Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US5243982A
US5243982A US07732401 US73240191A US5243982A US 5243982 A US5243982 A US 5243982A US 07732401 US07732401 US 07732401 US 73240191 A US73240191 A US 73240191A US 5243982 A US5243982 A US 5243982A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
unit
device
capillary
ampoules
metering
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US07732401
Inventor
Anton Mostl
Michael Mayer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AVL Medical Instruments AG
Original Assignee
AVL Medical Instruments AG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/145Measuring characteristics of blood in vivo, e.g. gas concentration, pH value; Measuring characteristics of body fluids or tissues, e.g. interstitial fluid, cerebral tissue
    • A61B5/14532Measuring characteristics of blood in vivo, e.g. gas concentration, pH value; Measuring characteristics of body fluids or tissues, e.g. interstitial fluid, cerebral tissue for measuring glucose, e.g. by tissue impedance measurement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/172Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic
    • A61M5/1723Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic using feedback of body parameters, e.g. blood-sugar, pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/172Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic
    • A61M5/1723Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic using feedback of body parameters, e.g. blood-sugar, pressure
    • A61M2005/1726Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body electrical or electronic using feedback of body parameters, e.g. blood-sugar, pressure the body parameters being measured at, or proximate to, the infusion site
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S128/00Surgery
    • Y10S128/12Pressure infusion

Abstract

A device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue includes a subcutaneous needle for insertion into the tissue and a pumping and suction unit which is controlled by a microprocessor and is used for delivering a perfusion fluid and draining it after its partial equilibration with the tissue. The device further includes a sensing unit connected to the microprocessor for determining the concentration of the substance to be analyzed and one or more marker variables. The perfusion fluid, a calibrating solution and at least one drug are provided in replaceable metering ampoules sealed with membranes, whose metering plungers can be actuated by a drive unit controlled by the microprocessor. The metering ampoules communicate with a master capillary leading from the pumping and suction unit to the subcutaneous needle; communication is established via capillary tubes piercing the membranes.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue, including a hypodermic needle for insertion into the tissue, a pumping and suction unit provided in a housing, which unit is controlled by a microprocessor and is used for delivering a perfusion fluid and draining it after its partial equilibration with the tissue, and further including a sensing unit connected to the microprocessor for determining the concentration of the substance to be analyzed and one or more marker variables, as well as containers for the perfusion fluid, for a calibrating solution and at least one drug.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

In medical applications it is often necessary to analyze the composition of body fluids repeatedly or continuously so as to be able to detect and remove disturbances of the homeostasis. The need for frequent blood sampling has been eliminated by the development of devices delivering a steady flow of information on the patient.

In WO 88/05643, for instance, a pen-shaped device referred to as "glucose-pen" is described, which has a hypodermic needle at its end for insertion into the tissue. The pen-shaped housing contains a plunger pump with a reservoir for the perfusion fluid, whose plunger may be used both for pumping the perfusion fluid out of the reservoir and delivering it into the collecting vessel opening up behind the plunger. The perfusion fluid is delivered to openings in the wall of the hypodermic needle through a first channel in this needle, thus coming into contact with the tissue, and is taken to the collecting vessel through a second channel, which may be concentric with the first, by means of the prevailing suction. As close to the hypodermic needle as possible an anlyzing unit is installed adjacent to the drainage tube for the perfusion fluid, carrying a measuring capillary for the substance to be analyzed and for a marker variable. Relevant marker variables are the conductivity or ionic concentration of the perfusion fluid, for example, the measured values permitting the degree of interaction between perfusion fluid and tissue to be calculated and the actual concentration of the substance of interest (e.g., glucose) to be subsequently determined, even in the instance of only partial equilibration of the perfusion fluid with the tissue.

The use of a device of the above kind as published in EP-A 0 367 752, an enhanced variant of the subject of WO 88/05643, will eliminate the need for multi-channel hypodermic needles, whose manufacture is complicated. This device is based on the use of a single-channel needle whose channel is directly connected with the analyzing unit or the sensing unit. The analyzing unit is connected with a plunger pump which may be used for reversing the direction of flow of the perfusion fluid in the channel of the hypodermic needle. By means of this very simple device a few microliters of the perfusate are pumped into the hypodermic needle after it has been inserted into the patient's body, the perfusion solution passing through the analyzing unit and enabling zero-point calibration. After partial equilibration of the perfusate with the tissue surrounding the hypodermic needle, the fluid is sucked out of the needle and again brought into contact with the sensors of the analyzing unit, the substance to be determined and the marker variable being measured and the actual concentration being calculated from the values obtained.

The only disadvantage of this perfectly functional device is that it may be awkward to handle or refill with the various fluids, such as calibrating solution, perfusion fluid, or the particular drug used.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the invention to develop and improve a device of the above type in such a way as to make it easy to handle even for medical or technical laymen, and to permit simple maintenance jobs, such as the refilling and replacing of spent materials to be carried out quickly.

In the invention this is achieved by providing the perfusion fluid, the calibrating solution and the drug in replaceable metering ampoules sealed by membranes, whose metering plungers are actuated by a drive unit controlled by the microprocessor, and by providing that the metering ampoules communicate with a master capillary leading from the pumping and suction unit to the hypodermic needle, communication being established via capillary tubes piercing the membranes. In this manner handling is simplified and the device is made less expensive, since conventional drug ampoules available on the market, such as insulin ampoules, may be directly used. The perfusion fluid and the calibrating solution may be filled into standard-size ampoules, eliminating the necessity of specially manufactured containers.

Although the devices disclosed in EP-A 0 293 958 and EP-A 0 362 484 are provided with insulin ampoules whose membranes are pierced by a needle unit upon use, these devices do not permit the delivery of a perfusion fluid into the patient's body, nor the collecting or measuring of this fluid.

In the invention the device is further simplified by providing the entrance points of the capillary tubes into the master capillary with check valves which will open at a defined level of excess pressure in the capillary tubes. In this way the multiway valve required for the device in EP-A 0 367 752, for example, is made superfluous, together with its drive element.

The check valve may comprise a piece of flexible tubing inserted into the master capillary, which is placed at the entrance point of the capillary tube, sealing the latter or opening it at an excess pressure level inside the capillary tube. Other types of non-energized, pressure-controlled valves could be used, of course, such as a spring-loaded ball pressed against a valve seat and opening upon the application of excess pressure.

It will be a special advantage if the device of the invention is configured as a four-part assembly comprising

(1) a housing containing the microprocessor and a communication unit attached thereto, the drive unit for the metering ampoules and the pumping and suction unit, a receiving position for one or more drug metering ampoules as well as the energy supply;

(2) a replaceable unit to be inserted into the housing, which unit holds the sensing unit, the master capillary together with its capillary branches and the metering ampoules for the perfusion fluid and the calibrating solution;

(3) one or more drug metering ampoules to be inserted into the receiving position of the housing, which may be connected to the specific capillary tubes in the replaceable unit provided for this purpose;

(4) a hypodermic needle to be attached to the replaceable unit.

To ensure simplicity of handling, the device of the invention thus consists of very few separate components, such as a housing, drug ampoules, a replaceable unit (to be called KIT in the following) and a needle. Apart from the housing, which contains the microprocessor, the communication unit, the drive mechanism and the pumping and suction unit of the device, all other components are consumable parts which may be easily replaced by the user. All the patient has to do is replace empty drug ampoules, or the KIT (in the instance of empty metering ampoules or faulty sensors) or a needle that is blunt or no longer sterile.

It is further provided by the invention that the pumping and suction unit be configured as a plunger pump which is located in the housing of the device together with its drive mechanism, the plunger chamber of the pump being connected with the master capillary in the replaceable unit by means of a coupling.

Like the device disclosed in EP-A 0 367 752, the device of this invention also benefits from separating the individual fluids of the system by means of an air bubble, for which purpose a valve for ventilation of the master capillary may be provided next to the pumping and suction unit, which valve is controlled by the microprocessor.

A particularly simple variant of the invention provides that the ventilation valve be furnished with a movable element which can be shifted between two extreme positions, preferably by means of an electromagnet, the pumping and suction unit being connected to the hypodermic needle in one extreme position, and to the ambient air in the other extreme position of this movable element.

For further reduction of mechanical and electrical connections between the housing and the replaceable unit, the proposal is put forward that the movable element of the ventilation valve and at least one electromagnet actuating this element be placed in the housing of the device.

It is provided in a particularly favorable variant of the invention that the pumping and suction unit be configured as a peristaltic pump to be put into the housing of the device together with its drive mechanism, one end of the tube of this pump being connected to the master capillary in the replaceable unit by means of a coupling, and the other end being connected to an opening into the ambient air, which is covered by a filter.

To enhance the modular design of the device, it is proposed that the drive unit include a microprocessor-controlled motor with gear for each metering ampoule as well as a driving rod actuating the metering plunger in the ampoule.

The device of the invention is particularly well suited for determining the concentration of glucose and for the automatic administration of insulin, if the sensing unit is provided with sensors for measuring glucose concentration and the conductivity of the perfusion fluid, and if metering ampoules are provided for regular insulin and/or NPH insulin.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will now be further described by way of example only with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which

FIG. 1 shows a partial section of a device of the invention,

FIGS. 2a, 2b and 3a, 3b show a detail of the invention in two operating states each,

FIG. 4 shows a detail of a variant of the invention of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The device presented in FIG. 1 is a glucose-insulin-pen; however, other uses are possible.

The device comprises a housing 1, a replaceable unit or KIT 2 to be inserted into the housing 1, drug ampoules 3, 3', and a hypodermic needle 4 to be attached to the replaceable unit.

The housing 1 contains a microprocessor 5, which is connected to a communication unit 6, via which the device is controlled by the patient using pushbuttons and an optical/acoustic display. The housing 1 further contains a drive unit 7 for the metering ampoules 3, 3' for the drug, and for the metering ampoules in the KIT to be described below, and for the pumping and suction unit configured as a plunger pump 8 in FIG. 1. In addition, the housing 1 has a receiving position 9 for the drug ampoules 3, 3' and the energy supply (such as simple or rechargeable batteries), not shown here.

The KIT 2 for insertion into the housing 1 is a compact plastic component with a master capillary 10 leading from the attachable hypodermic needle 4 to the pumping and suction device 8, which master capillary 10 receives the individual capillary tubes 11. The KIT 2 is provided with a metering ampoule 12 for the perfusion fluid simultaneously used as zero-point-solution (N solution) and a metering ampoule 13 for the calibrating solution (S solution).

The individual metering ampoules 3, 3', 12, 13 are sealed by membranes 14, which are punctured by the capillary tubes 11 upon insertion into the receiving position 9, or rather, the KIT 2, such that a connection to the master capillary 10 is established. The ampoules have metering plungers 15 which are actuated by the drive unit 7 controlled by the microprocessor 5.

At the points of entrance 16 of the capillary tubes 11 into the master capillary 10 are located the check valves 17 presented in detail in FIGS. 2a and 2b, which will open at a given level of excess pressure. Next to the plunger pump 8 the master capillary 10 is provided with a ventilation valve 18 controlled by the microprocessor. At the needle end of the KIT the master capillary 10 goes through the sensing unit 19 with its sensors for determining glucose concentration and conductivity. It would also be possible to put the sensing unit in some other place along the master capillary 10, e.g., in positions 19' indicated by a broken line. The electric connection between the sensor 19 and the housing 1 is established via a contact 30 when the KIT 2 is inserted into the housing 1. The contact 30 is electrically connected to the microprocessor 5 by a wire 31'.

As is shown in FIG. 1, the pumping and suction unit may be configured as a plunger pump 8, whose drive unit 20 is located in the housing 1 together with its plunger 21, and whose plunger chamber 22 communicating with the master capillary 10 is located in the replaceable unit 2.

For each metering ampoule 3, 3', 12, 13 the drive unit is provided with a motor with gear 7' and a driving rod 23 acting on the metering plunger 15, which may be part of the housing 1 or the respective metering ampoule.

FIGS. 2a and 2b show a variant of a check valve 17 provided with a piece of flexible tube 24 to be inserted into the master capillary 10, which tube is located at the entrance point 16 of the capillary tube 11. In the instance of excess pressure (FIG. 2b) the piece of tube is deformed and the capillary tube 11 is opened. Basically, any type of check valve would be suitable such as a ball and spring unit, for example.

It is an advantage as shown in a variant in two operating states 3a and 3b if both the ventilation valve 18 and the plunger pump 8 are located in the housing 1 of the device. The plunger chamber 22 of the plunger pump 8 is connected to the master capillary 10 in the replaceable unit 2 via a coupling 28. When the unit 2 is inserted into the housing 1 a gas- and liquid-tight connection is established.

The ventilation valve 18 has a slide element 25 which may be shifted between two extreme positions and which is moved by an electromagnet 26 in the housing 1 against the force of a spring 27, connecting the plunger pump 8 with the master capillary 10 leading to the hypodermic needle in one extreme position (FIG. 3a), and with the ambient air via the opening 29 in the other extreme position. Again, other known types of two-way valves may be used.

In a variant shown in FIG. 4 a peristaltic pump 8' is provided as a pumping and suction unit, which is placed in the housing 1 of the device together with its drive unit 20. One end of the tube 31 of the pump 8' is connected to the master capillary 10 in the replaceable unit 2 by means of the coupling 28; the other end leads to an opening 9 covered by a bacteriological filter 32, through which ambient air may be drawn. This variant does not require a controlled valve.

The device illustrated by FIG. 1 provides receiving positions for two insulin ampoules. Depending on the kind of therapy needed for diabetic patients of type I or type II the appropriate insulin ampoules may be inserted into these positions.

The usage period of the insulin ampoules is determined by the number of applications and the insulin doses. Normally, the insulin ampoules will be used up before the KIT 2 needs replacing. In the device of the invention the insulin ampoules are exchanged independently of any replacement of the KIT. If an ampoule is ready for replacement this is indicated by the communication unit 6 of the device, and the corresponding ampoules are automatically released for removal.

The patient is only required to remove the empty ampoules from the device and discard them, and to insert new ampoules and make the device ready for operation by pushing a button.

Besides, the patient must replace the old KIT by a new one from time to time, depending on the amount of calibrating solution or perfusion fluid used for each measurement and the dimensioning of the corresponding metering ampoules.

The device will indicate if the KIT needs replacing, releasing the empty KIT for removal at the same time. After the KIT has been replaced the device is switched back to operating mode by the pushing of a button.

The KIT and the hypodermic needle are delivered to the patient in sterile packaging. Insulin ampoules are delivered in standard packaging.

Claims (13)

We claim:
1. A device for determining a concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue, comprising
a subcutaneous needle which is insertable into said organic tissue,
a microprocessor and a sensing unit means which is connected to said microprocessor for determining the concentration of said substance to be determined and at least one endogenous or exogenous marker variable of a perfusion fluid,
a pumping and suction unit means for feeding said perfusion fluid into said subcutaneous needle and for draining said perfusion fluid after partial equilibration with said at least one substance, said pumping and suction unit means being controlled by said microprocessor,
replaceable metering ampoules sealed with membranes containing said perfusion fluid, a calibrating solution and at least one drug, and drive unit means for actuating metering plungers of said metering ampoules, said drive unit means controlled by said microprocessor, and wherein said metering ampoules communicate with a master capillary leading from said pumping and suction unit means to said subcutaneous needle, communication being established via capillary tubes piercing said membranes of said metering ampoules.
2. A device according to claim 1, wherein all entrance points of said capillary tubes into said master capillary are provided with check valves opening at a defined level of excess pressure inside said capillary tubes.
3. A device according to claim 2, wherein each of said check valves comprises a piece of flexible tubing inserted into said master capillary, each said piece being placed at said entrance point of said capillary tube.
4. A device according to claim 1, essentially configured as a four-part assembly comprising
a housing, as a first part, containing said microprocessor and a communication unit attached thereto, said drive unit means for actuating said metering plungers of said metering ampoules, said pumping and suction unit, means receiving positions for at least one drug metering ampoule, a replacement unit, and an energy supply,
a second part embracing said replacement unit insertable into said housing, said replacement unit holding said sensing unit means, said master capillary together with said capillary tubes and said metering ampoules containing said perfusion fluid and said calibrating solution,
a third part consisting of said at least one drug metering ampoule respectively insertable into one of said receiving positions of said housing, which is connectable to one of said capillary tubes in said replacement unit, and
a fourth part comprising said subcutaneous needle attachable to said replacement unit, said subcutaneous needle being connected with said master capillary.
5. A device according to claim 4, wherein said pumping and suction unit means is configured as a plunger pump located in said housing together with a drive mechanism of said plunger pump, a plunger chamber of said plunger pump being connected with said master capillary in said replacement unit by means of a coupling.
6. A device according to claim 5, wherein a valve means for ventilation of said master capillary is provided next to said pumping and suction unit means, said valve means being controlled by said microprocessor.
7. A device according to claim 6 wherein said ventilation valve means comprises a movable element which can be shifted between two extreme positions by means of an electromagnet, thus connecting said pumping and suction unit means to said subcutaneous needle through said master capillary in one extreme position, and to the ambient air in the other extreme position of said movable element.
8. A device according to claim 7, wherein said movable element of said ventilation valve means and at least one electromagnet actuating said movable element are placed in said housing.
9. A device according to claim 4, wherein said pumping and suction unit means is configured as a peristaltic pump located in said housing together with a drive mechanism of said peristaltic pump, one end of a tube or said peristaltic pump being connected to said master capillary in said replacement unit by means of a coupling, and the other end of said tube being connected to an opening to the ambient air, said opening being covered by a filter.
10. A device according to claim 4, wherein said drive unit means comprises a microprocessor-controlled motor with gear for each of said metering ampoules and driving rods actuating said metering plungers in said ampoules.
11. A device according to claim 4, for determining the concentration of glucose and for the automatic administration of insulin, wherein said sensing unit means is provided with sensor means of measuring glucose concentration and the conductivity of the perfusion fluid, and wherein metering ampoules are provided for regular insulin or NPH insulin.
12. A device according to claim 1, for determining the concentration of glucose and for the automatic administration of insulin, wherein said sensing unit means is provided with sensor means for measuring glucose concentration and the conductivity of the perfusion fluid, and wherein metering ampoules are provided for regular insulin or NPH insulin.
13. A device according to claim 1, wherein said drive unit means comprises a microprocessor-controlled motor with gear for each of said metering ampoules and driving rods actuating said metering plungers in said ampoules.
US07732401 1990-07-19 1991-07-18 Device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue Expired - Lifetime US5243982A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AT153090 1990-07-19
AT1530/90 1990-07-19

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US5243982A true US5243982A (en) 1993-09-14

Family

ID=3515530

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US07732401 Expired - Lifetime US5243982A (en) 1990-07-19 1991-07-18 Device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in organic tissue

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US5243982A (en)
DE (1) DE4123441A1 (en)

Cited By (62)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1997019633A1 (en) * 1995-11-27 1997-06-05 Hill-Rom, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus and method
WO1997036542A1 (en) * 1996-03-29 1997-10-09 Willis John P Improved point-of-care analyzer module
US5747666A (en) * 1997-03-26 1998-05-05 Willis; John P. Point-of-care analyzer module
WO1999017114A1 (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-04-08 Pepex Biomedical, Llc System and method for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US5916197A (en) * 1997-02-14 1999-06-29 Medrad, Inc. Injection system, pump system for use therein and method of use of pumping system
US6014577A (en) * 1995-12-19 2000-01-11 Abbot Laboratories Device for the detection of analyte and administration of a therapeutic substance
US6415642B1 (en) * 1999-12-14 2002-07-09 Hans Rudolph, Inc. DLco calibration syringe apparatus
US20020123676A1 (en) * 1999-09-08 2002-09-05 Ulrich Haueter Measuring device for body fluids and infusion set and dialysis probe comprising such a measuring device one
US6464849B1 (en) 1999-10-07 2002-10-15 Pepex Biomedical, L.L.C. Sensor for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US6468247B1 (en) * 2000-04-21 2002-10-22 Mark Zamoyski Perfusion device for localized drug delivery
US6488623B1 (en) 2000-11-09 2002-12-03 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus
WO2003096903A1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2003-11-27 Hemapure Ab Sensor unit and method for sensing a blood related parameter and system including such a sensor unit
US6679300B1 (en) * 2002-01-14 2004-01-20 Thermogenesis Corp. Biological adhesive loading station and method
US6801041B2 (en) * 2002-05-14 2004-10-05 Abbott Laboratories Sensor having electrode for determining the rate of flow of a fluid
US20050238537A1 (en) * 1999-10-07 2005-10-27 Pepex Biomedical, L.L.C. Sensor for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US20060211933A1 (en) * 2003-04-18 2006-09-21 The Regents Of The University Of California Monitoring method and/or apparatus
WO2006103061A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Medizinische Universität Graz Device and method for delivery of a physiologically active substance depending on a measured physiological parameter
US20070191702A1 (en) * 2006-02-15 2007-08-16 Medingo Ltd. Systems and methods for sensing analyte and dispensing therapeutic fluid
US20070239068A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2007-10-11 Juergen Rasch-Menges Control solution packets and methods for calibrating bodily fluid sampling devices
US20070293742A1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2007-12-20 Novo Nordisk A/S Medical System And A Method Of Controlling The System For Use By A Patient For Medical Self Treatment
US20080045925A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2008-02-21 Stepovich Matthew J Drug delivery system
US20080086108A1 (en) * 2006-10-05 2008-04-10 Falkel Michael I Method and apparatus for delivering a drug
WO2008037316A3 (en) * 2006-09-28 2008-08-28 Regittnig Werner Device and method for determining a value of a physiological parameter of a body fluid
US7775975B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2010-08-17 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US7783333B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2010-08-24 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous medical device with variable stiffness
US7857760B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2010-12-28 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US7885697B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2011-02-08 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous analyte sensor
US20110152830A1 (en) * 2009-12-17 2011-06-23 Hospira, Inc. Systems and methods for managing and delivering patient therapy through electronic drug delivery systems
US20110152681A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Reilly David M Pumping devices, systems and methods for use with medical fluids including compensation for variations in pressure or flow rate
US8002736B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-08-23 Carticept Medical, Inc. Injection systems for delivery of fluids to joints
US8114623B2 (en) 2005-05-07 2012-02-14 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Method for determining glucose concentration in tissue fluid
US8133178B2 (en) 2006-02-22 2012-03-13 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8275438B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2012-09-25 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8290559B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2012-10-16 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US8287453B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2012-10-16 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8298142B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2012-10-30 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8364230B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-01-29 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8364231B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-01-29 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8396528B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2013-03-12 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8417312B2 (en) 2007-10-25 2013-04-09 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US8425417B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2013-04-23 Dexcom, Inc. Integrated device for continuous in vivo analyte detection and simultaneous control of an infusion device
US8425416B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-04-23 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8447376B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-05-21 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8449464B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-05-28 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8478377B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-07-02 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8506740B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2013-08-13 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Manufacturing electrochemical sensor module
US8545440B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2013-10-01 Carticept Medical, Inc. Injection system for delivering multiple fluids within the anatomy
US8562528B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-10-22 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8562558B2 (en) 2007-06-08 2013-10-22 Dexcom, Inc. Integrated medicament delivery device for use with continuous analyte sensor
US8626257B2 (en) 2003-08-01 2014-01-07 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8702932B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2014-04-22 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US8886273B2 (en) 2003-08-01 2014-11-11 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8944780B2 (en) 2011-03-25 2015-02-03 Bayer Medical Care Inc. Pumping devices, systems including multiple pistons and methods for use with medical fluids
US8951377B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2015-02-10 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Manufacturing electrochemical sensor module
US9022988B1 (en) 2010-05-07 2015-05-05 Kavan J. Shaban System and method for controlling a self-injector device
US9044178B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2015-06-02 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US9044542B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2015-06-02 Carticept Medical, Inc. Imaging-guided anesthesia injection systems and methods
US9135402B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2015-09-15 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9445755B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2016-09-20 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Electrochemical sensor module
US9504162B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2016-11-22 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Manufacturing electrochemical sensor modules
US9585605B2 (en) 2011-05-19 2017-03-07 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Fluid management and patient monitoring system
US9649436B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2017-05-16 Bayer Healthcare Llc Assembly method for a fluid pump device for a continuous multi-fluid delivery system

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE29607783U1 (en) * 1996-04-30 1996-06-20 Tillich Dirk A device for automated analysis in liquid media
DE19647701A1 (en) * 1996-11-08 1998-05-14 Schering Ag A device for achieving constant densities of contrast agents in tissues and organs
DE20008961U1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2001-09-27 Braun Melsungen Ag infusion pump
CN1471980A (en) 2002-06-06 2004-02-04 西门子公司 Injecting systems
NL1030272C1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-27 Variak An apparatus for automatically regulating the concentration of glucose in the blood of a diabetes patient.

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3405706A (en) * 1965-04-22 1968-10-15 Cinqualbre Paul Arrangement for taking blood
US4676256A (en) * 1986-03-24 1987-06-30 Golden Theodore A Hypodermic device
US4689042A (en) * 1985-05-20 1987-08-25 Survival Technology, Inc. Automatic medicament ingredient mixing and injecting apparatus
US4784157A (en) * 1986-02-04 1988-11-15 Halls Justin A T Method and apparatus for taking samples from or administering medication to a patient
US4795441A (en) * 1987-04-16 1989-01-03 Bhatt Kunjlata M Medication administration system
US4846797A (en) * 1985-05-14 1989-07-11 Intelligent Medicine, Inc. Syringe positioning device for enhancing fluid flow control
US4850972A (en) * 1987-01-16 1989-07-25 Pacesetter Infusion, Ltd. Progammable multiple pump medication infusion system with printer
EP0367752A1 (en) * 1988-10-31 1990-05-09 AVL Medical Instruments AG Device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in living tissue
US4957490A (en) * 1986-12-16 1990-09-18 National Research Development Corporation Injection device
US5097834A (en) * 1987-02-02 1992-03-24 Avl Ag Process for determining parameters of interest in living organisms

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3405706A (en) * 1965-04-22 1968-10-15 Cinqualbre Paul Arrangement for taking blood
US4846797A (en) * 1985-05-14 1989-07-11 Intelligent Medicine, Inc. Syringe positioning device for enhancing fluid flow control
US4689042A (en) * 1985-05-20 1987-08-25 Survival Technology, Inc. Automatic medicament ingredient mixing and injecting apparatus
US4784157A (en) * 1986-02-04 1988-11-15 Halls Justin A T Method and apparatus for taking samples from or administering medication to a patient
US4676256A (en) * 1986-03-24 1987-06-30 Golden Theodore A Hypodermic device
US4957490A (en) * 1986-12-16 1990-09-18 National Research Development Corporation Injection device
US4850972A (en) * 1987-01-16 1989-07-25 Pacesetter Infusion, Ltd. Progammable multiple pump medication infusion system with printer
US5097834A (en) * 1987-02-02 1992-03-24 Avl Ag Process for determining parameters of interest in living organisms
US4795441A (en) * 1987-04-16 1989-01-03 Bhatt Kunjlata M Medication administration system
EP0367752A1 (en) * 1988-10-31 1990-05-09 AVL Medical Instruments AG Device for determining the concentration of at least one substance in living tissue

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
International Publication No. WO88/05643, published 11 Aug. 1988, to Falko Skrabal. *

Cited By (108)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6248066B1 (en) 1995-11-27 2001-06-19 Hill-Rom, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus
US5769784A (en) * 1995-11-27 1998-06-23 Hill-Rom, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus and method
WO1997019633A1 (en) * 1995-11-27 1997-06-05 Hill-Rom, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus and method
US6010455A (en) * 1995-11-27 2000-01-04 Hill-Rom, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus
US6014577A (en) * 1995-12-19 2000-01-11 Abbot Laboratories Device for the detection of analyte and administration of a therapeutic substance
US6032059A (en) * 1995-12-19 2000-02-29 Abbott Laboratories Device for the detection of analyte and administration of a therapeutic substance
WO1997036542A1 (en) * 1996-03-29 1997-10-09 Willis John P Improved point-of-care analyzer module
US5916197A (en) * 1997-02-14 1999-06-29 Medrad, Inc. Injection system, pump system for use therein and method of use of pumping system
US6197000B1 (en) 1997-02-14 2001-03-06 Medrad, Inc. Injection system, pump system for use therein and method of use of pumping system
US5747666A (en) * 1997-03-26 1998-05-05 Willis; John P. Point-of-care analyzer module
GB2344897A (en) * 1997-09-26 2000-06-21 Pepex Biomedical Llc System and method for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
WO1999017114A1 (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-04-08 Pepex Biomedical, Llc System and method for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
GB2344897B (en) * 1997-09-26 2002-03-13 Pepex Biomedical Llc System and method for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US6117290A (en) * 1997-09-26 2000-09-12 Pepex Biomedical, Llc System and method for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US20070293742A1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2007-12-20 Novo Nordisk A/S Medical System And A Method Of Controlling The System For Use By A Patient For Medical Self Treatment
US20020123676A1 (en) * 1999-09-08 2002-09-05 Ulrich Haueter Measuring device for body fluids and infusion set and dialysis probe comprising such a measuring device one
US20050238537A1 (en) * 1999-10-07 2005-10-27 Pepex Biomedical, L.L.C. Sensor for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US6464849B1 (en) 1999-10-07 2002-10-15 Pepex Biomedical, L.L.C. Sensor for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US20100252430A1 (en) * 1999-10-07 2010-10-07 Pepex Biomedical, L.L.C. Sensor for measuring a bioanalyte such as lactate
US6415642B1 (en) * 1999-12-14 2002-07-09 Hans Rudolph, Inc. DLco calibration syringe apparatus
US6468247B1 (en) * 2000-04-21 2002-10-22 Mark Zamoyski Perfusion device for localized drug delivery
US6488623B1 (en) 2000-11-09 2002-12-03 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Skin perfusion evaluation apparatus
US8772034B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2014-07-08 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Control solution packets and methods for calibrating bodily fluid sampling devices
US20070239068A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2007-10-11 Juergen Rasch-Menges Control solution packets and methods for calibrating bodily fluid sampling devices
US8066958B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2011-11-29 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Device and kit for calibrating bodily fluid sampling devices
US20120041341A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2012-02-16 Juergen Rasch-Menges Control solution packets and methods for calibrating bodily fluid sampling devices
US6679300B1 (en) * 2002-01-14 2004-01-20 Thermogenesis Corp. Biological adhesive loading station and method
US20040140012A1 (en) * 2002-01-14 2004-07-22 Eric Sommer Biological adhesive loading station and method
US7182107B2 (en) 2002-01-14 2007-02-27 Thermogenesis Corp. Biological adhesive loading station and method
US6801041B2 (en) * 2002-05-14 2004-10-05 Abbott Laboratories Sensor having electrode for determining the rate of flow of a fluid
WO2003096903A1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2003-11-27 Hemapure Ab Sensor unit and method for sensing a blood related parameter and system including such a sensor unit
US20050131305A1 (en) * 2002-05-17 2005-06-16 Danielson Bo G. Sensor unit and method for sensing a blood related parameter and system including such a sensor unit
US7415299B2 (en) * 2003-04-18 2008-08-19 The Regents Of The University Of California Monitoring method and/or apparatus
US20060211933A1 (en) * 2003-04-18 2006-09-21 The Regents Of The University Of California Monitoring method and/or apparatus
US20090069651A1 (en) * 2003-04-18 2009-03-12 The Regents Of The University Of California Monitoring method and/or apparatus
US8886273B2 (en) 2003-08-01 2014-11-11 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8626257B2 (en) 2003-08-01 2014-01-07 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8425417B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2013-04-23 Dexcom, Inc. Integrated device for continuous in vivo analyte detection and simultaneous control of an infusion device
US8287453B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2012-10-16 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8750955B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2014-06-10 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US7783333B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2010-08-24 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous medical device with variable stiffness
US7857760B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2010-12-28 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8792953B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2014-07-29 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous analyte sensor
US8812072B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2014-08-19 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous medical device with variable stiffness
US7885697B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2011-02-08 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous analyte sensor
US9414777B2 (en) 2004-07-13 2016-08-16 Dexcom, Inc. Transcutaneous analyte sensor
WO2006103061A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Medizinische Universität Graz Device and method for delivery of a physiologically active substance depending on a measured physiological parameter
US8303533B2 (en) 2005-03-29 2012-11-06 Medizinische Universitaet Graz Device and method for delivery of a physiologically active substance depending on a measured physiological parameter
US8114623B2 (en) 2005-05-07 2012-02-14 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Method for determining glucose concentration in tissue fluid
US20070191702A1 (en) * 2006-02-15 2007-08-16 Medingo Ltd. Systems and methods for sensing analyte and dispensing therapeutic fluid
US9724028B2 (en) 2006-02-22 2017-08-08 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8133178B2 (en) 2006-02-22 2012-03-13 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US20080045925A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2008-02-21 Stepovich Matthew J Drug delivery system
WO2008037316A3 (en) * 2006-09-28 2008-08-28 Regittnig Werner Device and method for determining a value of a physiological parameter of a body fluid
US20090312622A1 (en) * 2006-09-28 2009-12-17 Werner Regittnig Device And Method For Determining A Value Of A Physiological Parameter Of A Body Fluid
US8774886B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2014-07-08 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8275438B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2012-09-25 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8364230B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-01-29 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8364231B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-01-29 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8911367B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2014-12-16 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US7775975B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2010-08-17 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8562528B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-10-22 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8532730B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-09-10 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US9451908B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2016-09-27 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8425416B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-04-23 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8447376B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-05-21 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8449464B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-05-28 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8478377B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2013-07-02 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8298142B2 (en) 2006-10-04 2012-10-30 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US20080086108A1 (en) * 2006-10-05 2008-04-10 Falkel Michael I Method and apparatus for delivering a drug
US9741139B2 (en) 2007-06-08 2017-08-22 Dexcom, Inc. Integrated medicament delivery device for use with continuous analyte sensor
US8562558B2 (en) 2007-06-08 2013-10-22 Dexcom, Inc. Integrated medicament delivery device for use with continuous analyte sensor
US9044178B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2015-06-02 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US8702932B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2014-04-22 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US9459228B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2016-10-04 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US9746440B2 (en) 2007-08-30 2017-08-29 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Electrochemical sensor and method for manufacturing
US8417312B2 (en) 2007-10-25 2013-04-09 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9717449B2 (en) 2007-10-25 2017-08-01 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9339238B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2016-05-17 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9135402B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2015-09-15 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9149234B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2015-10-06 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9149233B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2015-10-06 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US9839395B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2017-12-12 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US8290559B2 (en) 2007-12-17 2012-10-16 Dexcom, Inc. Systems and methods for processing sensor data
US8142414B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2012-03-27 Carticept Medical, Inc. Methods of injecting fluids into joints using a handpiece assembly
US8079976B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-12-20 Carticept Medical, Inc. Articular injection system
US8002736B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-08-23 Carticept Medical, Inc. Injection systems for delivery of fluids to joints
US9044542B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2015-06-02 Carticept Medical, Inc. Imaging-guided anesthesia injection systems and methods
US9067015B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2015-06-30 Carticept Medical, Inc. System for injecting fluids in a subject
US8425463B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2013-04-23 Carticept Medical, Inc. Anesthetic injection system
US8545440B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2013-10-01 Carticept Medical, Inc. Injection system for delivering multiple fluids within the anatomy
US8425464B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2013-04-23 Carticept Medical, Inc. Imaging-guided anesthetic injection method
US8007487B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-08-30 Carticept Medical, Inc. Method of treating a joint using an articular injection system
US9398894B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2016-07-26 Carticept Medical, Inc. Removable cassette for articular injection system
US8396528B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2013-03-12 Dexcom, Inc. Analyte sensor
US8951377B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2015-02-10 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Manufacturing electrochemical sensor module
US8506740B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2013-08-13 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Manufacturing electrochemical sensor module
US9445755B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2016-09-20 Pepex Biomedical, Llc Electrochemical sensor module
US8771251B2 (en) 2009-12-17 2014-07-08 Hospira, Inc. Systems and methods for managing and delivering patient therapy through electronic drug delivery systems
US20110152830A1 (en) * 2009-12-17 2011-06-23 Hospira, Inc. Systems and methods for managing and delivering patient therapy through electronic drug delivery systems
US20110152681A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Reilly David M Pumping devices, systems and methods for use with medical fluids including compensation for variations in pressure or flow rate
US9480791B2 (en) 2009-12-21 2016-11-01 Bayer Healthcare Llc Pumping devices, systems and methods for use with medical fluids including compensation for variations in pressure or flow rate
US9844628B1 (en) 2010-05-07 2017-12-19 Kavan J. Shaban System and method for controlling a self-injector device
US9022988B1 (en) 2010-05-07 2015-05-05 Kavan J. Shaban System and method for controlling a self-injector device
US8944780B2 (en) 2011-03-25 2015-02-03 Bayer Medical Care Inc. Pumping devices, systems including multiple pistons and methods for use with medical fluids
US9585605B2 (en) 2011-05-19 2017-03-07 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Fluid management and patient monitoring system
US9504162B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2016-11-22 Pepex Biomedical, Inc. Manufacturing electrochemical sensor modules
US9649436B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2017-05-16 Bayer Healthcare Llc Assembly method for a fluid pump device for a continuous multi-fluid delivery system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE4123441A1 (en) 1992-01-23 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7314453B2 (en) Handheld diagnostic device with renewable biosensor
US3838682A (en) Automated blood analysis system
US7744589B2 (en) Infusion medium delivery device and method with drive device for driving plunger in reservoir
US4902278A (en) Fluid delivery micropump
US4505710A (en) Implantable fluid dispensing system
US5993421A (en) Medicament dispenser
US7641649B2 (en) Reservoir support and method for infusion device
US5827219A (en) Injection system and pumping system for use therein
US6086561A (en) Fluid delivery apparatus with reservoir fill assembly
US7367942B2 (en) Method and apparatus for testing blood glucose in a reversible infusion line
US4696309A (en) Portable apparatus for taking blood samples
US4080967A (en) Parenteral syringe pump drive system with installation indicator means
US20110160654A1 (en) Alignment systems and methods
US20090082757A1 (en) Pressure based refill status monitor for implantable pumps
EP0401179A1 (en) Wearable artificial pancreas
EP1545657B1 (en) Flow restrictor with safety feature
US6280408B1 (en) Controlled fluid transfer system
US5308341A (en) Method of testing the dose accuracy of a medication delivery device
US5779676A (en) Fluid delivery device with bolus injection site
US8298172B2 (en) Medical skin mountable device and system
US5298022A (en) Wearable artificial pancreas
US6554822B1 (en) Microbolus infusion pump
US20080167641A1 (en) Medical Device Adapted To Detect Disengagement Of A Transcutaneous Device
US7162290B1 (en) Method and apparatus for blood glucose testing from a reversible infusion line
US20080255516A1 (en) Apparatus and method for pumping fluid

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: AVL MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS AG

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:MOSTL, ANTON;MAYER, MICHAEL;SKRABAL, FALKO;REEL/FRAME:005778/0468

Effective date: 19910703

CC Certificate of correction
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12