US4454426A - Linear electromagnetic machine - Google Patents

Linear electromagnetic machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US4454426A
US4454426A US06293825 US29382581A US4454426A US 4454426 A US4454426 A US 4454426A US 06293825 US06293825 US 06293825 US 29382581 A US29382581 A US 29382581A US 4454426 A US4454426 A US 4454426A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
voltage
flux
magnet
coil
fluid
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US06293825
Inventor
Glendon M. Benson
Original Assignee
NEW PROCESS IND Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K7/00Arrangements for handling mechanical energy structurally associated with dynamo-electric machines, e.g. structural association with mechanical driving motors or auxiliary dynamo-electric machines
    • H02K7/18Structural association of electric generators with mechanical driving motors, e.g. turbine
    • H02K7/1869Linear generators; sectional generators
    • H02K7/1876Linear generators; sectional generators with reciprocating, linearly oscillating or vibrating parts
    • H02K7/1884Linear generators; sectional generators with reciprocating, linearly oscillating or vibrating parts structurally associated with free piston engines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02GHOT GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT ENGINE PLANTS; USE OF WASTE HEAT OF COMBUSTION ENGINES; NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F02G1/00Hot gas positive-displacement engine plants
    • F02G1/04Hot gas positive-displacement engine plants of closed-cycle type
    • F02G1/043Hot gas positive-displacement engine plants of closed-cycle type the engine being operated by expansion and contraction of a mass of working gas which is heated and cooled in one of a plurality of constantly communicating expansible chambers, e.g. Stirling cycle type engines
    • F02G1/0435Hot gas positive-displacement engine plants of closed-cycle type the engine being operated by expansion and contraction of a mass of working gas which is heated and cooled in one of a plurality of constantly communicating expansible chambers, e.g. Stirling cycle type engines the engine being of the free piston type
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K33/00Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system
    • H02K33/02Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system with armatures moved one way by energisation of a single coil system and returned by mechanical force, e.g. by springs
    • H02K33/04Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system with armatures moved one way by energisation of a single coil system and returned by mechanical force, e.g. by springs wherein the frequency of operation is determined by the frequency of uninterrupted AC energisation
    • H02K33/06Motors with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating magnet, armature or coil system with armatures moved one way by energisation of a single coil system and returned by mechanical force, e.g. by springs wherein the frequency of operation is determined by the frequency of uninterrupted AC energisation with polarised armatures
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K35/00Generators with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating coil system, magnet, armature or other part of the magnetic circuit
    • H02K35/02Generators with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating coil system, magnet, armature or other part of the magnetic circuit with moving magnets and stationary coil systems

Abstract

A linear electromagnetic machine has a stator with a coil mounted thereon. A reciprocating element has permanent magnet segments of alternating polarity so that reciprocation of said element relative to said stator in an axial direction causes periodic flux reversal through the coil to induce an alternating voltage therein. The magnetized segments are of equal axial extent and are axially spaced by transitional regions that are of axial extent substantially less than that of the magnetized segments. Flux return and core elements associated with the stator provides a relatively low reluctance magnetic path for flux lines resulting from magnetization of the permanent magnets wherein the reluctance is generally independent of the position of the reciprocating element.

Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to electromagnetic machines which transform mechanical energy into electrical energy or vice versa, and more particularly to linear electromagnetic machines.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The need for efficient conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy or mechanical energy into electrical energy is so well established as to require no elaboration. The disscusion that follows will be in terms of engine-driven alternators, it being understood that the same general considerations apply to electric motors.

In many applications, the mechanical energy input is provided by the reciprocation of a positive displacement mechanical element such as the piston in a Diesel, Brayton, or Stirling engine. The most common alternators are rotary machines which utilize a kinematic converter to transform the reciprocal motion of the positive displacement element to the rotary motion required by the alternator. However, the kinematic converter is subject to parasitic friction and life-shortening wear, with most such converters requiring separate bearings and lubrication systems using specially formulated lubricants. Thus, the requirement of such a kinematic converter adds cost, weight, and bulk of the machine.

Furthermore rotary machines tend to be relatively heavy and inefficient. For example, a typical 10-kilowatt alternator is 12 inches in diameter, 18 inches in length, weighs approximately 100 pounds, and has an efficiency on the order of 80%. To be sure, there are rotary machines having a lower weight/power ratio and a higher efficiency, but the machines exhibiting these desirable characteristics tend to be central station machines in the 100 megawatt range.

Some of the above deficiencies may be eliminated by employing a linear configuration wherein a reciprocating electromagnetic element is directly connected to the positive displacement element of the free-piston engine. These linear electromagnetic machines may be classified generally into two groups. First, are the Henry-type machines in which the magnetic field reciprocates relative to an armature coil, thereby inducing voltage in the coil by the well-known Henry law of induction. Second, are the Faraday-type machines in which the magnetic flux imposed on the armature coil is made to vary periodically with time, thereby inducing voltage in the coil by the well known Faraday law of induction. The prior art is replete with examples of both types of machines.

Representative of Henry-type machines are those disclosed in the following U.S. Patents:

Ostenberg, U.S. Pat. No. 2,362,151

Martin, U.S. Pat. No. 2,842,688

Dickinson, U.S. Pat. No. 2,944,160

Stauder, U.S. Pat. No. 3,024,374

Cutkosky, U.S. Pat. No. 3,465,161.

Representative of Faraday-type machines are those described in the following U.S. Patents:

Christian, U.S. Pat. No. 2,928,959

Schmidt, et al., U.S. Pat. No. 2,992,342

Wysocki, U.S. Pat. No. 3,094,635

James, Jr., U.S. Pat. No. 3,105,153

Dawes, U.S. Pat. No. 3,206,609

Colgate, U.S. Pat. No. 3,234,395

Montpetit, et al., U.S. Pat. No. 3,443,111

Wills, U.S. Pat. No. 3,629,595.

However, while the elimination of the kinematic converter overcomes some of the problems discussed above, the voltage output of prior art linear alternators renders such machines unsuitable for certain applications. More particularly, any AC power generation equipment that is to be connected to a power grid must provide a substantially pure sinusoidal output waveform at precisely controlled frequency and phase. While the Faraday-type machines of the prior art tend to be simpler to construct than the Henry-type machines, they are variable reluctance machines which are subject to pronounced cogging action. This renders them very difficult to control with a free-piston engine, so that a sinusoidal output voltage is virtually unattainable.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a linear electromagnetic machine wherein even small versions possess the high efficiencies and low weight/power ratios that were heretofore attainable only in central station machines. In an illustrative embodiment, a 11.25-kilowatt machine according to the present invention weighs approximately 25 pounds and is 98% efficient. Moreover, the output waveform from an alternator embodiment of the present invention is substantially purely sinusoidal, and may be controlled to maintain constant frequency and voltage.

Broadly, the present invention is a constant reluctance Faraday-type machine. High efficiency and low weight are achieved by the use of a geometry in which the reciprocating element comprises a piston to which is mounted a tubular permanent magnet having multiple magnetic poles of alternating radial polarity. The permanent magnet reciprocates relative to radially inboard stator coils, thereby periodically reversing the magnet flux imposed on the coils to induce a sinusoidal output voltage. The use of a reciprocating permanent magnet provides a lighter weight system than if the coil were moved, and provides a lower reluctance since a moving coil would present a low permeability. In order to acheive suitable power levels, a moving coil design typically would require increased flux linkage which could be achieved either by providing more permanent magnet material or by adding iron teeth to the reciprocating element to reduce the reluctance. Locating the coils radially inboard of the permanant magnet reciprocator leads to greater efficiency since the coils require less cooper to provide the same number of coil turns. Thus there is less resistive heat loss for a given current density.

According to a further aspect of the present invention, torquing means subjects the permanent magnet reciprocator to a unidirectional torque to maintain rotation thereof. This generates a hydrodynamic fluid film which causes the magnet to float in the stator bore eithout contacting the walls. The torquing means may be electrical (torquing coil) or mechanical (turbine vanes on piston).

According to a further aspect of the invention, the permanent magnet reciprocates at a damped resonant frequency synchronous with the electric frequency. In an alternator embodiment, working fluid pressure fluctuations operate on one face of the piston, and a bounce fluid (gas spring) operates on the opposite face. The spring effect produced by the bounce gas and the working fluid, and the mass of the magnet/piston reciprocator define a spring-mass system having a characteristic natural frequency. The system includes means such as a servo-controlled bellows for varying the means pressure of the bounce gas and working fluid, and thus controlling the frequency. This permits very precise control of the frequency, while a small pressure impulse actuation of the bellows may be used to momentarily change the frequency and thus produces a phase shift of the electrical output relative to a fixed frequency standard. Thus, the electrical output of the alternator can be modulated and thereby phase locked to an electric grid.

The system frequency may be rendered substantially independent of load by the provision of a second servo-controlled bellows operative to change the volume of the bounce chamber in response to changes in the load. This compensates for the load-dependent inductive spring force that acts on the reciprocating permanant magnet. In order to maintain resonant mechanical oscillation at a fixed frequency, the spring coefficient of the bounce gas is reduced as the load (current) increases.

The stroke of the permanent magnet is determined by the load on the pressure means acting on the piston head. In the case of a free-piston engine driven alternator, the stroke of the permanent magnet may be varied by controlling the combustion of the fuel or the phase angle of the displacer depending on the nature of the engine. In this way, the voltage output may be maintained at a constant desired level.

The present invention further provides methods of synchronizing two or more reciprocating permanant magnets so that their respective outputs are either in phase, or phasespaced to permit polyphase electrical operation. Furthermore, a network is disclosed for interfacing a single-phase machine of the present invention to a three-phase load.

For a further understanding of the nature and advantages of the present invention, reference should be made to the remaining portions of the specification and to the attached drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a linear alternator and control system according to the present invention;

FIGS. 2A-B are electrical schematic and phasor diagrams for the linear alternator;

FIG. 2C is a plot of terminal voltage as a function of reactive voltage drop;

FIG. 3 is a sectioned oblique view of the alternator stator;

FIG. 4 is a sectioned oblique view of the alternator reciprocator;

FIGS. 5A-C are sectional views illustrating the magnetic circuit of the linear alternator;

FIG. 5D is a plot of the flux linking the coil as a function of the linear position of the reciprocator;

FIGS. 6A-B illustrate mechanisms for imparting rotation to the reciprocator;

FIGS. 7A-B show a preferred configuration for a foil-wound coil;

FIG. 8 is a plot of frequency as a function of mean pressure;

FIG. 9 is a plot of drag force as a function of inductive spring force;

FIGS. 10A-C are plots illustrating the linearity of the effective spring force as a function of piston position;

FIG. 11 is a schematic of a circuit for phase locking multiple alternators; and

FIG. 12 is a schematic of a circuit for interfacing to a three-phase network.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Overview and General Principles of Operation

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a system 2 including a linear alternator 5 with associated driving and control systems. In its broadest aspect, alternator 5 includes a permanent magnet reciprocator 10 which oscillates linearly with respect to stator mounted armature coils 12a and 12b to produce a sinusoidal output voltage at a set of output terminals 15. Reciprocator 10 includes a crown 16 which is acted upon by working fluid in a working fluid space 17 with pressure fluctuations being provided by any convenient pressure fluctuation source 18. In an illustrative system, this may be the displacer piston 20 of a free-piston Stirling engine. Typically, a single engine would drive two identical alternators in phase opposition to avoid mechanical imbalances.

The working fluid in working fluid space 17 acts on one face of piston crown 16 while bounce gas within a bounce chamber 22 acts on the opposite face. As will be discussed in greater detail below, the operating frequency controlled by a first servo-controlled bellows 25 which controls the means pressure within the working fluid and a second servo-controlled bellows 27 which controls the volume of bounce chamber 22 and the mean pressure within the bounce gas. Additionally, the stroke is controlled by a third servo-controlled bellows 28 which controls the volume of the displacer bounce chamber, designated 29.

Prior to describing the precise geometrical configuration of alternator 5, the electrical characteristics will be set forth. The linear reciprocating electromagnetic machine is closely analagous to the conventional rotating electrical machine for which a large body of theory and test results exists. The primary difference between the linear machine and the rotating one is the shape of the magnetic circuit and its influence on losses, reactances, and flux leakage. These differences may best be illustrated by considering an alternator embodiment as shown in FIG. 1 and as will be discussed below in detail, the design of the present invention is equally applicable to electric motors.

All alternators produce an alternating voltage which is sinusoidal in the ideal case. The voltage is produced by the changes of magnetic flux linking the coils of the machine, with the voltage resulting from the change of flux being found from the following well-known Faraday equation: ##EQU1## where N=number of turns in coil.

A sinusoidal flux variation is required for a sinusoidal voltage.

In a rotary machine the coils rotate through a magnetic field having a flux density which varies with respect to the angular position. Thus, the variation in the flux linkage is found from the following equation. ##EQU2## where (dθ/dt)=rotational velocity

(dφ/dθ)=change of flux with respect to angular position.

Typically, the rotational velocity is constant and the change of angular flux with respect to position is designed to be as close to sinsusoidal as possible.

For the linear alternator, the motion of the coil or other moving part is oscillatory and variation in flux linkage is found from the following equation: ##EQU3## where (dx/dt)=velocity of reciprocator

(dφ/dx)=variation of flux with respect to linear position.

For a sinusoidal voltage waveform and a sinusoidal displacement, the variation of flux with respect to linear position must be a constant, that is, the flux φ must be a linear function of displacement. Non-linearities in the flux function may be compensated by corresponding departures from sinusoidal behavior in the displacement in order to achieve substantially sinusoidal voltage.

FIG. 2A is the simplified equivalent circuit for linear alternator 5. The alternator includes an ideal voltage generator 30 having an output voltage EG in series with the reactance Xcoil of armature coil 12. A resistive load 35 characterized by a resistance Rload is coupled across output terminals 15. While the no-load voltage may be found from Equations 1 and 3 above, once current is drawn by a load, such current flowing in armature coil 12 produces a counter magnetomotive force (mmf) acting to oppose the permanent magnet flux. This counter mmf has a phase relationship to the permanent magnet mmf dependent upon the nature of the load. For a purely resistive load, the current is in phase with the voltage and the counter mmf is more than 90° out of phase with the permanent magnet mmf (the phase angle is 90+δ). The armature current normally causes a reduction in flux and a corresonding reduction in voltage.

FIG. 2B is a phasor diagram illustrating the voltage change caused by armature current for a generalized load. The terminal volage ET and the no-load generator voltage EG are out of phase by a power angle δ while the terminal voltage and the current I are out of phase by a phase angle θ which is zero for a purely resistive load.

The resultant flux change is the vector sum of the variation due to motion and that due to armature current. The armature current is in phase with the armature voltage for a purely resistive load. A reactive component of the current lags or leads the voltage depending on the nature of the load. For an inductive reactance the current lags the voltage; for a capacitive reactance, the current leads the voltage. For a resistive load, the flux produced by the armature current results in a voltage vector which causes a decrease in terminal voltage so that as the armature current increases, the terminal voltage decreases. It will be appreciated that for a given frequency, the voltage EG will increase when the stroke increases.

FIG. 2C shows a plot of terminal voltage magnitude against reactive voltage drop. The plot is a quarter circle having radius EG. By varying the resistance of the load, the power angle may be varied to maximize the power delivered to the load. The peak power point occurs for a power angle of 45°, the output voltage and current at this power angle being designated E45° and I45°. It is noted that E45° =EG /√2. For resistive loads that draw a current greater than I45°, the power is less than maximum power because the voltage drops off faster than the current increases. It is desirable that the alternator operate in the region where the current is less than I45°. For currents in this operating range, the voltage varies between E45° and EO. This variation in voltage may be avoided by having a variable stroke (see below) which would keep the voltage at a level less than EO. Since some overload capacity is normally required, a rated power should be established at a level less than the maximum value. This condition is shown at a power angle δ less than 45°, the operating point being designated by a current IR and a terminal voltage ER. To achieve good regulation, a variable stroke is used to keep the voltage at ER for loads drawing up to IR, allowing regulation to deteriorate under overload conditions. Alternately, the voltage may be maintained at E45° at the full load range (zero to maximum power) by varying the stroke through a greater range (70.7%-100% of full stroke) and then allowing regulation to deteriorate under overload conditions while maintaining full stroke.

Geometrical and Material Design Considerations

As shown in Equations 1 and 3, the slope of the flux-vs.-displacement curve is a major factor for determining the no-load voltage of alternator 5. The maximum permanent magnet flux linking the coils may be expressed as follows:

φ.sub.m =F.sub.l AB                                    (4)

where

φm =maximum flux (maxwells)

A=pole area (cm2)

B=induction (gauss)

Fl =dimensionless leakage factor

As will be seen below with reference to the preferred embodiment, the maximum slope at the midstroke position is approximately given by: ##EQU4## where xm =maximum displacement. For sinusoidal oscillation, the velocity at midstroke is given by: ##EQU5## where f=frequency of oscillation. The rms voltage may be determined by combining Equations 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and is given as follows: ##EQU6## The voltage change caused by armature current was discussed in connection with FIGS. 2A-C. The relationship for the voltage component due to armature current can be found in terms of the flux change caused by the current. This flux, also designated φ, is given as follows: ##EQU7## where μ=magnet permeabilty

Fs =dimensionless armature flux fringe factor

L=path length through magnet

(dI/dt)=time rate of change of armature current.

For sinusoidal variation of the current, ##EQU8## where IO =current amplitude. The rms value of the induced voltage is as follows: ##EQU9## Recalling that the maximum power occurs for Ei =EG /√2, the value of IO at peak power is found from Equations 7 and 9, and the rms value of I is: ##EQU10## The maximum power is this value of I times the terminal voltage ET =EG /√2, and noting that the product of A and L is the volume V of material, the maximum power is given by: ##EQU11##

Thus, for a permanent magnet linear alternator, maximum power is directly proportional to the frequency, to the volume of permanent magnet material, and to the BH product of the magnet material. The maximum power is proportional to the square of the leakage factor so that flux leakage will greatly decrease the power. For example, a leakage of 20% (Fl =0.80) would reduce the maximum power by 36% relative to an ideal non-leakage design. Obviously, design configurations which have low leakage are desired since such designs make more effective use of the permanent magnet material and reduce the amount of permanent material required for a given power. The leakage flux is reduced by using designs with thin magnets which yield greater pole area for a given permanent magnet volume than do thick magnet configurations. Setting the iron core cross-sectional areas high enough to ensure flux densities well below saturation also reduces the flux leakage. As will be seen below, the configuration of the present invention achieves these benefits.

Geometrical Configuration

FIG. 3 is a sectioned oblique view illustrating a preferred geometrical configuration for the stator, designated generally by reference numeral 40. Stator 40 includes an outer cylindrical wall portion 41, a central portion 42 which carries coils 12a and 12b, and an annular end wall 43. Stator portions 41 and 42 define an annular bore 44 to accommodate reciprocation of the tubular permanent magnet (to be described below). Stator end wall 43 carries a cylindrical bellows housing 45, which accommodates bellows 27. The region of the bellows housing interior that is outside bellows 27 defines a portion of bounce chamber 22. Bellows housing 45 is formed with radial passageways 46 adjacent stator end wall 43 to provide fluid communication between bore 44 and the interior of bellows housing 45.

Coils 12a and 12b are copper foil-wound coils located within enclosures in respective iron core elements 48a and 48b. Core elements 48a and 48b are each of split construction to accommodate the respective foil wound coils. A preferred coil configuration will be described below. The core elements are shaped to minimize the amount of nonessential iron, being separated by an insulative spacer 50. A hollow titanium tie bolt 52 holds the core elements and spacer rigidly to bellows housing 45 in a coaxial relation thereto to define stator central portion 42. Outer stator portion 41 carries iron flux return elements 57a and 57b opposite the respective coils. The core elements and the flux return elements are of laminated construction, comprising tapered stamped silicon steel laminations. The construction is similar to that of transformers. Stator portions 41 and 43, and spacer 50 are made of any nonmagnetic structural material such as fiberglass or Micarta.

FIG. 4 is a sectioned oblique view of reciprocator 10. Reciprocator 10 includes a tubular permanent magnet 70 mounted coaxially to piston crown 16 and sized to reciprocate within annular bore 44. Magnet 70 is subdivided into five magnetic segments 70a-e of alternating radial polarity, the axial extent of the segments being such that the center-to-center segment spacing is one-half of the center-to-center coil spacing. When reciprocator 10 is in place within annular bore 44, bounce chamber 22 is formed. The bounce chamber is defined by the portion of bore 44 between magnet segment 70a and stator end wall 43, the region between piston crown 16 and core 48b, the hollow region of tie bolt 52, and the interior of bellows housing 45 except for the region occupied by bellows 27. The working fluid in working fluid space 17 is typically the same as the bounce fluid within bounce chamber 22, in which case the narrow clearance between the outer surface of tubular magnet 70 and the inner surface of stator outer portion 41 forms a gas seal.

FIGS. 5A-C illustrate in schematic sectioned form the flux coupling properties of the configuration described above. Broadly, the permanent magnet mmf couples to the magnetic circuit defined by the core elements and the flux return elements in a manner that varies as the reciprocator moves.

FIG. 5A shows reciprocator 10 in its leftmost (bottom dead center) position in which magnet segment 70a is completely disengaged from the magnetic circuit. Magnet segments 70b and 70c cooperate with core element 48a and flux return element 57a to form a low reluctance magnetic flux path 80 that completely encircles coil 12a while magnet segments 70d and 70e similarly cooperate with core element 48b and flux return element 57b.

FIG. 5B shows reciprocator 10 in its midstroke position wherein magnet segments 70b and 70d are directly opposite the coil centers. In this position, the low reluctance flux path 82 does not encircle coil 12a.

FIG. 5C shows reciprocator at its rightmost (top dead center) position in which segment 70e is disengaged from the magnetic circuit. Segments 70a and 70b cooperate with core element 48a and flux return element 57a to form a low reluctance flux path 83 that encircles coil 12a while segments 70c and 70d similarly cooperate with core element 48b and flux return element 57b. However, the direction of the flux is reversed with respect to that in the position of FIG. 5A.

FIG. 5D is a plot of the flux linking the coils as a function of reciprocator position. As can be seen, the flux curve is highly linear in the central region, with departures at the ends of stroke due to flux leakage.

The basic rationale of the geometrical configuration may now be seen. While from an electrical point of view, coils 12a and 12b could be located radially outboard of tubular magnet 70, such a configuration would require larger coils. However, for a given current density in the copper conductors of the coils, the ohmic heating losses are proportional to the weight of copper used. Thus, configurations which reduce the weight of copper not only save the cost of the copper, but also reduce the losses (if the current density is not raised). Similarly, configurations which reduce the iron in the magnetic circuit for a given flux density not only lower the weight but also reduce the eddy current and hysteresis losses in the core. Locating the coils and core elements radially inboard of the tubular magnet clearly leads to physically smaller elements. Moreover, in order to achieve designs with low copper and iron weights without having excessive flux leakage it is essential that the magnetic flux paths be short and the average flux density in the area inscribed by the coils be high. The configuration with the coils inside the magnet cylinder provides a higher flux density than would be provided for a configuration with the coil outside.

The preferred embodiment utilizes two coils and five magnet segments. It will be readily appreciated that an embodiment with a single coil and three magnet segments would work, but that an embodiment with a larger number of coils and segments provides better magnet utilization. Generally, for N coils there would be (2N+1) magnetic segments, but arrangments with more than about seven magnet segments do not appreciably improve the utilization factor beyond that of the preferred embodiment with five segments.

Magnet 70 is preferably made of a material which exhibits a linear demagnetization curve, such as exhibited by ceramic-10 and samarium-cobalt type permanent magnets. Typical specific weight values for these permanent magnets are 1 lb/kw for ceramic magnets and 0.3 lb/kw for samarium-cobalt magnets when operated at 60 Hz. Although samarium-cobalt would appear preferable on this basis, it is significantly more costly than ceramic materials, so that ceramic material is preferred.

Table 1 sets forth the representative dimensions and characterisitics for a relatively small unit according to the present invention.

              TABLE 1______________________________________Characteristics of Linear Alternator______________________________________Voltage               240       voltsRated Power           7,500     wattsMaximum Power         11,250    wattsStroke                1.5       inchesFrequency             60        HzPermanent Magnet Material                 Ceramic   10Permanent Magnet Thickness                 0.6       inchesPermanent Magnet Area/segment                 18.7      inch.sup.2Permanent Magnet Mean Radius                 2.2       inchesPermanent Axial Length                 7.35      inches(1.35 inch segments; 0.15 inch transitions)Coil turns            52        turnsWeights:Permanent Magnets     11        lbIron Cores            11        lbCopper Coil           3         lbTotal                 25        lb______________________________________          Rated Power  Max Power______________________________________Losses:Copper         40.3 w       161.2 wIron           27.8 w        27.8 wTotal          68.1 w       189.0 wEfficiency     99%          98%Specific Weight          3.3 lb/kw    2.2 lb/kw______________________________________

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate alternate techniques for exerting a unidirectional torque on reciprocator 10. The purpose of exerting this torque is to impart unidirectional rotation to the reciprocator so that a hydrodynamic fluid film is generated to keep the reciprocator from frictionally engaging the walls of annular bore 44.

FIG. 6A illustrates a stator mounted torquing conductor 90 in which axially flowing alternating current is caused to flow synchronously with the reciprocator motion, and interact with the permanent magnet segments to induce the desired torque. Conductor 90 preferably comprises a very thin sheet of copper which is mounted to stator central portion 42, and carries a central circumferentially extending bus connection 92 and a pair of outer circumferentially extending bus connections 95, thus defining first and second conductor segments 96a and 96b. Central bus connection 92 is axially located opposite the coil center. Conductor 90 typically has an angular extent of 360° around stator central portion 42. It should, however, be understood that current will flow axially in response to an impressed voltage between the common central bus connection and the outer bus connections. An AC voltage derived from the coil voltage is applied between bus connection 92 and bus connections 95. This voltage is applied through a capacitor 98. Assume, for example, that the current is flowing away from central bus connection 92 when the reciprocator is in the position of FIG. 5A. When the reciprocator is in the position of FIG. 5C, the current would be flowing toward the center bus connection. However, this 180° reversal of the current polarity is also accompanied by a shift in the magnet position so that the torque is unidirectional. The magnitude of the torque will depend on the amplitude and phase of the current flow through conductor 90. Since the copper sheet material is typically only a few mils in thickness, the resistance is sufficiently high that the full coil voltage may be applied. Otherwise, any convenient voltage derived from the output voltage may be utilized. While the illustrated embodiment utilizes a torquing conductor that is radially inboard of the reciprocator, it should be understood that an embodiment having the torquing conductor radially outboard of the tubular magnet is generally equally viable, although it is no longer possible to directly connect the conductor to the armature coils.

FIG. 6B illustrates an alternate technique for imparting the unidirectional torque utilizing a turbine drive mechanism wherein the working fluid is utilized to impart the torque. The clearance between tubular magnet 70 and outer stator portion 41 is somewhat exaggerated for clarity. Piston crown 16 is fitted with a vaned impeller comprising a plurality of impulse turbine blades 102 and a reinforcing ring 105. Outer stator wall 41 is formed with a plurality of radially extending fluid ports 105, an internal manifold 107, and a plurality of obliquely extending nozzle passageways 108 communicating to the interior of working fluid space 17. Incoming working fluid flows through fluid ports 105 into manifold 107, and then through nozzles 108 to impinge on turbine blades 102 to impart rotation to the reciprocator. The nozzles are located so as to engage the turbine blades near top dead center.

Alternately, the reciprocator may be floated in the stator bore by the use of a hydrostatic fluid bearing that is provided by orifices 110, shown in FIG. 3, opposite the tubular magnet. Pressurized fluid may be injected through these orifices during start up until hydrodynamic action is sufficient to continue floating the permanent magnet.

FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate a preferred configuration for the copper foil-wound coils 12a and 12b. FIG. 7A shows the conductor for coil 12a prior to the coil's being wound on a suitable mandrel 118, shown in phantom. The coil conductor is generally Z-shaped having parallel strip portions 120a and 120a' which are offset by a distance slightly greater than the strip width. The strip portions are joined at a central stepped portion 121a. Strip portions 120a and 120a' are formed at their remote ends with respective connection tabs 122a and 122a'. Central stepped portion 121a defines the radially innermost portion of the coil, and the two strip portions extending away therefrom are wound in opposite directions on the cylindrical mandrel surface. When the coil is wound, tabs 122a and 122a' protrude from the radially outermost coil surface, and thus present the connection points for the coil. It will be appreciated that current flowing between connection tabs 122a and 122a' flows in the same direction over both strip portions of the coil, initially flowing in strip portion 120a, spiralling radially inward, and then in strip portion 120a', spiralling radially outward, but with the same angular sense.

FIG. 7B shows the bus connections to the wound coils. Corresponding reference numerals are used for coil 12b except that elements have the alphabetic designator "b." The lengths of the strip portions are chosen so that once the coils are wound, connector tabs 122a and 122a' are located generally proximate one another while tabs 122b and 122b' are located on opposite sides of coil 12b. For a series connection of coils 12a and 12b, a first axially extending bus bar 127 is connected to connection tab 122b', a second axially extending bus bar 128 is connected between connection tabs 122b and 122a', and a third axially extending bus bar 130 is connected to connection tab 122a. Core elements 48a and 48b, spacer 50, and bellows housing 45 are provided with appropriate grooves to accomodate the bus bars, with appropriate electrical insulation preventing any current flow other than through the series-connected coils.

Operation and Control

Broadly, the control system incorporates multiple feedback loops, with the primary controlled variables being frequency, output voltage, and, where appropriate, engine temperature. The manipulated variables are engine mean pressure, the volume of bounce chamber 22, the volume of displacer bounce chamber 29, and a displacer damping rate (to be discussed below). Additionally, either the rate of heat input into the engine or the power output from the engine would be considered manipulated variables.

The spring effect produced by the bounce gas and working fluid, and the mass of reciprocator 10 define a spring-mass system having a characteristic natural frequency. This frequency may be increased by either reducing the mass of the reciprocator or by increasing the effective spring coefficient of the bounce gas and working fluid. As a practical matter, the frequency is most easily controlled by changing the effective spring coefficient of the working and bounce fluids. This is accomplished by varying the mean pressure in both fluids, it being understood that both fluids should have the same mean pressure in order that the reciprocator not experience unidirectional motion toward one end or the other of the unit. FIG. 8 is a plot of oscillation frequency as a function of mean pressure for frequencies in the neighborhood of 60 Hz, the design frequency for coupling to an AC grid.

As discussed above, the mean pressure in working fluid space 17 and the mean pressure and volume of bounce chamber 22 may be varied by varying the settings of bellows 25 and 27. The setting of bellows 25 is controlled by a first servo-controlled plunger mechanism 140 while the setting of bellows 27 is controlled by a second servo-controlled plunger mechanism 142. Plunger mechanisms 140 and 142 are controlled by signals from appropriate frequency control circuitry 145 which monitors the AC output at output terminals 15 and the AC from a frequency standard such as the power grid to maintain the frequency in synchronous relationship. The phase may be shifted if necessary by momentarily changing the spring coefficient to momentarily change the frequency, thus producing a net phase shift of desired magnitude.

In addition to the gas spring forces acting on reciprocator 10, the linear electromagnetic machine of the present invention exhibits a total reactive force Fr acting on the reciprocator in phase with the armature current. One component is the drag force associated with the alternator (or the driving force in a motor embodiment). The other component is the inductive spring force. The drag force is in phase with the internal emf while the inductive spring force lags by 90°. FIG. 9 is a plot of the drag force, plotted on a vertical axis, as a function of the inductive spring force, plotted on a horizontal axis. In order to maintain resonant mechanical oscillation at a fixed frequency (to match the line frequency), the spring force associated with bounce chamber 22 must be reduced as the load (current) increases. This may be accomplished by varying the volume of bounce chamber 22 as determined by the setting of bellows 27. Bellows 27 is fully extended at no load, partially collapsed at peak load, and fully collapsed for a short circuit condition.

As discussed above, the degree to which the oscillation of reciprocator 10 is sinusoidal is determined by the linearity of the total effective gas spring force as a function of position. FIG. 10A shows plots of force versus reciprocator position, with the origin taken at zero force and midstroke. A first plot 150 shows the force exerted by the bounce gas in chamber 22, normalized to pass through the origin. This curve is highly nonlinear. A second plot 152 shows the additive effect of the bounce gas force and the working gas force, and it can be seen that this curve is more nearly linear with the non-linearity compensating for the non-linearity of the flux curve. Both curves are for the bounce gas and working gas pressure ratio equal to 1.931.

FIG. 10B is a plot of working fluid pressure over a cycle. The curve is not sinusoidal, but rather the high pressure portion of the cycle is shorter than the low pressure portion of the cycle. The peak of the pressure, designated 160 corresponds to the reciprocator top dead center (rightmost position) at no load, while a point, designated 162, on the rise of the pressure curve, corresponds to the reciprocator top dead center position at full load. FIG. 10C is a plot of the resultant power piston motion for an intermediate load, and it can be seen that the motion is more nearly sinusoidal, even though the working fluid pressure wave is highly non-sinusoidal.

As discussed above, voltage regulation in the desired operating range is maintained by controlling the stroke of reciprocator 10. The stroke is determined by the load on the pressure generating means, in the illustrative embodiment the displacer piston of a Stirling engine. As is known regarding Stirling engine behavior, the stroke and phase of the displacer motion are extremely important, thermodynamically, in determining the behavior of the power piston, in this case, reciprocator 10. A typical engine design is characterized by a displacer frequency ratio of approximately 0.98, as determined by the mass of displacer 20 and the effective spring rate of displacer bounce chamber 29. Due to low regenerator pressure drop, the damping ratio is less than 0.1, so that displacer motion is very sensitive to small changes in frequency and damping ratio. As load decreases, the displacer phase angle increases towards 180° in order to drop the power output of the engine, while piston stroke remains relatively high. In this way, constant output voltage is available from the alternator, even at low power levels. At very low power levels, a small amount of negative displacer damping is typically necessary to achieve the desired stroke and phase angle.

The frequency may be controlled by changing the effective spring rate of bounce chamber 29, as determined by the setting of bellows 28 which is controlled by a servo-controlled plunger mechanism 170. The damping parameter may be controlled by coupling displacer 20 to an alternator and drawing varying amounts of current therefrom. This alternator may be configured along the lines of alternator 5, in which case displacer 20 carries a tubular magnet 172 which interacts with a fixed coil 175. This is shown schematically in FIG. 1. Appropriate stroke control circuitry 177 senses the voltage at output terminals 15, and changes the setting of plunger mechanism 170 and the load on coil 175 as required.

The active volume of bounce chamber 22 must decrease as load decreases to maintain operation at the 60 Hz design frequency. The inductive spring constant decreases with load, and this drop in spring constant must be countered by increasing the pressure ratio and spring constant of the bounce gas. In addition, a decrease in piston stroke causes a small reduction in equivalent spring rate because of non-linear gas behavior. This effect is also accommodated by changing the bounce chamber volume.

The wide range of control options available indicates that the transient response of the system may be tailored to suit necessary requirements, and while a Stirling engine is inherently stable, the overall system's stability and transient response is largely determined by the feedback control system. The particular control circuitry and algorithms are generally familiar to those skilled in the art. It is noted that a microprocessor controller would typically be preferred, although it is possible to implement suitable control logic in discrete form.

In some applications, it is desired to operate a number of alternators in phase-locked relationship, whether or not driven from the same pressure variation source. This may be accomplished as shown in FIG. 11 by connecting the terminals of multiple alternators (5, 5') in series, and connecting a capacitor 180 across the output terminals of the series combination. Load 35 is connected across capacitor 180. The capacitor is selected such that the inductance of the series-connected alternators and the overall capacitance of the circuit form a resonant circuit having a resonant frequency equal to that of the mechanical system. The energy transfer produced when the inductance in the resonant circuit is forcibly oscillated is well known, and this energy transfer produces a synchronizing force that phase-locks each of the reciprocating permanent magnets. The phase-locking may be further assisted by having the bounce chambers for the various alternators in fluid communication with one another.

While the linear electromagnetic machine of the present invention is a single-phase device, it is possible to utilize it in connection with a three-phase electrical network. A first method utilizes three separate linear machines, each connected to one leg of the three-phase network, with each machine phase-spaced at a constant 120° relative phase angle by trim-controlling its frequency, utilizing the control bellows as described above. A second method also employs three separate linear machines, each connected to one leg of the three-phase network, with each machine phase-spaced at a constant 120° relative phase by modulating the frequency through timing of the pressure means.

FIG. 12 shows a third method which utilizes but a single machine coupled to a three-phase network. The three terminals of the network are designated 190a, 190b, and 190c, with an optional ground point being designated 190d. While a wye connection is shown, a Δ connection could also be used. Alternator 5 is connected in series with an inductance 192, with a capacitor 195 being connected across the series combination. The common terminal between alternator 5 and inductor 192 is connected to network 190a, while the terminals of the capacitor 195 are connected to network terminals 190b and 190c. The capacitor and inductor are each sized to have power ratings approximately 53% of that of the alternator. The three-phase output remains phase-locked, independent of load drawn by three-phase system. Such a transformation system can also be used for a linear motor according to the present invention.

Conclusion

In summary it can be seen that the present invention provides a highly compact and efficient design for a linear electromagnetic machine having a low weight/power ratio rivaling that of much larger rotary machines. The radially poled tubular magnet reciprocator oscillates at a damped resonant frequency which permits the frequency, stroke, and phase to be easily controlled so that even small machines are suitable for connection to a power grid. The integral torquing means provides a method for using a working or bounce fluid for self-acting bearings for support and sealing.

While the above provides a full and complete disclosure of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, various modifications, alternate contructions, and equivalents may be employed without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention. It has already been mentioned that while an alternator embodiment is disclosed, the present invention applies to AC linear motors. Additionally, while parameters for a relatively small machine are set forth, the design scales with the power output being proportional to the cube of the scaling dimension, so that comparable weight/power ratios are achieved for varying sizes. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (17)

I claim:
1. A linear electromagnetic machine comprising:
means defining a stator;
a coil mounted on said stator;
a reciprocating element having permanent magnet material with magnetized segments of alternating polarity so that reciprocation of said element relative to said stator in an axial direction causes periodic flux reversal through said coil to induce an alternating voltage therein, said magnetized segments being of equal axial extent and being axially spaced by transitional regions that are of axial extent substantially less than that of said magnetized segments; and
flux return means associated with said stator for providing a relatively low reluctance magnetic path for flux lines resulting from the magnetization of said permanent magnet material wherein the reluctance is generally independent of the position of said reciprocating element.
2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said stator carries N axially aligned coils at a predetermined center-to-center spacing and wherein said segments on said reciprocating element are disposed at intervals one-half said predetermined center-to-center spacing.
3. The invention of claim 1 wherein the permanent magnet material on said reciprocating element is in the form of a cylindrical shell, and wherein said segments of alternating polarity are radially polarized.
4. The invention of claim 3, and further comprising means for imparting a unidirectional torque to said reciprocating element to provide a hydrodynamic fluid film to prevent said reciprocator from contacting said stator.
5. An electromagnetic machine comprising:
a stator defining an annular bore, the central region of said stator including at least one coil mounted axially with respect to said bore and radially inboard therefrom;
a reciprocating element including a tubular permanent magnet having multiple magnetic poles of alternating radial polarity;
means defining a gas spring acting on said reciprocating element, the effective spring coefficient of said gas spring and the mass of said reciprocating element defining a resonant frequency; and
means for varying said effective spring coefficient to permit control of the operating frequency.
6. The invention of claim 5 wherein said means defining a gas spring comprises:
a working fluid chamber in fluid communication with a first side of said reciprocating element; and
a bounce fluid chamber in fluid communication with a second side of said reciprocating element.
7. The invention of claim 6 wherein said means for varying said effective spring coefficient comprises:
means for varying the mean pressure in said working fluid chamber; and
means for varying the mean pressure in said bounce fluid chamber.
8. The invention of claim 7 wherein said means for varying the mean pressure in said bounce fluid chamber comprises:
a bellows having a movable wall with first and second oppositely facing surfaces, said first surface being in fluid communication with said bounce fluid chamber such that movement of said wall causes a change of the volume of said bounce fluid chamber;
a servo-controlled plunger;
means defining a fluid volume between a face of said plunger and said second surface of said movable wall, such that when said fluid volume is filled with incompressible fluid, movement of said plunger causes a corresponding movement of said movable wall to cause a corresponding change in the volume of said bounce gas chamber; and
means for moving said plunger in response to a signal representative of a difference in frequency between a reference frequency and said operating frequency, whereupon said operating frequency may be brought into correspondence with said reference frequency.
9. Apparatus for generating an alternating voltage output comprising:
means defining a stator;
a coil mounted on said stator;
a reciprocating element having permanent magnet material with segments of alternating polarity so that reciprocation of said element relative to said stator causes periodic flux reversal through said coil to induce an alternating voltage therein;
flux return means associated with said stator defining a relatively low reluctance magnetic path wherein the reluctance is generally independent of the position of said reciprocating element;
a Stirling engine having a displacer piston;
means defining a working fluid chamber in fluid communication with a first side of said displacer piston and with a first side of said reciprocating element;
means defining a bounce fluid chamber in fluid commmunication with a second side of said reciprocating element;
said working fluid chamber and said bounce fluid chamber defining a gas spring acting on said reciprocating element;
the effective spring coefficient of said gas spring and the mass of said reciprocating element defining a resonant frequency;
means for varying said effective spring coefficient in response to feedback signals representative of the phase and frequency relationship between said alternating voltage and a standard alternating voltage to permit control of the operating frequency; and
means responsive to the voltage output of said apparatus for providing variable damping of said Stirling engine displacer;
whereupon the stroke of said displacer may be varied to maintain voltage regulation of said output.
10. The invention of claim 9 wherein said means for varying said effective spring coefficient comprises:
means for varying the mean pressure in said working fluid chamber; and
means for varying the mean pressure in said bounce fluid chamber.
11. The invention of claim 9 wherein said means for providing damping comprises:
means defining a second stator;
a second coil mounted on said second stator;
a second reciprocating element having permanent magnet material with segments of alternating polarity, said second reciprocating element being rigidly coupled to said displacer piston so that reciprocation of said displacer relative to said second stator causes periodic flux reversal through said second coil to induce an alternating voltage therein; and
means for coupling said second coil to a controlled load so that variable current may be drawn through said second coil.
12. A linear electromagnetic machine comprising:
means defining a stator;
a plurality of coils mounted on said stator and disposed at a predetermined center-to-center axial spacing;
a reciprocating element having permanent magnet material with magnetized segments of alternating polarity, said segments being disposed at one-half said predetermined center-to-center axial spacing, so that reciprocation of said element relative to said stator causes periodic flux reversal through said coils to induce an alternating voltage therein; and
flux return means associated with said stator for providing a relatively low reluctance magnetic path for flux lines resulting from the magnetization of said permanent magnet material wherein the reluctance is generally independent of the position of said reciprocating element.
13. The invention of claim 12 wherein said stator carries N axially aligned coils, and wherein said reciprocating element has (2N+1) segments.
14. The invention of claim 13 wherein the permanent magnet material on said reciprocating element is in the form of a cylindrical shell, and wherein said segments of alternating polarity are radially polarized.
15. The invention of claim 14 and further comprising means for imparting a unidirectional torque to said reciprocating element to provide a hydrodynamic fluid film to prevent said reciprocator from contacting said stator.
16. A linear electromagnetic machine comprising:
a stator defining an annular bore;
a plurality of coils mounted to said stator and disposed at a center-to-center axial spacing therealong and radially inboard from said bore;
a reciprocating element having permanently magnetized cylindrical segments of alternating polarity, which segments are disposed at one-half the center-to-center spacing of said coils, so that axial reciprocation of said reciprocating element relative to said stator causes periodic flux reversal through said coils to induce an alternating voltage therein; and
flux return means associated with said stator for providing a relatively low reluctance magnetic path for the flux lines resulting from the magnetization of said reciprocating element wherein the reluctance is generally independent of the position of said reciprocating element.
17. The invention of claim 16 wherein said magnetized segments are separated by transitional regions having an axial dimension small compared to the axial dimension of said segments.
US06293825 1981-08-17 1981-08-17 Linear electromagnetic machine Expired - Lifetime US4454426A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06293825 US4454426A (en) 1981-08-17 1981-08-17 Linear electromagnetic machine
PCT/US1984/000880 WO1986000182A1 (en) 1981-08-17 1984-06-11 Linear electromagnetic machine

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06293825 US4454426A (en) 1981-08-17 1981-08-17 Linear electromagnetic machine
JP50244784A JPS61503000A (en) 1981-08-17 1984-06-11
EP19840902480 EP0185656B1 (en) 1981-08-17 1984-06-11 Linear electromagnetic machine
PCT/US1984/000880 WO1986000182A1 (en) 1981-08-17 1984-06-11 Linear electromagnetic machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US4454426A true US4454426A (en) 1984-06-12

Family

ID=26770308

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US06293825 Expired - Lifetime US4454426A (en) 1981-08-17 1981-08-17 Linear electromagnetic machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US4454426A (en)

Cited By (62)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0185656A1 (en) * 1981-08-17 1986-07-02 New Process Ind Inc Linear electromagnetic machine.
US4602174A (en) * 1983-12-01 1986-07-22 Sunpower, Inc. Electromechanical transducer particularly suitable for a linear alternator driven by a free-piston stirling engine
US4649283A (en) * 1985-08-20 1987-03-10 Sunpower, Inc. Multi-phase linear alternator driven by free-piston Stirling engine
US4675563A (en) * 1982-10-29 1987-06-23 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics & Space Administration Reciprocating linear motor
US4697113A (en) * 1985-08-01 1987-09-29 Helix Technology Corporation Magnetically balanced and centered electromagnetic machine and cryogenic refrigerator employing same
EP0266834A1 (en) * 1986-10-29 1988-05-11 Philips Electronics N.V. Oscillating motor
US4827163A (en) * 1986-03-04 1989-05-02 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Monocoil reciprocating permanent magnet electric machine with self-centering force
US4924123A (en) * 1987-12-18 1990-05-08 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Linear generator
US4937481A (en) * 1989-01-13 1990-06-26 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Permanent magnet linear electromagnetic machine
US5038061A (en) * 1990-05-25 1991-08-06 Olsen John H Linear actuator/motor
US5057724A (en) * 1990-01-16 1991-10-15 Patton James V Ceramic magnet motor
WO1992018346A1 (en) * 1991-04-19 1992-10-29 Varela Arthur A Jr Hybrid electric propulsion system
US5175457A (en) * 1991-10-28 1992-12-29 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Linear motor or alternator plunger configuration using variable magnetic properties for center row and outer rows of magnets
US5349256A (en) * 1993-04-23 1994-09-20 Holliday Jeffrey C Linear transducer
US5453821A (en) * 1988-11-23 1995-09-26 Datacard Corporation Apparatus for driving and controlling solenoid impact imprinter
US5525845A (en) * 1994-03-21 1996-06-11 Sunpower, Inc. Fluid bearing with compliant linkage for centering reciprocating bodies
US5965964A (en) * 1997-09-16 1999-10-12 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for a downhole current generator
US6268667B1 (en) * 1998-02-20 2001-07-31 Advanced Motion Technologies, Llc Apparatus for producing linear motion
US6288470B1 (en) * 1999-02-11 2001-09-11 Camco International, Inc. Modular motor construction
US6406294B1 (en) 1999-11-24 2002-06-18 Bell Dental Products, Llc Self contained dental chair with integrated compressor and vacuum pump and methods
US20020079763A1 (en) * 2000-12-21 2002-06-27 Fleshman Roy R. Field configurable modular motor
US20020113497A1 (en) * 2001-02-02 2002-08-22 Park Kyeong Bae Stator fastening structure of reciprocating motor
US20020152750A1 (en) * 2001-03-14 2002-10-24 Masahiro Asai Stirling engine
US6484498B1 (en) * 2001-06-04 2002-11-26 Bonar, Ii Henry B. Apparatus and method for converting thermal to electrical energy
US6612163B2 (en) * 2000-06-27 2003-09-02 Kabushiki Kaisha Meidensha Device for testing transaxle
WO2003091556A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-11-06 Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. Free-piston device provided with an electric linear drive
US20040012270A1 (en) * 2000-11-20 2004-01-22 Kwon Kye Si Reciprocating motor
US20040207347A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-10-21 Zaher Daboussi Linear-motion engine controller and related method
US20040221576A1 (en) * 2003-05-08 2004-11-11 Lynch Thomas H. Thermal cycle engine boost bridge power interface
US20040263003A1 (en) * 2003-03-10 2004-12-30 Hoganas Ab Linear motor
US20050001500A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-01-06 Allan Chertok Linear electrical machine for electric power generation or motive drive
US20050028520A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-02-10 Allan Chertok Free piston Stirling engine control
US20050081804A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2005-04-21 Deutsches Zentrum Fur Luft- Und Raumfahrt E.V. Free-piston device with electric linear drive
US20050151375A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 Rockwell Scientific Licensing, Llc. Autonomous power source
US20050224025A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2005-10-13 Sanderson Robert A Overload protection mecanism
US20050268869A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2005-12-08 Sanderson Robert A Variable stroke and clearance mechanism
US20060108878A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Lindberg Paul M Linear motor and stator core therefor
US20060153633A1 (en) * 2001-02-07 2006-07-13 R. Sanderson Management, Inc. A Texas Corporation Piston joint
WO2006107866A2 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-12 Heat2Energy Llc Accelerated permanent magnet generator
US20070033935A1 (en) * 2005-08-09 2007-02-15 Carroll Joseph P Thermal cycle engine with augmented thermal energy input area
US20080116693A1 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-05-22 Stumm Robert E Electronically Moderated Expansion Electrical Generator
US20080164701A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-07-10 Veryst Engineering Llc Method and Apparatus for Energy Harvesting Using Energy Storage and Release
US20080217926A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2008-09-11 Aaron Patrick Lemieux Electrical Energy generator
US20080252150A1 (en) * 2005-04-15 2008-10-16 Compact Dynamics Gmbh Linear Actuator in an Electric Percussion Tool
WO2009013270A1 (en) 2007-07-23 2009-01-29 Umc Universal Motor Corporation Gmbh Free-piston device and method for controlling and/or regulating a free-piston device
US20090152990A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-06-18 Veryst Engineering Llc Apparatus for in vivo energy harvesting
US7550880B1 (en) 2006-04-12 2009-06-23 Motran Industries Inc Folded spring flexure suspension for linearly actuated devices
US20100283263A1 (en) * 2006-11-29 2010-11-11 Dynatronic Gmbh Device for conversion of thermodynamic energy into electrical energy
US20110012367A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Free-piston linear alternator systems and methods
US20110109085A1 (en) * 2009-11-10 2011-05-12 Nelson Robert J Power Oscillation Damping Employing a Full or Partial Conversion Wind Turbine
US20110193427A1 (en) * 2010-01-06 2011-08-11 Tremont Electric, Llc Electrical energy generator
US20130001959A1 (en) * 2010-04-05 2013-01-03 Takaitsu Kobayashi Linear power generator
US8674526B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2014-03-18 Tremont Electric, Inc. Electrical energy generator
US8688224B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2014-04-01 Tremont Electric, Inc. Implantable biomedical device including an electrical energy generator
US20150001852A1 (en) * 2012-01-19 2015-01-01 Libertine Fpe Ltd. Linear Electrical Machine
US8947185B2 (en) 2010-07-12 2015-02-03 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc Magnetic system
US8963380B2 (en) 2011-07-11 2015-02-24 Correlated Magnetics Research LLC. System and method for power generation system
US9105384B2 (en) 2008-04-04 2015-08-11 Correlated Megnetics Research, Llc. Apparatus and method for printing maxels
US9257219B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2016-02-09 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. System and method for magnetization
US9275783B2 (en) 2012-10-15 2016-03-01 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. System and method for demagnetization of a magnetic structure region
US9298281B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2016-03-29 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. Magnetic vector sensor positioning and communications system
US9367783B2 (en) 2009-06-02 2016-06-14 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc Magnetizing printer and method for re-magnetizing at least a portion of a previously magnetized magnet

Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US637809A (en) * 1897-12-08 1899-11-28 Siemens & Halske Elec Co Usa Reciprocating drill.
US814083A (en) * 1904-08-12 1906-03-06 Malcolm P Ryder Generator of intermittent electric currents.
US1621469A (en) * 1925-12-01 1927-03-15 Benjamin P Remy Electric generator
US1785643A (en) * 1927-04-25 1930-12-16 Noack Walter Gustav Internal-combustion power plant
US2362151A (en) * 1943-08-18 1944-11-07 Ostenberg Pontus Electric generator
US2842688A (en) * 1953-10-30 1958-07-08 Bendix Aviat Corp Linear rate generator
US2928959A (en) * 1956-09-14 1960-03-15 Lorin M Christian Electrical generator
US2944160A (en) * 1958-05-16 1960-07-05 Charles B Dickinson Oscillatory motor-generator
US2992342A (en) * 1957-04-29 1961-07-11 Denver And Rio Grande Western Reciprocating type electric generator
US3024374A (en) * 1957-10-07 1962-03-06 Bendix Corp Linear rate generator
US3094635A (en) * 1957-12-21 1963-06-18 Meccaniche Riva S P A Costruzi Linear motion generator transducer signal
US3105153A (en) * 1960-08-05 1963-09-24 Exxon Research Engineering Co Free-piston generator of electric current
FR1406682A (en) * 1964-06-13 1965-07-23 Bouchayer Et Viallet Ets A method of manufacturing ferrule, in particular for pressure vessel
US3206609A (en) * 1962-04-09 1965-09-14 Herbert G Dawes Reciprocating engine-generator
US3234395A (en) * 1962-02-01 1966-02-08 Richard M Colgate Free piston electrical generator
US3247406A (en) * 1961-10-03 1966-04-19 Toesca Rene Antoine Michel Electromechanical energy converting device
US3349247A (en) * 1966-05-10 1967-10-24 Orville J Birkestrand Portable electric generator
US3443111A (en) * 1966-01-27 1969-05-06 Generateurs Jarret Sa Soc Alternator
US3465161A (en) * 1967-06-30 1969-09-02 Harold C Cutkosky Reciprocating internal combustion electric generator
US3484616A (en) * 1968-02-01 1969-12-16 Mc Donnell Douglas Corp Stirling cycle machine with self-oscillating regenerator
US3629596A (en) * 1970-12-29 1971-12-21 Gen Electric Free piston generator
US3675031A (en) * 1969-11-27 1972-07-04 Commissariat Energie Atomique Heat-to-electric power converter
US3783302A (en) * 1972-04-06 1974-01-01 D Woodbridge Apparatus and method for converting wave energy into electrical energy
US4036018A (en) * 1976-02-27 1977-07-19 Beale William T Self-starting, free piston Stirling engine
US4349757A (en) * 1980-05-08 1982-09-14 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Linear oscillating electric machine with permanent magnet excitation

Patent Citations (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US637809A (en) * 1897-12-08 1899-11-28 Siemens & Halske Elec Co Usa Reciprocating drill.
US814083A (en) * 1904-08-12 1906-03-06 Malcolm P Ryder Generator of intermittent electric currents.
US1621469A (en) * 1925-12-01 1927-03-15 Benjamin P Remy Electric generator
US1785643A (en) * 1927-04-25 1930-12-16 Noack Walter Gustav Internal-combustion power plant
US2362151A (en) * 1943-08-18 1944-11-07 Ostenberg Pontus Electric generator
US2842688A (en) * 1953-10-30 1958-07-08 Bendix Aviat Corp Linear rate generator
US2928959A (en) * 1956-09-14 1960-03-15 Lorin M Christian Electrical generator
US2992342A (en) * 1957-04-29 1961-07-11 Denver And Rio Grande Western Reciprocating type electric generator
US3024374A (en) * 1957-10-07 1962-03-06 Bendix Corp Linear rate generator
US3094635A (en) * 1957-12-21 1963-06-18 Meccaniche Riva S P A Costruzi Linear motion generator transducer signal
US2944160A (en) * 1958-05-16 1960-07-05 Charles B Dickinson Oscillatory motor-generator
US3105153A (en) * 1960-08-05 1963-09-24 Exxon Research Engineering Co Free-piston generator of electric current
US3247406A (en) * 1961-10-03 1966-04-19 Toesca Rene Antoine Michel Electromechanical energy converting device
US3234395A (en) * 1962-02-01 1966-02-08 Richard M Colgate Free piston electrical generator
US3206609A (en) * 1962-04-09 1965-09-14 Herbert G Dawes Reciprocating engine-generator
FR1406682A (en) * 1964-06-13 1965-07-23 Bouchayer Et Viallet Ets A method of manufacturing ferrule, in particular for pressure vessel
US3443111A (en) * 1966-01-27 1969-05-06 Generateurs Jarret Sa Soc Alternator
US3349247A (en) * 1966-05-10 1967-10-24 Orville J Birkestrand Portable electric generator
US3465161A (en) * 1967-06-30 1969-09-02 Harold C Cutkosky Reciprocating internal combustion electric generator
US3484616A (en) * 1968-02-01 1969-12-16 Mc Donnell Douglas Corp Stirling cycle machine with self-oscillating regenerator
US3675031A (en) * 1969-11-27 1972-07-04 Commissariat Energie Atomique Heat-to-electric power converter
US3629596A (en) * 1970-12-29 1971-12-21 Gen Electric Free piston generator
US3783302A (en) * 1972-04-06 1974-01-01 D Woodbridge Apparatus and method for converting wave energy into electrical energy
US4036018A (en) * 1976-02-27 1977-07-19 Beale William T Self-starting, free piston Stirling engine
US4349757A (en) * 1980-05-08 1982-09-14 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Linear oscillating electric machine with permanent magnet excitation

Cited By (106)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0185656A4 (en) * 1981-08-17 1986-12-01 New Process Ind Inc Linear electromagnetic machine.
EP0185656A1 (en) * 1981-08-17 1986-07-02 New Process Ind Inc Linear electromagnetic machine.
US4675563A (en) * 1982-10-29 1987-06-23 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics & Space Administration Reciprocating linear motor
US4602174A (en) * 1983-12-01 1986-07-22 Sunpower, Inc. Electromechanical transducer particularly suitable for a linear alternator driven by a free-piston stirling engine
EP0218682A4 (en) * 1985-04-04 1987-07-09 Sunpower Inc Electromechanical transducer.
EP0218682A1 (en) * 1985-04-04 1987-04-22 Sunpower Inc Electromechanical transducer.
US4697113A (en) * 1985-08-01 1987-09-29 Helix Technology Corporation Magnetically balanced and centered electromagnetic machine and cryogenic refrigerator employing same
US4649283A (en) * 1985-08-20 1987-03-10 Sunpower, Inc. Multi-phase linear alternator driven by free-piston Stirling engine
US4827163A (en) * 1986-03-04 1989-05-02 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Monocoil reciprocating permanent magnet electric machine with self-centering force
EP0266834A1 (en) * 1986-10-29 1988-05-11 Philips Electronics N.V. Oscillating motor
US4924123A (en) * 1987-12-18 1990-05-08 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Linear generator
US5453821A (en) * 1988-11-23 1995-09-26 Datacard Corporation Apparatus for driving and controlling solenoid impact imprinter
US4937481A (en) * 1989-01-13 1990-06-26 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Permanent magnet linear electromagnetic machine
EP0423253A1 (en) * 1989-01-13 1991-04-24 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Permanent magnet linear electromagnetic machine
EP0423253A4 (en) * 1989-01-13 1991-05-08 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Permanent magnet linear electromagnetic machine
US5057724A (en) * 1990-01-16 1991-10-15 Patton James V Ceramic magnet motor
US5038061A (en) * 1990-05-25 1991-08-06 Olsen John H Linear actuator/motor
WO1992018346A1 (en) * 1991-04-19 1992-10-29 Varela Arthur A Jr Hybrid electric propulsion system
US5172784A (en) * 1991-04-19 1992-12-22 Varela Jr Arthur A Hybrid electric propulsion system
US5175457A (en) * 1991-10-28 1992-12-29 Mechanical Technology Incorporated Linear motor or alternator plunger configuration using variable magnetic properties for center row and outer rows of magnets
US5349256A (en) * 1993-04-23 1994-09-20 Holliday Jeffrey C Linear transducer
US5525845A (en) * 1994-03-21 1996-06-11 Sunpower, Inc. Fluid bearing with compliant linkage for centering reciprocating bodies
US5965964A (en) * 1997-09-16 1999-10-12 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for a downhole current generator
US6268667B1 (en) * 1998-02-20 2001-07-31 Advanced Motion Technologies, Llc Apparatus for producing linear motion
US6288470B1 (en) * 1999-02-11 2001-09-11 Camco International, Inc. Modular motor construction
US6406294B1 (en) 1999-11-24 2002-06-18 Bell Dental Products, Llc Self contained dental chair with integrated compressor and vacuum pump and methods
US6612163B2 (en) * 2000-06-27 2003-09-02 Kabushiki Kaisha Meidensha Device for testing transaxle
US20040012270A1 (en) * 2000-11-20 2004-01-22 Kwon Kye Si Reciprocating motor
US6858954B2 (en) * 2000-11-20 2005-02-22 Lg Electronics Inc. Reciprocating motor
DE10156298B4 (en) * 2000-11-20 2015-12-10 Lg Electronics Inc. piston engine
US20020079763A1 (en) * 2000-12-21 2002-06-27 Fleshman Roy R. Field configurable modular motor
US6700252B2 (en) 2000-12-21 2004-03-02 Schlumberger Technology Corp. Field configurable modular motor
US20020113497A1 (en) * 2001-02-02 2002-08-22 Park Kyeong Bae Stator fastening structure of reciprocating motor
US6819015B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2004-11-16 Lg Electronics Inc. Stator fastening structure of reciprocating motor
US20060153633A1 (en) * 2001-02-07 2006-07-13 R. Sanderson Management, Inc. A Texas Corporation Piston joint
US6910331B2 (en) * 2001-03-14 2005-06-28 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Stirling engine
US20020152750A1 (en) * 2001-03-14 2002-10-24 Masahiro Asai Stirling engine
US6484498B1 (en) * 2001-06-04 2002-11-26 Bonar, Ii Henry B. Apparatus and method for converting thermal to electrical energy
US20050081804A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2005-04-21 Deutsches Zentrum Fur Luft- Und Raumfahrt E.V. Free-piston device with electric linear drive
US7082909B2 (en) 2002-04-25 2006-08-01 Deutsches Zentrum Fur Luft- Und Raumfahrt E.V. Free-piston device with electric linear drive
WO2003091556A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2003-11-06 Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. Free-piston device provided with an electric linear drive
US20050224025A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2005-10-13 Sanderson Robert A Overload protection mecanism
US20080211324A1 (en) * 2003-03-10 2008-09-04 Hoganas Ab Linear motor
US20040263003A1 (en) * 2003-03-10 2004-12-30 Hoganas Ab Linear motor
US7378763B2 (en) * 2003-03-10 2008-05-27 Höganäs Ab Linear motor
US7884508B2 (en) 2003-03-10 2011-02-08 Höganäs Ab Linear motor
US6856107B2 (en) * 2003-04-17 2005-02-15 Aerovironment Inc. Linear-motion engine controller and related method
US20040207347A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-10-21 Zaher Daboussi Linear-motion engine controller and related method
US20040221576A1 (en) * 2003-05-08 2004-11-11 Lynch Thomas H. Thermal cycle engine boost bridge power interface
US6871495B2 (en) * 2003-05-08 2005-03-29 The Boeing Company Thermal cycle engine boost bridge power interface
US20050001500A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-01-06 Allan Chertok Linear electrical machine for electric power generation or motive drive
US7200994B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2007-04-10 Tiax Llc Free piston stirling engine control
US20050028520A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-02-10 Allan Chertok Free piston Stirling engine control
US6914351B2 (en) 2003-07-02 2005-07-05 Tiax Llc Linear electrical machine for electric power generation or motive drive
US7009310B2 (en) * 2004-01-12 2006-03-07 Rockwell Scientific Licensing, Llc Autonomous power source
US20050151375A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 Rockwell Scientific Licensing, Llc. Autonomous power source
US20050268869A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2005-12-08 Sanderson Robert A Variable stroke and clearance mechanism
US20060108878A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Lindberg Paul M Linear motor and stator core therefor
WO2006107866A3 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-12-28 Heat2Energy Llc Accelerated permanent magnet generator
WO2006107866A2 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-12 Heat2Energy Llc Accelerated permanent magnet generator
US20080252150A1 (en) * 2005-04-15 2008-10-16 Compact Dynamics Gmbh Linear Actuator in an Electric Percussion Tool
US7607299B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2009-10-27 Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, Inc. Thermal cycle engine with augmented thermal energy input area
US20070033935A1 (en) * 2005-08-09 2007-02-15 Carroll Joseph P Thermal cycle engine with augmented thermal energy input area
US7550880B1 (en) 2006-04-12 2009-06-23 Motran Industries Inc Folded spring flexure suspension for linearly actuated devices
US20080116693A1 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-05-22 Stumm Robert E Electronically Moderated Expansion Electrical Generator
US7492052B2 (en) * 2006-11-21 2009-02-17 Northrop Grumman Corporation Electronically moderated expansion electrical generator
US20100283263A1 (en) * 2006-11-29 2010-11-11 Dynatronic Gmbh Device for conversion of thermodynamic energy into electrical energy
US8432047B2 (en) * 2006-11-29 2013-04-30 Dynatronic Gmbh Device for conversion of thermodynamic energy into electrical energy
US20080164702A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-07-10 Veryst Engineering Llc Method and Apparatus for Energy Harvesting Using Rotational Energy Storage and Release
WO2008085636A3 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-11-06 Stuart B Brown Method and apparatus for energy harvesting using energy storage and release
US7626279B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2009-12-01 Veryst Engineering Llc Method and apparatus for energy harvesting using rotational energy storage and release
US20080164701A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-07-10 Veryst Engineering Llc Method and Apparatus for Energy Harvesting Using Energy Storage and Release
US7605482B2 (en) * 2007-01-08 2009-10-20 Veryst Engineering Llc Method and apparatus for energy harvesting using energy storage and release
US20090121494A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-05-14 Aaron Patrick Lemieux Eletrical energy generator
US20090121493A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-05-14 Aaron Patrick Lemieux Electrical energy generator
US7498682B2 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-03-03 Aaron Patrick Lemieux Electrical energy generator
US20080217926A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2008-09-11 Aaron Patrick Lemieux Electrical Energy generator
US7989971B2 (en) 2007-03-07 2011-08-02 Tremont Electric Incorporated Electrical energy generator
US7692320B2 (en) 2007-03-07 2010-04-06 Tremont Electric, Llc Electrical energy generator
US20100162998A1 (en) * 2007-07-23 2010-07-01 Umc Universal Motor Corporation Gmbh Free piston assembly and method for controlling a free piston assembly
US8601988B2 (en) 2007-07-23 2013-12-10 Umc Universal Motor Corporation Gmbh Free piston assembly and method for controlling a free piston assembly
WO2009013270A1 (en) 2007-07-23 2009-01-29 Umc Universal Motor Corporation Gmbh Free-piston device and method for controlling and/or regulating a free-piston device
US20090152990A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-06-18 Veryst Engineering Llc Apparatus for in vivo energy harvesting
US8217523B2 (en) 2007-12-07 2012-07-10 Veryst Engineering Llc Apparatus for in vivo energy harvesting
US8688224B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2014-04-01 Tremont Electric, Inc. Implantable biomedical device including an electrical energy generator
US9269482B2 (en) 2008-04-04 2016-02-23 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. Magnetizing apparatus
US9536650B2 (en) 2008-04-04 2017-01-03 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. Magnetic structure
US9105384B2 (en) 2008-04-04 2015-08-11 Correlated Megnetics Research, Llc. Apparatus and method for printing maxels
US9367783B2 (en) 2009-06-02 2016-06-14 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc Magnetizing printer and method for re-magnetizing at least a portion of a previously magnetized magnet
US8324745B2 (en) * 2009-07-16 2012-12-04 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Free-piston linear alternator systems and methods
US20110012367A1 (en) * 2009-07-16 2011-01-20 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Free-piston linear alternator systems and methods
US20110109085A1 (en) * 2009-11-10 2011-05-12 Nelson Robert J Power Oscillation Damping Employing a Full or Partial Conversion Wind Turbine
US9478987B2 (en) * 2009-11-10 2016-10-25 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Power oscillation damping employing a full or partial conversion wind turbine
US8704387B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2014-04-22 Tremont Electric, Inc. Electrical energy generator
US8674526B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2014-03-18 Tremont Electric, Inc. Electrical energy generator
US20110193427A1 (en) * 2010-01-06 2011-08-11 Tremont Electric, Llc Electrical energy generator
US20130001959A1 (en) * 2010-04-05 2013-01-03 Takaitsu Kobayashi Linear power generator
US9917497B2 (en) * 2010-04-05 2018-03-13 Takaitsu Kobayashi Linear power generator
US8947185B2 (en) 2010-07-12 2015-02-03 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc Magnetic system
US9111672B2 (en) 2010-07-12 2015-08-18 Correlated Magnetics Research LLC. Multilevel correlated magnetic system
US8963380B2 (en) 2011-07-11 2015-02-24 Correlated Magnetics Research LLC. System and method for power generation system
US20150001852A1 (en) * 2012-01-19 2015-01-01 Libertine Fpe Ltd. Linear Electrical Machine
US9257219B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2016-02-09 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. System and method for magnetization
US9275783B2 (en) 2012-10-15 2016-03-01 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. System and method for demagnetization of a magnetic structure region
US9298281B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2016-03-29 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. Magnetic vector sensor positioning and communications system
US9588599B2 (en) 2012-12-27 2017-03-07 Correlated Magnetics Research, Llc. Magnetic vector sensor positioning and communication system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3312842A (en) Reciprocating actuator
US3452229A (en) Modular inductor alternator
Takemoto et al. Improved analysis of a bearingless switched reluctance motor
Matsuo et al. Rotor design optimization of synchronous reluctance machine
US5334898A (en) Polyphase brushless DC and AC synchronous machines
Miller Electronic control of switched reluctance machines
Al Jabri et al. Capacitance requirement for isolated self-exicted induction generator
US5670838A (en) Electrical machines
US4691119A (en) Permanent magnet alternator power generation system
US4434617A (en) Start-up and control method and apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engine
Miller Optimal design of switched reluctance motors
Rauch et al. Design principles of flux-switch alternators
US4542311A (en) Long linear stroke reciprocating electric machine
US6177746B1 (en) Low inductance electrical machine
US6097124A (en) Hybrid permanent magnet/homopolar generator and motor
US7034427B2 (en) Selective alignment of stators in axial airgap electric devices comprising low-loss materials
US6750588B1 (en) High performance axial gap alternator motor
Elder et al. Self-excited induction machine as a small low-cost generator
US4663581A (en) Voltage regulated permanent magnet generator system
US6211595B1 (en) Armature structure of toroidal winding type rotating electric machine
US6198238B1 (en) High phase order cycloconverting generator and drive means
US4725750A (en) Permanent magnet rotary machine
US5703423A (en) Energy storage flywheel system
US3321652A (en) Dynamo-electric machine
US5300870A (en) Three-phase motor control

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: NEW PROCESS INDUSTRIES, INC., 315 PEAVEY BLDG., 73

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BENSON, GLENDON M.;REEL/FRAME:003943/0379

Effective date: 19810923

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12

AS Assignment

Owner name: BENSON, GLENDON M., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEW PROCESS INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:008031/0491

Effective date: 19960709