US555395A - Sirup-pitcher - Google Patents

Sirup-pitcher Download PDF

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US555395A
US555395A US555395DA US555395A US 555395 A US555395 A US 555395A US 555395D A US555395D A US 555395DA US 555395 A US555395 A US 555395A
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Prior art keywords
pitcher
lid
shell
sirup
outer lid
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D47/00Closures with filling and discharging, or with discharging, devices
    • B65D47/40Closures with filling and discharging, or with discharging, devices with drip catchers or drip-preventing means

Description

H N01 0E SIRUP PITGHER.

(No Model.)

No. 555,395. Patented Feb. 25, 1896.

INVENTOH Nrrnn STATES ATENT OFFICE.

HARRY NOICE, OF HYDE PARK, NORTH DAKOTA.

SiRUP-PITCHER.

SPECIFIQATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 555,395, dated February 25, 1896.

Application filed August 23, 1895. Serial No. 560,260. (No model.)

To (@ZZ whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I, HARRY NOICE, of Hyde Park, in the county of Pembina and State of North Dakota, have invented a new and Improved Sirup-Pitcher, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to certain improvements in sirup-pitchers such as are provided with a channel or way outside the pouringlip to receive the drippings therefrom and return the same into the body of the pitcher; and the object of the invention is to provide a device of this character of a simple and inexpensive construction having means for effectually preventing the escape of the dripping-s outside said channel.

The invention consists in a sirup-pitcher having a shell inserted in and of less diameter than its neck, whereby a passage-way is formed between the said shell and the body of the pitcher, saidpassage-way beingin communication with the interior of the pitcherbody and adapted to receive the drippings, and two covers, one for the shell and one for the pitcher-neck, the cover for the shell being provided with means whereby it may be opened and closed by the raising of the cover for the pitcher-neck. The invention also contemplates certain novel features of the construction, combination and arrangement of the various parts of the improved sirup-pitcher, whereby certain important advantages are attained and the device is made simpler, cheaper, more con venient and is otherwise better adapted for use than various other devices heretofore employed, all as will be hereinafter fully set forth.

The novel features of the invention will be carefully defined in the claims.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the figures.

Figure 1 is a side view of the pitcher con structed according to my invention, the upper part thereof being represented in vertical section. Fig. 2 is an axial section taken through the pitcher, said pitcher being shown in its inclined or pouring position. Fig. 3 is a transverse section taken in the plane indicated by the linens a: in Fig. 2. Fig. & is a sectional view taken along the line y y in Fig. 1, showing the means employed for operating the inner lid or cover from the outer lid in front elevation.

In the views, 1 represents the body of the pitcher, which may be made of any material and of any desired size and shape, provided with a handle in the usual way and having formed in its neck or upper portion an interiorly-projecting flange 2, which extends around the front and side portions of the neck and forms on its upper side a shoulder to receive and support the inner shell 4, which is of a general tubular form having around its lower end a projecting flange 3, arranged to engage the shoulder in the neck of the pitcher, and provided at its rear side, toward which said flange or projection 3 is inclined, with an aperture '7 extending through it and communicating with the interior of the body.

The diameter of the shell 4 is somewhat less than that of the interior of the neck 5 of the pitcher, whereby an annular chamber or passage-way 6 is left between said neck 5 and shell 4 to receive the drippings, as will be hereinafter explained, and said chamber 6 has its bottom formed by the inclined flange or projection 3 on the shell, so that said drippings will flow down said inclined bottom when the pitcher is held in a vertical position, and escape through the aperture 7 into the body of the pitcher.

The upper edge of the shell 4 at the front thereof is made somewhat higher than the corresponding portion 9 of the body of the pitcher and forms a pouring-1i p, the sirup contained in the pitcher being adapted to flow thereover when the pitcher is tilted, as seen in Fig. 2, and to close the mouth of the body a lid or cover 11, pivoted at 10 to the rear side of the neck and normally held in closed position by means of a spring 12, is employed, the lower edge 13 of said lid or cover 11 being arranged to fit flush against the upper edge of the pitcher-body, as shown in Fig. 1, which is provided with an inturned edge 5 to retain the drippings.

To close the open upper end of the shell 4 an inner lid or cover, 16, is employed, pivoted at to said shell and normally held closed by means of a spring 17, and on the upper side of said inner lid or cover, 16, is secured a a spring 20, having one of its extremities 19 guided in a bend or eye 21 formed in its other end and arranged to be engaged by a hook 14 on the lower end of a stud 18, secured to the outer lid or cover, 11, as clearly seen in the drawings.

In use when the pitcher is tilted, as shown in Fig. 2, the contents thereof will run toward the front of the shell 4, and the outer lid or cover, 11, being raised, by pressing on its handle in the usual way, also lifts the inner cover or lid, 16, so as to permit the sirup to be poured out over the lip 8 at the upper front part of the shell 4, as clearly seen in Fig. 2.

The spring 20 is of such a length that when the outer lid, 11, is raised above a certain point said spring will slip out of engagement with the hook 14 and the inner lid, 16, will at once i be snapped shut by its spring 17, while the outer lid is still open, and in this way it will E be seen the flow of the sirup over the lip S, of the shell 4: is quickly cut off. The pitcher I being then held in a vertical position, the drippings from said lip will fall into the space 6, I and the outer lid, 11, being closed efiectually prevents the entry of dust, 85c. into the 5 When said outer lid, 11, is closed, its hook 14 again engages the spring 19 and stands in position to again raise the inner lid, l6,when

pitcher.

next the said outer lid is raised.

In sirup-pitchers as heretofore constructed it has been usual to make the inner and outer lids open and close together, the said lids being adapted to be raised by pressure of the thumb upon a handle projecting from the rear end of the outer lid; but by this construction 1 it has been found that the thumb cannot be 1' made to move with sufficient rapidity to cut off the flow of the sirup over the inner lip quick enough. By the construction of the device as above described, however, the inner lip is automatically detached from the outer lid as the latter is moved up by the pressure of 1 the thumb on its handle.

The construction of the device as above set forth is extremely simple and inexpensive,

and affords an effectual means for catching the drippings from the pitcher, and also serves is kept pure and clean. Moreover, the construction is such that the shell may be made removable from the pitcher, so as to enable handle, and means actuated by the raising of the device to be conveniently washed.

From the above description of my improvements it will be seen that the device is susceptible of considerable modification without do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the precise form of the device herein set forth.

Having thus fully described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A sirup-pitcher having an interior shell, the upper edge of which extends above the edge of the pitcher at the front thereof, to form a pouring-lip, a lid arranged to fit said shell, an outer lid arranged to fit the mouth of the pitcher and having a handle, and a catch on the outer lid to engage lift and release the inner lid when the former is raised, substantially as set forth.

2. A sirup-pitcher having an interior shell,

the upper edge of which extends above the edge of the pitcher at the front thereof to form a pouring-lip, a lid arranged to fit said shell, an outer lid arranged to fit the mouth of the pitcher and having a handle, and a catch on one lid arranged to engage the other lid when the outer lid is lifted, whereby the inner lid is also lifted, said catch being arranged to slip out. of engagement with the other lid as the outer lid is raised, so as to permit the inner lid to close, substantially as set forth.

3. A sirup-pitcher having an interior shell, the upper edge of which extends above the edge of the pitcher, to form a pouring-lip, a lid to fit said shell, an outer lid to fit the mouth of the pitcher, said lids being eccentrically pivoted, a spring on one lid, and a hook on the other lid to engage said spring when the lids are closed, whereby when the outer lid is raised the inner lid is also raised, said spring being arranged to be disengaged from said hook by the movement of the lids, to permit the inner lid to close, substantially as set forth.

4. A sirup-pitcher having an interior shell the upper edge of which is provided with a pouring-lip, a lid to fit said shell, an outer lid to fit the mouth of the pitcher and having a handle, a hook on one lid, a catch on the other lid arranged to engage said hook when the lids are closed, whereby when the outer lid is raised the inner lid will be also raised, and means for disengaging said catch to permit the inner lid to close independent of the outer lid, substantially as specified.

5. A sirup-pitcher having an interior shell the upper edge of which is provided with a pouring-lip, a lid to fit said shell, an outer lid to fit the mouth of the pitcher and having a the outer lid to raise and release the inner lid, substantially as set forth.

HARRY NOICE.

Witnesses:

FRED FANSETT, ALBERT NoIoE.

US555395D Sirup-pitcher Expired - Lifetime US555395A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2601039A (en) * 1949-12-01 1952-06-17 Livingstone Jay Gould Pouring spout
US2763403A (en) * 1953-06-16 1956-09-18 Jay G Livingstone Fittings
US2851196A (en) * 1954-01-11 1958-09-09 Jay G Livingstone Adapter
US2889080A (en) * 1956-02-06 1959-06-02 Livingstone Jay Gould Teapot or the like
US3022925A (en) * 1959-04-20 1962-02-27 Frank P Daniell Dispensers for granular material
EP1566122A1 (en) * 2004-02-19 2005-08-24 Leifheit Ag Dripless vessel

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2601039A (en) * 1949-12-01 1952-06-17 Livingstone Jay Gould Pouring spout
US2763403A (en) * 1953-06-16 1956-09-18 Jay G Livingstone Fittings
US2851196A (en) * 1954-01-11 1958-09-09 Jay G Livingstone Adapter
US2889080A (en) * 1956-02-06 1959-06-02 Livingstone Jay Gould Teapot or the like
US3022925A (en) * 1959-04-20 1962-02-27 Frank P Daniell Dispensers for granular material
EP1566122A1 (en) * 2004-02-19 2005-08-24 Leifheit Ag Dripless vessel
US20050211727A1 (en) * 2004-02-19 2005-09-29 Leifheit Ag Container
US7552846B2 (en) 2004-02-19 2009-06-30 Leifheit Ag Container

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