New! View global litigation for patent families

US5478751A - Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays - Google Patents

Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US5478751A
US5478751A US08229256 US22925694A US5478751A US 5478751 A US5478751 A US 5478751A US 08229256 US08229256 US 08229256 US 22925694 A US22925694 A US 22925694A US 5478751 A US5478751 A US 5478751A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
device
sample
layer
surface
test
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
US08229256
Inventor
Gary M. Oosta
Thomas G. Schapira
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Abbott Laboratories
Original Assignee
Abbott Laboratories
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N33/00Investigating or analysing materials by specific methods not covered by the preceding groups
    • G01N33/48Biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Haemocytometers
    • G01N33/50Chemical analysis of biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Testing involving biospecific ligand binding methods; Immunological testing
    • G01N33/53Immunoassay; Biospecific binding assay
    • G01N33/543Immunoassay; Biospecific binding assay with an insoluble carrier for immobilising immunochemicals
    • G01N33/54366Apparatus specially adapted for solid-phase testing
    • G01N33/54386Analytical elements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L3/00Containers or dishes for laboratory use, e.g. laboratory glassware; Droppers
    • B01L3/50Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes
    • B01L3/502Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures
    • B01L3/5027Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip
    • B01L3/502723Containers for the purpose of retaining a material to be analysed, e.g. test tubes with fluid transport, e.g. in multi-compartment structures by integrated microfluidic structures, i.e. dimensions of channels and chambers are such that surface tension forces are important, e.g. lab-on-a-chip characterised by venting arrangements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2200/00Solutions for specific problems relating to chemical or physical laboratory apparatus
    • B01L2200/06Fluid handling related problems
    • B01L2200/0684Venting, avoiding backpressure, avoid gas bubbles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2300/00Additional constructional details
    • B01L2300/08Geometry, shape and general structure
    • B01L2300/0809Geometry, shape and general structure rectangular shaped
    • B01L2300/0825Test strips
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2300/00Additional constructional details
    • B01L2300/08Geometry, shape and general structure
    • B01L2300/0887Laminated structure
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2400/00Moving or stopping fluids
    • B01L2400/04Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means
    • B01L2400/0403Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means specific forces
    • B01L2400/0406Moving fluids with specific forces or mechanical means specific forces capillary forces
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T436/00Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing
    • Y10T436/25Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing including sample preparation
    • Y10T436/25375Liberation or purification of sample or separation of material from a sample [e.g., filtering, centrifuging, etc.]
    • Y10T436/255Liberation or purification of sample or separation of material from a sample [e.g., filtering, centrifuging, etc.] including use of a solid sorbent, semipermeable membrane, or liquid extraction

Abstract

Methods and devices are provided involving an inlet port, at least one chamber, a channel providing access for fluids to flow through via capillary action or differential pressure, reagents, detection means and self-venting materials. The devices allow for the appropriate mixing, reacting, incubating needed to give a detectable signal which can be read. The self-venting materials allow for the 1) displacement of gases inside a track to the outside of the device and 2) oxygen movement into the track from the outside.

Description

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/174,973 filed Dec. 29, 1993, entitled, "SELF-VENTING IMMUNODIAGNOSTIC DEVICES AND METHODS OF PERFORMING ASSAYS" now abandoned.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to analytical devices for detecting analytes in a test sample utilizing unique venting methods in the device.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The qualitative or quantitative determination of analytes in test samples continues to be important in the diagnoses of physiological and non-physiological conditions. The analysis of a test sample mixed with reagents results in a detectable signal which can be evaluated with the aid of instrumentation.

Methods and devices have been provided which give determinations of a variety of analytes in a test sample. Such devices generally involve an inlet port, at least one chamber, at least one capillary, a vent, and at least one reagent providing for a detectable signal. Additionally, several chambers, capillaries and reagents can be provided in a single device permitting complex determinations.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,756,884 to Biotrack, Inc. teaches a capillary flow device which detects antigns in blood samples. Reagents are supplied in the track which can affect blood clotting or antibodies which can cause changes in the flow of sample in the track pathway. U.S. Pat. No. 5,135,719 to Biotrack teaches a blood separation device which separates plasma from red blood cells by use of a filter. Capillary action drives the separation procedure.

Typically, such devices have vents on one of the surfaces of the device. The vent is required to allow air to be displaced as liquid fills the track. The vents on the surfaces are troublesome since they generally have to be added by a separate process step. Vent holes are also problem some in that an air bubble is typically trapped at the site of the vent hole. If the device is jostled, the bubble may move into the track and interfere with assay mechanics or detection. In addition, if the vent is large and the device is angled, liquid may leak out. These issues impart extra design constraints or manufacturing control to insure proper sizing and positioning of the vent hole. Moreover, where a long residence time in a particular chamber is needed in a multistep reaction, the vents may be closed and opened accordingly to control fluid flow.

U.S. Pat. 4,952,516 to Pall Corporation, teaches a self-venting diagnostic test device which includes a porous absorbent which draws liquid through a microporous medium. A liquophobic material vents gases while preventing liquid from passing through the gas vent.

These references fail to teach self-venting capillary diagnostic devices which can vent along the length of a track.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention advantageously uses analytical devices which can self-vent in capillary tracks. The analytical devices are comprised of materials which facilitate fluid flow through capillary action or differential pressure while venting gases through the material, thereby eliminating the need for vents to be mechanically placed in the device. Such analytical devices can be utilized in homogenous and heterogenous assays to determine the presence or amount of an analyte in a test sample.

The analytical devices of the present invention includes an inlet port or entry port which provides an access to a capillary channel or chamber. The capillary channel can be a conduit to one or more reaction zones, mixing chambers, incubation chambers and the like.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, an analytical device is comprised completely of a hydrophobic material. Such a device includes an inlet port accessing a track that was bored into the material. The surface on which the test sample will access inside the device can be chemically treated to create a hydrophilic surface. The hydrophilic surface can have reagents applied onto its surface to react with the test sample. The track may have a capillary channel which can provide a means for the fluid to travel to various chambers. Additionally, the device must vent gases trapped in the device out through the material. The material also allows oxygen into the device whereby particular assays can be facilitated by the utilization of oxygen. This can be an important function of the present invention wherein oxygen can move into the analytical device along the length of the track.

In addition, according to another embodiment of the present invention, an analytical device can comprise at least two materials. Such devices can use layers of material superimposed on each other and bonded together by various methods such as, but not intended to be limited to, adhesives, heat sealing, ultrasonic welding, or the like. This permits a stratification of layers whereby some layers can be hydrophobic while some layers are hydrophilic. Once again, the venting of gases from inside the device to the outside is accomplished by selecting materials which can permeate gas but not biological liquids, such as test samples.

The present invention also includes methods of performing assays utilizing analytical devices of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates one version of an analytical device composed of three different layers; a top layer, core layer, and a base layer.

FIG. 2 illustrates a multichambered device for multistep assays.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Definitions

"Analyte," as used herein, is the substance to be detected in the test sample using the present invention. Analytes thus includes antigenic substances, haptens, antibodies, and combinations thereof. Thus an analyte can be a protein, a peptide, an amino acid, a carbohydrate, a hormone, asteroid, a vitamin, a lipid, a nucleic acid, a peptide, a trace element, a drug including those administered for therapeutic purposes as well as those administered for illicit purposes, a bacterium, a virus, and a metabolite of or an antibody to any of the above substances.

"Binding molecule" as used herein, is a member of a binding molecule pair, i.e., two different molecules where one of the molecules, through chemical or physical means, specifically binds to the second molecule. In addition to antigen and antibody binding molecules, other binding molecules include biotin and avidin, carbohydrates and lectins, complementary nucleotide sequences (including probe and captured nucleic acid sequences used in DNA hybridization assays to detect a nucleic acid sequence), effector and receptor molecules, enzyme cofactors and enzymes, enzyme inhibitors and enzymes, and the like. Furthermore, binding molecules can include members that are analogs of the original binding molecule. For example, a derivative or fragment of the analyte, e.g., an analyte-analog can be used which has at least one epitope or binding site in common with the analyte. Immunoreactive binding molecules include antigens, haptens, antibodies, and complexes thereof including those formed by recombinant DNA methods or peptide synthesis.

"Capillary", as used herein, is a solid surface surrounding a void, in which air can be preferentially displaced by a liquid of the right surface tension. The mechanism for capillarity is dependent on the surface free energy of the system. For spontaneous spreading of the liquid to occur, the surface free energy of the system must decrease during the spreading process. This can be accomplished for the devices used herein, by selecting the appropriate solid surfaces for the biologic fluid of interest.

"Chamber", as used herein, is an enclosed space or cavity of defined dimensions. The chamber may have inlet and outlet openings. The chamber can be filled by capillary forces or by differential pressure. The control of dimensions for a particular chamber allows for independent control of reagent additions, flow, incubation, reaction zones, or detection.

"Conjugation," as used herein, is the chemical coupling of one moiety to another to form a conjugate. Coupling agents for covalent conjugation to protein have been described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,053,520, the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference. Homobifunctional agents for coupling enzymes to antibodies are also known in the art as described in P.C.T. Publication Number WO 92/07268, published on Apr. 30, 1992.

"Inlet port", or "entry port", or sample in are terms that are synonymous. They refer to the site where the test sample is introduced into the analytical device. The site accesses a receiving area of the device. The receiving area of the device can be a chamber or a capillary.

"Ligand" is defined as a chemical group or molecule capable of being bound or conjugated to another chemical group or molecule. Ligands are molecular species that are capable of competing against or inhibiting the binding of the analyte. Such a ligand can be a small molecule or a macromolecule. Examples of ligands include theophylline, antibiotics, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Preferably, smaller molecular weight oligopeptides which represent or mimic the epitopes of the analytes are used. Hetero- or homo- bifunctional, or photoreactive linkers can be used. Examples of linkers include carbodiimide, glutaraldehyde, haloformate, iodoacetamide, maleimide, N-hydroxysuccinimide, 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, imidate, aryl azide, arylacid hydrazide, and p-nitrophenyl-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionate.

"Reaction mixture," as used herein, means a mixture of the test sample and other biological, chemical, and physical substances and reagents used to apply the present invention for the detection of analyte in the test sample. The reaction mixture can also include diluents and buffers.

"Sidewalls," as used herein, means the boundaries of the track for the test sample. The sidewalls can be created by removing material from a core layer in a multi-layer housing or removing material from a single material housing.

"Test sample," as used herein, means the sample containing an analyte to be detected and assayed using the present invention. A test sample can contain other components besides the analyte, can have the physical attributes of liquids, biological liquids, or a solid wherein the solid can be made soluble in a liquid, and can be of any size or volume, including for example, a moving stream of liquid. The test sample can contain any substances other than the analyte as long as the other substances do not interfere with the analyte or the analyte-analog. Examples of test samples include, but are not limited to: serum, plasma, spinal fluid, sputum, seminal fluid, amniotic fluid, urine, saliva, other body fluids, and environmental samples such as ground water or waste water, soil extracts and pesticide residues.

"Track(s)," as used herein, means the area within the device in which the test sample flows. Generally, the track is made out of a hydrophobic material and forms the hydrophobic sidewalls of the device. The track is generally formed by removal of a portion of the hydrophobic material in the core layer. Generally, the track has access to the inlet port of the device and extends from the inlet port access for a predetermined length necessary to carry out the desired assay. The track length will be sufficient in length to carry out the necessary functions and procedures, via capillaries and chambers, for analyte determinations and detections.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This invention provides devices and methods, where the devices rely on capillary action or differential pressure to pump fluids through chambers in order to control measurement of fluids, reaction times, and mixing of reagents, and to determine a detectable signal. By varying the path through which the fluid flows, one can provide for a variety of activities such as mixing, incubating, reacting and detecting.

The methods may involve binding of members of a specific binding pair resulting in complex formation. The complex formation can provide for a variety of events which can be detected by instrumentation or visual means. Alternatively, the methods may involve chemical reactions, e.g., the detection of glucose, or serum enzymes which result in a detectable change in the sample medium. Since the devices rely upon capillaries or other chambers to control movement of fluids, accurate control of dimensions of the internal chambers is essential.

The sample, e.g. test samples containing an analyte to be detected, may be a fluid which is used directly as obtained from the source or may be pretreated in a variety of ways so as to modify its character. The test sample will then be introduced into the device through an inlet port, the inlet port accesses a receiving area of the track. The receiving area of the track will be either a chamber or a capillary. The test sample will then transfer through the device passing through the capillaries and/or chambers where the test sample will encounter one or more reagents. The reagents will typically involve a system in which a detectable signal is produced.

Any liquid test sample may be employed, where the test sample will have a reasonable rate of flow due to the pumping of the capillary action or differential pressure applied. It is to be understood that the capillary action or differential pressure is the driving force. Capillary action depends on three critical factors; first, the surface energies of the gas, the surface on which the fluid flows, and the fluid, second, the dimensions of the capillary channel, and third, the efficiency of venting. The flow rate for both capillary flow and differential pressure flow will be influenced by the geometry of the capillary or chamber and the viscosity of the fluid. For differential pressure flow, the flow rate can be further impacted by increasing or decreasing the differential pressure. Where the test sample is too viscous, it can be diluted to provide for a capillary pumping rate which allows for the desired manipulation such as mixing and a reasonable flow time which will control the time period for the assay.

Differential pressure may be used to move the test sample in the device. Methods of applying differential pressures include, but are not intended to be limited to, motors, pumps, vacuums or the like.

The test sample may be derived from a source such as, but is not intended to be limited to, a physiological fluid such as blood, saliva, ocular lense fluid, cerebral spinal fluid, pus, sweat, exudate, urine, milk or the like. The test sample may be subject to prior treatment such as but not limited to addition, separation, dilution, concentration, filtration, distillation, dialysis or the like. Besides physiological fluids, other liquid test samples may be employed and the components of interest may be either liquids or solids whereby the solids are dissolved in a liquid medium.

The analytes of interest are widely varied depending upon the purposes of the assay and the source of the test sample. Analytes may include a protein, a peptide, an amino acid, a carbohydrate, a hormone, asteroid, a vitamin, a lipid, a nucleic acid, a peptide, a trace element, a drug including those administered for therapeutic purposes as well as those administered for illicit purposes, a bacterium, a virus, and a metabolite. Aggregation of molecules may also be of interest particularly naturally occurring aggregations such as viroids, viruses, cells, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic including unicellular microorganisms, mammalian cells such as lymphocytes, epithelial cells, neoplastic and the like. Additionally, analytes can be any substance for which there exists a naturally occurring binding molecule (e.g., an antibody) or for which a binding molecule can be prepared, and the analyte can bind to one or more binding molecules in an assay. Analyte thus includes antigenic substances, haptens, antibodies, and combinations thereof.

Phenomena of interest which may be measured may be indicative of physiological or non-physiological processes such as, but not intended to be limited to, blood clotting platelet aggregation, complement mediated lysis, polymerization, agglutination, or the like.

The test sample medium employed may be naturally occurring medium or the test sample can be introduced into a liquid medium which provides the desired characteristics necessary for capillary pumping action and a detectable signal. For the most part, aqueous media will be employed and to that extent, aqueous media will be exemplary for the medium employed for the subject invention. Additives and solvents can be added to the aqueous media to increase or decrease oxygenation, stability and fluidity.

Other additives may be included for specific purposes. Buffers may be desirable to maintain a particular pH. Enzyme inhibitors may be included as well. Other reagents of interest are, but are not intended to be limited to, antibodies, preservatives, stabilizers, activators, enzyme substrates and cofactors, oxidants, reductants, or the like.

In addition, filtration or trapping devices may be included in device pathway so as to remove particles above a certain size. The particles may include, but are not intended to be limited to, cells, virus latex particles, high molecular weight polymers, nucleic acids by themselves or in combination with proteins such as nucleosomes, magnetic particles, ligands or receptor containing particles or the like. FIG. 2 shows various regions that can be used for reagent addition, filtration and the like as well as having separate areas where capillary action and differential pressure drive the reaction.

Test samples may provide a detectable component of the detection system or such components may be added. The components will vary widely depending on the nature of the detection system. One such detection method will involve the use of particles, where particles provide for light scatter or the change of the rate of flow. Particles may be, but are not intended to be limited to, cells, polymeric particles which are immiscible with a liquid system, latex particles, charcoal particles, metal particles, polysaccharides or protein particles, ceramic particles, nucleic acid particles, agglutinated particles or the like. The choice of particles will depend on the method of detection, the dispersability or the stability of the dispersion, inertness, participation in the change of flow, or the like.

Other methods of detection include, but are not intended to be limited to, changes in color, light absorption, or transmission of fluorescence, change in physical phase or the like. The test sample will be introduced into the inlet port into a receiving area of the track. The receiving area may be a capillary or a chamber. The receiving area may be used to measure the particular sample volume or may simply serve to receive the sample and direct the sample to the next area of the device. A capillary may serve a variety of functions including a measuring device for volume measurement, a metering pump for transferring liquid from one chamber to another, a flow controller for controlling the rate of flow between chambers, a mixer for mixing reagents and a detecting area for detection. For the most part, the capillaries will serve as transfer areas, flow control areas and detection areas. Generally, the chambers may be used to define events, e.g., zones of reaction, or different structural entities in certain embodiments of the invention.

The capillaries will usually be of substantially smaller cross-section or diameter in the direction transverse to the direction of flow, than the chambers. The cross-section or the length of directional flow may be similar or may differ depending on the function of the capillary and the chamber. The first capillary will usually control a rate of flow into a chamber which will usually serve as a reaction chamber. Thus, the capillary may aid in the control of the time with which the assay medium is in contact with reagent contained within or bound to the wall of the reaction chamber. The capillary can also control the progress of the assay medium through the chamber. Additionally, the reagent can be contained within or bound to the wall of the capillary itself. Other components which may affect the rate of flow in the chamber include baffles, walls, supports or other impediments in the chamber, the geometry of the chamber, the reagent in the chamber and the nature of the surfaces of the capillary and chamber.

Depending upon a particular system, the length of the capillaries, their cross-sectional area, the volume of various chambers and their length and shape may be varied widely. One constraint on each of the capillaries is a necessity for their function providing capillary pumping action for flow. The capillary or differential pressure provides the driving force for the movement of liquid through the device. Flow rate will be determined by viscosity of the liquid sample, geometry of the track, tortuosity of the track, vapor pressure of the sample, hydrostatic head pressure, impediments in the track, and efficiency of venting. The combined surface characteristic of the capillaries and chambers must be hydrophilic in nature for flow to occur in a capillary driven format. If differential pressure is used, there is less restriction on selection of surface properties.

The selection of material of the present invention also requires a self-venting material along at least one of the surfaces at or beyond the chamber being filled. The self-venting material is porous in nature with hydrophobic walls which do not allow liquid to pass through the material. If necessary, any of the surfaces of the hydrophobic vent can be treated to render it hydrophilic on the surface contacting the fluid. In this manner, the interior zones of the hydrophobic material can still act as a liquid block, while maintaining the surface capillarity desired for transporting the liquid sample. Hydrophobic materials suitable for the present invention include, but are not intended to be limited to, acrylics, polycarbonates, polystyrenes, silicones, polyurethanes, polyolefins, polytetrafluoroethylenes, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, thermoplastic elastomers, and copolymers such as acrylnitrylbutadienestyrene and styreneacrylonitrile, or the like.

The chambers also have a variety of functions, serving as protection for the reagents, mixing chambers for dissolution of reagent, reaction of the test sample with the reagent, volume measurement, incubation, detection, or the like. Chambers will be primarily employed for mixing, reacting, incubating and for holding of the test sample. The self-venting material can be used to supply oxygen or other gases required in the chamber. The oxygen or other gases can permeate from outside the device through the self-venting material and into the chamber. The self-venting material will allow quick and more uniform supply of oxygen, e.g., in an enzymatic reaction with an oxidase enzyme. These reactions will tend to be substrate limited rather than oxygen limited because the reaction can extend the length of the track due to the oxygen input into the reaction from outside the device. Generally, the self-venting material will cover the entire length of the track so as both capillaries and chambers are lined with the self-vent material.

Conversely, the self-vent can be restricted to only particular regions of the track so as to prevent gas permeation, slow down fluid movement, increase reaction time in the chamber, or control other aspects of the reaction. In addition, capillary action can be coupled with differential pressure to drive the reaction. In this respect, areas of mixing, reaction, detection, and the like can be created to utilize both capillary action and differential pressure to drive the test sample throught the device.

In addition, the devices can be constructed to conviently fit directly into instrumentation for detection purposes. An example of such a method would be to create a self-venting device which can fit into a spectrophotometer much like a cuvette. In this manner, detection can be read directly from the device in the instrumentation.

In order to minimize handling of reagents by the user of the device, reagents may be supplied within the device, usually in at least one chamber, whereby the mixing of the test sample with reagents occurs in the chamber. The reagents may be present either diffusively or non-diffusively bound to the surface of the chamber, that is, adhered, absorbed, adsorbed or covalently linked, so that the reagent may become dissolved in the test sample or may remain fixed to the surface. Techniques of putting reagents down can include but are not limited to reagent jetting, spotting and the like. Where the reagents are diffusively bound (non-covalently and weakly bound), a variety of situations can be accommodated. One situation is where the test sample liquid front dissolves all the reagents so that the test sample liquid front receives a high concentration of the reagent and most of the reaction occurs at the test sample liquid front. A second situation would be with a reagent of limited solubility. In this situation, the reagent may be present in the test sample at a substantially uniform concentration. The third situation has a limited amount of a reagent of limited solubility, so the test sample liquid front will have a relatively constant reagent concentration.

In many instances, it is essential that the reagent be present in the reaction chamber which makes fabrication of an internal chamber followed by later addition of reagent difficult. While for the most part the reagent will be present in one or more chambers of the device, reagents can also be mechanically introduced by various techniques. For example, by employing a septum, a syringe may be used to introduce a reagent. Alternatively, one could have an orifice or use an eyedropper or other means by introducing liquid reagent into the device. Usually, unless essential, these alternative techniques will be avoided.

The reagent will vary depending on the nature of the test sample, the analyte, and the manner in which detectable signal is generated. One embodiment of the present invention includes a chemical reaction which occurs due either to the formation of covalent bonds, e.g., oxidation or reduction, hydrolysis, or noncovalent bonds, e.g., complex formation between ligand and receptor, including complex formation between nucleic acids. The same or different reagent may be present in the various chambers, so that successive reactions can occur or a reagent continually supplied into the test sample.

In addition, the device can employ a plurality of chambers and capillary channels. The chambers can be varied in size and purpose, providing the varying incubation times, varying reaction times, mixing of media from different capillaries, or the like. Any number of chambers may be employed, and may line up in parallel, series, or a combination of the two. The size of the chamber can be particularly important where the reagent is fixed, so that the test sample residence time in contact with the reagent will be affected by the area of the reagent contacted. By employing various filtration or trapping devices, one can inhibit the transfer of particles from a capillary channel to a chamber or vice versa. In this manner, various components of the sample can be removed by employing diversion channels.

Detection, for the most part will involve the absorption, scatter or emission of light. A wide variety of protocols and reagents are available which provide for a change in measured light, as a result of absorption, scatter or emission. An example of such a detection system is the absorption of light in glucose assays. Elevated urine or plasma glucose is correlated with diabetes mellitus. In the case of diabetes mellitus, it is often advisable to be able to quantitate plasma or urine glucose levels as a means to better control side effects of the disease. One of the methods most often utilized for glucose measurement correlates changes in absorption or reflectance of the medium with glucose concentration. One common method for glucose determination employs glucose oxidase (GOD) and peroxidase (POD) along with 4-aminoantipyrene (4-AAP) and dichlorohydroxybenzene sulfonate (DCHBS) to measure glucose levels in urine or serum. The chemistry involved is as follows: ##STR1## In this system, one mole of oxygen is consumed for each mole of glucose oxidized. Normal plasma glucose concentrations (60-100 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) represent concentrations between 3.3 and 5.5 millimolar (mM). In diabetes mellitus, elevated plasma glucose levels can reach 500 mg/dL (27.8 mM), and can be as high as 5% (278 mM) in urine. In aqueous medium, oxygen's solubility is near 1.3 mM. As a result, assay reaction (1) is dependent on an accessible supply of molecular oxygen to allow it to run to completion. Failure to supply an adequate oxygen amount dooms the reaction to an inaccurate measurement of glucose concentration because a non-stoichiometric amount of H2 O2 is produced by reaction (1). In most cases, molecular oxygen is supplied to the reaction by frequent mixing of reaction tubes or cuvettes, allowing molecular oxygen from the air to saturate the reaction solution.

An advantage of the present invention is that the hydrophobic, porous side walls provide a ready source of molecular oxygen from outside the device. The assay of glucose using glucose oxidase is by no means unique. Many other assay methods employ molecular oxygen as an assay reagent. Examples are enzymatic cholesterol assays that make use of cholesterol oxidase, alcohol can use alcohol oxidase, and bilirubin can be measured using bilirubin oxidase. Many other assays can also be configured with oxidases. Such assays include but are not limited to oxidase reactions. All of these assay methods could benefit from a cuvette or reaction vessel which provided an open surface through which molecular oxygen could easily penetrate.

Labels which may be employed include enzymes in combination with substrates, co-factors or inhibitors, fluorescers, combinations of fluorescers and quenchers, dyes and the like. In some instances, the chemical reaction occurs as a result of the presence of the analyte or with the analyte, which provides a detectable signal. By employing appropriate protocols, the amount of absorption or emission of light and the detection unit can be directly related to the amount of analyte in the sample.

Detection by the measurement of light, for example, scatter, can be used to measure the size population. This can be particularly useful for the measurement of agglutination clumping, conformation or dissolution, and the like. A laser is able to distinguish particles without a change in the flow rate. Small particles have a low frequency and a high amplitude whereas large particles such as agglutinated particles have a lower frequency and a higher amplitude. Thus, the change in particle size and distribution may be detected by integrated noise employing known circuitry.

Additionally, detection of the change in the rate of flow may be the signal which reacts from the label or may be the result of a combination of a plurality of entities which apply to the rate of flow. The change in the flow rate may be the result of agglutination, a complex formation of high molecular weight compounds or aggregations, or the like.

The device can be fabricated from materials with the appropriate physical properties, which include optical transmission, thermal conductivity, and mechanical properties and which allow for uniform coding and stability of reagent, as well as medium compatibility. The device can be fabricated in a variety of ways. The chambers can be formed in a plastic sheet by vacuum forming, injection molding, casting, sintering, machining, or hot stamping. Capillaries and tracks may be formed by chemical or plasma etching a channel into the plastic, similar to the etching performed on photoresists in the semi-conductor fields. The device can be sealed by placing another material on the plastic sheet and sealing with various methods such as but not limited to ultrasonic welding, solvent bonding, adhesive bonding such as adhesive tapes, or the like. Films from extrusion, casting, sintering, or blow molding can be fabricated. Sandwich layers may be die or laser cut from these films of desired thickness which would then be coated with adhesive and sandwiched. The adhesive could also be silk screened on to the base to give a raised pattern of desired thickness. The sheet thickness of the device in the region of the capillary channels will generally be sufficient to prevent compression to the capillary action. The self-vented portion of the device can be incorporated as the adhesive layer, the capillary, the chamber, or a film layer. The adhesive layer if acting as a self-vent can be processed by applying an incomplete pattern with islands of adhesive to allow the uncoated regions to act as the hydrophobic vent. The islands are sufficiently hydrophobic to be impermeable to the test sample. Self-venting materials as plastic parts or films can be processed by casting, sintering, extrusion, solution, stretching, or other methods which can introduce voids into the structure. Common porous media are generated by cellulosics, cellulose esters, nylons, polycarbonate, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyesters, polytetrafluoroethylene, acrylics, polysulfones, and ceramics.

It is to be understood that this invention utilizes adhesives for different purposes. First, adhesives are used primarily for their bonding capabilities. The adhesives can be applied to secure devices. These adhesives can also be used in a manner to vent the device. Second, an adhesive system can be applied to a permeable surface to render it hydrophobic. The adhesive systems are primarily used for their ability to render the permeable surfaces hydrophobic and are not used for their adhesive qualities. It may be necessary to use an additional adhesive for its adhesive properties to bond the device where an adhesive system has been used to render a permeable surface hydrophobic. The use of an adhesive system is discussed in detail later in this document.

While other materials may be used for fabrication, such as glass, for the most part these materials lack one or more desirable characteristics to the indicated materials, and therefore have not been discussed. However, there may be particular situations where glass, ceramics, or other materials may find application, such as a glass window for optical clarity, modification of surface tension, and the like.

The device will normally include a reagent within a reaction chamber. The reagents may be formulated prior to or with various additives. The manner in which it is formulated, produced chamber, must provide for mixing with the test sample, reproducible distribution in the chamber, stability during storage, and reproducible reaction with the test sample.

Once the various materials are mixed for the test sample, the sample medium would be introduced to the receiving chamber and transferred by capillary action into the next chamber. Either visual evaluation of the flow rate change or an electromechanical evaluation may be employed. The initiation will flow through the first capillary channel or through a successive capillary channel may be selected as the initiation time for measurement, or some point in between.

The present invention includes analytical devices which employ the aforementioned components and techniques while providing a self-venting mechanism. Analytical devices typically employ vent ports which may be deferentially activated when necessary. The present invention utilizes materials which allow the elimination of such vent ports by supplying a device that can vent continuously or in a controlled fashion, based on the materials employed as well as provide for venting along the length of a capillary track device. Materials which provide for gaseous porosity yet maintain a hydrophilic surface that maintains good test sample fluid flow are necessary.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, an analytical device is comprised completely of a hydrophobic material. Such a device includes an inlet port accessing a track that was bored into the material. The surface on which the test sample will flow upon inside the device can be chemically treated to create a hydrophilic surface. The hydrophilic surface can have reagents applied onto its surface and accessible when the test sample is introduced into the device. The track typically has a capillary channel which can provide a means for the fluid to travel to various reaction zones and chambers. Additionally, the device must vent gases trapped in the device out through the material. The porous material also allows oxygen into the device whereby particular assays can be facilitated by the utilization of oxygen.

In addition, according to another embodiment of the present invention, an analytical device can comprise at least two materials. Such devices can use layers of material superimposed on each other and bonded together by various adhesives. This permits a stratification of layers whereby some layers can be hydrophobic while some layers are hydrophilic. As shown in FIG. 1 there can be a top layer containing an inlet or entry port, a core layer comprised of a material wherein some material is removed to create a track. The track has sidewalls along its length and width which will generally create the boundaries of which the test sample can flow. There can be a bottom or base layer comprising a surface upon which the test sample will flow upon within the boundaries of the track. Generally, all the layers will be impermeable to liquid. Once again, the venting of gases from inside the device to the outside is accomplished by selecting hydrophobic materials which can allow gaseous exchange in and out of the device but not biological liquids such as test samples.

As mentioned above, a hydrophobic surface upon which the test sample will flow can be modified to render it hydrophilic and hence more wettable. Creating wettable surfaces can include, but is not limited to, wet chemical modification, surface coatings, gas modification, plasma deposition, or plasma modification. These procedures introduce hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyls, carbonyls, carboxylics, aminos, sulfonics, sulfonates, sulfates, pyrroles, acetates, acrylics, carbonates, amidos, and phosphates onto the hydrophobic surface. In the alternative, materials such as surfactants can be applied to the hydrophobic surfaces to enhance wettability as recognized by those skilled in the art. In addition, both hydrophilic groups can be introduced onto the hydrophobic surface by the above techniques and materials such as surfactants applied in unison. These techniques can be used in various procedures and combinations with the present invention.

Conversely, another embodiment of the present invention utilizes the analytical devices to include forms of impregnated hydrophilic, liquid permeable materials. The impregnation of the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material renders the material hydrophobic and therefore impermeable to the test sample. Examples of such hydrophilic materials include, but are not intended to be limited to, bibulous materials and polymer screens. Bibulous materials can include fibers, filter papers, cellulosic materials and the like.

The bibulous materials or screens can be impregnated with adhesive systems to render them hydrophobic. The general class of "adhesive systems" which can be used within the scope of the present invention are those which will create a hydrophobic material that is impermeable to the test sample yet porous to gas exchange. It is not primarily for the adhesive properties that the adhesive systems are utilized but for attaining a hydrophobic, porous feature in the analytical device design. There are a variety of adhesive systems suitable for use in the invention and a criteria for selection is the difference each subclass of an adhesive system uses to allow a solid to liquid conversion and vice-versa. Adhesive systems require a liquid state to allow wetting at the surface of the hydrophilic, liquid permeable materials. The liquid state is required to allow impregnation into the structure. This results in subsequent blockage of liquids across the surface interface.

One such example of an adhesive system is the use of hot melt adhesives. Typically, hot melt adhesives are solids at room temperature and heat is used to convert the adhesive to a liquid which allows wetting and impregnation of the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material. The material is allowed to cool after impregnation to allow the adhesive to solidify. Examples of commercially available hot melt adhesives are: Tanner Tivomelt® 9600 (Tanner, Greenville, S.C.); Eastobond A-605® (Eastman-Kodak, Kingsport, Tenn.); and Bostik Thermogrip 2391® (Bostik, Middleton, Mass.). In addition, polymers can be used as hot melt adhesives such as, but are not intended to be limited to, nylons, polyolefins, waxes, ethylenevinylacetates, polyesters, polyurethanes, and polyethylenes.

Another example of an adhesive system is a one part heat curable. Typically, one part curables are liquids at room temperature due to the low molecular weight of their starting components. The one part curable is applied in its liquid form to the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material to allow impregnation. Upon heating the impregnated hydrophilic material, a temperature induced reaction occurs which polymerizes the liquid and converts it to solid state. Epoxies are the most common reaction chemistries, but polyimides, urethanes, and silicones can also be used. Examples of commercially available one part heat curables are: A-3888® (Engelhard Corp., East Newark, N.J.); and National Starch Screenimid 9010™ (National Starch, Bridgewater, N.J.). In addition, two part heat curables can be used. In two part heat curables, solvents can be added to lower viscosity to improve processing. These solvents can then be driven off by heat prior to curing. Two part curables that are not heated can also be used.

Another example of an adhesive system is a solvent based/emulsion system. Such systems contain solids that are solubilized or suspended in a liquid solvent for the application. After impregnation of the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material, the liquid is driven off by drying. The drying can be accelerated by heat or can occur at ambient or vacuum assisted conditions. Examples of commercially available solvent based/ emulsion systems are: Polygard NF-100® (Ferro, Santa Barbara, Calif.); 6C-33 (Olin-Hunt, Ontario, Calif.); and AS-100P (Teknek, Renfrewshire, Scotland, UK.).

Yet another example of an adhesive system are ultraviolet (UV) curables. UV curables are similar to heat curables in that the starting components are liquid at room temperature. After application and impregnation of the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material, a UV light source is used to induce a reaction that converts the adhesive system components to a solid. Examples of commercially available UV curables are: UV D40-90 (Colonial, E. Rutherford, N.J.); and Masterbond UV-15® (Masterbond, Teaneck, N.J.). Other adhesive systems may be used with the present invention. Another adhesive system is a water induced cures common for silicone room temperature vulcanizers.

The adhesive systems can be applied as a complete coating or can be applied as islands. The islands impregnate the hydrophilic, liquid permeable material and render it hydrophobic. The islands can be applied as a pattern or randomly. There must be sufficient application of islands to provide a hydrophobic material which is impermeable to the test sample yet able to allow gaseous exchange in and out of the material.

The Examples below are embodiments of both devices and methods of the present invention. The embodiments are examples and are not a limitation of the present invention. Each of the below Examples' devices were constructed and tested in three constructions. Where there was a difference in the performance of any device, the differences are listed in the Examples.

EXAMPLE 1

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film (Pilcher Hamilton Corporation, Greer, S.C., 29651) with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive (Adhesives Research, Glen Rock, Pa., 17327) was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom or base layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 microliter (μl) water sample was added to the inlet port. The water sample entered the track for approximately 2 millimetres (mm) but did not continue to fill the track. This device was used as a control.

EXAMPLE 2

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A vent hole was punched at the end of the track. A 100 μl water sample was added to the inlet port and the track filled smoothly. This was used as a second control.

EXAMPLE 3

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a teflon membrane (W. L. Gore & Associates, Elkton, Md., 21921) with a 0.45 μm pore size. The membrane is hydrophobic and a 100 μl water sample added to the inlet port was repelled so strongly that it failed to enter the track and collected on the upper surface of the top layer.

EXAMPLE 4

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a hydrophobic gas permeation layer (General Electric Co., Schenectady, N.Y., 12345). A 100 μl water sample failed to enter the track and collected on the upper surface of the top layer.

EXAMPLE 5

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Celgard microporous polypropylene engineering film composite (Celanese, Charlotte, N.C., 28232) with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. The bottom layer had a hydrophobic side oriented towards the inside of the device, A 100 μl water sample failed to enter the track but was not repelled onto the upper surface of the top layer.

EXAMPLE 6

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Celgard microporous polypropylene engineering film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. The porous, hydrophilic surface of the bottom layer film was oriented toward the inside of the device. A 100 μl water sample flowed into the track and air bubbles were eliminated due to the venting of the polypropylene film.

EXAMPLE 7

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Tetko polyethylene monofilament woven screen (Tetko, Elmsford, NY., 10523) with 136 μm pores and 37% open area, with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 μl water sample entered the track for approximately 2 mm but did not continue to fill the track.

EXAMPLE 8

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Whatman filter paper (Whatman, Inc., Clifton, N.J., 07014) with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 μl water sample filled the track and filter paper at equal rates. One of the three devices trapped an air bubble at the end of the track.

EXAMPLE 9

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was Pilcher Hamilton Film with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a nylon screen with a 1 μm pore size, with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 μl water sample filled the track first and then fluid entered into the nylon screen and eventually leaked from the nylon screen.

EXAMPLE 10

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was a Porex HDPE (Porex, Fairburn, Ga., 30213) with a 0.25 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 1000 μl water sample flowed into the track. An air bubble formed in the track but was eliminated.

EXAMPLE 11

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was a Delrin non porous core 0.125 inch wide track. The bottom layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 1000 μl water sample would not enter the track.

EXAMPLE 12

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. An MA-38 adhesive was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was composed of double stick tape whereby the tape has irregular islands on its adhesive surface creating channels for air flow (3M Corp., St. Paul, Minn., 55144). The bottom layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a MA-38 adhesive applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 μl water sample filled the track smoothly with no air bubbles.

EXAMPLE 13

A device was constructed containing a top layer of Pilcher Hamilton Film with an inlet port of 0.25 inches. A double stick adhesive tape (3M) was applied to the under surface of the top layer. The core layer was composed of filter paper impregnated with a heat cured epoxy. The heat cured epoxy essentially coated the filter paper fibers rendering them hydrophobic while leaving the spaces between the coated fibers porous to gases. The bottom layer was a Pilcher Hamilton Film with a double stick adhesive (3M) applied to the top surface of the bottom layer. A 100 μl test samples of glucose standards filled the track smoothly with no air bubbles.

Adhesive systems can be vacuum drawn through the filter paper as was the heat cured epoxy. The epoxy used was A-3888® from Engelhard Corp., (East Newark, N.J.).

The device that was constructed in Example 13 was read by placing the device in a cuvette and read by a Beckmann DU 470 Spectrophotometer (Beckman Instruments, Inc., Fullerton, Calif., 92634). The device was read at absorbance =513 nm. The assay was performed as follows:

Solution A was comprised of:

1. 0.0056 grams (g) of magnesium chloride (Fisher Scientific, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219)

0.370 g of bovine serum albumin (Boehinnger Mannheim Corp., Biochemical Products, Indianapolis, Ind., 46250)

3. 0.0934 g of 4-AAP (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo., 63178)

4. 0.90 g of glucose oxidase (Sigma)

5. 8.1. milliliters (mL) of 50 mM MOPSO (Sigma)

Solution B was comprised of:

1. 0.403 g of DCHBS (Aldrich Chemical Co., Milwaukee, Wis., 53201)

2. 0.107 g of Peroxidase (Amano Pharmaceutical Co., Nagoya, Japan)

3. 5.1. mL of 50 mM MOPSO (Sigma)

The core layer was bonded to the bottom layer with a MA-38 adhesive. Five spots of 1 μl of Solution A was laid down inside the track on the bottom layer surface and allowed to dry. The five spots were located along the central longitudinal axis of the track. Ten spots of 1 μl of Solution B were laid down on the both sides of the Solution A spots. The Solution A and B spots were in close proximity to each other but did not touch. The top layer was bonded to the core layer with a MA-38 adhesive. The adhesive was confined in all layers to only non-track areas. A 30 μl sample of Glucose/Urea standard (Sigma) was added to the inlet port of the top layer. The reaction was allowed to proceed for thirty (30) to ensure sufficient reaction time. The device was places in a Beckman DU-70 spectrophotometer and read at 513 nm.

______________________________________Glucose concentration(milligrams/deciliter)             A.sub.513                      % CV______________________________________0                 0.2072   2.7100               0.7399   9.7200               1.541    16.6300               1.396    26.7500               2.415    7.0800               2.054    22.5______________________________________
EXAMPLE 14

Devices which employ hydrophobic porous side walls can also be used as cuvettes for a spectrophotometer. Because of the hydrophobic porous walls, these cuvettes will fill easily. These devices were created by laminating Pilcher Hamilton film to a core layer composed of POREX (high density polyethylene) laminated on both sides with MA-38 adhesive and Scotch double stick adhesive tape. From front to back, the device was configured as follows: Pilcher Hamilton film, Scotch double stick tape, MA38, POREX, MA38, Scotch double stick tape, and Pilcher Hamilton film.

To test the reproducibility of the path length of the constructed devices, a tartrazine (Aldrich, Milwaukee, Wis, 53233) solution was prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) pH=7.0 (Sigma, St. Louis, Mo. 63178) with an absorbance of 3.122 in a 1.00 cm cuvettes at 426 nm. Absorbances of dilutions of the stock solution gave a linear response in the range tested (r2 =0.999905, slope=0.304903 mm cuvette thickness/ 426 nm absorbance unit). PBS was introduced into each of ten cells constructed as noted above and absorbance at 426 nm was recorded. Then, the stock tartrazine solution was introduced into the same cells, and again, absorbance at 426 nm was recorded. The absorbance due to tartrazine was calculated by subtracting the absorbance due to saline from the absorbance with tartrazine. Using the slope of the dilution calibration line, cell thicknesses were computed.

______________________________________            A 426 nm,         Cell ThicknessCell # A426, Saline            Tartrazine                      Difference                              (mm)______________________________________1     .0987      1.2216    1.1229  3.682     .0937      1.1803    1.0866  3.563     .1069      1.1821    1.0752  3.534     .0951      1.1816    1.0865  3.565     .1023      1.1797    1.0774  3.536     .0964      1.2033    1.1069  3.637     .0884      1.1762    1.0878  3.578     .1049      1.1910    1.0861  3.569     .0963      1.1530    1.0567  3.4710    0.2537     1.3625    1.1088  3.64                      Mean    3.57                      % CV    1.7%______________________________________

A glucose assay was also conducted in similar hydrophobic, porous cuvettes. A reaction mixture was prepared by diluting 34 uL of Solution A (Example 13) and 17 uL of Solution B with 1 mL of PBS. Assays were run in glass tubes by mixing 2.0 uL glucose/urea standard (Example 13) with 1.05 mL of reaction mixture. The mixtures were incubated 15 min. at room temperature to ensure adequate reaction. Then, the reaction mixtures were split, a portion of the solution being read at 513 nm in a 5.00 mm quartz cuvette and a portion being read at 513 nm in the laminated cuvette described above. Reaction were run in triplicate. Results were as follows:

______________________________________     Laminated           5.00 mm     Cuvettes            QuartzGlucose   Mean                Cells(mg/dL)   A 513 nm  % CV      A 513 nm                                % CV______________________________________0         0.2705    1.7%      0.3004 0.2%100       0.4959    1.6%      0.6305 1.1%200       0.7355    1.3%      0.9654 0.3%300       0.9776    1.1%      1.3308 0.6%500       1.5224    0.8%      2.0778 0.6%800       2.1240    1.2%      2.9373 1.4%Slope     0.002359            0.003562Intercept 0.2740              0.2773r.sup.2   0.997               0.999______________________________________

Claims (44)

We claim:
1. A method for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample, comprising providing:
(a) an analytical device comprising: a housing made of a hydrophobic material, said hydrophobic material consisting of: acrylics, polycarbonates, polystyrenes, silicones, polyurethanes, polyolefins, polytetrafluoroethylenes, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, thermoplastic elastomers, copolymers, acrylnitrylbutadienestyrene, and styreneacrylonitrile;
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing a track of predetermined width and length within said housing and having at least one reagent therein;
said track having at least one hydrophobic surface modified to create a hydrophilic surface by introducing at least one hydrophilic group onto said hydrophobic surface, said hydrophilic group consisting of: hydroxyls, carbonyls, carboxylics, aminos, sulfonics, sulfonates, sulfates, pyrroles, acetates, acrylics, carbonates, amidos, and phosphates;
said hydrophobic material being impermeable to said test sample and allowing gaseous exchange in and out of a portion of said track;
(b) adding said test sample to said housing through said inlet port;
said test sample and said reagent producing a detectable signal upon mixing; and
(c) determining the presence or an amount of an analyte in said test sample from said detectable signal.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein said analyte is a member of a group consisting of: proteins, peptides, amino acids, carbohydrates, hormones, steroids, vitamins, lipids, nucleic acids, trace elements, drugs including those administered for therapeutic purposes as well as those administered for illicit purposes, bacteria, viruses, metabolites, viroids, mammalian cells such as lymphocytes, epithelial cells, and neoplastic cells.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device by an instrument.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein said instrument is a member of a group consisting of: spectrophotometers, colorimeters, fluorimeters, spectroscopies, calorimeters, reflectance meters, and conductimeters.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein said modification of said hydrophobic surface is by wet chemical modification, surface coatings, gas modification, plasma deposition, plasma modification treatments and sufactants.
7. A method for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample comprising providing:
(a) an analytical device comprising a first hydrophobic material and a second hydrophilic material,
said first hydrophobic material consisting of: acrylics, polycarbonates, polystyrenes, silicones, polyurethanes, polyolefins, polytetrafluoroethylenes, polypropylenes, polyethylenes thermoplastic elastomers, copolymers, acrylnitrylbutadienestyrene, and styreneacrylonitrile;
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing a track of predetermined width and length within said housing and containing a reagent therein;
said first hydrophobic material allowing gaseous exchange in and out of a portion of said track; and
said track having at least one surface of said first hydrphobic material modified to create said second hydrophilic material by introducing at least one hydrophilic group onto said first hydrophobic surface, said hydrophilic group consisting of: hydroxyls, carbonyls, carboxylics, aminos, sulfonics, sulfonates, sulfates, pyrroles, acetates, acrylics, carbonates, amidos, and phosphates; and
(b) adding said test sample to said housing through said inlet port;
said test sample and said reagent producing a detectable signal upon mixing; and
(c) determining the presence or an amount of an analyte in said test sample from said detectable signal.
8. The method of claim 7 wherein said analyte is a member of a group consisting of: proteins, peptides, amino acids, carbohydrates, hormones, steroids, vitamins, lipids, nucleic acids, trace elements, drugs including those administered for therapeutic purposes as well as those administered for illicit purposes, bacteria, viruses, metabolites, viroids, mammalian cells such as lymphocytes, epithelial cells, and neoplastic cells.
9. The method of claim 7 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device.
10. The method of claim 7 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device by an instrument.
11. The method of claim 10 wherein said instrument is a member of a group consisting of: spectrophotometers, colorimeters, fluorimeters, spectroscopies, calorimeters, reflectance meters, and conductimeters.
12. A method for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample comprising providing:
(a) a housing having a first layer, a core layer, and a second layer, said core layer made of a hydrophobic material containing a track of predetermined width and length and having at least one reagent therein, said track having a sidewall defining the boundaries for flow of said test sample, said first and second layers being impermeable to said test sample;
at least one of said first or second layers having a hydrophilic surface;
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing said track, at least one of said first layer, second layer, or core layer made of a porous material that will vent gases in and out of a portion of said track;
(b) adding said test sample to said housing through said inlet port;
said test sample and said reagent producing a detectable signal upon mixing; and
(c) determining the presence or an amount of an analyte in said test sample from said detectable signal.
13. The method of claim 12 wherein said analyte is a member of a group consisting of: proteins, peptides, amino acids, carbohydrates, hormones, steroids, vitamins, lipids, nucleic acids, trace elements, drugs including those administered for therapeutic purposes as well as those administered for illicit purposes, bacteria, viruses, metabolites, viroids, mammalian cells such as lymphocytes, epithelial cells, and neoplastic cells.
14. The method of claim 12 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device.
15. The method of claim 12 wherein said detectable signal is read directly from said analytical device by an instrument.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein said instrument is a member of a group consisting of: spectrophotometers, colorimeters, fluorimeters, spectroscopies, calorimeters, reflectance meters, and conductimeters.
17. An analytical device for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample, comprising:
a housing made of a hydrophobic material, said hydrophobic material consisting of: acrylics, polycarbonates, polystyrenes, silicones, polyurethanes, polyolefins, polytetrafluoroethylenes, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, thermoplastic elastomers, copolymers, acrylnitrylbutadienestyrene, and styreneacrylonitrile;
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing a track of predetermined width and length within housing;
said track having at least one hydrophobic surface modified to create a hydrophilic surface by introducing at least one hydrophilic group onto said hydrophobic surface, said hydrophilic group consisting of: hydroxyls, carbonyls, carboxylics, aminos, sulfonics, sulfonates, sulfates, pyrroles, acetates, acrylics, carbonates, amidos, and phosphates; and
said hydrophobic material being impermeable to said test sample and allowing gaseous exchange in and out of a portion of said track.
18. The analytical device of claim 17 wherein said track has at least one chamber.
19. The analytical device of claim 17 further comprising a reagent within said device.
20. The analytical device of claim 19 wherein said reagent is on said hydrophilic surface.
21. The analytical device of claim 17 wherein said test sample flows along said hydrophilic surface by differential pressure.
22. The analytical device of claim 17 wherein said device is a cuvette.
23. The analytical device of claim 17 wherein said modification of said hydrophobic surface is by wet chemical modification, surface coatings, gas modification, plasma deposition, plasma modification treatments, and a surfactant.
24. An analytical device for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample comprising:
a housing made of a first hydrophobic material and a second hydrophilic material,
said first hydrophobic material consisting of: acrylics, polycarbonates, polystyrenes, silicones, polyurethanes, polyolefins, polytetrafluoroethylenes, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, thermoplastic elastomers, copolymers, acrylnitrylbutadienestyrene, and styreneacrylonitrile;
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing a track of predetermined width and length within said housing;
said first hydrophobic material allowing gaseous exchange in and out of a portion of said track; and
said track having at least one surface of said first hydrophobic material modified to create said second hydrophilic material by introducing at least one hydrophilic group onto said first hydrophobic surface, said hydrophilic group consisting of: hydroxyls, carbonyls, carboxylics, aminos, sulfonics, sulfonates, sulfates, pyrroles, acetates, acrylics, carbonates, amidos, and phosphates.
25. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said track has at least one chamber.
26. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said reagent is on the surface of said hydrophilic surface.
27. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said reagent is on the hydrophobic surface of said track.
28. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said test sample is moved along said hydrophilic surface by a differential pressure.
29. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said device is a cuvette.
30. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said modification of said first hydrophobic surface is by wet chemical modification, surface coatings, gas modification, plasma deposition, plasma modification treatments, and surfactants.
31. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said hydrophilic material is modified by application of an adhesive system to a polymer screen.
32. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said hydrophilic material is modified by an adhesive systems consisting of: hot melt adhesives, one part curables, two part curables, solvent based/emulsion adhesives, ultraviolet curables, and water induced curables.
33. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said hydrophilic material is modified by application of an adhesive system as one or more islands.
34. The analytical device of claim 24 wherein said hydrophilic material is modified by application of an adhesive system to a bibulous material.
35. An analytical device for detecting the presence or an amount of an analyte in a test sample comprising:
a housing having a first layer, a core layer, and a second layer, said core layer made of a hydrophobic material containing a track of predetermined width and length, said track having a sidewall defining the boundaries for flow of said test sample, said first and second layers being impermeable to said test sample;
at least one of said first or second layers having a hydrophilic surface; and
said housing containing an inlet port, said inlet port accessing said track of, at least one of said first layer, second layer, or core layer made of a porous material that will vent gases in and out of a portion of said track.
36. The analytical device of claim 35 wherein said track has at least one chamber.
37. The analytical device of claim 35 further comprising a reagent on the surface of said first or second layer.
38. The analytical device of claim 35 further comprising a reagent on the hydrophobic material of said track.
39. The analytical device of claim 35 wherein said test sample flows along said hydrophilic surface by differential pressure.
40. The analytical device of claim 35 wherein said device is a cuvette.
41. The analytical device of claim 35 wherein said hydrophilic surface is modified by wet chemical modification, surface coatings, gas modification, plasma deposition, plasma modification treatments and surfactants.
42. The analytical device of claim 35 wherein said core layer is a hydrophilic material which is modified by application of an adhesive system.
43. The adhesive system of claim 42 selected from the group consisting of: hot melt adhesives, one part curables, two part curables, solvent based/emulsion adhesives, ultraviolet curables, and water induced curables.
44. The analytical device of claim 42 wherein said adhesive system is applied as one or more islands.
US08229256 1993-12-29 1994-04-18 Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays Expired - Fee Related US5478751A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US17497393 true 1993-12-29 1993-12-29
US08229256 US5478751A (en) 1993-12-29 1994-04-18 Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08229256 US5478751A (en) 1993-12-29 1994-04-18 Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays
PCT/US1994/014936 WO1995017966A1 (en) 1993-12-29 1994-12-28 Self-venting immunodiagnostic devices and methods of performing assays
EP19950906128 EP0737105A1 (en) 1993-12-29 1994-12-28 Self-venting immunodiagnostic devices and methods of performing assays
JP51817895A JPH09507572A (en) 1993-12-29 1994-12-28 Self-venting type immunodiagnostic instruments and analytical methods
CA 2178505 CA2178505A1 (en) 1993-12-29 1994-12-28 Self-venting immunodiagnostic devices and methods of performing assays

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US17497393 Continuation-In-Part 1993-12-29 1993-12-29

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US5478751A true US5478751A (en) 1995-12-26

Family

ID=26870742

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08229256 Expired - Fee Related US5478751A (en) 1993-12-29 1994-04-18 Self-venting immunodiagnositic devices and methods of performing assays

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US5478751A (en)
EP (1) EP0737105A1 (en)
JP (1) JPH09507572A (en)
CA (1) CA2178505A1 (en)
WO (1) WO1995017966A1 (en)

Cited By (78)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5843691A (en) * 1993-05-15 1998-12-01 Lifescan, Inc. Visually-readable reagent test strip
WO1999003584A1 (en) * 1997-07-21 1999-01-28 Ysi Incorporated Microfluidic analyzer module
US6073482A (en) * 1997-07-21 2000-06-13 Ysi Incorporated Fluid flow module
US6082185A (en) * 1997-07-25 2000-07-04 Research International, Inc. Disposable fluidic circuit cards
US6120676A (en) 1997-02-06 2000-09-19 Therasense, Inc. Method of using a small volume in vitro analyte sensor
WO2001024931A1 (en) * 1999-10-05 2001-04-12 Roche Diagnostic Gmbh Capillary device for separating undesired components from a liquid sample and related method
US6251260B1 (en) 1998-08-24 2001-06-26 Therasense, Inc. Potentiometric sensors for analytic determination
US6293012B1 (en) 1997-07-21 2001-09-25 Ysi Incorporated Method of making a fluid flow module
US6299757B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2001-10-09 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US20020106710A1 (en) * 1989-08-28 2002-08-08 Tuohy Deborah P. Method of making a test strip for determining analyte concentration over a broad range of sample volumes
US20030064507A1 (en) * 2001-07-26 2003-04-03 Sean Gallagher System and methods for mixing within a microfluidic device
US20030106799A1 (en) * 2001-12-06 2003-06-12 Nanostream, Inc Adhesiveless microfluidic device fabrication
US6591125B1 (en) 2000-06-27 2003-07-08 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US20030150792A1 (en) * 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 Nanostream, Inc. Frit material and bonding method for microfluidic separation devices
US20030150806A1 (en) * 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 Nanostream, Inc. Separation column devices and fabrication methods
US20030162235A1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2003-08-28 Yuko Seino Reaction detecting method, immune reaction detecting method and apparatus therefor
US6616819B1 (en) 1999-11-04 2003-09-09 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods
US6654625B1 (en) 1999-06-18 2003-11-25 Therasense, Inc. Mass transport limited in vivo analyte sensor
US20030221771A1 (en) * 1998-03-02 2003-12-04 Cepheid Method for fabricating a reaction vessel
US6696240B1 (en) 1999-10-26 2004-02-24 Micronix, Inc. Capillary test strip to separate particulates
EP1419818A1 (en) * 2002-11-14 2004-05-19 Steag MicroParts GmbH Device for sequential transport of liquids by capillary forces
US20040179972A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Nanostream, Inc. Systems and methods for detecting manufacturing defects in microfluidic devices
US20040226884A1 (en) * 2003-05-08 2004-11-18 Nanostream, Inc. Sample preparation for parallel chromatography
US20050032238A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-10 Nanostream, Inc. Vented microfluidic separation devices and methods
US20050047968A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2005-03-03 Horacio Kido Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US20050070029A1 (en) * 2003-09-30 2005-03-31 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Reaction method with use of biochemical analysis unit
US20050084422A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2005-04-21 Horacio Kido Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US20050100270A1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2005-05-12 Nanostream, Inc. Optical devices with fluidic systems
US20050136552A1 (en) * 1992-05-21 2005-06-23 Biosite, Inc. Diagnostic devices and apparatus for the controlled movement of reagents without membranes
EP1548447A1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2005-06-29 ARKRAY, Inc. Method of producing analytical tool
US20050148091A1 (en) * 1999-08-11 2005-07-07 Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha Analyzing cartridge and liquid feed control device
US20050284213A1 (en) * 2004-06-29 2005-12-29 Nanostream, Inc. Sealing interface for microfluidic device
US7094354B2 (en) 2002-12-19 2006-08-22 Bayer Healthcare Llc Method and apparatus for separation of particles in a microfluidic device
US7125711B2 (en) 2002-12-19 2006-10-24 Bayer Healthcare Llc Method and apparatus for splitting of specimens into multiple channels of a microfluidic device
US20060275852A1 (en) * 2005-06-06 2006-12-07 Montagu Jean I Assays based on liquid flow over arrays
US7178386B1 (en) 2003-04-10 2007-02-20 Nanostream, Inc. Parallel fluid processing systems and methods
US20070092975A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 General Electric Company Methods and systems for delivery of fluidic samples to sensor arrays
US20070092407A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 General Electric Company Optical sensor array system and method for parallel processing of chemical and biochemical information
US7261812B1 (en) 2002-02-13 2007-08-28 Nanostream, Inc. Multi-column separation devices and methods
US20080038839A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2008-02-14 Vincent Linder Fluid Delivery System And Method
US7347617B2 (en) 2003-08-19 2008-03-25 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Mixing in microfluidic devices
US7435381B2 (en) 2003-05-29 2008-10-14 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Packaging of microfluidic devices
US20080267829A1 (en) * 2003-02-28 2008-10-30 Applera Corporation Sample Substrate Having a Divided Sample Chamber and Method of Loading Thereof
US20080273918A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US20080280373A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2008-11-13 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for measuring pH of low alkalinity solutions
US7459127B2 (en) 2002-02-26 2008-12-02 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Method and apparatus for precise transfer and manipulation of fluids by centrifugal and/or capillary forces
US7485454B1 (en) 2000-03-10 2009-02-03 Bioprocessors Corp. Microreactor
US7491552B2 (en) * 1998-07-16 2009-02-17 The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System Fluid based analysis of multiple analytes by a sensor array
US20090178497A1 (en) * 2008-01-14 2009-07-16 Medi Medical Engineering Corp. Fluid transferring apparatus
US20090266421A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Flow control in microfluidic systems
US20100028207A1 (en) * 2008-07-16 2010-02-04 International Technidyne Corporation Cuvette-based apparatus for blood coagulation measurement and testing
US20100172801A1 (en) * 2003-06-27 2010-07-08 Pugia Michael J Method for uniform application of fluid into a reactive reagent area
US20100173395A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2010-07-08 Micronics, Inc. Microfluidic devices for fluid manipulation and analysis
US7824611B2 (en) 1992-05-21 2010-11-02 Biosite, Inc. Diagnostic devices and apparatus for the controlled movement of reagents without membranes
US20110076697A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2011-03-31 Innovative Laboratory Technologies, Inc. Lateral-flow immuno-chromatographic assay devices
USD645971S1 (en) 2010-05-11 2011-09-27 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Sample cassette
US20110243813A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Jackinsky Steve W Diagnostic card with micro-fluidic channels and method of construction thereof
US8101431B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2012-01-24 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Integration of fluids and reagents into self-contained cartridges containing sensor elements and reagent delivery systems
US8221700B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2012-07-17 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Structures for controlling light interaction with microfluidic devices
US8287495B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2012-10-16 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US8377398B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2013-02-19 The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System Methods and compositions related to determination and use of white blood cell counts
US8389272B2 (en) 2004-01-26 2013-03-05 President And Fellows Of Harvard College Fluid delivery system and method
US8408421B2 (en) 2008-09-16 2013-04-02 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Flow regulating stopcocks and related methods
US8567425B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2013-10-29 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US8580569B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2013-11-12 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Feedback control in microfluidic systems
US8591829B2 (en) 2008-12-18 2013-11-26 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Reagent storage in microfluidic systems and related articles and methods
US8650937B2 (en) 2008-09-19 2014-02-18 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Solute concentration measurement device and related methods
US8961764B2 (en) 2010-10-15 2015-02-24 Lockheed Martin Corporation Micro fluidic optic design
US8986253B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2015-03-24 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Two chamber pumps and related methods
US9067207B2 (en) 2009-06-04 2015-06-30 University Of Virginia Patent Foundation Optical approach for microfluidic DNA electrophoresis detection
US9180449B2 (en) 2012-06-12 2015-11-10 Hach Company Mobile water analysis
US9182353B2 (en) 2010-07-22 2015-11-10 Hach Company Lab-on-a-chip for alkalinity analysis
US9255866B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2016-02-09 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Mixing of fluids in fluidic systems
US9316590B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2016-04-19 Cepheid Apparatus for controlling and monitoring reactions
US9322054B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2016-04-26 Lockheed Martin Corporation Microfluidic cartridge
USD768872S1 (en) 2012-12-12 2016-10-11 Hach Company Cuvette for a water analysis instrument
US9668684B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2017-06-06 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Self-powered analyte sensor
USD804682S1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-12-05 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Multi-layered sample cassette

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE19602861C2 (en) * 1996-01-28 1997-12-11 Meinhard Prof Dr Knoll Sampling system for contained in carrier liquids analytes and to methods for its preparation
EP1051616B1 (en) * 1997-08-04 2006-09-27 Serex Inc. Integrated collection and assay device for saliva and blood
US6571651B1 (en) 2000-03-27 2003-06-03 Lifescan, Inc. Method of preventing short sampling of a capillary or wicking fill device
DE602004015084D1 (en) * 2003-03-10 2008-08-28 Univ Johns Hopkins Method and apparatus for environmental monitoring and biological exploration
DE10359303A1 (en) 2003-12-17 2005-07-21 Roche Diagnostics Gmbh Injection molded plastic part with embedded component
US7497827B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2009-03-03 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous analyte sensor
WO2007122819A1 (en) * 2006-04-18 2007-11-01 Ngk Insulators, Ltd. Device for reactions with liquid media
US8583204B2 (en) 2008-03-28 2013-11-12 Dexcom, Inc. Polymer membranes for continuous analyte sensors
US8682408B2 (en) 2008-03-28 2014-03-25 Dexcom, Inc. Polymer membranes for continuous analyte sensors

Citations (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3799742A (en) * 1971-12-20 1974-03-26 C Coleman Miniaturized integrated analytical test container
US3921460A (en) * 1974-09-06 1975-11-25 Albertus E Schmidlin Precision liquid-handling instrument
US4043678A (en) * 1976-03-01 1977-08-23 Technicon Instruments Corporation Cuvette
US4323536A (en) * 1980-02-06 1982-04-06 Eastman Kodak Company Multi-analyte test device
US4596695A (en) * 1984-09-10 1986-06-24 Cottingham Hugh V Agglutinographic reaction chamber
US4756884A (en) * 1985-08-05 1988-07-12 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary flow device
EP0295069A2 (en) * 1987-06-12 1988-12-14 Pall Corporation Diagnostic test device
US4849340A (en) * 1987-04-03 1989-07-18 Cardiovascular Diagnostics, Inc. Reaction system element and method for performing prothrombin time assay
US4946795A (en) * 1987-08-27 1990-08-07 Biotrack, Inc. Apparatus and method for dilution and mixing of liquid samples
US4952516A (en) * 1987-06-12 1990-08-28 Pall Corporation Self-venting diagnostic test device
US4963498A (en) * 1985-08-05 1990-10-16 Biotrack Capillary flow device
US4981805A (en) * 1980-01-18 1991-01-01 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Method of using chemical analysis slide
US5039617A (en) * 1989-04-20 1991-08-13 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary flow device and method for measuring activated partial thromboplastin time
EP0470438A1 (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-02-12 Bayer Corporation Self-metering fluid analysis device
WO1992008972A1 (en) * 1990-11-16 1992-05-29 Abbott Laboratories Improved agglutination reaction device having geometrically modified chambers
US5135873A (en) * 1989-11-27 1992-08-04 Syntex (U.S.A.) Inc. Device and method for completing a fluidic circuit which employs a liquid expandable piece of bibulous material
US5135719A (en) * 1986-10-29 1992-08-04 Biotrack, Inc. Blood separation device comprising a filter and a capillary flow pathway exiting the filter
US5223219A (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-06-29 Biotrack, Inc. Analytical cartridge and system for detecting analytes in liquid samples
US5222808A (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-06-29 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary mixing device
US5230866A (en) * 1991-03-01 1993-07-27 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary stop-flow junction having improved stability against accidental fluid flow
US5288463A (en) * 1992-10-23 1994-02-22 Eastman Kodak Company Positive flow control in an unvented container
WO1994011489A1 (en) * 1992-11-06 1994-05-26 Biolog, Inc. Testing device for liquid and liquid suspended samples

Patent Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3799742A (en) * 1971-12-20 1974-03-26 C Coleman Miniaturized integrated analytical test container
US3921460A (en) * 1974-09-06 1975-11-25 Albertus E Schmidlin Precision liquid-handling instrument
US4043678A (en) * 1976-03-01 1977-08-23 Technicon Instruments Corporation Cuvette
US4981805A (en) * 1980-01-18 1991-01-01 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Method of using chemical analysis slide
US4323536A (en) * 1980-02-06 1982-04-06 Eastman Kodak Company Multi-analyte test device
US4596695A (en) * 1984-09-10 1986-06-24 Cottingham Hugh V Agglutinographic reaction chamber
US4963498A (en) * 1985-08-05 1990-10-16 Biotrack Capillary flow device
US4756884A (en) * 1985-08-05 1988-07-12 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary flow device
US5135719A (en) * 1986-10-29 1992-08-04 Biotrack, Inc. Blood separation device comprising a filter and a capillary flow pathway exiting the filter
US4849340A (en) * 1987-04-03 1989-07-18 Cardiovascular Diagnostics, Inc. Reaction system element and method for performing prothrombin time assay
EP0295069A2 (en) * 1987-06-12 1988-12-14 Pall Corporation Diagnostic test device
US4952516A (en) * 1987-06-12 1990-08-28 Pall Corporation Self-venting diagnostic test device
US4946795A (en) * 1987-08-27 1990-08-07 Biotrack, Inc. Apparatus and method for dilution and mixing of liquid samples
US5039617A (en) * 1989-04-20 1991-08-13 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary flow device and method for measuring activated partial thromboplastin time
US5135873A (en) * 1989-11-27 1992-08-04 Syntex (U.S.A.) Inc. Device and method for completing a fluidic circuit which employs a liquid expandable piece of bibulous material
US5147606A (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-09-15 Miles Inc. Self-metering fluid analysis device
EP0470438A1 (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-02-12 Bayer Corporation Self-metering fluid analysis device
WO1992008972A1 (en) * 1990-11-16 1992-05-29 Abbott Laboratories Improved agglutination reaction device having geometrically modified chambers
US5230866A (en) * 1991-03-01 1993-07-27 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary stop-flow junction having improved stability against accidental fluid flow
US5223219A (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-06-29 Biotrack, Inc. Analytical cartridge and system for detecting analytes in liquid samples
US5222808A (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-06-29 Biotrack, Inc. Capillary mixing device
US5288463A (en) * 1992-10-23 1994-02-22 Eastman Kodak Company Positive flow control in an unvented container
WO1994011489A1 (en) * 1992-11-06 1994-05-26 Biolog, Inc. Testing device for liquid and liquid suspended samples

Cited By (220)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6986869B2 (en) 1989-08-28 2006-01-17 Lifescan, Inc. Test strip for measuring analyte concentration over a broad range of sample volume
US6949221B2 (en) 1989-08-28 2005-09-27 Lifescan, Inc. Method of making a test strip for determining analyte concentration over a broad range of sample volumes
US20020106711A1 (en) * 1989-08-28 2002-08-08 Tuohy Deborah P. Test strip for measuring analyte concentration over a broad range of sample volume
US20020106710A1 (en) * 1989-08-28 2002-08-08 Tuohy Deborah P. Method of making a test strip for determining analyte concentration over a broad range of sample volumes
US20050136552A1 (en) * 1992-05-21 2005-06-23 Biosite, Inc. Diagnostic devices and apparatus for the controlled movement of reagents without membranes
US7824611B2 (en) 1992-05-21 2010-11-02 Biosite, Inc. Diagnostic devices and apparatus for the controlled movement of reagents without membranes
US7615191B2 (en) 1992-05-21 2009-11-10 Biosite, Inc. Diagnostic devices and apparatus for the controlled movement of reagents without membranes
US5843691A (en) * 1993-05-15 1998-12-01 Lifescan, Inc. Visually-readable reagent test strip
US8123929B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-02-28 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US7909984B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2011-03-22 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US7988845B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2011-08-02 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Integrated lancing and measurement device and analyte measuring methods
US7906009B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2011-03-15 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6143164A (en) 1997-02-06 2000-11-07 E. Heller & Company Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6120676A (en) 1997-02-06 2000-09-19 Therasense, Inc. Method of using a small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8142643B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-03-27 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US9234864B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2016-01-12 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6551494B1 (en) 1997-02-06 2003-04-22 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6576101B1 (en) 1997-02-06 2003-06-10 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8114270B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-02-14 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8114271B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-02-14 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8118992B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-02-21 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8142642B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-03-27 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8105476B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2012-01-31 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Integrated lancing and measurement device
US8808531B2 (en) 1997-02-06 2014-08-19 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US9316590B2 (en) 1997-02-28 2016-04-19 Cepheid Apparatus for controlling and monitoring reactions
EP1520621A3 (en) * 1997-07-21 2006-06-07 Ysi Incorporated Microfluidic analyzer module
US6073482A (en) * 1997-07-21 2000-06-13 Ysi Incorporated Fluid flow module
US5932799A (en) * 1997-07-21 1999-08-03 Ysi Incorporated Microfluidic analyzer module
WO1999003584A1 (en) * 1997-07-21 1999-01-28 Ysi Incorporated Microfluidic analyzer module
EP1520621A2 (en) * 1997-07-21 2005-04-06 Ysi Incorporated Microfluidic analyzer module
US6293012B1 (en) 1997-07-21 2001-09-25 Ysi Incorporated Method of making a fluid flow module
US6082185A (en) * 1997-07-25 2000-07-04 Research International, Inc. Disposable fluidic circuit cards
US20030221771A1 (en) * 1998-03-02 2003-12-04 Cepheid Method for fabricating a reaction vessel
US8293064B2 (en) * 1998-03-02 2012-10-23 Cepheid Method for fabricating a reaction vessel
US7491552B2 (en) * 1998-07-16 2009-02-17 The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System Fluid based analysis of multiple analytes by a sensor array
US6251260B1 (en) 1998-08-24 2001-06-26 Therasense, Inc. Potentiometric sensors for analytic determination
US8425743B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2013-04-23 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8449758B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2013-05-28 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8268144B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-09-18 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8262996B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-09-11 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro sensor and methods of making
US8226815B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-07-24 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro sensor and methods of making
US8221685B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-07-17 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro sensor and methods of making
US8650751B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2014-02-18 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Methods of making small volume in vitro analyte sensors
US8211363B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-07-03 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8192611B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-06-05 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8272125B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-09-25 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Method of manufacturing in vitro analyte sensors
US8187895B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-05-29 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8186044B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-05-29 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Method of manufacturing small volume in vitro analyte sensors
US8182670B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-05-22 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US6618934B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2003-09-16 Therasense, Inc. Method of manufacturing small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8182671B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-05-22 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8701282B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2014-04-22 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Method for manufacturing a biosensor
US8163164B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-04-24 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8153063B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-04-10 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8728297B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2014-05-20 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6592745B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2003-07-15 Therasense, Inc. Method of using a small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US8083924B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2011-12-27 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8118993B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-02-21 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US9234863B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2016-01-12 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US9291592B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2016-03-22 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8372261B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2013-02-12 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US9316609B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2016-04-19 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6461496B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2002-10-08 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US8091220B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-01-10 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Methods of making small volume in vitro analyte sensors
US8087162B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-01-03 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Methods of making small volume in vitro analyte sensors
US6338790B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2002-01-15 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US8083929B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2011-12-27 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro sensor and methods of making
US8083928B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2011-12-27 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US6299757B1 (en) 1998-10-08 2001-10-09 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US8377378B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2013-02-19 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US9341591B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2016-05-17 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US8425758B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2013-04-23 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US8273241B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-09-25 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US20100015326A1 (en) * 1998-10-08 2010-01-21 Feldman Benjamin J Small Volume In Vitro Sensor and Methods of Making
US8268163B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2012-09-18 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods of making
US9891185B2 (en) 1998-10-08 2018-02-13 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor
US6654625B1 (en) 1999-06-18 2003-11-25 Therasense, Inc. Mass transport limited in vivo analyte sensor
US20050148091A1 (en) * 1999-08-11 2005-07-07 Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha Analyzing cartridge and liquid feed control device
US7625760B2 (en) 1999-08-11 2009-12-01 Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha Analyzing cartridge and liquid feed control device
WO2001024931A1 (en) * 1999-10-05 2001-04-12 Roche Diagnostic Gmbh Capillary device for separating undesired components from a liquid sample and related method
US6696240B1 (en) 1999-10-26 2004-02-24 Micronix, Inc. Capillary test strip to separate particulates
US8066858B2 (en) 1999-11-04 2011-11-29 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Analyte sensor with insertion monitor, and methods
US6749740B2 (en) 1999-11-04 2004-06-15 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods
US6616819B1 (en) 1999-11-04 2003-09-09 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor and methods
US7485454B1 (en) 2000-03-10 2009-02-03 Bioprocessors Corp. Microreactor
US9662057B2 (en) 2000-06-27 2017-05-30 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Integrated sample acquisition and analyte measurement method
US8795176B2 (en) 2000-06-27 2014-08-05 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Integrated sample acquisition and analyte measurement device
US9017259B2 (en) 2000-06-27 2015-04-28 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Integrated sample acquisition and analyte measurement device
US9271669B2 (en) 2000-06-27 2016-03-01 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Method for integrated sample acquisition and analyte measurement device
US6591125B1 (en) 2000-06-27 2003-07-08 Therasense, Inc. Small volume in vitro analyte sensor with diffusible or non-leachable redox mediator
US8532731B2 (en) 2000-06-27 2013-09-10 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Methods of determining analyte concentration
US20050100270A1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2005-05-12 Nanostream, Inc. Optical devices with fluidic systems
US7027683B2 (en) 2000-08-15 2006-04-11 Nanostream, Inc. Optical devices with fluidic systems
US20030162235A1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2003-08-28 Yuko Seino Reaction detecting method, immune reaction detecting method and apparatus therefor
US20030064507A1 (en) * 2001-07-26 2003-04-03 Sean Gallagher System and methods for mixing within a microfluidic device
US20030106799A1 (en) * 2001-12-06 2003-06-12 Nanostream, Inc Adhesiveless microfluidic device fabrication
WO2003050035A3 (en) * 2001-12-06 2004-02-19 Nanostream Inc Adhesiveless microfluidic device fabrication
WO2003050035A2 (en) * 2001-12-06 2003-06-19 Nanostream, Inc. Adhesiveless microfluidic device fabrication
US6848462B2 (en) 2001-12-06 2005-02-01 Nanostream, Inc. Adhesiveless microfluidic device fabrication
US6814859B2 (en) 2002-02-13 2004-11-09 Nanostream, Inc. Frit material and bonding method for microfluidic separation devices
US20030150806A1 (en) * 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 Nanostream, Inc. Separation column devices and fabrication methods
US7261812B1 (en) 2002-02-13 2007-08-28 Nanostream, Inc. Multi-column separation devices and methods
US7153421B2 (en) 2002-02-13 2006-12-26 Nanostream, Inc. Frit material and bonding method for microfluidic separation devices
US20030150792A1 (en) * 2002-02-13 2003-08-14 Nanostream, Inc. Frit material and bonding method for microfluidic separation devices
US6923907B2 (en) 2002-02-13 2005-08-02 Nanostream, Inc. Separation column devices and fabrication methods
US20050006293A1 (en) * 2002-02-13 2005-01-13 Nanostream, Inc. Frit material and bonding method for microfluidic separation devices
US7459127B2 (en) 2002-02-26 2008-12-02 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Method and apparatus for precise transfer and manipulation of fluids by centrifugal and/or capillary forces
US8337775B2 (en) 2002-02-26 2012-12-25 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Inc. Apparatus for precise transfer and manipulation of fluids by centrifugal and or capillary forces
EP1548447A1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2005-06-29 ARKRAY, Inc. Method of producing analytical tool
EP1548447A4 (en) * 2002-09-26 2010-11-03 Arkray Inc Method of producing analytical tool
EP1419818A1 (en) * 2002-11-14 2004-05-19 Steag MicroParts GmbH Device for sequential transport of liquids by capillary forces
US20040096358A1 (en) * 2002-11-14 2004-05-20 Gert Blankenstein Device for the stepwise transport of liquid utilizing capillary forces
US7316802B2 (en) 2002-11-14 2008-01-08 Boehringer Ingelheim Microparts Gmbh Device for the stepwise transport of liquid utilizing capillary forces
US7125711B2 (en) 2002-12-19 2006-10-24 Bayer Healthcare Llc Method and apparatus for splitting of specimens into multiple channels of a microfluidic device
US7094354B2 (en) 2002-12-19 2006-08-22 Bayer Healthcare Llc Method and apparatus for separation of particles in a microfluidic device
US8318109B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2012-11-27 Micronics, Inc. Microfluidic devices for fluid manipulation and analysis
US8557198B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2013-10-15 Micronics, Inc. Microfluidic devices for fluid manipulation and analysis
US8697009B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2014-04-15 Micronics, Inc. Microfluidic devices for fluid manipulation and analysis
US20100173395A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2010-07-08 Micronics, Inc. Microfluidic devices for fluid manipulation and analysis
US8628730B2 (en) * 2003-02-28 2014-01-14 Applied Biosystems, Llc Sample substrate having a divided sample chamber and method of loading thereof
US20080267829A1 (en) * 2003-02-28 2008-10-30 Applera Corporation Sample Substrate Having a Divided Sample Chamber and Method of Loading Thereof
US20140096625A1 (en) * 2003-02-28 2014-04-10 Applied Biosystems, Llc Sample Substrate Having a Divided Sample Chamber and Method of Loading Thereof
US20040179972A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Nanostream, Inc. Systems and methods for detecting manufacturing defects in microfluidic devices
US7178386B1 (en) 2003-04-10 2007-02-20 Nanostream, Inc. Parallel fluid processing systems and methods
US20040226884A1 (en) * 2003-05-08 2004-11-18 Nanostream, Inc. Sample preparation for parallel chromatography
US7074327B2 (en) 2003-05-08 2006-07-11 Nanostream, Inc. Sample preparation for parallel chromatography
US7435381B2 (en) 2003-05-29 2008-10-14 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Packaging of microfluidic devices
US20070280859A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2007-12-06 Horacio Kido Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US7390464B2 (en) 2003-06-19 2008-06-24 Burstein Technologies, Inc. Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US20050084422A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2005-04-21 Horacio Kido Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US20050047968A1 (en) * 2003-06-19 2005-03-03 Horacio Kido Fluidic circuits for sample preparation including bio-discs and methods relating thereto
US20100172801A1 (en) * 2003-06-27 2010-07-08 Pugia Michael J Method for uniform application of fluid into a reactive reagent area
US20050032238A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-10 Nanostream, Inc. Vented microfluidic separation devices and methods
US7347617B2 (en) 2003-08-19 2008-03-25 Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. Mixing in microfluidic devices
US7550288B2 (en) * 2003-09-30 2009-06-23 Fujifilm Corporation Reaction method with use of biochemical analysis unit
US20050070029A1 (en) * 2003-09-30 2005-03-31 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Reaction method with use of biochemical analysis unit
US9116148B2 (en) 2004-01-26 2015-08-25 President And Fellows Of Harvard College Fluid delivery system and method
US20080038839A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2008-02-14 Vincent Linder Fluid Delivery System And Method
US8030057B2 (en) 2004-01-26 2011-10-04 President And Fellows Of Harvard College Fluid delivery system and method
US8389272B2 (en) 2004-01-26 2013-03-05 President And Fellows Of Harvard College Fluid delivery system and method
US8101431B2 (en) 2004-02-27 2012-01-24 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Integration of fluids and reagents into self-contained cartridges containing sensor elements and reagent delivery systems
US20050284213A1 (en) * 2004-06-29 2005-12-29 Nanostream, Inc. Sealing interface for microfluidic device
US7028536B2 (en) 2004-06-29 2006-04-18 Nanostream, Inc. Sealing interface for microfluidic device
US8377398B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2013-02-19 The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System Methods and compositions related to determination and use of white blood cell counts
US20060275852A1 (en) * 2005-06-06 2006-12-07 Montagu Jean I Assays based on liquid flow over arrays
US8986983B2 (en) 2005-06-06 2015-03-24 Courtagen Life Sciences, Inc. Assays based on liquid flow over arrays
WO2006132666A1 (en) * 2005-06-06 2006-12-14 Decision Biomarkers, Inc. Assays based on liquid flow over arrays
CN101262948B (en) 2005-06-06 2011-07-06 决策生物标志股份有限公司 Assays based on liquid flow over arrays
US20070092975A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 General Electric Company Methods and systems for delivery of fluidic samples to sensor arrays
US8133741B2 (en) 2005-10-26 2012-03-13 General Electric Company Methods and systems for delivery of fluidic samples to sensor arrays
US8420025B2 (en) 2005-10-26 2013-04-16 General Electric Company Methods and systems for delivery of fluidic samples to sensor arrays
US20070092407A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 General Electric Company Optical sensor array system and method for parallel processing of chemical and biochemical information
US8105552B2 (en) 2005-10-26 2012-01-31 General Electric Company Optical sensor array system for parallel processing of chemical and biochemical information
US20100178208A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2010-07-15 General Electric Company Optical sensor array system for parallel processing of chemical and biochemical information
US7723120B2 (en) 2005-10-26 2010-05-25 General Electric Company Optical sensor array system and method for parallel processing of chemical and biochemical information
US8475737B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2013-07-02 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US8409527B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2013-04-02 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US8202492B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2012-06-19 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US9075047B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2015-07-07 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US20080273918A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US9234888B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2016-01-12 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US8802445B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2014-08-12 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic connectors and microfluidic systems
US20080280373A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2008-11-13 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for measuring pH of low alkalinity solutions
US7883898B2 (en) 2007-05-07 2011-02-08 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for measuring pH of low alkalinity solutions
US8076153B2 (en) 2007-05-07 2011-12-13 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for measuring pH of low alkalinity solutions
US20110091985A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2011-04-21 General Electric Company METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MEASURING pH OF LOW ALKALINITY SOLUTIONS
US8148166B2 (en) 2007-05-07 2012-04-03 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for measuring pH of low alkalinity solutions
US20110217213A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2011-09-08 General Electric Company METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MEASURING pH OF LOW ALKALINITY SOLUTIONS
US8001855B2 (en) * 2008-01-14 2011-08-23 Medi Medical Engineering Corp. Fluid transferring apparatus
US20090178497A1 (en) * 2008-01-14 2009-07-16 Medi Medical Engineering Corp. Fluid transferring apparatus
US8986253B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2015-03-24 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Two chamber pumps and related methods
US9849455B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2017-12-26 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Flow control in microfluidic systems
US8222049B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2012-07-17 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Flow control in microfluidic systems
US9592505B2 (en) 2008-04-25 2017-03-14 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Flow control in microfluidic systems
US20090266421A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Flow control in microfluidic systems
US20100028207A1 (en) * 2008-07-16 2010-02-04 International Technidyne Corporation Cuvette-based apparatus for blood coagulation measurement and testing
US8448824B2 (en) 2008-09-16 2013-05-28 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Slideable flow metering devices and related methods
US8408421B2 (en) 2008-09-16 2013-04-02 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Flow regulating stopcocks and related methods
US8650937B2 (en) 2008-09-19 2014-02-18 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Solute concentration measurement device and related methods
US9878324B2 (en) 2008-12-18 2018-01-30 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Reagent storage in microfluidic systems and related articles and methods
US9561506B2 (en) 2008-12-18 2017-02-07 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Reagent storage in microfluidic systems and related articles and methods
US8591829B2 (en) 2008-12-18 2013-11-26 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Reagent storage in microfluidic systems and related articles and methods
US9827563B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2017-11-28 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic systems and methods for analyses
US9770715B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2017-09-26 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Structures for controlling light interaction with microfluidic devices
US8480975B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2013-07-09 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Structures for controlling light interaction with microfluidic devices
US8802029B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2014-08-12 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Structures for controlling light interaction with microfluidic devices
US9827564B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2017-11-28 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluidic systems and methods for analyses
US8221700B2 (en) 2009-02-02 2012-07-17 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Structures for controlling light interaction with microfluidic devices
US9668684B2 (en) 2009-02-26 2017-06-06 Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. Self-powered analyte sensor
US20110076697A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2011-03-31 Innovative Laboratory Technologies, Inc. Lateral-flow immuno-chromatographic assay devices
US9649631B2 (en) 2009-06-04 2017-05-16 Leidos Innovations Technology, Inc. Multiple-sample microfluidic chip for DNA analysis
US9067207B2 (en) 2009-06-04 2015-06-30 University Of Virginia Patent Foundation Optical approach for microfluidic DNA electrophoresis detection
US9656261B2 (en) 2009-06-04 2017-05-23 Leidos Innovations Technology, Inc. DNA analyzer
US8926561B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2015-01-06 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US8287495B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2012-10-16 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US9211377B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2015-12-15 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US8298184B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2012-10-30 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US8758323B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2014-06-24 Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. Infusion pump system with disposable cartridge having pressure venting and pressure feedback
US9731291B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2017-08-15 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US8915259B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2014-12-23 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US9075051B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2015-07-07 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US9555408B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2017-01-31 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US9861980B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2018-01-09 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US8567425B2 (en) 2009-11-24 2013-10-29 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Fluid mixing and delivery in microfluidic systems
US20110243813A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Jackinsky Steve W Diagnostic card with micro-fluidic channels and method of construction thereof
US8765062B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2014-07-01 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Systems and devices for analysis of samples
US8580569B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2013-11-12 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Feedback control in microfluidic systems
US9116124B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2015-08-25 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Feedback control in microfluidic systems
US8932523B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2015-01-13 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Systems and devices for analysis of samples
US9643182B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2017-05-09 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Systems and devices for analysis of samples
US9682376B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2017-06-20 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Systems and devices for analysis of samples
USD645971S1 (en) 2010-05-11 2011-09-27 Claros Diagnostics, Inc. Sample cassette
US9182353B2 (en) 2010-07-22 2015-11-10 Hach Company Lab-on-a-chip for alkalinity analysis
US8961764B2 (en) 2010-10-15 2015-02-24 Lockheed Martin Corporation Micro fluidic optic design
US9322054B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2016-04-26 Lockheed Martin Corporation Microfluidic cartridge
US9180449B2 (en) 2012-06-12 2015-11-10 Hach Company Mobile water analysis
USD768872S1 (en) 2012-12-12 2016-10-11 Hach Company Cuvette for a water analysis instrument
US9255866B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2016-02-09 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Mixing of fluids in fluidic systems
US9588027B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-03-07 UPKO Diagnostics, LLC Mixing of fluids in fluidic systems
USD804682S1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-12-05 Opko Diagnostics, Llc Multi-layered sample cassette

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JPH09507572A (en) 1997-07-29 application
EP0737105A1 (en) 1996-10-16 application
CA2178505A1 (en) 1995-07-06 application
WO1995017966A1 (en) 1995-07-06 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4704255A (en) Assay cartridge
US6124138A (en) Method for multiple analyte detection
US4994238A (en) Constant volume chemical analysis test device
US5023052A (en) Element for analyzing body fluids
US5082626A (en) Wedge shaped test strip system useful in analyzing test samples, such as whole blood
US4918025A (en) Self contained immunoassay element
US5110727A (en) Method for performing coagulation assays accurately, rapidly and simply, using dry chemical reagents and paramagnetic particles
US5426030A (en) Apparatus for determination of HDL cholesterol
US4637978A (en) Assay for analysis of whole blood
US4654197A (en) Cuvette for sampling and analysis
US5520787A (en) Diagnostic flow cell device
US6001307A (en) Device for analyzing a sample
US6136272A (en) Device for rapidly joining and splitting fluid layers
US5601991A (en) Dry chemistry cascade immunoassay and affinity assay
US5681529A (en) Biological fluid analyzing device
US6592815B1 (en) Analytical test element with a narrowed capillary channel
US6541213B1 (en) Microscale diffusion immunoassay
US6551841B1 (en) Device and method for the detection of an analyte utilizing mesoscale flow systems
US7723099B2 (en) Immunoassay device with immuno-reference electrode
US4797259A (en) Well-type diagnostic plate device
US6468807B1 (en) Mixing method
US5460777A (en) Analytical element for whole blood analysis
US20040115831A1 (en) Diagnostic devices for use in the assaying of biological fluids
US5208163A (en) Self-metering fluid analysis device
US5147606A (en) Self-metering fluid analysis device

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ABBOTT LABORATORIES, ILLINOIS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:OOSTA, GARY M.;SCHAPIRA, THOMAS G.;REEL/FRAME:006982/0727

Effective date: 19940418

CC Certificate of correction
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
FP Expired due to failure to pay maintenance fee

Effective date: 20031226