New! View global litigation for patent families

US545149A - Electromagnetic tool - Google Patents

Electromagnetic tool Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US545149A
US545149A US545149DA US545149A US 545149 A US545149 A US 545149A US 545149D A US545149D A US 545149DA US 545149 A US545149 A US 545149A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
cylinder
tool
current
iron
end
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K33/00Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system
    • H02K33/02Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system with armatures moved one way by energisation of a single coil system and returned by mechanical force, e.g. by springs
    • H02K33/04Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system with armatures moved one way by energisation of a single coil system and returned by mechanical force, e.g. by springs wherein the frequency of operation is determined by the frequency of uninterrupted AC energisation

Description

(No Model.)

0.15'. CARPENTER. ELEGTROMAGNETIG TOOL.

N0.`545,149; Patented Aug. 27,1895

sill

fzvenw" UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CHARLES F. CARPENTER, 0F LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY.

ELECTROMAGN ETIC TOOL,

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 545,149, dated 'August 27, 1895.

Applicationfiled August 20, 1894. Serial No. 520,851. (No model.)

To all whom it may conce-rn: I

Be it known that I, CHARLES F. CARPENTER, acitizen ot the United States, residing at Louisville, in the county of Jefferson and State of Kentucky, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Electromagnetic Tools; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description ofthe invention, which will enable others skilledin the art to which it appertains to use the same.Y

The figure ofthe drawing isa longitudinal section. I c

-This invention has relation to electromagnetic tools or machines having a reciprocating motion for eecting rapid 'intermittent `blows or strokes when inlluenced by an electric current, and is designed chiefly for cutting stone and other hard substances.

In the accompanyingdrawing, the letter A designates a cylinder or casing of soft iron, having a rim P projecting inwardly and supporting an iron bottom plate D, to which is connected an inner hollow or bored cylinder or core B of soft iron, which is surrounded by part of the coil or helixv C of insulated wire, (the size of the Wire is according to the voltage of the electric current that is to pass through it-a one-hundred-and-ten-volt current and a No. 28 wire work Well together,) forming an electromagnet.

The cylinderB lhas a male screw on its lower end for the attachment of a tubular guide J.

B represents another cylinder of soft iron inside of cylinder A, surrounded by part of the coil or helix C, forming another electromagnet.

F is a central rodhammer of no magnetic power, preferably of aluminum bronze, which moves with a reciprocating.;r or to-and-fro motion through the cylinder or electromagnet B. Its lower end operates on the end of the anvilpiece or bit-carrier K. The other endI ot the said central rod-hammer plays to and fro in a hole in the bearing E, which aids vin keeping the said hammer-rod in proper position, so that the cylindrical armature or electromagnet B', which is attached to the rod-harn mer, can play to and fro within the coil or helix C.

I is a balancing or equipoising spring, and I is also a balancing or equipoising spring.

I is a. retractingspring between thelower interior shoulder d of the tubular guide J and the collarlc of the anvil-piece or bit-carrier K.

Attached to the cylinder B by a screw is the brass tubular guide J, within which is carried the anvil-piece or' bit-carrier K, having upon it a guide-collar lc. This anvil-pieceis preferably of a cylindrical form, as is also the hammer-rod, and theseN parts are in axial relation to the Velectromagnets or cylinders B and B. n p

- G is a spoolot non-magnetic material arranged inside of the cylinder A, and around the cylinders B and B on this spool-is Wound the coil or. helix C, the ends of the wire coming out vat c c. y

Mis a brass yoke-piece, to which is ,attached the bearing E, supporting the end of the hammer-rod F.

ll is a brass cap screwing into the end ot the casing A, securing all the internal parts in proper position, and. allowing the passage out of the Wires c c. By unscrewing and removing this cap all the interior construction will drop out.

b is a very thin disk Ofaluminuxn bronze or brass which, when the .tool is in operation, rests on the top of the cylinder B, and prevents the cylindersB and B from comingin actual contact.

When an electric current passes through the wire c c' and helix C, the cylinders B and B becomepowerful magnets and are attracted toward each other. rl`he.t'orce of the downward motion or blow is expended on the anvilpiece or bit-carrier K, causing the same to move forward sharply iu its guide in an ef fective manner for working its bit or chisel in cutting stone. When the electric current is interrupted the cylinderB is separated from cylinder B by the force of the spring I', and is then in position for another blow. The tool is therefore operated by an interrupted current of electricity. The outer casing being made of iron, the cylinders B and B', surrounded by the same helix Gand cylinder B, connected by the iron plate or yoke-piece D to the outer casing A, allows the magnetic current or lines ofl force to pass freely to nearly complete its circuit at the upper end ot' the tool, being, as it were, iron-clad nearly. The result is a magnetic held of ICO greater intensity between the cylinders il and B', consequently greater power in the tool.

In tools or machines of this character it has previously been found impossible to get over 5 about twelve hundred blows per minute, and then they will not satisfactorily eut granite, although the tool might malte powerful strokes. The character, number, and veloeity of the blows were not suited for that work, and when the number of breaks in the current exceeded about twelve hundred per minute the tool ceased to work. lily using the balancing,r or equipoising springs I I', I have increased the rapidity of the blows to over tbe almost incredible number of two thousand per minute, and at the saine time they have the peculiar impact blow required in working granite.

The two balancing or equipoising springs I I may be made of the same piece oi' wire. 'lhc spring I should belong enough and strongenough to move the cylinder Il until it is aimost in cont'aot with the cylinder Il, when the toeiis in ahorizontal position. The springl z5 should be long.,T enough and strong enough to force back the cylinder ll against the pressu re ot tbe sprint,Y I the propel' distance from the cylinder ll, which distance varies aeeord ing to the electrcnnotive force of the current, used. ily thus balancing or equipoising the cylinder Il between two elastic forces I have obtained much greater rapidityin action and el'lieieney in eleetronn'ignetie tools.

I am aware that various devices called buffers have been used to arrest the upper end of the hammer-rod l nearly at the end ot' thc slight blow upward from the foi-ee of a spring that separated an armature from a magnet. The action ot' these bul'i'ers is very limited, and that, too, at nearly the end ot the upward stroke, so as to take the shot-lt' oli' tht` tool.

llaving fully described my in\ ent'ion, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters latent, is-

l. In an eleetroanagnetie tool the combina tion of a fixed electro-magnet baring.; itsl ex tension on the outer side ot the motor coil, a solenoid or motor coil, an eleeti'o-nnienet with axial hammer rod baring a reciprooatiirny mi u tion therein, and counterbalanciner or eqilipoising springs, substantially as described.

3. In an electro-magnetic tool, the roznbination of a helix, an iron exterior easing, an iron yoke piece, a Iixod electroflnatxnet, and an electro-magnet held in balant'i, or equipoised, between two elastic foret-s, substantially as described.

tliltlililln i". \\'itnesses:

. .lons llonnn'rs,

Winery Fifnpoxo.

US545149A Electromagnetic tool Expired - Lifetime US545149A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US545149A true US545149A (en) 1895-08-27

Family

ID=2613894

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US545149A Expired - Lifetime US545149A (en) Electromagnetic tool

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US545149A (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2427898A (en) * 1945-11-19 1947-09-23 Oak Mfg Co Vibrator
US2480451A (en) * 1945-05-18 1949-08-30 Burgess Battery Co Tool
US2825534A (en) * 1954-09-20 1958-03-04 Phillips Petroleum Co Apparatus for drilling wells
US3343611A (en) * 1965-02-23 1967-09-26 Jr Grover Stephen Jones Electromagnetic hammer drill
US3436121A (en) * 1967-05-02 1969-04-01 Wesley B Cunningham Electrically actuated demolition device
US3468384A (en) * 1968-02-05 1969-09-23 Albert G Bodine Sonic hand cutting tool utilizing sonic rectification in conjunction with double acting spring biasing
US3485307A (en) * 1968-02-13 1969-12-23 Black & Decker Mfg Co Portable sonic hand tool with means for reducing the effects of operator bias upon transducer output and efficiency
US4370906A (en) * 1980-05-05 1983-02-01 Resonant Technology Company Sequenced fastener installation system
US20050132652A1 (en) * 2003-12-23 2005-06-23 Haibo Tong Unlock mechanism for a rotary door operator

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2480451A (en) * 1945-05-18 1949-08-30 Burgess Battery Co Tool
US2427898A (en) * 1945-11-19 1947-09-23 Oak Mfg Co Vibrator
US2825534A (en) * 1954-09-20 1958-03-04 Phillips Petroleum Co Apparatus for drilling wells
US3343611A (en) * 1965-02-23 1967-09-26 Jr Grover Stephen Jones Electromagnetic hammer drill
US3436121A (en) * 1967-05-02 1969-04-01 Wesley B Cunningham Electrically actuated demolition device
US3468384A (en) * 1968-02-05 1969-09-23 Albert G Bodine Sonic hand cutting tool utilizing sonic rectification in conjunction with double acting spring biasing
US3485307A (en) * 1968-02-13 1969-12-23 Black & Decker Mfg Co Portable sonic hand tool with means for reducing the effects of operator bias upon transducer output and efficiency
US4370906A (en) * 1980-05-05 1983-02-01 Resonant Technology Company Sequenced fastener installation system
US20050132652A1 (en) * 2003-12-23 2005-06-23 Haibo Tong Unlock mechanism for a rotary door operator

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3434026A (en) Electrically operated reciprocating tool
US3312841A (en) Electromagnetic vibrator
US2919324A (en) Magnetic shuttle device
US2239312A (en) Electromagnetic apparatus
US3040217A (en) Electromagnetic actuator
US3484629A (en) Reciprocating motor structure
US5300908A (en) High speed solenoid
US2671483A (en) Magnetic hammer
US1822242A (en) Pump for liquids
US3419739A (en) Electromechanical actuator
US5269213A (en) Punch apparatus
US6520269B2 (en) Hand-held tool with electromagnetic hammer mechanism
US4090816A (en) Electromagnetic fluid operating apparatus
US1403689A (en) Magneto
JPH06315255A (en) Moving-magnet actuator
US1966446A (en) Impact tool
US2490302A (en) Means for removing embedded material
US946215A (en) Electromagnetic device.
US2628319A (en) Electric hammer
US3878412A (en) Magneto-motive reciprocating device
US2561355A (en) Electric signal device
US2091680A (en) Jar
US1226748A (en) Solenoid.
US2881367A (en) Articulated armature means
US3755700A (en) Electromagnetic drive