutive data blocks stored on a disk, before the next group of consecutive blocks are stored on a second disk can vary. Each set of X consecutive blocks constitute a stripe unit. A parity stripe unit is a consecutive set of X parity blocks from a disk, such as P1 and P2 for X=2. A stripe consists of N corresponding stripe units from the N disks. X consecutive parity groups constitute a stripe. In typical implementations, a stripe unit will consist of some multiple of 8 blocks. Therefore, a stripe consists of some multiple of 8 parity groups.

As shown in FIG. 2, the location of the parity block 35 is rotated among the disk drives on a track basis.

The Data First Method

When a host issues a request to write (update) block B on disk I, changing its value from D to D' where, for example, the parity for block B on disk I is block B on disk J, and the old parity value is P which needs to be changed to P', the following steps are performed (referred to as the data first method) to satisfy the write request:

(1) Lock the parity group consisting of block B on all disks in array.

(2) In parallel, issue a request to read block B from disk I (old data) and block B from disk J (old parity).

Many disk implementations will allow this write to be chained to and issued at

the same time as the previous read for block B disk I.

(3) Queue a request to write D' to block B on disk I as soon as possible, so it can occur in the next revolution of the disk after the read of block B on disk I.

(4) Return "done" to system as soon as possible after D' written safely to disk.

(5) Compute P by performing an XOR operation on D' with D and P, in an order determined by whether D or P first became available.

(6) Write P' as the to disk J block B. This step must not be initiated until after D' has been written safely to disk I block B.

(7) Unlock parity group.

Power may fail at any time during these steps. On recovery from power failure, all parity groups need to be scanned to ensure parity consistency. The following procedure is performed to determine parity group consistency: (1) For each parity group, all data blocks are XORed to produce an expected parity, which is compared with the parity block. (2) If parity is inconsistent (expected parity is not equal to the actual parity block) the parity is made consistent by writing the previously computed expected parity to the parity block on disk.

A faster alternative is to simply always write the computed parity to the parity block on disk, without even checking it first. This works because, during normal operation, data is always written first and then parity. If power failed before data is written, then parity will be consistent. If power failed after data is written, but before parity is successfully written, then making parity consistent during recovery will be appropriate. If power failed in the middle of writing data, the data field may contain garbage. However, since completion of the write request was never conveyed to the host, the host software can recover this data. This is a problem that also occurs with standard (non-Raid) disks.

The long recovery time can be reduced if the user did an orderly "shutdown" prior to turning power off to the machines. During the shutdown, the software RAID completes any ongoing updates, makes all parity groups consistent, and writes a "consistent" flag to disk. On recovery, the RAID software reads the consistent flag from a known location on disk. If the flag is set, it turns off the flag on disk, but knows that no recovery is needed. If the flag is reset, it proceeds to do the lengthy recovery as described previously. This means that lengthy recovery is only initiated for a system crash or a power failure.

The Parallel Method

An alternative to the data first write method is the parallel write method which allows the writing of data and parity to proceed in parallel so that locks are held for a shorter period of time. This parallelism is achieved by affixing time stamps to disk blocks. A field added at the beginning of a block and the same field repeated at the end of the block detect partial writes of blocks caused by power failures during the middle of a write. A partial write of a block is detected if the fields are not identical; otherwise, the block is self-verifying.

During recovery, time stamps provide a way to pinpoint the inconsistent block of an inconsistent parity group. For example, if the parity block indicates a later time stamp for disk 2, than the time stamp in the corresponding data block on disk 1, the data block on disk 1 is backlevel and needs to be made up-to-date. The use of time stamps permits a more aggressive update algorithm, where data and parity are written in parallel.

Preferably, a 2 bit time stamp is used, where the time stamp is actually a counter that increments (through 0) each time a new write occurs.

The following steps are performed to satisfy a host write request:

(1) Lock the parity group consisting of block B from all disks in the array to prevent later host writes to the same parity group.

(2) In parallel, issue a request to read block B from disk I (old data) and block B from disk J (old parity).

(3) XOR D' with D and P (in an order determined by whether D or P first became available) to produce P'.

(4) Queue a request to write D' to block B on disk I as soon as possible, so it can occur in next revolution of disk after read of block B on disk I. This can happen before the previous step completes. The time stamp that goes with D' is obtained by incrementing the time stamp that went with D. The write for D' can not be chained and issued at the same time as the read for D.

(5) Queue a request to write P' (as soon as it is produced) on block B disk J. P' can be written in parallel with the writing of D'. The time stamp that goes with P' is produced by incrementing the appropriate one of the several time stamps associated with P.

(6) Return "done" to system right after the earlier of D' or P' is written safely to disk.

(7) Unlock parity group after later of D' or P' written safely to disk.

Power may fail (or the system may crash) at any time during these steps. On recovery, all parity groups are scanned to check that parity is consistent. If parity is inconsistent, the parity is made consistent as follows:

(1) First, ensure that all blocks are self-verifying. If they are, then find the data block whose time stamp is different from the corresponding time stamp in the parity block, and fix the data block or the parity block, whichever has the earlier time stamp. (2) If only one block is not self-verifying (either data block or parity block), then it is calculated using the other members of the parity group. (3) If two blocks (one data block and the parity block) are both not self-verifying (when the power failure happened at a time when both the data block and the parity block were partially written so that both data and parity are garbage) an arbitrary time stamp for the garbage data field is used and the blocks are made self-verifying. This self-verifying data block and the remaining data blocks are used to produce a consistent parity block. The fact that one data block still contains garbage, is not a problem since there was never a completion of the write request to the host. The host software can recover this data.

Unit of Locking

A typical update might modify 4K bytes (8 sectors), so it might require locking 8 parity groups. To speed up locking, at the expense of update concurrency, larger units can be locked.

Type of Locks

Read requests also need to get locks when a read request to a data block that is in the process of getting updated by an earlier update request must return the updated value of the data block. In this case, read requests would get a shared lock. Many shared locks can be held against a particular parity group, stripe, or whatever lock unit is considered appropriate; this allows many reads to be performed concurrently against a lock unit. Update requests, on the other hand, get exclusive locks so other update or read requests can not be performed concurrently.

Implementing Locks as Queues

Queues are used for requests waiting for locks. For example, two concurrent updates to the same block(s), or a concurrent read and update to the same block(s), may need to be executed in the order these requests were received. This is typically accomplished with a queue (lock) header and a queue of waiting requests (per lock unit). The most convenient way to organize and locate the queue headers is with a hash table. A queue header (and queue) should take up memory only if there is an outstanding request against the corresponding parity group or stripe (or if there was a request in the recent past).

More than one request in a queue can be operational. For example, if all requests in a queue are read requests, they may all be executed. However, once an update request begins execution, other requests in the queue must wait their turn.

Enhancements for Improved Concurrency

An alternative to using a parity group lock which prevents multiple concurrent updates to data blocks in the same parity group, is to allow multiple concurrent updates to blocks in a parity group for the data first algorithm. The read and write of data and the read and write of parity are treated as atomic operations which cannot be interrupted by any other disk I/O to the same block. Host reads to the data block can also occur between the reading and writing of data.

As shown in FIG. 3, a lock is placed on individual blocks. First a lock is acquired on data and then on parity in that order. Operations are initiated on the data and parity disks only after the lock on the data and parity is acquired respectively. The data and parity locks are released after completing the writing of the new data and new parity to disk respectively.

The concurrency enhanced data first method implements the following steps:

(1) Acquire lock on data (block B of disk I) 36. Wait if needed.

(2) Issue an atomic pair of requests to read D from block B on disk I (old data) and to write D' to block B disk I (new data) 37. This request can be interrupted by requests to other blocks on the same disk, and by host reads for this block.

(3) Acquire lock on parity (block B of disk J) 38. Wait if needed. This lock should be acquired only after a lock on data has been acquired.

(4) Return done to system as soon as possible after D' written safely to disk 39. This can happen before a lock on parity is acquired.

(5) Release lock on data as soon as D' written to disk 40. This can happen before lock on parity is acquired.

(6) XOR D' with D to produce Delta P 41. This can happen as soon as D is read from disk.

(7) Issue a request to read block B from disk J (old parity) 42. This can happen any time after lock on parity is acquired.

(8) Compute new parity P' as old parity XOR Delta P 43.

(9) Issue a request to write P' to block B of disk J 44. This request MUST be the next request for block B after the read of old parity (the lock on parity ensures this).

(10) Release the lock on parity 45.

Another alternative that is a simpler, but more restrictive, way to achieve enhanced concurrency is to treat the read and write of data and of parity as atomic operations which cannot be interrupted by any other disk I/O. This may slow down the response time for some host reads, but it is simpler to implement, since it requires no locking.

Another alternative to locking individual blocks, is to lock stripe units. This reduces locking overhead, since a typical update request would only require one lock on a data stripe unit and one lock on a parity stripe unit (instead of eight locks on data blocks and eight locks on parity blocks), but comes at the expense of reduced concurrency.

The foregoing parallel method may also be enhanced to allow multiple concurrent updates by ensuring that if there are N update requests to a particular block, the order in which the N reads and writes of data are processed is the same as the order in which the N reads and writes of parity are processed.

The following steps implement locking at a block level for multiple concurrent updates using the parallel method:

(1) Acquire a lock on data, then a lock on parity in that order.

(2) Initiate operations on the data disk only after the lock on data is acquired.

(3) Initiate operations on the parity disk only after the lock on parity is acquired.

(4) Don't release any locks until both locks are acquired.

(5) Release the data lock after the writing of the new data to disk is complete.

Release the parity lock after the writing of the new parity to disk is complete. This differs from the scheme for the data first algorithm only in that locks cannot be released until both locks have been acquired.

Stripe unit locking, may be used with a trade off between concurrency and reduced lock overhead.

Another alternative to achieve enhanced concurrency for the parallel algorithm is to initiate or queue up both the data and parity operations for an update request at the respective disks before starting to handle another update request.

The concurrency enhanced parallel method without locking is described below:

(1) Issue an atomic request to read block B from disk I (old data) and to write D' to block B disk I (new data).

(2) As soon as old data is available, XOR D' with D to produce Delta P.

(3) As soon as old data is available, issue a request to read block B from disk J (old parity).

(4) Do not allow another host update request until after completing steps 1-3.

(5) Compute new parity P' as old parity XOR Delta P. Issue a request to write P' to block B of disk J. This request must be the next one executed after the read of old parity.

(6) Issue "done" to requestor as soon as either D' or P' are written to disk.

Parity Group Sets

Software RAIDs that do not have an NVRAM for marking parity groups that are in the process of being modified where either the data or parity is updated, but not both, (in an inconsistent state). Further writes are required to be made to the disks to protect the integrity of the parity groups in the event of a system failure. In the event of a system failure, all parity groups that were being modified need to be brought into a consistent state (as described previously). A preferred embodiment of the invention, as shown in FIG. 2, provides for aggregating a plurality of parity groups 34 to form a Parity Group Set (PGS) 48.

A PGS is used as an aggregation unit for identifying parity groups that may be in the process of being updated. Only parity groups in a PGS which an indicator identifies as being a PGS which may contain a parity group that may be in the process of being updated, need to be modified to be brought into a consistent state. A PGS is preferably a stripe or larger. For example, an array having 30,000 parity groups, 300 Parity Group Sets (PGSes) can be formed where each PGS comprises 100 parity groups. The first 100 parity groups would be in the first PGS, the second 100 parity groups would be in the second PGS, and so on.

Referring to FIG. 4, a bit map 50 is used where each bit 51 represents a PGS. The bit for a PGS is set if any parity group in the PGS may be inconsistent. The bit map is maintained in memory and on disk where the disk version tracks the memory version closely, but the two are not identical at all times. Whenever a parity group is inconsistent, the disk version of the bit map will have its bit set. On a power failure, only the PGSes whose bits are set in the disk PGS bit map need to be scanned.

Preferably the PGS bit map 50 fits in a single disk block 52. Two copies of the PGS bit map 50 are stored on a disk and are written to alternately. This avoids problems caused by power failures in the middle of writing the PGS bit map block. To determine the latest copy and detect partial writes of PGS blocks, a time stamp 54 is stored in the first and last byte of the PGS bit map blocks. A partial write is detected if the time stamp in the first byte is not the same as the time stamp in the last byte. On recovery following power failure, both PGS blocks are read to determine the version with the latest time stamp if both PGS blocks are self-verifying. If one of the PGS disk blocks was only partially written and consequently is not self-verifying, the other PGS block is used for recovery. The two PGS disk blocks are stored at known fixed locations in the array (for example, block 0 and block 1 of first disk of the array). If the disk holding the PGS bit map fails, another disk is selected to hold the PGS bit map. Following a power failure, the disk with the bit map is found using mechanisms similar to the ones used to find other configuration information such as which disks belong to which arrays, etc.

Additionally, for each PGS, a count is maintained of the number of concurrent updates in progress against that PGS.

A process is used to improve the recovery performance of write operations using either the data first or the parallel algorithm in conjunction with the parity group sets bit map. The process uses a global lock on the PGS bit map before checking or changing the bit map and/or the PGS count. It also uses three global flags, a Force flag, a Write in Progress Flag and a Changed Flag. The first flag, if set, indicates that the PGS bit map must be immediately forced to disk. This flag is turned on whenever a bit in the PGS bit map is set. The second flag, if set, indicates that the bit map is being written to disk. The third flag, if set, indicates that the bit map has changed since the last write, but does not require that the change be written to disk immediately. This is the case when one or more bits in the PGS bit map have been reset, but none have been set, since the last write of the bit map.

The process for writing data will be described with reference to the flow chart 60 in FIG. 5.

First, follow the steps outlined for the data first or parallel methods until data or parity are to be written to disk 61. At any time after acquiring the parity group lock but before initiating the write of either the data or the parity, acquire a lock on the PGS bit map 62. Next, check the PGS bit map to see if the bit for this PGS is set 63. If already set, go to next step. If not set, set the bit in the bit map for this PGS 64 and set the Force Flag. If the Write in Progress flag is not set, set this flag which will awaken the PGS bit map writing process. If the Write in Progress flag is already set, the PGS bit map writing process is currently writing a previous change to the bit map; it will automatically initiate the write request containing the new change to the bit map when the old write completes (see below for details). Next, the PGS Count for the appropriate PGS is incremented 65. Afterwards, the PGS bit map is unlocked 66.

If the bit was not already set in PGS bit map, wait until the PGS bit map writing process reports that the PGS bit map with the bit set has been written to disk before continuing with rest of write operation 68.

Following the update of the parity group 70, the PGS bit map is locked and the PGS count decremented for appropriate PGSes 71. If count=0 72, the appropriate bit in PGS bit map is reset. The Changed Flag is set and the PGS bit map is unlocked.

The bit map writing process works as follows:

(1) Wait for Write in Progress Flag to be set.

(2) Lock PGS bit map. Check Force Flag. If not set, then reset Write in Progress Flag, unlock PGS bit map, and return. If set, make a separate memory copy of PGS bit map to be written to disk, reset Force and Changed Flags and unlock PGS bit map.

(3) Increment time stamp to be written with PGS bit map, and change address at which to write bit map to point to alternate location.

(4) Write memory copy of PGS bit map to disk.

(5) When complete, notify write complete.

The bit map writing process is also used occasionally, to dump the PGS bit map to disk if the Changed Flag is on, even if the Force Flag is not on. In addition to the four disk I/Os needed per update request, a fifth disk I/O is sometimes used to write the PGS bit map. This fifth disk I/O is needed only if the appropriate bit in the PGS bit map was not already set. That is, the fifth I/O is needed only if the selected PGS did not already have an update in progress to it. The fifth I/O is sometimes not needed even if the appropriate bit in the PGS bit map was not already set. An update to PGS 1, which sets bit 1, and initiates the first write of the PGS bit map results in five disk I/Os. An update to PGS 2 results in bit 2 being set, and will require another write of the PGS bit map. However, since the bit map writing process is busy writing the PGS bit map, this second write is not immediately initiated. When updates to PGSes are all received before the first write of the PGS bit map completes, then the PGS bits are also set in the bit map, and the second disk write of the bit map will combine the bit map writing for all these update requests into one disk I/O. Thus, the one extra disk I/O needed was shared between the subsequent update requests, each of which did not separately need 5 disk I/Os.

If the PGS size is small, recovery time is improved at the expense of extra disk I/Os during normal operation. With a large PGS size, recovery times will be longer, but normal update performance might be improved.

Distributed PGS Bit Maps

Though unlikely, it may be possible that the throughput of the array becomes limited by how fast we can write the PGS bit map. This is because other disk I/Os are distributed across the disks of the array, whereas the PGS bit map writes are all to one disk.

In one alternate embodiment, the PGS bit map is distributed across the disks in the array. For example, for N disks in the array, the bit map associated with the first 1/N PGSes can be stored (with its alternate location) on disk 1, the bit map associated with the second 1/N PGSes can be stored on disk 2, and so on. With this distribution, there are 2 PGS disk blocks per disk in the array, and the PGS bit map writing is unlikely to be a bottleneck.

A preferred alternative (shown in FIG. 4) is to have the entire bit map replicated on all N disks and establish an order for writing the bit map to the disks, such as writing the bit map first to disk 1, then to disk 2, . . . , then to disk N, then back to disk 1, and so on. N writes of bit maps to the N disks cannot be in progress concurrently, otherwise a power failure could then potentially destroy all N disk copies of the bit map. N-1 concurrent bit map writes can be allowed. Following a power failure, the most recent bit map can be determined as the one with the most recent self-verifying time stamp. If a disk fails, it must be taken out of the write rotation and this information must be recorded so as to be accessible during bring-up after a power failure. It can be recorded the same way as other array configuration information needed at bring-up is recorded.

The process for recovering from a failure is shown in FIG. 6. For a parity group set with a bit on the bit map set 80, each parity group is scanned to identify any inconsistent parity groups. Inconsistent parity group are made consistent (as described previously) 82 and the failure is corrected under standard RAID 5 recovery procedures 84.

Enhancements for Sequential Workloads

Performance can be improved for workloads that include sequential updates. That is, where the request stream is of the form update block 1, update block 2, . . . , update block N. There are a number of ways consecutive data blocks can be striped across the disks. One way is to stripe data blocks in such a way that a stripe is equal to a parity group. Alternatively multiple consecutive data blocks can be stored on one disk, before the next multiple consecutive blocks are stored on a second disk, and so on. That is, a stripe can be multiple parity groups. This is referred to as having a data stripe interleaf depth of N.

Parity Caching Optimization

In one embodiment of the invention, a parity cache is used (when available) to store parity that needs to be written to disk, but has not yet been written. The following steps implement parity caching for write operations described previously in the Data First Method:

(1) Lock the parity group consisting of block B from all disks in the array.

(2) Issue a request to read block B from disk I (old data). Check the parity cache for old parity. If the old parity is not in parity cache, issue a request to read block B from disk J (old parity).

(3) Queue a request to write D' to block B on disk I as soon as possible, so it can occur in next revolution of disk after read of block B on disk I.

(4) Return done to system as soon as possible after D' written safely to disk.

(5) XOR D' with D and P to produce P', in an order determined by whether D or P first became available. The XORing may begin before the previous step is executed.

(6) Save P' in a parity cache. Do not write to disk yet.

(7) Unlock parity group.

This process can be applied to either the data first method, or the data first method with the PGS bit map. If the PGS bit map is used (as shown in FIG. 7, at 88), only one disk I/O is needed for writing the PGS bit map if the sequential stream of updates all fall within the same PGS (which is likely). When the PGS bit map is used, the bit in the bit map is not reset until the parity is actually written to disk.

If a disk fails, and the array enters a degraded mode of operation, the parity cache is written to disk, and all subsequent update requests are executed without the parity caching optimization, until rebuild of the failed disk has completed to a spare disk. This minimizes the amount of data that can be lost if there were a power failure or system crash while the array was still in the degraded mode.

Delta Parity Caching Optimization

A further embodiment of the invention is to implement parity caching optimization and delay both the read and the write of parity until the sequential update stream is broken (as shown in FIG. 7 at 90). So, when block 1 is updated, block 1 is read and new data is written, and the XOR of old and new values of block 1 is stored in cache as delta parity. This delta parity must later be applied to parity to compute new parity. When block 2 is updated, block 2 is read and new data written, and a new delta parity is computed (old delta parity XOR old value of block 2 XOR new value of block 2). When the sequential stream is broken, the parity block(s) are read, the delta parity (ies) applied, and the parity block(s) rewritten to the disk.

The bigger the stream of consecutive updates, the bigger the advantage of Delta Parity Caching over Parity Caching. Delta parity caching can also be extended with data prefetching (described below). Parity caching and delta parity caching optimizations can be used by hardware RAIDs, even when the I/O pattern is random. They are most appropriate for low-cost hardware RAIDs which cannot afford to have a large NVRAM for extensive write caching and fast write.

FIG. 6 provides a flow chart of a preferred embodiment for processing sequential write requests for parity groups organized as parity group sets and using the delta parity caching.

Delta Parity and Partial Parity Caching Optimization

A further alternative embodiment of the invention is to save the reading of parity if the entire parity group is updated. This optimization requires that both delta parity and partial parity be cached as follows: (1) When block 1 is updated, read and write block 1. (2) Save in cache the delta parity (new value of block 1 XOR old value of block 1) and the partial parity (new value of block 1). (3) When block 2 is updated, read and write block 2. Also, save in the cache the new delta parity (old delta parity XOR old value of block 2 XOR new value of block 2) and the new partial parity (old partial parity XOR new value of block 2). (4) If an entire parity group is updated, new parity can be computed simply from the partial parity generated in cache. If the entire parity group is not updated, new parity is computed by reading old parity from the disk and applying delta parity to it.

Data Prefetch Optimization

In a further embodiment of the invention, data blocks of a parity group are pre-fetched into the NVRAM when there are sequential updates. When striping the data having an interleaf depth of one, the process works as follows:

(1) When the first block is updated, read and write data block 1, and read parity P1. (2) A new value for P1 is calculated and stored in parity cache, but not written to disk. (3) When the next consecutive block, block 2, is updated, read and write block 2 and compute a new value for P1 in parity cache. At the same time, also prefetch the next consecutive blocks in the parity group, blocks 3 and 4, in anticipation of updates to blocks 3 and 4. (4) When blocks 3 and 4 are updated, writing block 3 to disk completes the update; that is, there is only 1 disk I/O involved in the response time of the update operation. The prefetching of blocks is triggered as soon as 2 out of N blocks in a parity group have been updated, or as soon as N/2 blocks in a parity group have been updated, or any other criterion chosen has been satisfied.

As before, the writing of parity is delayed until the sequential stream of update requests is broken. Some wasted work may be done if the update request stream is broken too soon.

The prefetching described above is different from the prefetching performed automatically by many disk drives, since the prefetching here goes across disk drives.

Caching Enhancements

Caching of data and parity blocks may be employed to reduce disk I/Os, even when updates are random. Such general caching is complementary to all methods presented. The following additional points apply when data and parity are cached.

Locks are acquired as before, but the locks on parity can be released as soon as new parity has been updated in cache. There is no need to wait until parity is written to the disk.

After appropriate locks have been acquired, always check in cache for data (parity) first. Cache should return either that (1) data (parity) is in cache; (2) data (parity) is not in cache, but is being fetched from the disk for another request; or (3) data (parity) is not in cache. The request uses the data (parity) from cache, in the first case. The request waits until the I/O completes and then uses data (parity) from cache, in the second case. The request puts a mark in the cache that it is fetching data (parity) from disk, in the third case, so later update requests to the same data or parity group will be appropriately notified.

Data (parity) is pinned in cache for the duration of time it is needed by one or more requests. This prevents it from being replaced by normal LRU replacement policies while being used.

Fully Enhanced Data First With Parity Caching Method

The fully enhanced embodiment of the data first algorithm described below for data first writes with enhanced concurrency, enhanced recovery, parity caching and data caching and is described with reference to FIG. 8.

(1) Acquire lock on data (block B disk I) 100. Wait if needed.

(2) Allocate space for D' in cache and bring D' from host into cache.

(3) Check cache for old data 102. If there or being fetched, use cache copy and go to Step 4. If not there and not being fetched, issue a request to read old data D 104.

(4) Acquire lock on parity (block B of disk J) 106 after lock on data has been acquired. Wait if needed. This lock should be acquired only after lock on data has been acquired.

(5) After the parity lock is acquired, check the parity cache for old parity 108. If old parity is not in parity cache, and not being fetched, issue a request to read old parity 110. Otherwise, use cache copy.

(6) Acquire a lock on the PGS bit map 112. This can be attempted before the lock on parity has been acquired. Check the PGS bit map to see if the bit for this PGS is set. If already set, go to next step. If not set, set the bit in the bit map 114.

(7) Set the Force Flag. If Write in Progress not set, set this flag which will awaken the PGS bit map writing process. If Write in Progress is already set, the PGS bit map writing process is currently writing a previous change to the bit map; it will automatically initiate the write containing the new change to the bit map when the old write completes (see below for details).

(8) Increment PGS Count for appropriate PGS 116. Unlock PGS bit map 117.

(9) If bit was not already set in PGS bit map when checked earlier, wait until PGS bit map writing process reports that the PGS bit map with the bit set in Step 6 has been written to disk 118.

(10) Queue a request to write D' to block B on disk I as soon as possible after D has been read. This can only happen after the PGS bit map was written if needed, but it can happen before the parity lock was acquired.

(11) Return done to system as soon as possible after D' written safely to disk 120. This can happen before lock on parity is acquired.

(12) Release lock on data as soon as D' written to disk and D' is established as new value of block on disk 122. This can happen before lock on parity is acquired.

(13) XOR D' with D and P to produce P' 124, in an order determined by whether D or P first became available. XORing may begin as early as Step 3. It cannot complete until after Steps 3 and 5 have both completed.

(14) Save P' in a parity cache 126. Do not write to disk yet. It will be written by the parity writing process (see below).

(15) Release the lock on parity 128.

(16) Remove D and P from cache 130.

In the above sequence of steps, steps 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 must be executed in that order. Step 4 can be executed any time after Step 1, and Step 5 after Step 4. Step 12 can begin as soon as data from Step 3 is available or parity from Step 5 is available. Step 12 cannot complete until both data and parity are available. Steps 13, 14 and 15 must sequentially follow Step 12.

The bit map writing process works as follows:

(1) Wait for Write in Progress Flag to be set.

(2) Lock PGS bit map.

(3) Check Force Flag.

(4) If Force Flag not set, then reset Write in Progress Flag, unlock PGS bit map, and return to Step 1. If Force Flag is set, make a separate memory copy of PGS bit map to be written to disk, reset Force and Changed Flags and unlock PGS bit map.

(5) Increment time stamp to be written with PGS bit map, and change address at which to write bit map to point to alternate location.

(6) Write memory copy of PGS bit map (made in Step 3) to disk.

(7) When complete, notify all requestors waiting for write to complete. Go to Step 2.

The parity writing process works as follows:

(1) Write parity to disk when sequential stream of updates is broken, or later.

(2) Make parity the least-recently-used (LRU) block so it will be flushed quickly from cache.

(3) Lock PGS bit map and decrement PGS count for appropriate PGS. If count=0, reset appropriate bit in PGS bit map. Set the Changed Flag and unlock the PGS bit map.

Awaken the bit map writing process occasionally, to dump the PGS bit map to disk if the Changed Flag is set, even if the Force Flag is not set.

During an orderly shutdown, the RAID subsystem forces any cached parity or data to disk until the PGS bit map becomes all zeroes then, the PGS bit map is forced to disk. The recovery time at next power on will be accomplished quickly.

Random Workloads

All of the embodiments can be used even for random workloads (particularly, the fully enhanced delta parity caching approach). There are many advantages of using this invention including improved concurrency, and the opportunity for optimizing I/O for parity, since these can be delayed until more opportune times and I/O combining may be possible.

CONCLUSION

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the preferred embodiment, it will be understood that various changes of form and detail may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (19)

We claim:
1. A method for storing data in an array of storage devices, including processor and memory comprising the steps of:
(A) logically arranging a plurality of block locations on the storage devices as a plurality of parity groups wherein a parity block stored in a block location as part of a parity group is logically derived from the combination of data blocks stored in the block locations of the parity group, and each parity and data block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device;
(B) grouping a set of the plurality of parity groups into a parity group set; and
(C) when writing a new data block to a data block location on a storage device:
(i) reading an old data block stored at the data block location;
(ii) writing the new data block to the data block location;
(iii) identifying a parity group and a parity group set to which the block location belongs;
(iv) only when the identified parity group set is in an unmodified state prior to writing the new data block, writing to the storage device an indicator that the identified parity group set is in a modified state indicating that during a recovery process, all parity groups in the identified parity group set will be checked for inconsistent parity; and
(D) using a parity group set counter to track whether the parity group set is in an unmodified state and when there are no longer any write operations currently modifying the parity group set, an indicator is set that the parity group set is in an unmodified state.
2. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 1, further comprising the steps of:
(D) reading an old parity block for the identified parity group to which the data block location belongs;
(E) calculating a new parity block for the identified parity group from the old data block, the old parity block and the new data block;
(F) writing the new parity block to a location on the storage device for the old parity block;
(G) after completing step (F), indicating that the identified parity group is in an unmodified state;
(H) determining whether all parity groups in the identified parity group set are in an unmodified state;
(I) for each parity group set where all parity groups in the parity group set are in unmodified states, writing in memory an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state; and
(J) occasionally writing to a storage device, indicators of which parity group sets are in an unmodified state, wherein, during a recovery process, no parity group in a parity group set having an indicator written to the storage device indicating the parity group set is in an unmodified state will be checked for inconsistent parity.
3. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 2, further comprising the steps of:
locking the data block location before step (C)(i);
unlocking the data block location after step (C) (ii);
locking a block location of the old parity block before step (D); and
unlocking the block location of the old parity block after step (F).
4. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 1, further comprising the steps of:
(D) calculating a change parity block for the identified parity group from the old data block and the new data block;
(E) reading an old parity block for the identified parity group to which the data block location belongs;
(F) calculating a new parity block from the change parity block and the old parity block; and
(G) writing the new parity block to a location on the storage device for the old parity block;
(H) after completing step (G), indicating that the identified parity group is in an unmodified state;
(I) determining whether all parity groups in the identified parity group set are in an unmodified state;
(J) for each parity group set where all parity groups in the parity group set are in unmodified states, writing in memory an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state; and
(K) occasionally writing to a storage device, indicators of which parity group sets are in an unmodified state, wherein, during a recovery process, no parity group in a parity group set having an indicator written to the storage device indicating that the parity group set is in an unmodified state will be checked for inconsistent parity.
5. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 1, wherein each parity group set is represented in a bit map having a bit set when the parity group set is in a modified state and said bit map is stored in memory and on a storage device and wherein the bit is reset when there are no longer any write operations modifying the parity group.
6. A method for recovering from a failure in a storage system using the method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 5, comprising the steps of:
(A) retrieving from a storage device the parity group set bit map;
(B) for each parity group set having a bit set, identifying each inconsistent parity group in each said parity group set having a bit set, having an inconsistent parity block; and
(C) for each said inconsistent parity group, updating the parity block for the inconsistent parity group based on the data blocks of the inconsistent parity group.
7. A method for recovering from a failure as called for in claim 6 further comprising the steps of:
writing the parity group set bit map in two locations on the storage devices;
writing a time stamp at the beginning and end of the bit map as the bit map is written to the storage devices;
retrieving from the storage devices the most recent consistent time stamped version of the bit map when retrieving the bit map for a recovery process.
8. A method for recovering from a failure in a storage system using the method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 1, comprising the steps of:
(A) reading from a storage device, indicators identifying modified parity group sets;
(B) for each modified parity group set, identifying each inconsistent parity group in said modified parity group set having an inconsistent parity block; and
(C) for each said inconsistent parity group, updating the parity block for the inconsistent parity group based on the data blocks of the inconsistent parity group.
9. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 1 further comprising the steps of:
(D) determining whether the new data block is a continuation of a sequential data stream;
(E) calculating a change parity block for the identified parity group from the old data block and the new data block; and
(F) when said new data block is not the continuation of said sequential data stream:
(i) reading an old parity block for each parity group to which each block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs;
(ii) calculating a new parity block for each parity group to which each block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs based on a change parity block for said each parity group and the old parity block for said each parity group; and
(iii) writing the new parity block for each parity group to which each block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs to a block location for the old parity block of said each parity group.
10. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 9 wherein the indicator that the identified parity group set is in a modified state is written to the storage device after the new data block is determined to be in a parity group that is in a new parity group set from the parity group set of the previous data block of the data stream.
11. The method for storing data in an array of storage devices as called for in claim 10, further comprising the step of:
(iv) after completing step (F)(iii), for each parity group set in an unmodified state, writing in memory an indicator that the parity group set is in the unmodified state.
12. In a storage array system including plurality of storage devices, each storage device comprising a plurality of block locations, wherein a group of block locations are designated as a parity group, each parity group including a plurality of data blocks and a parity block stored in the parity group block locations, the parity block being logically derived from the combination of data blocks of the parity group, a method for writing a new data block to a designated block location in an array of storage devices without first storing the data blocks and parity block in a cache memory, comprising the ordered steps of:
(A) determining an old parity block corresponding to a parity group of the designated block location;
(B) locking the designated block location;
(C) reading an old data block stored at the designated block location;
(D) writing the new data block to the designated block location;
(E) unlocking the designated block location;
(F) locking a block location of the old parity block for the designated parity group to which the designated block location belongs;
(G) reading the old parity block;
(H) calculating a new parity block for the designated parity group based on the old data block, the old parity block and the new data block;
(I) writing the new parity block to the block location of the old parity block; and
(J) unlocking the block location of the old parity block.
13. A storage array system comprising:
a plurality of storage devices, wherein each storage device comprises a plurality of block locations;
a plurality of parity groups logically organized from said plurality of block locations on the storage devices, said parity groups comprising a parity block stored in one of the parity group block locations, said parity block logically derived from a combination of the data blocks stored in the parity group block locations, wherein each data and parity block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device;
a plurality of parity group sets, each parity group set comprising a set of said plurality of parity groups;
means for writing a new data block to one of said parity group block locations on one of said storage devices:
means for reading an old data block stored at said one of said parity group block locations;
means for identifying one of said parity group sets to which said one of said parity group block locations belongs;
means for determining when said one of said parity group sets does not have an indicator that said one of said parity group sets is in an unmodified state; and
means for writing to the storage devices, an indicator that said one of said parity group sets is in a modified state.
14. The system of claim 13 further comprising:
means for determining the parity group to which the parity group block location belongs;
means for reading an old parity block for the determined parity group;
means for calculating a new parity block for the determined parity group from the old data block, the old parity block and the new data block;
means for writing the new parity block to a parity group block location on the storage device where the old parity block was stored;
means for determining each parity group set in an unmodified state; and
means for writing to the storage device an indicator that at least one of said parity group sets is in an unmodified state.
15. The system of claim 14 wherein said indicator that at least one of said parity group sets is in an unmodified state and a modified state comprises a parity group set bit map having a bit set for each parity group set in said modified state; and a set counter for each parity group set of the number of write operations currently modifying a parity group set wherein when said set counter becomes zero, the bit for the parity group set is changed.
16. The system of claim 13 further comprising:
means for identifying a modified parity group set;
means for identifying any parity groups in said modified parity group set having an inconsistent parity block; and
means for updating the parity block for each inconsistent parity group based on the data blocks of the parity group.
17. The system of claim 13 further comprising:
means for determining whether the new data block is a continuation of sequential data stream;
means for calculating a change parity block for a parity group from the old data block and the new data block;
means for reading an old parity block for each parity group to which a block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs;
means for calculating a new parity block for each parity group to which a block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs based on the change parity for each parity group and the old parity block for each parity group; and
means for writing the new parity block for each parity group to which a block location that is part of the sequential data stream belongs to each block location on the storage device of the old parity block for the parity group.
18. An article of manufacture for use in a computer system for storing data in a computer system having an array of storage devices, the computer system having means to write data blocks to the storage devices, said article of manufacture comprising a computer-readable storage medium having a computer program code embodied in said medium which may cause the computer to:
(A) logically arrange a plurality of block locations on the storage devices as a plurality of parity groups wherein a parity block stored in a block location as part of a parity group is logically derived from the combination of data blocks stored in the block locations of the parity group, and each parity and data block in a parity group is stored on a different storage device;
(B) group a set of the plurality of parity groups into a parity group set; and
(C) when writing a new data block to a data block location on a storage device:
(i) read an old data block stored at the data block location;
(ii) write the new data block to the data block location;
(iii) identify a parity group and a parity group set to which the block location belongs;
(iv) only when the identified parity group set is in an unmodified state prior to writing the new data block, write to the storage device an indicator that the identified parity group set is in a modified state so that during a recovery process, all parity groups in the identified parity group set will be checked for inconsistent parity;
(v) incrementing a parity group set counter for the identified parity group set when the identified parity group becomes modified;
(vi) decrementing the parity group set counter for the identified parity group when the identified parity group becomes unmodified; and
(vii) when the parity group set counter for the parity group set becomes zero, setting an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state.
19. The new article of manufacture as claimed in claim 18 wherein the computer program code may further cause the computer to:
(D) read an old parity block for the identified parity group to which the data block location belongs;
(E) calculate a new parity block for the identified parity group from the old data block, the old parity block and the new data block;
(F) write the new parity block to a location on the storage device for the old parity block;
(G) after completing step (F), indicate that the identified parity group is in an unmodified state;
(H) determine whether all parity groups in the identified parity group set are in an unmodified state;
(I) for each parity group set where all parity groups in the parity group set are in unmodified states, write in memory an indicator that the parity group set is in an unmodified state; and
(J) intermittently write to a storage device, indicators of which parity group sets are in an unmodified state, wherein, during a recovery process, no parity group in a parity group set having an indicator written to the storage device indicating the parity group set is in an unmodified state will be checked for inconsistent parity unmodified state.
US08397817 1995-03-03 1995-03-03 System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage Expired - Fee Related US5574882A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08397817 US5574882A (en) 1995-03-03 1995-03-03 System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08397817 US5574882A (en) 1995-03-03 1995-03-03 System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage
JP3939996A JP3348416B2 (en) 1995-03-03 1996-02-27 Method, and a storage array system for storing data in an array

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US5574882A true US5574882A (en) 1996-11-12

Family

ID=23572752

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08397817 Expired - Fee Related US5574882A (en) 1995-03-03 1995-03-03 System and method for identifying inconsistent parity in an array of storage

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US5574882A (en)
JP (1) JP3348416B2 (en)

Cited By (69)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5734813A (en) * 1994-08-18 1998-03-31 Hitachi, Ltd. Storage apparatus system for reallocating data records among parity groups
US5752004A (en) * 1995-07-31 1998-05-12 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for modifying an internal data processing system identification
US5764880A (en) * 1996-09-10 1998-06-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for rebuilding log-structured arrays
US5774643A (en) * 1995-10-13 1998-06-30 Digital Equipment Corporation Enhanced raid write hole protection and recovery
US6016552A (en) * 1997-06-06 2000-01-18 The Chinese University Of Hong Kong Object striping focusing on data object
US6041423A (en) * 1996-11-08 2000-03-21 Oracle Corporation Method and apparatus for using undo/redo logging to perform asynchronous updates of parity and data pages in a redundant array data storage environment
US6098114A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-08-01 3Ware Disk array system for processing and tracking the completion of I/O requests
US6128762A (en) * 1998-08-04 2000-10-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating and reading data and parity blocks in a shared disk system with request forwarding
US6158019A (en) * 1996-12-15 2000-12-05 Delta-Tek Research, Inc. System and apparatus for merging a write event journal and an original storage to produce an updated storage using an event map
US6170063B1 (en) 1998-03-07 2001-01-02 Hewlett-Packard Company Method for performing atomic, concurrent read and write operations on multiple storage devices
US6175837B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2001-01-16 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Object-relational mapping toll that processes views
US6192484B1 (en) 1997-03-11 2001-02-20 Nec Corporation Method and system for recovering lost data
US6240413B1 (en) * 1997-12-22 2001-05-29 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Fine-grained consistency mechanism for optimistic concurrency control using lock groups
US6243827B1 (en) 1998-06-30 2001-06-05 Digi-Data Corporation Multiple-channel failure detection in raid systems
US6268850B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2001-07-31 Sun Microsystems, Inc. User interface for the specification of lock groups
US6272662B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-08-07 International Business Machines Corporation Distributed storage system using front-end and back-end locking
US6279138B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-08-21 International Business Machines Corporation System for changing the parity structure of a raid array
US6332197B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-12-18 International Business Machines Corp. System for updating data in a multi-adaptor environment
WO2001096987A2 (en) * 2000-06-15 2001-12-20 Datadirect Networks Inc. Data management architecture
US6360223B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-03-19 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Rule-based approach to object-relational mapping strategies
US6374256B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-04-16 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Method and apparatus for creating indexes in a relational database corresponding to classes in an object-oriented application
US6385618B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-05-07 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Integrating both modifications to an object model and modifications to a database into source code by an object-relational mapping tool
US6427212B1 (en) 1998-11-13 2002-07-30 Tricord Systems, Inc. Data fault tolerance software apparatus and method
US20020120789A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-08-29 Raidcore Inc. Finite state machine with a single process context for a RAID system
US6446220B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating data and parity data with and without read caches
US6446237B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating and reading data and parity blocks in a shared disk system
US20020124137A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-09-05 Ulrich Thomas R. Enhancing disk array performance via variable parity based load balancing
US6449731B1 (en) 1999-03-03 2002-09-10 Tricord Systems, Inc. Self-healing computer system storage
US20020156840A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-10-24 Ulrich Thomas R. File system metadata
US20020166026A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-11-07 Ulrich Thomas R. Data blocking mapping
US6519677B1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2003-02-11 International Business Machines Corporation Managing access to shared data in data processing networks
US6523087B2 (en) 2001-03-06 2003-02-18 Chaparral Network Storage, Inc. Utilizing parity caching and parity logging while closing the RAID5 write hole
US6530036B1 (en) 1999-08-17 2003-03-04 Tricord Systems, Inc. Self-healing computer system storage
US6591275B1 (en) 2000-06-02 2003-07-08 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Object-relational mapping for tables without primary keys
US6675318B1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2004-01-06 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Two-dimensional storage array with prompt parity in one dimension and delayed parity in a second dimension
US20040034736A1 (en) * 2002-08-19 2004-02-19 Robert Horn Method of flexibly mapping a number of storage elements into a virtual storage element
US6704837B2 (en) 1998-06-29 2004-03-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for increasing RAID write performance by maintaining a full track write counter
US6725392B1 (en) 1999-03-03 2004-04-20 Adaptec, Inc. Controller fault recovery system for a distributed file system
US6731445B1 (en) * 2000-06-21 2004-05-04 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Disk drive having DPS logging sector
US20040103246A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2004-05-27 Paresh Chatterjee Increased data availability with SMART drives
US20040250028A1 (en) * 2003-06-09 2004-12-09 Daniels Rodger D. Method and apparatus for data version checking
WO2005001841A2 (en) * 2003-06-28 2005-01-06 International Business Machines Corporation Safe write to multiply-redundant storage
US6862692B2 (en) * 2001-01-29 2005-03-01 Adaptec, Inc. Dynamic redistribution of parity groups
US20050144381A1 (en) * 2003-12-29 2005-06-30 Corrado Francis R. Method, system, and program for managing data updates
US6950901B2 (en) * 2001-01-05 2005-09-27 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for supporting parity protection in a RAID clustered environment
US20050243609A1 (en) * 2004-05-03 2005-11-03 Yang Ken Q Adaptive cache engine for storage area network including systems and methods related thereto
US20050278483A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Andruszkiewicz John J Local bitmaps for an array of redundant storage devices
US20060036904A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Gemini Storage Data replication method over a limited bandwidth network by mirroring parities
US20060036901A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Gemini Storage Data replication method over a limited bandwidth network by mirroring parities
US20060236029A1 (en) * 2005-04-15 2006-10-19 Corrado Francis R Power-safe disk storage apparatus, systems, and methods
US20060282700A1 (en) * 2005-06-10 2006-12-14 Cavallo Joseph S RAID write completion apparatus, systems, and methods
US20060288161A1 (en) * 2005-06-17 2006-12-21 Cavallo Joseph S RAID power safe apparatus, systems, and methods
US20080168304A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-07-10 David Flynn Apparatus, system, and method for data storage using progressive raid
CN100498680C (en) 2006-03-21 2009-06-10 国际商业机器公司 RAID storage adapter, system and method for generating checking value
US20090198883A1 (en) * 2008-02-04 2009-08-06 Microsoft Corporation Data copy management for faster reads
US20110208912A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 International Business Machines Corporation Full-stripe-write protocol for maintaining parity coherency in a write-back distributed redundancy data storage system
US20120144209A1 (en) * 2010-12-01 2012-06-07 International Business Corporation Methods for process key rollover/re-encryption and systems thereof
US8239706B1 (en) * 2007-01-03 2012-08-07 Board Of Governors For Higher Education, State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Data retrieval system and method that provides retrieval of data to any point in time
US8612706B1 (en) 2011-12-21 2013-12-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Metadata recovery in a disk drive
US8726129B1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2014-05-13 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Methods of writing and recovering erasure coded data
US8756382B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2014-06-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Method for file based shingled data storage utilizing multiple media types
US8756361B1 (en) * 2010-10-01 2014-06-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Disk drive modifying metadata cached in a circular buffer when a write operation is aborted
US8782661B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2014-07-15 Overland Storage, Inc. Systems and methods for load balancing drives and servers
US8954664B1 (en) 2010-10-01 2015-02-10 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Writing metadata files on a disk
US20150149819A1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2015-05-28 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Parity chunk operating method and data server apparatus for supporting the same in distributed raid system
US20170031759A1 (en) * 2015-07-30 2017-02-02 International Business Machines Corporation Party stripe lock engine
US20170097887A1 (en) * 2015-10-02 2017-04-06 Netapp, Inc. Storage Controller Cache Having Reserved Parity Area
US9658803B1 (en) * 2012-06-28 2017-05-23 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Managing accesses to storage
US9766809B2 (en) 2015-07-30 2017-09-19 International Business Machines Corporation Parity stripe lock engine

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP5245472B2 (en) * 2008-03-13 2013-07-24 富士通株式会社 Control method, a disk array device

Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4761785A (en) * 1986-06-12 1988-08-02 International Business Machines Corporation Parity spreading to enhance storage access
US4849929A (en) * 1984-03-16 1989-07-18 Cii Honeywell Bull (Societe Anonyme) Method of recording in a disk memory and disk memory system
US5088081A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-02-11 Prime Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for improved disk access
US5109505A (en) * 1988-09-29 1992-04-28 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Semiconductor memory disk apparatus with backup device capable of being accessed immediately after power source is recovered
US5233618A (en) * 1990-03-02 1993-08-03 Micro Technology, Inc. Data correcting applicable to redundant arrays of independent disks
US5249279A (en) * 1989-11-03 1993-09-28 Compaq Computer Corporation Method for controlling disk array operations by receiving logical disk requests and translating the requests to multiple physical disk specific commands
US5263145A (en) * 1990-05-24 1993-11-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and means for accessing DASD arrays with tuned data transfer rate and concurrency
US5287473A (en) * 1990-12-14 1994-02-15 International Business Machines Corporation Non-blocking serialization for removing data from a shared cache
US5301310A (en) * 1991-02-07 1994-04-05 Thinking Machines Corporation Parallel disk storage array system with independent drive operation mode
US5301297A (en) * 1991-07-03 1994-04-05 Ibm Corp. (International Business Machines Corp.) Method and means for managing RAID 5 DASD arrays having RAID DASD arrays as logical devices thereof
US5333305A (en) * 1991-12-27 1994-07-26 Compaq Computer Corporation Method for improving partial stripe write performance in disk array subsystems
US5341381A (en) * 1992-01-21 1994-08-23 Tandem Computers, Incorporated Redundant array parity caching system
US5375128A (en) * 1990-10-18 1994-12-20 Ibm Corporation (International Business Machines Corporation) Fast updating of DASD arrays using selective shadow writing of parity and data blocks, tracks, or cylinders
US5390327A (en) * 1993-06-29 1995-02-14 Digital Equipment Corporation Method for on-line reorganization of the data on a RAID-4 or RAID-5 array in the absence of one disk and the on-line restoration of a replacement disk
US5398253A (en) * 1992-03-11 1995-03-14 Emc Corporation Storage unit generation of redundancy information in a redundant storage array system
US5402428A (en) * 1989-12-25 1995-03-28 Hitachi, Ltd. Array disk subsystem
US5416915A (en) * 1992-12-11 1995-05-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for minimizing seek affinity and enhancing write sensitivity in a DASD array
US5418925A (en) * 1992-10-23 1995-05-23 At&T Global Information Solutions Company Fast write I/O handling in a disk array using spare drive for buffering
US5418921A (en) * 1992-05-05 1995-05-23 International Business Machines Corporation Method and means for fast writing data to LRU cached based DASD arrays under diverse fault tolerant modes

Patent Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4849929A (en) * 1984-03-16 1989-07-18 Cii Honeywell Bull (Societe Anonyme) Method of recording in a disk memory and disk memory system
US4761785A (en) * 1986-06-12 1988-08-02 International Business Machines Corporation Parity spreading to enhance storage access
US4761785B1 (en) * 1986-06-12 1996-03-12 Ibm Parity spreading to enhance storage access
US5109505A (en) * 1988-09-29 1992-04-28 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Semiconductor memory disk apparatus with backup device capable of being accessed immediately after power source is recovered
US5249279A (en) * 1989-11-03 1993-09-28 Compaq Computer Corporation Method for controlling disk array operations by receiving logical disk requests and translating the requests to multiple physical disk specific commands
US5402428A (en) * 1989-12-25 1995-03-28 Hitachi, Ltd. Array disk subsystem
US5233618A (en) * 1990-03-02 1993-08-03 Micro Technology, Inc. Data correcting applicable to redundant arrays of independent disks
US5088081A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-02-11 Prime Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for improved disk access
US5263145A (en) * 1990-05-24 1993-11-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and means for accessing DASD arrays with tuned data transfer rate and concurrency
US5375128A (en) * 1990-10-18 1994-12-20 Ibm Corporation (International Business Machines Corporation) Fast updating of DASD arrays using selective shadow writing of parity and data blocks, tracks, or cylinders
US5287473A (en) * 1990-12-14 1994-02-15 International Business Machines Corporation Non-blocking serialization for removing data from a shared cache
US5301310A (en) * 1991-02-07 1994-04-05 Thinking Machines Corporation Parallel disk storage array system with independent drive operation mode
US5301297A (en) * 1991-07-03 1994-04-05 Ibm Corp. (International Business Machines Corp.) Method and means for managing RAID 5 DASD arrays having RAID DASD arrays as logical devices thereof
US5333305A (en) * 1991-12-27 1994-07-26 Compaq Computer Corporation Method for improving partial stripe write performance in disk array subsystems
US5341381A (en) * 1992-01-21 1994-08-23 Tandem Computers, Incorporated Redundant array parity caching system
US5398253A (en) * 1992-03-11 1995-03-14 Emc Corporation Storage unit generation of redundancy information in a redundant storage array system
US5418921A (en) * 1992-05-05 1995-05-23 International Business Machines Corporation Method and means for fast writing data to LRU cached based DASD arrays under diverse fault tolerant modes
US5418925A (en) * 1992-10-23 1995-05-23 At&T Global Information Solutions Company Fast write I/O handling in a disk array using spare drive for buffering
US5416915A (en) * 1992-12-11 1995-05-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for minimizing seek affinity and enhancing write sensitivity in a DASD array
US5390327A (en) * 1993-06-29 1995-02-14 Digital Equipment Corporation Method for on-line reorganization of the data on a RAID-4 or RAID-5 array in the absence of one disk and the on-line restoration of a replacement disk

Non-Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
C. Crews et al. "Method for Background Parity Update in a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)", IBM Technical Technical Disclosure Bulletin vol. 35 No. 5 (Oct. 1992), pp. 139-141.
C. Crews et al. Method for Background Parity Update in a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) , IBM Technical Technical Disclosure Bulletin vol. 35 No. 5 (Oct. 1992), pp. 139 141. *
Chen et al., "RAID: High-Performance, Reliable Secondary Storage" ACM Computing Surveys, vol. 26 No. 2, (Jun. 1994).
Chen et al., RAID: High Performance, Reliable Secondary Storage ACM Computing Surveys, vol. 26 No. 2, (Jun. 1994). *
F. D. Lawlor "Efficient Mass Storage Parity Recovery Mechanism", IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin vol. 24 No. 2 (Jul. 1981), pp. 986-987.
F. D. Lawlor Efficient Mass Storage Parity Recovery Mechanism , IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin vol. 24 No. 2 (Jul. 1981), pp. 986 987. *
Katz and Lee, "The Performance of Parity Placements in Disk Arrays", IEEE Transactions on Computers, vol. 42, No. 6, Jun. 1993.
Katz and Lee, The Performance of Parity Placements in Disk Arrays , IEEE Transactions on Computers, vol. 42, No. 6, Jun. 1993. *
Menon and Cortney "The Architecture of a Fault-Tolerant Cached RAID Controller", 20th Annual Int'l Symposium on Computer Architecture, May 1993, pp. 76-86.
Menon and Cortney The Architecture of a Fault Tolerant Cached RAID Controller , 20th Annual Int l Symposium on Computer Architecture, May 1993, pp. 76 86. *
Menon et al., "Floating Parity and Data Disk Arays", Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing 17, 1993, pp. 129=14 139.
Menon et al., Floating Parity and Data Disk Arays , Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing 17, 1993, pp. 129=14 139. *
Menon, "Performance of RAID5 Disk Arrays with Read and Write Caching", Distributed and Parallel database, vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 261-294.
Menon, Performance of RAID5 Disk Arrays with Read and Write Caching , Distributed and Parallel database, vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 261 294. *
Patterson, Gibson and Katz, "A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)", Proceedings of the ACM SIGMOD Conference, 1988, pp. 109-116.
Patterson, Gibson and Katz, A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) , Proceedings of the ACM SIGMOD Conference, 1988, pp. 109 116. *
Stodolsky, Gibson and Holland, "Parity Logging Overcoming the Small Write Problem in Redundant Disk Arrays", 20th Int'l Symposium on Computer Architecture, May 1993, pp. 64-75.
Stodolsky, Gibson and Holland, Parity Logging Overcoming the Small Write Problem in Redundant Disk Arrays , 20th Int l Symposium on Computer Architecture, May 1993, pp. 64 75. *

Cited By (119)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5734813A (en) * 1994-08-18 1998-03-31 Hitachi, Ltd. Storage apparatus system for reallocating data records among parity groups
US5752004A (en) * 1995-07-31 1998-05-12 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for modifying an internal data processing system identification
US5774643A (en) * 1995-10-13 1998-06-30 Digital Equipment Corporation Enhanced raid write hole protection and recovery
US5764880A (en) * 1996-09-10 1998-06-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for rebuilding log-structured arrays
US6041423A (en) * 1996-11-08 2000-03-21 Oracle Corporation Method and apparatus for using undo/redo logging to perform asynchronous updates of parity and data pages in a redundant array data storage environment
US6158019A (en) * 1996-12-15 2000-12-05 Delta-Tek Research, Inc. System and apparatus for merging a write event journal and an original storage to produce an updated storage using an event map
US6192484B1 (en) 1997-03-11 2001-02-20 Nec Corporation Method and system for recovering lost data
US6016552A (en) * 1997-06-06 2000-01-18 The Chinese University Of Hong Kong Object striping focusing on data object
US6098114A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-08-01 3Ware Disk array system for processing and tracking the completion of I/O requests
US6301625B1 (en) 1997-11-14 2001-10-09 3Ware, Inc. System and method for processing and tracking the completion of I/O requests in a disk array system
US6360223B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-03-19 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Rule-based approach to object-relational mapping strategies
US6609133B2 (en) 1997-12-22 2003-08-19 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Integrating both modifications to an object model and modifications to a database into source code by an object-relational mapping tool
US6268850B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2001-07-31 Sun Microsystems, Inc. User interface for the specification of lock groups
US6240413B1 (en) * 1997-12-22 2001-05-29 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Fine-grained consistency mechanism for optimistic concurrency control using lock groups
US6374256B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-04-16 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Method and apparatus for creating indexes in a relational database corresponding to classes in an object-oriented application
US6385618B1 (en) 1997-12-22 2002-05-07 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Integrating both modifications to an object model and modifications to a database into source code by an object-relational mapping tool
US6170063B1 (en) 1998-03-07 2001-01-02 Hewlett-Packard Company Method for performing atomic, concurrent read and write operations on multiple storage devices
US6477617B1 (en) 1998-03-07 2002-11-05 Hewlett-Packard Company Method for performing atomic, concurrent read and write operations on multiple storage devices
US6704837B2 (en) 1998-06-29 2004-03-09 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for increasing RAID write performance by maintaining a full track write counter
US6175837B1 (en) 1998-06-29 2001-01-16 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Object-relational mapping toll that processes views
US6243827B1 (en) 1998-06-30 2001-06-05 Digi-Data Corporation Multiple-channel failure detection in raid systems
US6671782B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2003-12-30 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for processing read requests in a shared disk system
US6279138B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-08-21 International Business Machines Corporation System for changing the parity structure of a raid array
US6272662B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-08-07 International Business Machines Corporation Distributed storage system using front-end and back-end locking
US6332197B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2001-12-18 International Business Machines Corp. System for updating data in a multi-adaptor environment
US6128762A (en) * 1998-08-04 2000-10-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating and reading data and parity blocks in a shared disk system with request forwarding
US6446220B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating data and parity data with and without read caches
US6446237B1 (en) 1998-08-04 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Updating and reading data and parity blocks in a shared disk system
US6427212B1 (en) 1998-11-13 2002-07-30 Tricord Systems, Inc. Data fault tolerance software apparatus and method
US6725392B1 (en) 1999-03-03 2004-04-20 Adaptec, Inc. Controller fault recovery system for a distributed file system
US6449731B1 (en) 1999-03-03 2002-09-10 Tricord Systems, Inc. Self-healing computer system storage
US6519677B1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2003-02-11 International Business Machines Corporation Managing access to shared data in data processing networks
US6530036B1 (en) 1999-08-17 2003-03-04 Tricord Systems, Inc. Self-healing computer system storage
US6591275B1 (en) 2000-06-02 2003-07-08 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Object-relational mapping for tables without primary keys
WO2001096987A3 (en) * 2000-06-15 2007-10-25 Datadirect Networks Inc Data management architecture
US7127668B2 (en) 2000-06-15 2006-10-24 Datadirect Networks, Inc. Data management architecture
US20010056520A1 (en) * 2000-06-15 2001-12-27 Mcbryde Lee Data management architecture
WO2001096987A2 (en) * 2000-06-15 2001-12-20 Datadirect Networks Inc. Data management architecture
US6731445B1 (en) * 2000-06-21 2004-05-04 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Disk drive having DPS logging sector
US6675318B1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2004-01-06 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Two-dimensional storage array with prompt parity in one dimension and delayed parity in a second dimension
US6950901B2 (en) * 2001-01-05 2005-09-27 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for supporting parity protection in a RAID clustered environment
US8214590B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2012-07-03 Overland Storage, Inc. Systems and methods for storing parity groups
US7917695B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2011-03-29 Overland Storage, Inc. Systems and methods for storing parity groups
US20020166079A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-11-07 Ulrich Thomas R. Dynamic data recovery
US20020166026A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-11-07 Ulrich Thomas R. Data blocking mapping
US7356730B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2008-04-08 Adaptec, Inc. Dynamic redistribution of parity groups
US6754773B2 (en) * 2001-01-29 2004-06-22 Snap Appliance, Inc. Data engine with metadata processor
US20020156840A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-10-24 Ulrich Thomas R. File system metadata
US7054927B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2006-05-30 Adaptec, Inc. File system metadata describing server directory information
US8782661B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2014-07-15 Overland Storage, Inc. Systems and methods for load balancing drives and servers
US6862692B2 (en) * 2001-01-29 2005-03-01 Adaptec, Inc. Dynamic redistribution of parity groups
US6871295B2 (en) * 2001-01-29 2005-03-22 Adaptec, Inc. Dynamic data recovery
US8943513B2 (en) 2001-01-29 2015-01-27 Overland Storage, Inc. Systems and methods for load balancing drives and servers by pushing a copy of a frequently accessed file to another disk drive
US6775792B2 (en) * 2001-01-29 2004-08-10 Snap Appliance, Inc. Discrete mapping of parity blocks
US20020124137A1 (en) * 2001-01-29 2002-09-05 Ulrich Thomas R. Enhancing disk array performance via variable parity based load balancing
US20020120789A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-08-29 Raidcore Inc. Finite state machine with a single process context for a RAID system
US7219353B2 (en) * 2001-02-27 2007-05-15 Broadcom Corporation Finite state machine with a single process context for a RAID system
US6523087B2 (en) 2001-03-06 2003-02-18 Chaparral Network Storage, Inc. Utilizing parity caching and parity logging while closing the RAID5 write hole
US20040034736A1 (en) * 2002-08-19 2004-02-19 Robert Horn Method of flexibly mapping a number of storage elements into a virtual storage element
US6912643B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2005-06-28 Aristos Logic Corporation Method of flexibly mapping a number of storage elements into a virtual storage element
US6892276B2 (en) * 2002-11-26 2005-05-10 Lsi Logic Corporation Increased data availability in raid arrays using smart drives
US20040103246A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2004-05-27 Paresh Chatterjee Increased data availability with SMART drives
US20040250028A1 (en) * 2003-06-09 2004-12-09 Daniels Rodger D. Method and apparatus for data version checking
WO2005001841A2 (en) * 2003-06-28 2005-01-06 International Business Machines Corporation Safe write to multiply-redundant storage
JP2009514047A (en) * 2003-06-28 2009-04-02 インターナショナル・ビジネス・マシーンズ・コーポレーションInternational Business Maschines Corporation Apparatus and method for secure write to the multiplexing redundant storage
JP4848272B2 (en) * 2003-06-28 2011-12-28 インターナショナル・ビジネス・マシーンズ・コーポレーションInternational Business Maschines Corporation Apparatus and method for secure write to the multiplexing redundant storage
WO2005001841A3 (en) * 2003-06-28 2005-09-09 Ibm Safe write to multiply-redundant storage
CN100483323C (en) 2003-12-29 2009-04-29 英特尔公司 Method, system, and program for managing data updates
US7197599B2 (en) 2003-12-29 2007-03-27 Intel Corporation Method, system, and program for managing data updates
WO2005066759A3 (en) * 2003-12-29 2006-06-22 Francis Corrado Method, system, and program for managing parity raid data updates
US20050144381A1 (en) * 2003-12-29 2005-06-30 Corrado Francis R. Method, system, and program for managing data updates
WO2005066759A2 (en) 2003-12-29 2005-07-21 Intel Corporation Method, system, and program for managing parity raid data updates
US20050243609A1 (en) * 2004-05-03 2005-11-03 Yang Ken Q Adaptive cache engine for storage area network including systems and methods related thereto
US7370163B2 (en) 2004-05-03 2008-05-06 Gemini Storage Adaptive cache engine for storage area network including systems and methods related thereto
US8275951B2 (en) * 2004-06-10 2012-09-25 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Local bitmaps for an array of redundant storage devices
US20050278483A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Andruszkiewicz John J Local bitmaps for an array of redundant storage devices
US8726129B1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2014-05-13 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Methods of writing and recovering erasure coded data
US20060036904A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Gemini Storage Data replication method over a limited bandwidth network by mirroring parities
US7457980B2 (en) 2004-08-13 2008-11-25 Ken Qing Yang Data replication method over a limited bandwidth network by mirroring parities
US20060036901A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Gemini Storage Data replication method over a limited bandwidth network by mirroring parities
US20060236029A1 (en) * 2005-04-15 2006-10-19 Corrado Francis R Power-safe disk storage apparatus, systems, and methods
US7779294B2 (en) 2005-04-15 2010-08-17 Intel Corporation Power-safe disk storage apparatus, systems, and methods
US7441146B2 (en) * 2005-06-10 2008-10-21 Intel Corporation RAID write completion apparatus, systems, and methods
US20060282700A1 (en) * 2005-06-10 2006-12-14 Cavallo Joseph S RAID write completion apparatus, systems, and methods
US20060288161A1 (en) * 2005-06-17 2006-12-21 Cavallo Joseph S RAID power safe apparatus, systems, and methods
US7562188B2 (en) 2005-06-17 2009-07-14 Intel Corporation RAID power safe apparatus, systems, and methods
CN100498680C (en) 2006-03-21 2009-06-10 国际商业机器公司 RAID storage adapter, system and method for generating checking value
US7934055B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2011-04-26 Fusion-io, Inc Apparatus, system, and method for a shared, front-end, distributed RAID
US20110179225A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2011-07-21 Fusion-Io, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for a shared, front-end, distributed raid
US8019940B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2011-09-13 Fusion-Io, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for a front-end, distributed raid
US20080168304A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-07-10 David Flynn Apparatus, system, and method for data storage using progressive raid
US20080256292A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-10-16 David Flynn Apparatus, system, and method for a shared, front-end, distributed raid
US8412904B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2013-04-02 Fusion-Io, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for managing concurrent storage requests
US20080256183A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-10-16 David Flynn Apparatus, system, and method for a front-end, distributed raid
US8412979B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2013-04-02 Fusion-Io, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for data storage using progressive raid
US8015440B2 (en) * 2006-12-06 2011-09-06 Fusion-Io, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for data storage using progressive raid
US8601211B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2013-12-03 Fusion-Io, Inc. Storage system with front-end controller
US8239706B1 (en) * 2007-01-03 2012-08-07 Board Of Governors For Higher Education, State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Data retrieval system and method that provides retrieval of data to any point in time
US8850148B2 (en) 2008-02-04 2014-09-30 Microsoft Corporation Data copy management for faster reads
US8433871B2 (en) 2008-02-04 2013-04-30 Microsoft Corporation Data copy management for faster reads
US20090198883A1 (en) * 2008-02-04 2009-08-06 Microsoft Corporation Data copy management for faster reads
US8151068B2 (en) 2008-02-04 2012-04-03 Microsoft Corporation Data copy management for faster reads
US8583866B2 (en) * 2010-02-22 2013-11-12 International Business Machines Corporation Full-stripe-write protocol for maintaining parity coherency in a write-back distributed redundancy data storage system
US8578094B2 (en) * 2010-02-22 2013-11-05 International Business Machines Corporation Full-stripe-write protocol for maintaining parity coherency in a write-back distributed redundancy data storage system
US20110208912A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 International Business Machines Corporation Full-stripe-write protocol for maintaining parity coherency in a write-back distributed redundancy data storage system
US8954664B1 (en) 2010-10-01 2015-02-10 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Writing metadata files on a disk
US8756361B1 (en) * 2010-10-01 2014-06-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Disk drive modifying metadata cached in a circular buffer when a write operation is aborted
US20120144209A1 (en) * 2010-12-01 2012-06-07 International Business Corporation Methods for process key rollover/re-encryption and systems thereof
US8732485B2 (en) * 2010-12-01 2014-05-20 International Business Machines Corporation Methods for process key rollover/re-encryption and systems thereof
US8756382B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2014-06-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Method for file based shingled data storage utilizing multiple media types
US8612706B1 (en) 2011-12-21 2013-12-17 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Metadata recovery in a disk drive
US9658803B1 (en) * 2012-06-28 2017-05-23 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Managing accesses to storage
US20150149819A1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2015-05-28 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Parity chunk operating method and data server apparatus for supporting the same in distributed raid system
US9411685B2 (en) * 2013-11-27 2016-08-09 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Parity chunk operating method and data server apparatus for supporting the same in distributed raid system
US20170031759A1 (en) * 2015-07-30 2017-02-02 International Business Machines Corporation Party stripe lock engine
US9772773B2 (en) 2015-07-30 2017-09-26 International Business Machines Corporation Parity stripe lock engine
US9690516B2 (en) * 2015-07-30 2017-06-27 International Business Machines Corporation Parity stripe lock engine
US9766809B2 (en) 2015-07-30 2017-09-19 International Business Machines Corporation Parity stripe lock engine
US20170097887A1 (en) * 2015-10-02 2017-04-06 Netapp, Inc. Storage Controller Cache Having Reserved Parity Area

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JP3348416B2 (en) 2002-11-20 grant
JPH08263228A (en) 1996-10-11 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5430855A (en) Disk drive array memory system using nonuniform disk drives
US6119209A (en) Backup directory for a write cache
US5805788A (en) Raid-5 parity generation and data reconstruction
Menon et al. The architecture of a fault-tolerant cached RAID controller
US7024586B2 (en) Using file system information in raid data reconstruction and migration
US5860090A (en) Append-only storage in a disk array using striping and parity caching
Hartman et al. The Zebra striped network file system
US8082390B1 (en) Techniques for representing and storing RAID group consistency information
US6378038B1 (en) Method and system for caching data using raid level selection
US5303244A (en) Fault tolerant disk drive matrix
US7076606B2 (en) Accelerated RAID with rewind capability
US5581724A (en) Dynamically mapped data storage subsystem having multiple open destage cylinders and method of managing that subsystem
US6728833B2 (en) Upgrading firmware on disks of the raid storage system without deactivating the server
US5809224A (en) On-line disk array reconfiguration
US5233618A (en) Data correcting applicable to redundant arrays of independent disks
US5581690A (en) Method and apparatus for preventing the use of corrupt data in a multiple disk raid organized storage system
US7055058B2 (en) Self-healing log-structured RAID
US6529995B1 (en) Method and apparatus for maintaining and restoring mapping table entries and data in a raid system
US5596709A (en) Method and apparatus for recovering parity protected data
US6219751B1 (en) Device level coordination of access operations among multiple raid control units
US5195100A (en) Non-volatile memory storage of write operation identifier in data sotrage device
US5235601A (en) On-line restoration of redundancy information in a redundant array system
US7146461B1 (en) Automated recovery from data corruption of data volumes in parity RAID storage systems
US5951691A (en) Method and system for detection and reconstruction of corrupted data in a data storage subsystem
US6907507B1 (en) Tracking in-progress writes through use of multi-column bitmaps

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, NEW Y

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MENON, JAISHANKAR MOOTHEDATH;WYLLIE, JAMES CHRISTOPHER;RIEGEL, GEOFFREY A.;REEL/FRAME:007459/0323;SIGNING DATES FROM 19950331 TO 19950405

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20081112