US457316A - Vertical broiler - Google Patents

Vertical broiler Download PDF

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US457316A
US457316A US457316DA US457316A US 457316 A US457316 A US 457316A US 457316D A US457316D A US 457316DA US 457316 A US457316 A US 457316A
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chamber
broiling
chambers
fire
fumes
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J37/00Baking; Roasting; Grilling; Frying
    • A47J37/06Roasters; Grills; Sandwich grills
    • A47J37/0688Broilers with vertically disposed heat sources and food supports

Description

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet. 1.

J. GIBBO NS. VERTICAL BROILBR. No. 457,316. Patented Aug. 4, 1891.

lug;

WITNESSES: INVENTOR amwaw ATTORNEY we uonms per an: cm mrmrmnm, msnmm'ou, n. 04

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-:Sheet 2,

J. GIBBONS.

4 VERTICAL BROILER.

No. 457,316. Patented Aug. 4, 1891.

' A TTORNEYQ m: mm: PETERS cm. mom-mum, msumn'rEgEc.

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 3.

J. GIBBONS. VERTICAL BROILER.

No. 457,316. Patented Aug. 4, 1891.

IN VEN TOR ATTORNEY WITNESSES:

UNI-TED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES GIBBONS, OF JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY.

VERTICAL BROILER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 457,316, dated Augsistjl, 1891.

Application filed April 2, 1891. Serial No. 387,417- (No model.)

and useful Improvements in aVertical Broiler,

of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accom pan yi ng drawings, forming a part of this specification, and in which similar letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several views.

My present invention relates to an apparatus designed more especially for broiling meats, fish, or other food supplies, but adapted also for auxiliary boiling, frying, or stewing operations.

The invention has for its principal object to provide a vertically-arranged broiling apparatus which consumes within itself nearly all the fatty smoky fumes or vapors given off from the food being broiled and carries what little of the fumes which escape from the front of the broiling-chamber to the hot-product flue or outlet of the apparatus, whereby the disagreeable fatty fumes are kept from the room and to a considerable extent are utilized as fuel to secure maximum economy in operating the apparatus. Other important and auxiliary advantages in structure and operation are also obtained, as hereinafter recited.

The invention consists in certain novel features of construction and combination of parts of the apparatus, as hereinafter described and claimed.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a front or trans verse vertical sectional view of the broiler apparatus, taken on the line 1 1 in Fig. 4. and partly broken away. Fig. 2 is a detail perspective view showing another arrangement of the final upper hot-product outlets. Fi -3 is a detail rear face view of a portion of the intermediate partition-plate which forms the rear wall of the broiling and fire chambers. Fig. Ais a central vertical sectional side view of the apparatus, taken on the line 4 4 in Fig. 1, with the grid indicated in dotted lines. Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional side elevation of the broiler, taken on the irregular line 5 5 in Fig. 1. Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the broiler apparatus. Fig.7 is a plan view with thebroiler-casinginhorizontalsection through the upper hot-product chamber of the apparatus and illustrates a modified arrangement of the water-back or heater device. Fig.8is a detail transverse vertical section taken on the lineS 8 in Fig. 10; and Fig. 9 is a detail front vertical sectional View of the broiling and fire chambers,.illustrating a modification of the grid and its supports.

The broiling-chainber A of the apparatus is located or arranged verticallybetween two opposing contiguous plates or walls a a, which may be either cast or sheet metal and are set about at the center of the structure, and are preferably imperforate and made to slide in or out from the front, so as to be readily removable from the frame for pnrposes'of cleaning, repair, or renewal of the parts. Be-- hind each cooking plate or wall A is a firechamber 13, which receives the hot products of a burner O, which is located in a lower chamber D. These two side combustion: chambers D D, which. communicate, respect ively, with the two fire-chambers B 13, also communicate freely with a rear passage D, formed in the broiler easing or frame E behind the broiling-chamber A by a suitable intermediate vertical wall or partition 01, which at its main upper'portion extends from side to side of the casing E to form a backing to the rear end parts of the" fire-brick or other refractory linings b b of the two fire-chainbers. At its lower central portion this partition d extends down to the bottom or base plate E of the casing, so as to form in connection with two vertical plates F F, fitted between the lower horizontal wall or fire-brick supporting-partition I) of the fire-chambers and the base-plate, alower central chamber A, which virtually is a downward extension of the broiling-chamber A, both chambers communicating by a com paratively large cen tral opening a in the plate I). Openings tlf d at the lower side parts of the partition (Z provide freecommunication between the rear passage D and the two lower chambers D D,

which open to the fire-chambers B B, as above mentioned. v

A horizontal plate b fitted in the casing E a short distance-say four inchesbelow the top plate of the casing, partitions the fire- I chambers B B from an upper hot-product chamber G at the top of the apparatus. This plate b has two comparatively long and narrow slots or openings b b which allow pas.- sage of hot products from both fire-chambers B B into the chamber G, which has an outlet at 9 through the back plate of the casing to any suitably-connected discharge pipe or flue, and preferably to a trap-fitting or elbow H, which is adapted to a flange-collar on the easing, and has a pendent trap portion h catch ing the condensed fluid-deposits from the pipe N, which connects with an upper collar or flange 71 of the fitting. The side walls k of the trap-fitting preferably stand off laterally from the end of the flue-pipe N to give clear fall of deposits into the trap h, which preferably has a suitable plug h, allowing discharge of the trapped deposits at pleasure. The spaces between the inclined side parts of the fire-chamber brick-linings b and the casing E and horizontal partition-plates 1; 12 above mentioned, are preferably filled with asbestus, mineral wool, or other suitable non-conduotor of heat, as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings.

'It will be noticedthat the plate b forms a closed top to the broiling-chamberA and that the intermediate wall or partition (1 at the rearend of said chamber is providedwith an opening (1 allowing direct passage of air, mingled with fatty fumes from the substance being broiled in the chamber, rearward into the space D, which opens below at d 01' into the lower burning-chambers D D, into which thehot air and fumes thus pass, whence they rise into the two fire-chambers B B, wherein the air maintains combustion of the fluid fuel flaming at or from the burners, and the greasy smoky fumes are also entirely conapparatus.

sumed to prevent undue accumulation of highly-inflammable fatty or greasy deposits in'the outlets at T G g H and in the flue giving final exit of the hot products from the This desirable result, which prevents the fiue-outlets from easily taking fire, is attained, while the greasy fatty fumes consumed in the fire-chambers furnish additional fuel to increase the heating effect of the burners upon the opposing cooking-walls a a, of the broiling-chamber, which are maintained preferably at a dull red heat.

Figs. 1, 4:, and 5 of the drawings show that behind the broiling-chamber A, below the rear outlet at therefrom, is placed in the passage D a'partition rib or flange d which extends between the chamber-wall d and the rear plate of the main casing E and is preferably vertical and central at its upper part and at its lower part slopes off at an angle to either side and stops at the two lower side openings d d of the plate cl. This rib or flange d has a twofold purpose. It re-enforces the back plate 01 of the broiling-chamber'froin-the rear plate of the casing to prevent breaking or injury of said plate d by violent contact of the inner hinged end'of the grid device I with it, and it also divides the hot air and greasy fumes escaping through the broiling-chamber opening 01 and more certainly conducts said hot products in like volume to both lower chambers D D, and consequently evenly distributes between the two fire-chambers B B the fatty fumes to be consumed therein.

The central portion of the horizontal plate I), or that part of it at the bottom of the broilingchamber A has a central opening a, through which fat drippings from the substance being broiled in the grid I fall into a receiving pan or tray J, which is preferably fitted to slide endwise into and out of the casing E when the lower central front door e thereof is opened, said drip-tray being preferably sustained on ribs or flanges f f on the opposing lowerside walls F F of the lower chamber A of the apparatus. Thistray has abottom which slopes to an opening 3', through which thefat drippings fall to the bottom'plate E of the casing, which at the chamber A may be sloped every way toward a central opening it, through which the fat drippings finally fall into a suitable pan or receiver K, placed on the floor or bench support of the apparatus. If desired, the bottom plate E may be cut away to leave the lower chamber A practically bottomless, the drip-tray J in this case preventing-too free upward circulation of cool air to the broiling-chamber A above it.

Figs. 1 and 4 of the drawings best show that all that part of the plate 1) within the broiling-chamber A and bordering the fatdrip opening a thereof slopes downward 1 from the side andend walls of the chamber to the opening. This construction assures immediate downward discharge of liquid fat from the ledge b and obviates lighting of the fat by the heat of the cooking-walls. This ledge 12 by its side parts also supports the grid 1, the lower lateral extensions 11 of which rest upon it, while the upper lateral extensions 2' of the grid may enter between the opposite guides a a fastened to the cooking-walls a a to steady the grid centrally within the broiling-chamber.

The modification shown in Fig. 9 of the drawings illustrates how more prominent rails or plates a a may be attached to the cookingwalls a a to guide and steady an ordinary fiatsided grid 1 centrally within the broilingchamber A, this grid being sustained at its lower edge withina recess or pocket b ,pendent from the inclined or sloping drip-surface b of the plate b. An opening at the bottom of this grid-sustaining pocket b allows drip of fat to the tray J beneath it. It will be noticed that this construction. with the pocket 11 and either with or without the lateral-side guides or steadiments a a in the broilingchamber allows effective use of an ordinary fiat-sided grid, or one without lateral outward projections from its side parts or frames.

The door e, whichcloses the front opening which project at each side of said opening behind the front of the casing E. This door in opening downward stops against thefront gassupply rail or pipe of the apparatus. The broiling-chamber Ais preferably fitted at the front with two side hinged doors 6' e, which with the door e will be closed while the cooking-walls are being heated up ready for work, and when broiling is being done said doors 6 may or may not be closed as far as the projecting handles of the grid will allow.

Lower side front doors 6 e are peculiarly formed, so as to each cover an opening 6 of the casing, giving access to a lower side chamber D to allow introduction and adj ustment of the burner C and for cleaning out said burner-chamber, and also to coverv an upper smaller opening a, which aligns with a front opening 6 in the end of the fire-brick b, and gives access to the fire-chamber B by a taper or match for lighting the burner and also serves as a sight-hole for inspection of the burner to determine if it is flaming or working properly. These doors 6 are also preferably hinged at one side edge, as shown more clearly in Fig.6 of the drawings.

NVhile most of the fatty or greasy fumes from the meat or substance being broiled escape rearward through the broiling-chamber opening d and thence to the fire-chambers, where they are consumed, as above described, a comparatively small volume of these fumes will escape at the front of the broiling-chamber. It is desirable that these latter fumes be prevented from escaping into the kitchen or room. Hence I provide for carrying them off rearward through a front projecting hood L,which by an opening e in the front wall of the main easing communicates with an interior cap-or conduit M, which is open at both ends, and at its rear end communicates with the outlet g of the upper hot-product chamber G of the apparatus. This inner conduit M preferably overlies the broiling-chamher A, but, unlike a former broiler made by me, it has no direct communication with the broiling-chamber through the partition-wall b which in the prior construction was provided with openings with a damper thereat to allow all fatty fumes from the food being broiled to pass into the conduit and thence to the outlet fine or chimney, instead ofmost of the fumes being conducted to and burned within the fire-chambers, as in this apparatus. The outlet g, as shown in. Figs. 1 and 7 of the drawings, is wider than the inner open end of the conduit M to allow exit through end parts g g of said outlet of the hot products which rise from the firechambers B through the'openings b into the chamber G of the apparatus; but it will probably be preferable to form the hot-product outlets as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings, wherein the casing-outlet g is no wider than the conduit- M, which is cut away -at g g at both sides next vthe outlet g. This construction causes the hot products from the fire-chamber outlets b? to enter the rear end of the conduit on of frying, boiling,

their way to the final outlet 9 and promotes increased or stronger rearward draft offatty fumes through the conduit M to said outlet 9. The parts L M are preferably flangejointed to the front of the main casing E, and at its inner end the conduit M preferably has an upwardly-projecting rib or flange m, which is pressed by ribs or flanges m on the top E of the broiler to hold the conduit down snugly at its rear part and also at its side flange-joints with the partition-plate 12?. Or-

dinary nibs hold down the front of the conduit M and also the plate b on which it rests. I provide, this broiling apparatus with a water-back device located in the upper hot- 'product chamber G and to be heated by.hot

products from the two lower fire-chambers B B before said products escape at the exit-flue, thus utilizing these products to maintain a supply of hot water through the medium of and 5 of the drawings, or the water-back may comprise a hollow reservoir P, located, preferably, along the front of the chamber G and having pipe connections 19 p passing through the casing for attachment to the circulating-boiler, as will appear in Figs. 7 and 8 of the drawings. By placing the water-back reservoir ,P well toward the front it interferes little, if any, with the effective use or stewing vessels on the top plate ll of the broiler, which is shown with two oval-shaped pot-holes closed by lids 6 6 When the interior conduit M is used, the water-back reservoir P will preferably be supported by it and clear above the plate I) to avoid choking up the outlets b from the firechambers and let the heat play all around the reservoir Should this conduit be dispensed with, the reservoir may be sustained by feet directly from the plate 6 It will be noticed that the front crossing portion of the pipe water-back O is also sustained by the fume-conduit M and that said water-back extends over the hot waste-product outlets of the two fire-chambers of the apparatus.

I propose fitting this broiler apparatus, and, preferably, at each side, with a skeleton shelf or hot plate R, supported by suitably-designed brackets S from the main casing E, and having a couple of radial ribbed openings 1" '7', toward which flame suitable fluid-fuel burners T T, which, as shown, are sustained from the casing by brackets 25 and are connected to fuel-supply pipes U, which have cocks u and connect with rearward side extensions of the tubular gasrail V, which supplies the main burners O O of the broiler.

while broiling is being done in the chamber A a portable baking or roasting oven (not may be used on top ofxthe casing and shown) It will thus appear that ated structure for doing all kinds of cooking or'heating that an entire household may require.

The broiling-burners C have a tubular stem 0, which is preferably fitted by a plain slipjoint upon a collar which projects upward from the elbow-fitting w, to which is connected the mixing tube or pipe W, which at its other end is held to an outer air-bulb w, the inlet-apertures of which are outside the main casing E. To this bulb is connected the. gas-admitting nipple, which is held to a cock or valve '0, controlling supply of gas from the main feed-rail V to the burner. A lug e on the bottom plate E holds the burner up to place and relieves the front air-bulb and mixing-tube connection of undue strains.

In conclusion I specially mention that in this apparatus the air which enters at the front of the broiling-chamber and sweeps rearward through it to the back opening d thereof is highly superheated by its passage between the two hot cooking-walls a a of the chamber. Hence the said air, laden with fatty fumes from the meat or substance being broiled, passes down the rear channel D and thence tothe lower chambers D D and then upward to the fire-chambers B B in highlysuperheated condition, and in this state maintains combustion at the burners at a higher temperature than would be possible otherwise or if comparatively cool air were fed to the burner-tips to maintain combustion. The marked difference as regards the use of super-heated air for maintaining combustion at the burners between this broiler and one heretofore made by meconsists in the initial super-heating of the air directly'by the broiling-chamber walls and within the chamber itself prior to passage of the air to the firechambers instead of superheating the air by causing it to enter at upper openings of the main outer casing and taking up heat from the exterior walls of the fire-chambers before entering said chambers.

Another improved feature worthy of notice is that, while in the former construction the passage of air into the front of the broilingchamber and thence through its open top wall into a cap or conduit which conducted it and commingled fatty fumes directly to the outlet-fine had some considerable effect to brown the'broiled surfaces of the meat by contact of thepassing air with it, in the present construction the entire surfaces of the food are much more nicely browned, as the air sweeps clear through the broilingchamber from front to rear and no portion of the broiled food is left with an undesirablepale or livid color. Hence it is far more appetizing and palatable.

I have hereinbefore mentioned the important feature of supplying the inside of the burners only with pure atmospheric airadmitted at the air-bulbs w and mingling with gas admitted to the mixing-tubes of the burners, while combustion at the flaming points of the burners is maintained-by a mixture of superheated air and fatty fumes from the broiling-chamber. By this operation the fatty fumes are not allowed to enter the inside of the burners and clog them or interferewith their working with very hot blue flames, and at the same time the fatt-yfumes consumed by said flames with the superheated air inthe fire-chambers only increases the heating effect of the burners upon the broiler cooking walls, and thus promotes continued economy of gas in operating the apparatus. As the bnrner-chambers D' become quite'hot and as the mixing-tubes IV are within said chambers, the fluid fuel is superheatedbefore it reaches the flaming-points c of the burners, which increases the effectiveness of the burners.

I am awarethat cooking apparatus have before been made with a broiling-chamber having direct communication with one or more side fire chambers which therefore consumed fatty fumes from the food; but these prior constructions are clearly distinguishable from my apparatus, in that while in them the fumes are consumed the foodbeing broiled next or between the fires was tainted by the gaseous products of combustion or the dust thereof, while in my apparatus, wherein there is an indirect communication between the broiling-chamber and the firechambers or sources of heat, the fatty fumes from the food being broiled are consumed without causing the food to be contaminated by the gaseous or other products of the fluidfuel burners or any other sources of heat employed, and this is a most important consideration, as will readily be understood.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling and air-superheating chamber and fire-chambers at the sides thereof, said broiling-chamber communicating indirectly with the fire-chambers which consume fatty fumes from the food, substantially as described.

2. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling and air-superheating chamber, fire-chambers at the sides thereof and communicating indirectly therewith and consuming fatty fumes from the food, and an upper conduit receiving and carrying oif fumes escaping at the front of the broiling-chamber, substantially as described.

3. A broiling apparatus made with a cen- IIO tral or intermediate food-broiling and air-superheating chamber, fire-chambers at the sides thereof and communicating indirectly therewith and consuming fatty fumes from the food, an upper conduit receiving and carrying off fumes escaping at the front of the broiling-chamber, and a hood projecting at the front of said conduit, substantially as described.

4. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling and air-superheating chamber, firechambers at the sides thereof and communicating indirectly therewith and consuming fatty fumes from the food, an upper chamber receiving the hot products and having an outlet therefor, and a conduit in said upper chamber communicating with its outlet and carrying off fumes escaping at the front of the broiling-chamber, substantially as described.

5. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling and air-superheating chamber, fire -chambers at the sides thereof and communicating indirectly therewith and consumingfatty fumes from the food, an upper chamber receiving the hot products and having an outlet therefor, a conduit in said upper chamber communicating with its outlet and carrying off fumes escaping at the front of the broiling-chamber, and a hood at the front of said conduit, substantially as described.

6. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate broiling-chamber, firechambers at the sides thereof, an upper-chamber receiving the hot products and having an outlet therefor, and a conduit in said upper chamber carrying off fumes escaping at the front of the broiling-chamber, and a conduit having openings through its rear portion, forming alateral passage for the hot prod nets of the fire-chambers toward the hot-product outlet, thereby inducing increased rearward draft of fatty fumes through the conduit, sub stantially as described. I

7. The combination,in a broiling apparatus, of a casing, a food-broiling and air-superheating chamber A therein, fire-chambers B B next the broilingchamber, chambers D D below the fire-chambers, fluid-fuel burners in the chambers D, and an outlet-chamber G above the chambers A B B, passages d D (1 being provided between the chambers A D D, substantially as described.

8. The combination, in a broiling apparatus, of a casing, a food-broiling and air-superheating chamber A therein, fire-chambers B B next the broiling-chamber, chambers D D below the fire-chambers, fluid-fuel burners in the chambers D D, a chamber G above the chambers A B B and having an outlet 9, passages (2 D (1' being provided between the chambers A D D, and a conduit M in the chamber G, substantially as described.

9. The combination, in a broiling apparatus, of a casing, a food-broiling and air-superheatr ing chamber A therein, fire-chambers B B next the broilingchamber, chambers D D below the fire-chambers, fluid-fuel burners in the chambers D D, a chamber G above the chambers A B B and having an outlet g, passages d D (1 being provided between the chambers A D D, a conduit M in the chamber G, and a hood L at the front of the conduit, substantially as described.

10. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling andairvided below the fire-chambers, passages d D d being also provided between the chambers A D D, and a wall re-euforcing and fumedistributing plate (Z in the passage D, substantially as described.

12. A broiling apparatus made with a central orintermediate broiling-chamber and fire-chambers at the sides thereof, the bottom plate or wall of the lire-chambers being extended within the broiling-chamber as a marginal sloping fat-dripping ledge, substantially as described.

13. A broiling apparatus made with a broiling-chamber having 'a lower vertical grid-ens tainin g pocket, substantially as described.

14:. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate broiling-chamber and fire-chambers at the sides thereof, said broil ingchamber having an open bottom comprising a sloping fat-dripping ledge and a central vertical grid-sustaining pocket, substantially as described.

15. A broiling apparatus made with a broiling-chamber having a lower vertical grid-sustaining pocket between its opposing cooking? walls, said walls having inwardly-extending lateral rails or projections guiding and centrally steadying the grid when in said pocket, substantially as described.

16. A broiling apparatus made with a central or intermediate food-broiling and airsuperheating chamber, fire-chambers at the sides thereof and communicating indirectly therewith to consume fatty fumes from the food, and fluid-fuel burners-heating the broiling-chamber cooking-walls and provided at their mixing-tubes and outside the burner or fire-chambers with openings admitting atmospheric air, substantially as described, whereby the gas and air mixture in the burners is not vitiated by the hot air and fattyfume mixture consumed in the tire-chambers, as set forth.

17. The combination, in a broiling apparatus, of a casing, a broiling-chamber A, firechambers B B at-the sides thereof, and burn- ITO I hot products from both fire-cl1ambers, and a conduit traversing the outlet-chamberand carrying fatty fumes from the front of the broiling-chamber, of a Water-back device sustained by or from/the fume-conduit Within the upper outlet-chamber and extending over thehot Waste-product outlets of the fire-cham bers, substantia1ly as described. 1

JAMES GIBBONS.

Witnesses: r

WALT R H. BABCOOK, R. MILEs ROBINSON.

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2821127A (en) * 1955-07-01 1958-01-28 Selas Corp Of America Broiler
US2925771A (en) * 1958-07-30 1960-02-23 Albert J Avetta Broilers
US20060042620A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Luoma Eugene H Portable vertical gas grill
US20100297321A1 (en) * 2009-05-20 2010-11-25 Jan Eric Strauch Barbecue Grill with Variably Positioned Food Basket

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2821127A (en) * 1955-07-01 1958-01-28 Selas Corp Of America Broiler
US2925771A (en) * 1958-07-30 1960-02-23 Albert J Avetta Broilers
US20060042620A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Luoma Eugene H Portable vertical gas grill
US20100297321A1 (en) * 2009-05-20 2010-11-25 Jan Eric Strauch Barbecue Grill with Variably Positioned Food Basket
US8418685B2 (en) * 2009-05-20 2013-04-16 Jan Eric Strauch Barbecue grill with variably positioned food basket

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