US4924858A - Electromagnetic shockwave generator transducer - Google Patents

Electromagnetic shockwave generator transducer Download PDF

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Publication number
US4924858A
US4924858A US07/286,965 US28696588A US4924858A US 4924858 A US4924858 A US 4924858A US 28696588 A US28696588 A US 28696588A US 4924858 A US4924858 A US 4924858A
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United States
Prior art keywords
membrane
transducer
coil
membranes
copper
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US07/286,965
Inventor
Josef Katona
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Dornier Medizintechnik GmbH
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Dornier Medizintechnik GmbH
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Priority to DE19873743822 priority Critical patent/DE3743822C2/de
Priority to DE3743822 priority
Application filed by Dornier Medizintechnik GmbH filed Critical Dornier Medizintechnik GmbH
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Publication of US4924858A publication Critical patent/US4924858A/en
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Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; METHODS OR DEVICES FOR PROTECTING AGAINST, OR FOR DAMPING, NOISE OR OTHER ACOUSTIC WAVES IN GENERAL; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K9/00Devices in which sound is produced by vibrating a diaphragm or analogous element, e.g. fog horns, vehicle hooter, buzzer
    • G10K9/12Devices in which sound is produced by vibrating a diaphragm or analogous element, e.g. fog horns, vehicle hooter, buzzer electrically operated

Abstract

A transducer to be used in a shock wave generator including a support, at least one energizing coil mounted on the support; at least one, preferably two copper or silver membranes are placed on the coil and insulated from each other; an outer, stainless steel membrane is grounded and an electrical insulation is interposed between the first and the second membranes.

Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a transducer to be used in a shock wave generator; the transducer broadly being comprised of some kind of base support, a metal membrane, some form of electrical insulation and an energizing coil by means of which the membrane is set into vibratory motion for purposes of generating a shock wave assuming a proper stimulating pulse is applied.

Electromagnetically generated shock waves are used in the important field of comminution of concrements in the body of living beings. German printed patent 33 28 066 discloses a generator of this kind. Also the journal "Akustische Beihefte", (Acoustic Miscels or Supplements) 1962, Volume 1, pages 158-202, describes a so called shock wave tube. Herein a flat coil is provided and a copper membrane is energized by that coil but separated therefrom physically through an insulation foil. A water filled tube adjoins the copper membrane. As a voltage is applied to the coil having a value of 2 to 20 kV, a magnetic field as induced by current flow in the copper membrane establishes repelling forces causing the membrane to recede from i.e. to be forced away from the coil. This way one provides for a planar pressure pulse, basically over the extension of the membrane width of pulse which is so to speak converted by and in the water into a steep shockwave front to be available for one purpose or another at the end of the tube. Shock wave tubes of this kind are used e.g. in chemistry for purposes of providing certain investigations.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved transducer to be used in a shock wave generator for a specific purpose outlined above but beginning with the prior art configuration as stated.

In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention, it is suggested to provide a plurality of metal membranes which are at least separated from each other through insulation so that in relation to an energizing coil there are at least two layers of insulation provided for separating the coil from the membranes and the membranes themselves and each other. An outer membrane is a relatively poor conductor but strong, e.g. made of stainless steel and is electrically grounded. One or more inner membranes are good conductors, they are preferably made of copper or silver. The potential of these high conductor membranes is more or less floating on account of insulative separation.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which is regarded as the invention, it is believed that the invention, the objects and features of the invention and further objects, features and advantages thereof will be better understood from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross section through a transducer constructed in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention for practicing the best mode thereof;

FIG. 1a is a voltage diagram plotting potential levels as they occur in the transducer structure shown in FIG. 1; the diagram being in terms of thickness values d through the generator and is drawn in alignment with the various elements of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 2 illustrates in various portions (a and b) the exemplary current densities in membranes as they may occur and are being or could be used in the construction shown in FIG. 1.

Proceeding now to the detailed description of the drawings FIG. 1 illustrates as shown a transducer to be used in a shock wave generator which is comprised of a basic body and element 1 having primarily the function of supporting. Immediately supported on the body 1 is a coil 2 of the suitable configuration. The turns of the coil are separated; the coil as a whole is covered by an electric insulation 3. Adjoining the insulation layer 3 is a first membrane being a copper membrane 4 and being separated through another, relatively thin insulation foil 5 from a second copper membrane 6. A somewhat thicker, electrically insulating layer 7 is provided on top of the second copper member 6, and this foil 7 in turn carries a stainless steel membrane 8 being grounded as schematically indicated.

It can thus be seen that this specific example shows two metal foils, namely 4 and 6 which are relatively speaking made of very good electrically conductive material. One could provide more membrane if that is desirable and they could be made of silver. The outer electrode 8 is strong and not as good a conductor. Preferably one uses stainless steel.

The various layers shown are physically interconnected in a conventional fashion through bonding by means of adhesive. The FIG. 1 illustrates this transducer on a very enlarged scale. A realistic value is e.g. a total thickness from say the outer surface of insulator 3, through the various membrane layers to be roughly about 1 mm. By way of example one can use the following values. The copper membranes each are from 0.05 to 0.2 mm thickness. As stated the Cu membranes could be replaced by silver of comparable dimension. The insulation foil 7 should be between 0.025 and 0.125 mm and the stainless steel membrane 8 should be between 0.1 and 0.2 mm. It can readily be seen that the total thickness will not exceed 1 mm.

As a voltage Uo is applied to the coil 2, the potential distribution is as shown in FIG. 1a and the zero level presents the fact of grounding; the stainless steel membrane 8 being connected to assume ground potential. The Cu membranes 4 and 6 are at more or less slowing potentials, in between the Uo level and the level 0 whereby owing to their good conductivity there is practically no potential drop across the thickness of each of the two copper membranes.

FIG. 2 illustrates in line a, the current density distribution for a simple copper membrane of 0.2 mm thickness. FIG. 2b illustrates the current density in two copper membranes each being 0.1 mm thick and being separated by an electrical insulation layer that is thinner than 1/10 mm. Owing to the skin effect the current density at high frequencies is not uniformly distributed across the conductor cross section. Maximum penetration depth for the frequency used is about 0.2 mm. Please note that the voltage applied to the coil 2 is a pulse with steep flanks thus being rich in high frequences.

The distribution of the current density is schematically shown in FIG. 2. As can be seen the integral of the current density across the respective membrane is larger if two membranes rather than one are used. This increases the efficiency for given voltage level of operation. The repulsion forces exerted upon the membrane and, therefore, the amplitude of the resulting pressure and shock wave pulse are larger. In the case of a good conducting membrane (copper, silver) with a thickness larger than 0.4 mm the current density actually drops to zero in the interior. This is not the case when the membrane is laminated. The distribution of the current density is similar.

The invention offers the following advantages. There is a reduction in loss of efficiency owing to the fact that it is not the copper membranes (4, 6) which are grounded. What is grounded is the outer membrane 8 which is relatively poor conductor and in that sense does not participate in a loss producing fashion. The heating of the system is, therefore, reduced owing to the increase in efficiency (and vice versa). The skin effect is not any more a limiting factor concerning the total thickness of the membrane, being a good conductor as stated and which was demonstrated above with a reference to FIG. 2. One can, therefore, and should use several membranes in a stack arrangement with a total thickness of course larger than the thickness of each individual membrane.

The potential distribution between the coil on one hand and the grounded outer membrane on the other hand is more favorable as shown in FIG. 1a because the membranes in between are electrically insulated vis-a-vis the outer membrane 8. Therefore as a high voltage is applied to the coil, two membranes 4 and 6 and others if they are provided assume a definitely lower potential level. This was found to increase the use life of the membrane and of the system as a whole.

The use life of such a transducer is generally determined by the breakthrough strength of insulation between e.g. the coil 2 and any of the membranes. Owing to the more favorable potential distribution in this multiple membrane systems, each of the insulation layers are not subjected anymore to such a strong electrical potential and that means its use life increases.

The membranes 4 and 6 i.e. in this case one of the membranes could actually be placed directly on the coil provided there is adequate electrical insulation between the outer membrane 8 and the rest of the system. In the illustrated case, however, it is the insulation layer 3 that provides the main insulative separation between coil 2 and grounded membrane 8. Distributing the insulation improves also the coupling, in an electric sense of the membrane in the coil since any stray field is minimized. From an overall point of view it was found that the eddy current losses are lower than in the conventional transducers.

The invention is not limited to the embodiments described above but all changes and modifications thereof, not constituting departures from the spirit and scope of the invention, are intended to be included.

Claims (6)

What is claimed:
1. For use in a shock wave generator, a transducer comprising:
a base support;
at least one energizing coil mounted on said base;
at least one first, electrically good conducting membrane on the coil;
an outer, grounded metal membrane of lesser conductivity; and
electrical insulation means interposed between the first and the second membrane.
2. A transducer as in claim 1 wherein said second membrane has a greater strength than the first membrane.
3. A transducer as in claim 2 said outer membrane being made of stainless steel.
4. A transducer as in claim 1 the first membrane being made of copper or silver.
5. A transducer as in claim 1 wherein said first membrane being made of copper from 0.05 to 0.2 mm thick, said insulation being between 0.025 to 0.125 mm thick and said second outer membrane being made of stainless steel having a thickness from 0.1 to 0.2 mm.
6. A transducer as in claim 1 there being a plurality of electrically insulated first membranes provided and disposed between said second electrode of relatively low conductivity and said coil.
US07/286,965 1987-12-23 1988-12-19 Electromagnetic shockwave generator transducer Expired - Lifetime US4924858A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE19873743822 DE3743822C2 (en) 1987-12-23 1987-12-23
DE3743822 1987-12-23

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US4924858A true US4924858A (en) 1990-05-15

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US07/286,965 Expired - Lifetime US4924858A (en) 1987-12-23 1988-12-19 Electromagnetic shockwave generator transducer

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US (1) US4924858A (en)
EP (1) EP0321759B1 (en)
JP (1) JPH0741043B2 (en)
DE (1) DE3743822C2 (en)
ES (1) ES2056880T3 (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5174280A (en) * 1989-03-09 1992-12-29 Dornier Medizintechnik Gmbh Shockwave source
US5214620A (en) * 1990-09-27 1993-05-25 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Electrically driveable shockwave source
US5230328A (en) * 1991-07-29 1993-07-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Electromagnetic acoustic pressure pulse source
US5233972A (en) * 1990-09-27 1993-08-10 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shockwave source for acoustic shockwaves
US6390995B1 (en) 1997-02-12 2002-05-21 Healthtronics Surgical Services, Inc. Method for using acoustic shock waves in the treatment of medical conditions
US20060285704A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2006-12-21 Hideo Kitazawa Speaker
US20060290481A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2006-12-28 Hideo Kitazawa Speaker
US7189209B1 (en) 1996-03-29 2007-03-13 Sanuwave, Inc. Method for using acoustic shock waves in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer or a pressure sore
US20180130531A1 (en) * 2016-11-07 2018-05-10 Seagate Technology Llc Three dimensional electric field data storage device utilizing shockwaves and a light source
US10056146B2 (en) 2016-11-07 2018-08-21 Seagate Technology Llc Electric field storage device

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE4041063A1 (en) * 1990-12-20 1992-06-25 Siemens Ag Removal of artificial joints - with focussed ultrasonic head to loosen cement around joint support
DE4201139A1 (en) * 1992-01-17 1993-07-22 Siemens Ag Electromagnetic acoustic pressure pulse source - has breakdown resistant insulating foils, useful in medical treatment
DE4228963C2 (en) * 1992-08-31 1998-10-22 Siemens Ag Pressure pulse source with cavitation resistant coated membrane
DE10160595A1 (en) * 2001-12-10 2003-06-26 Dornier Medtech Holding Int Gmbh Electromagnetic shock or pressure wave source
DE102004013573B3 (en) * 2004-03-19 2005-09-01 Dornier Medtech Systems Gmbh Production of a traction impulse between electrically conducting structures comprises preparing the structures insulated from each other and lying next to each other, producing a magnetic field and switching off the magnetic field
DE102004036526B4 (en) * 2004-07-28 2008-06-05 Dornier Medtech Systems Gmbh Shockwave source and shock wave treatment device

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3505894A1 (en) * 1985-02-20 1986-08-21 Siemens Ag Shock wave tube with coil and diaphragm
US4697588A (en) * 1984-12-27 1987-10-06 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave tube for the fragmentation of concrements
US4793329A (en) * 1986-10-06 1988-12-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave source
US4794914A (en) * 1986-06-05 1989-01-03 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave generator for an apparatus for non-contacting disintegration of calculi in the body of a life form
US4796608A (en) * 1986-06-16 1989-01-10 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave generator for an apparatus for non-contacting disintegration of calculi in the body of a life form

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4718421A (en) * 1985-08-09 1988-01-12 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Ultrasound generator
EP0278304A1 (en) * 1987-02-04 1988-08-17 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Lithotripter with an integrated positioning device

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4697588A (en) * 1984-12-27 1987-10-06 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave tube for the fragmentation of concrements
DE3505894A1 (en) * 1985-02-20 1986-08-21 Siemens Ag Shock wave tube with coil and diaphragm
US4794914A (en) * 1986-06-05 1989-01-03 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave generator for an apparatus for non-contacting disintegration of calculi in the body of a life form
US4796608A (en) * 1986-06-16 1989-01-10 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave generator for an apparatus for non-contacting disintegration of calculi in the body of a life form
US4793329A (en) * 1986-10-06 1988-12-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shock wave source

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5174280A (en) * 1989-03-09 1992-12-29 Dornier Medizintechnik Gmbh Shockwave source
US5214620A (en) * 1990-09-27 1993-05-25 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Electrically driveable shockwave source
US5233972A (en) * 1990-09-27 1993-08-10 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Shockwave source for acoustic shockwaves
US5230328A (en) * 1991-07-29 1993-07-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Electromagnetic acoustic pressure pulse source
US7985189B1 (en) 1996-03-29 2011-07-26 Sanuwave, Inc. Method for using acoustic shock waves in the treatment of medical conditions
US20080071198A1 (en) * 1996-03-29 2008-03-20 Ogden John A Method for using acoustic shock waves for bone grafting
US7189209B1 (en) 1996-03-29 2007-03-13 Sanuwave, Inc. Method for using acoustic shock waves in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer or a pressure sore
US6390995B1 (en) 1997-02-12 2002-05-21 Healthtronics Surgical Services, Inc. Method for using acoustic shock waves in the treatment of medical conditions
US20060290481A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2006-12-28 Hideo Kitazawa Speaker
US20060285704A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2006-12-21 Hideo Kitazawa Speaker
US7864976B2 (en) * 2005-06-07 2011-01-04 Nidec Pigeon Corporation Speaker
US7925040B2 (en) * 2005-06-07 2011-04-12 Nidec Pigeon Corporation Speaker
US20180130531A1 (en) * 2016-11-07 2018-05-10 Seagate Technology Llc Three dimensional electric field data storage device utilizing shockwaves and a light source
US9997189B2 (en) * 2016-11-07 2018-06-12 Seagate Technology Llc Three dimensional electric field data storage device utilizing shockwaves and a light source
US10056146B2 (en) 2016-11-07 2018-08-21 Seagate Technology Llc Electric field storage device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP0321759A2 (en) 1989-06-28
ES2056880T3 (en) 1994-10-16
DE3743822C2 (en) 1989-10-12
DE3743822A1 (en) 1989-07-13
EP0321759A3 (en) 1989-10-04
JPH01280451A (en) 1989-11-10
EP0321759B1 (en) 1994-06-01
JPH0741043B2 (en) 1995-05-10

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