US5543206A - Nonwoven composite fabrics - Google Patents

Nonwoven composite fabrics Download PDF

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Publication number
US5543206A
US5543206A US08/344,732 US34473294A US5543206A US 5543206 A US5543206 A US 5543206A US 34473294 A US34473294 A US 34473294A US 5543206 A US5543206 A US 5543206A
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Prior art keywords
web
percent
fibers
nonwoven fabric
composite nonwoven
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US08/344,732
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Jared A. Austin
David D. Newkirk
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FIBERWEB HOLDINGS Ltd
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Fiberweb North America Inc
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Priority to US08/344,732 priority Critical patent/US5543206A/en
Assigned to FIBERWEB NORTH AMERICA, INC. reassignment FIBERWEB NORTH AMERICA, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: AUSTIN, JARED A., NEWKIRK, DAVID D.
Priority claimed from DE69530971T external-priority patent/DE69530971T2/en
Publication of US5543206A publication Critical patent/US5543206A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Priority claimed from US09/476,067 external-priority patent/US6417121B1/en
Priority claimed from US09/476,068 external-priority patent/US6417122B1/en
Priority claimed from US09/476,062 external-priority patent/US6420285B1/en
Assigned to BBA NONWOVENS SIMPSONVILLE, INC. reassignment BBA NONWOVENS SIMPSONVILLE, INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: FIBERWEB NORTH AMERICA, INC.
Assigned to FIBERWEB SIMPSONVILLE, INC. reassignment FIBERWEB SIMPSONVILLE, INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BBA NONWOVENS SIMPSONVILLE, INC.
Assigned to FIBERWEB HOLDINGS LIMITED reassignment FIBERWEB HOLDINGS LIMITED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: FIBERWEB SIMPSONVILLE, INC.
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/04Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer characterised by a layer being specifically extensible by reason of its structure or arrangement, e.g. by reason of the chemical nature of the fibres or filaments
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/42Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties characterised by the use of certain kinds of fibres insofar as this use has no preponderant influence on the consolidation of the fleece
    • D04H1/4282Addition polymers
    • D04H1/4291Olefin series
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2255/00Coating on the layer surface
    • B32B2255/02Coating on the layer surface on fibrous or filamentary layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2255/00Coating on the layer surface
    • B32B2255/26Polymeric coating
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2262/00Composition of fibres which form a fibrous or filamentary layer or are present as additives
    • B32B2262/02Synthetic macromolecular fibres
    • B32B2262/0253Polyolefin fibres
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2262/00Composition of fibres which form a fibrous or filamentary layer or are present as additives
    • B32B2262/14Mixture of at least two fibres made of different materials
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/50Properties of the layers or laminate having particular mechanical properties
    • B32B2307/54Yield strength; Tensile strength
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/50Properties of the layers or laminate having particular mechanical properties
    • B32B2307/554Wear resistance
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/70Other properties
    • B32B2307/726Permeability to liquids, absorption
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2555/00Personal care
    • B32B2555/02Diapers or napkins
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/12Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin next to a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/32Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising polyolefins
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/022Non-woven fabric
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/08Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer the fibres or filaments of a layer being of different substances, e.g. conjugate fibres, mixture of different fibres
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/22Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed
    • B32B5/24Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/26Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer another layer next to it also being fibrous or filamentary
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B7/00Layered products characterised by the relation between layers; Layered products characterised by the relative orientation of features between layers, or by the relative values of a measurable parameter between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical, chemical or physicochemical properties; Layered products characterised by the interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/04Interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/12Interconnection of layers using interposed adhesives or interposed materials with bonding properties
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B7/00Layered products characterised by the relation between layers; Layered products characterised by the relative orientation of features between layers, or by the relative values of a measurable parameter between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical, chemical or physicochemical properties; Layered products characterised by the interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/04Interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/12Interconnection of layers using interposed adhesives or interposed materials with bonding properties
    • B32B7/14Interconnection of layers using interposed adhesives or interposed materials with bonding properties applied in spaced arrangements, e.g. in stripes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24826Spot bonds connect components
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/674Nonwoven fabric with a preformed polymeric film or sheet
    • Y10T442/678Olefin polymer or copolymer sheet or film [e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, ethylene-butylene copolymer, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/697Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials

Abstract

The invention is directed to composite nonwoven fabrics and processes for producing the same. The fabric includes a layer of inelastic continuous or staple fibers formed from a blend of polyethylene and polypropylene laminated to an extensible web, such as a polyolefin film. Preferably, the composition of the fibers ranges between 5 to 50 percent by weight of polypropylene with the balance made up of polyethylene. The nonelastic fibers are capable of being highly elongated upon mechanical stretching without adversely impacting fiber tie down. Accordingly, a smooth, strong, coherent fabric is obtained, which is especially well suited for incorporation into disposable absorbent articles such as diapers, training pants, incontinence briefs and feminine hygiene products.

Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to nonwoven composite fabrics and processes for producing the same. More particularly, the invention relates to extensible nonwoven composite fabrics comprising nonelastic fabrics capable of elongating during mechanical stretching without substantially decreasing fabric abrasion resistance.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Nonwoven composite fabrics are used in a variety of applications such as garments, disposable medical products, diapers and personal hygiene products. In many of these applications, good softness and drape properties are important in order to provide comfort, conformability and freedom of body movement.

In Sabee U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,153,664 and 4,223,063, it is disclosed that the softness and drapeability of composite nonwoven fabrics, formed for example from a meltblown or spunbonded nonwoven fabric, can be improved by drawing or stretching the fabric. More particularly, according to Sabee, the composite nonwoven fabrics are processed by differentially drawing or stretching the web to form a quilted pattern of drawn and undrawn areas, providing a product with enhanced softness, texture and drapeability. However, while the stretching may improve some fabric properties, it can adversely affect other important fabric physical properties, such as abrasion resistance, for example.

Fibrous webs formed of polyethylene possess properties which make them desirable for incorporation into composite nonwoven fabrics. As disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,644,045 to Fowells, spunbonded webs formed from low density polyethylene are particularly advantageous, possessing excellent hand, softness, and drape properties. Moreover, these fibers are capable of elongating to over 200% of their unstretched length upon mechanical stretching. Nonetheless, in spite of these advantages, elongation severely disrupts fiber tie down within the composite nonwoven fabric. As a result, the fibers detach, giving the fabric an unsightly fuzzed appearance. In addition, such detachment causes a noticeable loss in fabric strength.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention overcomes these adverse effects and provides a composite nonwoven fabric with a superior combination of tensile properties and abrasion resistance. The composite fabric utilizes a nonwoven component or layer comprised of nonelastic extensible fibers formed from a blend of polyethylene and polypropylene. The fibers are capable of high elongation upon stretching without adversely impacting fiber tie down and fabric abrasion resistance. As a result, a smooth, strong, coherent composite material is obtained.

The nonwoven composite fabric of the present invention includes a nonelastic layer of fibers formed from a polyethylene/polypropylene blend. The nonelastic layer of extensible fibers is laminated to an extensible web, preferably a polyolefin film. The polyethylene and polypropylene are blended in proportions such that the fibers comprise between 2 and 50 percent by weight polypropylene, balance polyethylene. Where high extensibility is of primary concern in the product, the fiber composition may range from 5 to 40 percent by weight polypropylene and 60 to 95 percent by weight polyethylene. Especially suited for applications requiring good extensibility, tensile strength and abrasion resistance are fiber compositions of from 5 to 25 percent by weight polypropylene of a melt index of 20 g/10 min. (ASTM D1238-89, 230° C.) or greater and 75 to 95 percent by weight linear low density polyethylene.

The nonelastic layer of fibers may be comprised of a staple fiber web, a spunbonded web, a meltblown web or combinations thereof. In either embodiment, the fibers are intermittently bonded together, typically by thermal point bonds, to form a strong, coherent web structure. Preferably, the intermittent bonds comprise between 6 and 30 percent of the area of the fibrous layer.

The extensible web is preferably a polyolefin film, and most preferably a polyolefin film that is extensible greater than 100 percent of its original length. Particularly suitable are polyethylene polymers, and in particular low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

The nonelastic layer of fibers and the extensible web layer are laminated together by known thermal and chemical techniques with the most preferred method employing a thin continuous or discontinuous coat of stretchable adhesive. Mechanical stretching permanently elongates the composite fabric typically between 70 and 300 percent of its unstretched length. The resulting elongated fabric has a reduced basis weight, with enhanced softness and drapeability. In accordance with the invention, the nonelastic fibers do not substantially detach from the coherent web structure as the intermittent bonds successfully secure the fibers to the extensible web during the stretching operation. As a result, fabric fuzzing and strength loss is minimized.

In one embodiment of the invention, a second layer of polymeric material is laminated to the extensible web on the opposite side of the outer nonelastic layer. A variety of materials can be employed in this layer, including nonwoven fabrics, laminates of carded or spunbond textile fibers and meltblown fibers, and polyolefin films such as polyethylene film.

In accordance with the invention, a desirable fabric especially well suited for incorporation into disposable absorbent articles such as diapers, training pants, incontinence briefs, and feminine hygiene products is obtained.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Some of the features and advantages of the invention having been stated, others will become apparent from the detailed description which follows, and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view showing a nonwoven composite fabric in an unstretched state, with the layers and bonds being exaggerated for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing a nonwoven composite fabric similar to FIG. 1 with an additional nonelastic layer being incorporated into the material;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the composite fabric of FIG. 1 being elongated by mechanical stretching; and

FIG. 4 is a side view of a diaper incorporating the composite fabric of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 shows a composite nonwoven fabric in accordance with the present invention. As depicted, the composite 10 includes an extensible, nonelastic layer or web 11 of fibers laminated to an extensible web 12. By "extensible nonelastic" it is meant that the layer or web 11 can be relatively easily stretched beyond its elastic limit and permanently elongated by application of tensile stress.

The nonelastic layer 11 is a nonwoven fabric or web which may be formed from various fibrous materials. More specifically, the fibers of layer 11 may suitably comprise either discrete staple fibers or continuous filaments. The nonelastic layer 11 may also be formed from a laminate of discrete staple fibers or continuous filaments and meltblown fibers.

A continuous filament nonwoven web may be produced, for example, by the conventional spunbond process wherein molten polymer is extruded into continuous filaments which are subsequently quenched, attenuated by a high velocity fluid, and collected in random arrangement on a collecting surface. After filament collection, any thermal or chemical bonding treatment may be used to form a plurality of intermittent bonds, indicated by the reference character B in FIG. 1, such that a coherent web structure results. In this regard, thermal point bonding is most preferred. Various thermal point bonding techniques are known, with the most preferred utilizing calender rolls with a point bonding pattern. Any pattern known in the art may be used with typical embodiments employing continuous or discontinuous patterns. Preferably, the bonds B cover between 6 and 30 percent of the area of the continuous layer 11, more preferably 8 to 18 percent, and most preferably, 12 percent of the layer is covered. By bonding the web in accordance with these percentage ranges, the filaments are allowed to elongate throughout the full extent of stretching while the strength and integrity of the fabric is maintained.

A staple fiber nonwoven web can be formed from any of the conventional methods known to the skilled artisan, with carding being most preferred. As known, carding is typically carried out on a machine which utilizes opposed moving beds or surfaces of fine, angled, spaced apart teeth or wires to pull clumps of staple fibers into a web. Fibers within the web are then subjected to bonding to form a coherent web structure by any suitable thermal or chemical bonding treatment. For example, thermal point bonds are formed in a manner previously described to impart strength and flexibility to the fabric.

In accordance with the invention, the staple fibers or continuous filaments which form the nonelastic layer 11 are of a blend of at least two components--a polypropylene component and a polyethylene component. The polyethylene component and the polyethylene component are immiscible and form distinct separate phases in the fibers.

Whether in staple or continuous filament form, the fibers comprise between 2 and 50 percent by weight polypropylene and 98 and 50 percent by weight polyethylene. In a preferred embodiment, the fiber composition may range from 5 to 40 percent by weight polypropylene and 95 to 60 percent by weight polyethylene, and most desirably between 5 to 25 percent by weight polypropylene and 75 to 95 percent by weight polyethylene. Especially suited for applications requiring good extensibility, tensile strength and abrasion resistance are fiber compositions of from 5 to 25 percent by weight polypropylene of a melt index of 20 g/10 min. (ASTM D1238-89, 230° C.) or greater and 75 to 95 percent by weight linear low density polyethylene. In these embodiments, the lower melting polyethylene is present as a substantially continuous phase in the blend and the higher melting polypropylene is present as a discontinuous phase dispersed in the polyethylene phase.

In producing the fibers, the polyethylene and polypropylene components are combined in appropriate proportional amounts and intimately blended before being melt-spun. In some cases sufficient mixing of the polymer components may be achieved in the extruder as the polymers are converted to the molten state, although it may be preferable to use a separate mixing step. Among the commercially well suited mixers that can be used include the Barmag 3DD three-dimensional dynamic mixer supplied by Barmag AG of Germany and the RAPRA CTM cavity-transfer mixer supplied by the Rubber and Plastics Research Association of Great Britain.

Various types of polyethylene may be employed with the most preferred being low density polyethylene. As an example, a branched (i.e., non-linear) low density polyethylene or a linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) can be utilized and produced from any of the well known processes. LLDPE is typically produced by a catalytic solution or fluid bed process under conditions established in the art. In general, LLDPE can be produced such that various density and melt index properties are obtained which make the polymer well suited for melt-spinning with polypropylene. In particular, preferred density values range from 0.87 to 0.95 g/cc and preferred melt index values usually range from 0.1 to about 150 g/10 min. (ASTM D1238-89, 190° C.). Examples of suitable commercially available linear low density polyethylene polymers include those available from Dow Chemical Company, such as ASPUN Type 6811 (27 MI, density 0.923), Dow LLDPE 2500 (55 MI, 0.923 density), Dow LLDPE Type 6808A (36 MI, 0.940 density), and the Exact series of linear low density polyethylene polymers from Exxon Chemical Company, such as Exact 2003 (31 MI, density 0.921).

Various polypropylene polymers made by processes known to the skilled artisan may also be employed.. In general, the propylene component can be an isotactic or syndiotactic polypropylene homopolymer, copolymer, or terpolymer with the most preferred being in the form of a homopolymer. For the purposes of the invention, polypropylene is preferably produced at melt index values suitable for melt spinning with polyethylene; as an example, polypropylene with a melt index of about 20 g/10 min. and greater can be successfully utilized. Examples of commercially available polypropylene polymers which can be used in the present invention include SOLTEX Type 3907 (35 MFR, CR grade), HIMONT Grade X10054-12-1 (65 MFR), Exxon Type 3445 (35 MFR), Exxon Type 3635 (35 MFR) and AMOCO Type 10-7956F (35 MFR), Aristech CP 350 JPP.

Extensible web 12 is preferably a polyolefin film, most preferably a polyolefin film that is extensible at least 100 percent of its original length. The film preferably has a basis weight within the range of 10 to 40 grams per square meter. The present invention is particularly applicable to extensible film/fabric composites where the film of the type conventionally used as the impermeable outer component of a disposable diaper.

In accordance with the invention, the composite fabric 10 is formed by laminating nonelastic layer 11 and extensible web 12 utilizing any of the well established thermal or chemical techniques including thermal point bonding, through air bonding, needlepunching, and adhesive bonding, with adhesive bonding being preferred. A suitable adhesive is applied either to fibrous layer 11, to extensible web 12, or to both, as either a continuous or discontinuous coating, to form an adhesive layer 13. Where a continuous adhesive coating is employed, the layer 13 should be relatively thin and the adhesive should be sufficiently flexible or extensible to allow the filaments to elongate upon stretching. Where a discontinuous adhesive is employed, any intermittent pattern can be used such as, for example, lines, spirals, or spots, and the adhesive can be less extensible. The adhesive can be applied continuously or intermittently by any accepted method including spraying, slot coating, and the like.

Suitable adhesives can be made from a variety of materials including polyolefins, polyvinyl acetate polyamides, hydrocarbon resins, waxes, natural asphalts, styrenic rubbers, and blends thereof. Preferred adhesives include those manufactured by Century Adhesives, Inc. of Columbus, Ohio and marketed as Century 5227 and by H.B. Fuller Company of St. Paul, Minn. and marketed as HL-1258.

In assembling the composite fabric 10, layers 11 and 12 are provided in a relaxed state from individual supply rolls. Adhesive is then applied over the surface of extensible web 12 or fibrous layer 11. Soon after the adhesive is applied, the layers are subjected to pressure thus forming fabric 10. For example, the layers can be fed through calender nip rolls.

In a alternative embodiment depicted in FIG. 2, a layer of nonelastic polymeric material 14 may be utilized on the side of extensible web 12 opposite fibrous layer 11. Any suitable material may be employed in various forms such as, for example, woven or nonwoven material, films or composites, such as a film-coated nonwoven. The layer 14 of nonelastic polymeric material on the side of the extensible web 12 opposite fibrous layer 11 may be a second fibrous layer, so that a fibrous layer 11 is used on both faces of the extensible web 12. Typically, a thermoplastic polymer film is used with preferred polymers being polypropylene or polyethylene. Commercially desirable films includes those manufactured by Tredegar Industries, Inc. of Terre Haute, Ind. If the layer 14 is substantially impervious to liquids, it can be suitably employed as a back sheet in personal garment applications such as diapers, training pants, incontinence briefs and feminine hygiene products. Any well known techniques for laminating layer 14 to the composite structure may be utilized; preferably, layer 14 is laminated by a thin layer 15 of adhesive in a manner previously described.

Referring to FIG. 3, stretching forces are applied to composite fabric 10 to extend and elongate the fabric in the machine direction (MD) and/or cross-machine direction (CD). Numerous established techniques can be employed in carrying out this operation. For example, a common way for obtaining MD elongation is to pass the fabric through two or more sets of nip rolls, each set moving faster than the previous set. CD elongation may be achieved through tentering. Other means may be employed; for example, "ring rolling" as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,242,436 to Weil et al., incorporated herein by reference, is often used in obtaining CD and/or MD elongation.

Upon application of elongation forces (denoted by F) on fabric 10, fibers within nonelastic layer 11 oriented in the direction of the elongation experience tension and the fabric and fibers undergo deformation. During this process, the fibers are capable of elongating well beyond their unstretched length. As an example, fabric elongation between 70 and 300 percent is often realized. In most instances, the fibers are elongated past their elastic limit and become permanently extended. In accordance with the invention, intermittent bonds B distributed throughout nonelastic layer 11 are of high strength such that fibers are sufficiently tied down within the nonelastic layer 11 that fiber detachment is minimized during the elongation process. The heightened bond strength can be attributed to the polypropylene in the blended fibers. Accordingly, fiber detachment is reduced with the desirable result that abrasion resistance is maintained and fuzzing is minimized. Moreover, fabric strength is maintained as the coherent web structure is kept in tact during the elongation operation.

The fabric 10 is particularly well suited for use in various disposable garments such as diapers, training pants, incontinence briefs and feminine hygiene products. The fabric may be utilized in a diaper, such as the one illustrated in FIG. 4 (denoted as 20) having a waist region 21 and leg cuff components 22. Since the composite fabric 10 is both soft and strong, the diaper can withstand rigorous movement of the wearer without rubbing or chafing the wearer's skin during use.

The following examples serve to illustrate the invention but are not intended to be limitations thereon.

EXAMPLE 1

Samples of continuous filament spunbonded nonwoven webs of basis weight approximately 25 grams/square meter were produced from blends of a linear low density polyethylene with a melt flow rate of 27 (Dow 6811A LLDPE) and a polypropylene homopolymer (either Appryl 3250 YR1 or Aristech CP350J) in various blend proportions. Control fabrics of 100 percent polypropylene and 100 percent polyethylene were also produced under similar conditions. The fabrics were produced by melt spinning continuous filaments of the various polymers or polymer blends, attenuating the filaments pneumatically by a slot draw process, depositing the filaments on a collection surface to form webs, and thermally bonding the webs using a patterned calender roll with a 12 percent bond area. The tensile strength and elongation properties of these fabrics and their abrasion resistance were measured, and these properties are listed in Table 1. As shown, the 100 percent polypropylene control fabric had excellent abrasion resistance, as indicated by no measurable fuzz generation; however the fabrics had very low elongation, thus limiting the utility of such fabrics in extensible film/fabric laminates. The 100 percent polyethylene control fabric exhibited excellent elongation properties, but very poor abrasion resistance (high fuzz values) and relatively low tensile strength. Surprisingly, the fabrics made of polypropylene/polyethylene blends exhibited an excellent combination of abrasion resistance, high elongation, and good tensile strength. The high filament elongation makes the fabrics well suited for use in an extensible film/fabric composite structure.

EXAMPLE 2

A polyethylene film of approximately 1.5 mil thickness, such as is used in a disposable diaper backsheet, was sprayed with an all purpose adhesive (Locktite Corporation) and was bonded by application of pressure to a 25 gsm spunbond fabric containing 15% polypropylene and 85% polyethylene, one of the nonwoven fabrics described in Example 1. The cross machine direction of the fabric coincided with the cross machine direction of the film. The composite fabric of film and polypropylene/polyethylene spunbond nonwoven was then extended to 200% extension in the CD direction, beyond the elastic limit of the spunbond fabric, by an Instron tensile tester. The resulting elongated composite fabric was found to exhibit reduced basis weight, desirable softness and drape properties, and was surprisingly free of detached fibers and lint, thus showing no unsightly fuzzed appearance. The extended composite fabric was thicker in appearance than its unextended precursor. The elongated fabric can be used as a diaper backside or diaper leg cuffs.

The invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to its preferred embodiments. However, it will be apparent that numerous variations and modifications can be made without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention as described in the foregoing specification and defined in the appended claims.

                                  TABLE 1__________________________________________________________________________MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE(PP)/POLYETHYLENE (PE) BLEND FABRICS                        Taber                             Taber                        Abrasion                             Abrasion  MD   CD   MD  CD      (cycles-                             (cycles-  Tensile       Tensile            Elong                Elong                    Fuzz                        rubber                             feltFabric (g/cm).sup.1       (g/cm).sup.1            (%).sup.1                (%).sup.1                    (mg).sup.2                        wheel).sup.3                             wheel).sup.3__________________________________________________________________________100% PP  925  405   62  70 0.0 40   73350/50 PP/PE  1110 415  147 145 0.3 --   --25/75 PP/PE  764  273  170 190 0.3 32   20015/85 PP/PE  676  277  199 224 0.5 22   50010/90 PP/PE  426  170  109 141 0.3 --   --100% PE  296   63  168 131 19.0                        10    15__________________________________________________________________________ .sup.1 Tensile and Peak Elongation were evaluated by breaking a one inch by seven inch long sample generally following ASTM D168264, the oneinch cut strip test. The instrument crosshead speed was set at 5 inches per minute and the gauge length was set at 5 inches per minute. The Strip Tensile Strength, reported as grams per inch, is generally the average of at least 8 measurements. Peak Elongation is the percent increase in lengt noted at maximum tensile strength. .sup.2 Fuzz is determined by repeatedly rubbing a soft elastomeric surfac across the face of the fabric a constant number of times. The fiber abraded from the surface is then weighed. Fuzz is reported as mg weight observed. .sup.3 Conducted according to ASTM D388480 where the number of cycles was counted until failure. Failure was defined as the appearance of a hole of one square millimeter or greater in the surface of the fabric.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A composite nonwoven fabric comprising a nonelastic layer of fibers formed from a blend of 50 to 98 percent polyethylene and 2 to 50 percent polypropylene, said nonelastic layer including a plurality of intermittent bonds bonding the fibers together to form a coherent web, and an extensible web layer laminated to said nonelastic layer of fibers, said composite nonwoven fabric existing in an untensioned, non-elongated state.
2. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said fibers comprise between 5 to 40 percent by weight polypropylene and 60 to 95 percent by weight polyethylene.
3. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 2 wherein said fibers comprise from 5 to 25 percent by weight polypropylene of a melt index of 20 g/10 min. or greater and 75 to 95 percent by weight linear low density polyethylene.
4. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said extensible web comprises a substantially continuous polyolefin film.
5. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 4, wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers has been permanently elongated by mechanical stretching.
6. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 5 wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers has been permanently elongated between 70 and 300 percent of its original unstretched length.
7. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1, wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers has a taber abrasion value (rubber wheel) of greater than 10 cycles.
8. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said intermittent bonds are thermal point bonds.
9. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said intermittent bonds comprise between 6 and 30 percent of the area of the nonelastic layer.
10. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers comprises a thermally bonded spunbond nonwoven web of randomly arranged substantially continuous filaments.
11. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers comprises a thermally bonded spunbond nonwoven web of randomly arranged substantially continuous filaments and meltblown fibers.
12. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 wherein said nonelastic layer of fibers comprises a thermally bonded carded web of staple fibers.
13. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 further comprising an adhesive layer disposed between said nonelastic layer and said extensible web laminating the nonelastic layer and the extensible web together to form the composite fabric.
14. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 1 comprising an additional nonelastic layer of fibers laminated to the side of said extensible web opposite said first-mentioned nonelastic layer, said additional nonelastic layer comprising fibers formed from a blend of polyethylene and polypropylene, said second nonelastic layer including a plurality of intermittent bonds bondling the fibers together to form a coherent web.
15. A composite nonwoven fabric comprising an extensible polyolefin film, a spunbonded nonwoven web of randomly arranged substantially continuous filaments formed from a blend of 5 to 50 percent by weight polypropylene and 50 to 95 percent by weight polyethylene, and a multiplicity of discrete thermal point bonds bonding the continuous filaments to form an extensible nonelastic coherent web, said thermal point bonds comprising between 6 and 30 percent of the area of the spunbonded web, and an adhesive disposed between said spunbonded nonwoven web and said extensible web to bond the spunbonded web to said extensible layer.
16. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 15 wherein said spunbonded web has been permanently elongated by mechanical stretching so as to extend said spunbonded web between 70 and 300 percent of its unstretched length.
17. A composite nonwoven fabric comprising a polyolefin film having an extensibility of at least 100 percent, a carded web of staple fibers formed from a blend of 5 to 50 percent by weight polypropylene and 50 to 95 percent by weight polyethylene, a multiplicity of discrete thermal point bonds bonding the staple fibers to form an extensible nonelastic coherent web, said thermal point bonds comprising between 6 and 30 percent of the area of the spunbonded web, and an adhesive disposed between said carded web and said extensible web to bond the carded web to said extensible web.
18. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 17 wherein said carded web has been permanently elongated by mechanical stretching so as to extend said web between 70 and 300 percent of its unstretched length.
19. A composite nonwoven fabric according to claim 18 wherein said adhesive is an elastomeric adhesive and extends substantially continuously over said web.
20. A disposable absorbent article comprising a composite nonwoven fabric according to any one of claims 1, 16, 17, or 19.
US08/344,732 1994-11-23 1994-11-23 Nonwoven composite fabrics Expired - Lifetime US5543206A (en)

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DE69530971T DE69530971T2 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Expandable composite nonwovens
DE69530971A DE69530971D1 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Expandable composite nonwovens
EP95940815A EP0740714B1 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
AT95940815T AT242349T (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Expandable composite nonwovens
JP51707196A JP3798018B2 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Stretchable composite nonwoven fabric
ES95940815T ES2201126T3 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 compounds extensible nonwoven fabrics.
PCT/US1995/015257 WO1996016216A1 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
DK95940815T DK0740714T3 (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
AU42441/96A AU4244196A (en) 1994-11-23 1995-11-22 Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
US09/476,067 US6417121B1 (en) 1994-11-23 1999-12-30 Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same
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US09/476,062 US6420285B1 (en) 1994-11-23 1999-12-30 Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same

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