US421089A - Journal-bearing - Google Patents

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US421089A
US421089A US421089DA US421089A US 421089 A US421089 A US 421089A US 421089D A US421089D A US 421089DA US 421089 A US421089 A US 421089A
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bushing
bearing
journal
faces
yielding
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16CSHAFTS; FLEXIBLE SHAFTS; ELEMENTS OR CRANKSHAFT MECHANISMS; ROTARY BODIES OTHER THAN GEARING ELEMENTS; BEARINGS
    • F16C33/00Parts of bearings; Special methods for making bearings or parts thereof
    • F16C33/02Parts of sliding-contact bearings
    • F16C33/04Brasses; Bushes; Linings
    • F16C33/24Brasses; Bushes; Linings with different areas of the sliding surface consisting of different materials
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16CSHAFTS; FLEXIBLE SHAFTS; ELEMENTS OR CRANKSHAFT MECHANISMS; ROTARY BODIES OTHER THAN GEARING ELEMENTS; BEARINGS
    • F16C2300/00Application independent of particular apparatuses
    • F16C2300/02General use or purpose, i.e. no use, purpose, special adaptation or modification indicated or a wide variety of uses mentioned
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16CSHAFTS; FLEXIBLE SHAFTS; ELEMENTS OR CRANKSHAFT MECHANISMS; ROTARY BODIES OTHER THAN GEARING ELEMENTS; BEARINGS
    • F16C2380/00Electrical apparatus
    • F16C2380/26Dynamo-electric machines or combinations therewith, e.g. electro-motors and generators
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16CSHAFTS; FLEXIBLE SHAFTS; ELEMENTS OR CRANKSHAFT MECHANISMS; ROTARY BODIES OTHER THAN GEARING ELEMENTS; BEARINGS
    • F16C35/00Rigid support of bearing units; Housings, e.g. caps, covers
    • F16C35/02Rigid support of bearing units; Housings, e.g. caps, covers in the case of sliding-contact bearings

Description

\ (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 1.-

- '1. J. WOOD.

JOURNAL BEARING. 7 No. 421,089. Paten t d Feb. 11, 1890.

- INVENTOR: WITNESSES 9 9 fwd.

I I By his A fl orneys, Mm 920 -m m G51 4 Sheets -Sheet 2. -;J. J. W0. JOURNAL BEAR Patented Feb. 11, 1890.

INVENTOR:

' 4 SheetsSheet 4.

(No Model.)

J-. J. WOOD. J'OURNAL BEARING.

Patented Feb. 11, 1890 ,1 iii, a aff/1,64 2442 INVENTOR: W 9; 4

WITNESSES: I 9

B; 1155 Al/ameys, fawn/ad im/w E; 3/LMM V60 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFIeE.

JAMES J. WOOD, OF BROOKLYN, NE\V YORK.

JOURNAL-BEARING.

SPECIFICATION forining part of Letters Patent No. 421,089, dated February 11, 1890. Application filed October 9, 1889- Serial No. 326,465- (No mulch), v

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that 1, J AMES J. W001), a citizen of the United States, residing in Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented. certain new and useful Improvements in Journal-Bearings, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to journal-bearings applicable to machinery generally.

I The object of the invention is to provide a bearing which will not bind the journal in case of its expansion through heating, as sometimes occurs by reason of deficient or suspended lubrication.

Another object of the invention is to provide bearings which will allow of a slight imperfection of alignment without interfering with the perfect running of the shaft.

To these ends my improved bearing iseonstrncted with the bearing-frame bored out somewhat larger than has been heretofore usual and with a yielding or elastic bushing interposed between the journal and the bearing-frame. This yielding bushing consists of a tubular sleeve having internal bearingfaces for upholding'(either directly or through ,the intermediation of an inner bushing) the journal which turns within it, and having external bearing-faces which are seated in the bore in the bearing-frame. The internal and external faces are arranged in different positions, instead of being in line with or di rectly opposite one another, and the portions of the sleeve intervening between the external and internal faces are made sufficiently thin to be/suitably elastic or yielding, so that any slight changes-in the size or in the axial position of the journal relatively to the unyielding bearing-frame will be compensated for or taken up by the flexure or slight distortion of these intervening yielding portions. In the preferred construction an inner bushing is provided in which the journal turns, and between this bushing and the bore in the bearing-frame is -interposed the yielding bushing or sleeve.

slightly from its general internal and external surfaces, and these feet are preferably extended longitudinally, the diiference'of position of the external and internal bearingfaces being in angular direction. Either the This yielding bushing has its external and internal bearing-faces constructed preferably as Ifeet projecting I internal or the external feet or bearing-faces. are made short and confined to the middle' portion of the bushing, so that the journal and inner bushing may be canted angularly slightly out of the true alignment of the shaft by a correspondingdistortion of the yielding bushing.

Having given thus a general or preliminary outline of my invention, I will now proceed to describe .it in detail in its preferred form and in certain modified forms,with reference to the accompanyingdrawings, where Figure 1 is an end elevation of the frame of a dynamo-electric machine, to the armatore-shaft of which my invention is applied. Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section of said frame and shaft, showing both the bearings of the shaft constructed according to my invention. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary section of one of the bearings shown in Fig. 2, on a larger scale. Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the'shaft, showing in elevation the bearing seen in Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a transverse section on the line 5 5 in Fig. 3. vation partly in longitudinal mid-section, and Fig. 7 is a transverse section on the line- 7 7, showing the preferred form of the yieldi'ng bushing. Fig. 8 is an end elevation, and Fig. 9 a side elevation,partly in longitudinal mid-section, showing the preferred form of the inner bushing. The remaining views show modifications. Fig. 10 is a transverse section answering to Fig. 7. Fig. 11 is atransverse section of another modification, the view answering to Fig. 5.. Fig. 12 is an elevation, answering tov Fig. 4, of a further modification of the bearing, the shaft being in section.

Figs. 13, 14, and 15 show another Fig. 6 is a side elemodification, Fig. 13 answering to Fig. 3 except that the shaft is removed, Fig. 14 being a side elevation of the outer bushing, and Fig. 15 an end view of the two bushings. Figs. 16 and 17 show another modification, Fig. 16 being a view answering-to Fig.3, and Fig. 17 a side elevation of the bushings, the outerone partly in section. Fig. 18 is a section answering to Fig. 3, showing another jmodificat-ion. Fig. 19 is a similar section showing still another modification.

I will first describe the construction of my invention shown in Figs. 1 to 9.

Although here shown as applied to a dyname-electric machine, it is obvious that my invention is applicable generally as a hearing for machinery, and is not limited to dynamo-machines or to other machines having frames and shaft-s similarly arranged.

In the particular machine shown in Figs. 1 and 2, A A are the opposite end frames constituting tho bearing-frames for the shaft. ll ii are the cores of the field-magnets, which constitute connecting cross-frames for uniting the frames A A. (i C are the pole-pieces of the dynamo. l) is the armature-shaft, and E the pulley. The shaft 1) is hung in two hearings in the end framesA A. One of these hearings is shown in detail in Figs.

3 to 0, inclusive, while the other bearing is of substantially-the same construction. In each bearing the shaft-journal a turns in a bushing 1 which is preferably made of gunmetal or any other suitable metal, and which is shown in detail in Figs. 8 and 9. This bushing I is held in a yielding bushing G, (shown in detail in Figs. 6 and 7,) and the bushing G is supported in the bore h in the bearing-frame A. The bearing-frame A is preferably widened at the hearing by being cast with bosses on its opposite sides to form a hub c, as usual.

The inner bushing F presents no especial characteristics and need not essentially differ from any ordinary bearing-bushing heretofore used. Preferably, however, it is formed with an enlargement or collar 1-, Fig. 9, around its middle portion, and on its inner or bearing surface it has, preferably, spiral grooves e e for facilitating the distribution of oilover the surface of the journal.

The bearing-frame A has its here I) turned somewhat larger than heretofore, sufficiently to leave room around the innerbushing F for the yielding bushing or sleeve G. This yielding bushing G embodies the characteristic features of my invention. It consists of a tube or sleeve preferably cylindrical, or approximately so, and having external and internal bcarin g-faces, lettered, respectively, f f and g g, as best shown in Fig. 7, where there are four of each suchfaces. These respective faces are preferably raised somewhat beyondthe general exterior and interior eontours of the sleeve, so that they may be readily faced off by boring, turning, or milling. The construction of these bearing-faces as such projecting feet, however, is not essential. The internal and external bearingfaees are arranged at diil'crent positions, so that they are. not opposite or in line with one another, and between them are the portions h h of the tube, which are out of eontactboth exteriorly and interiorl y and are suiliciently thin to be slightly yielding. or elastic. The result of this construction is that in case the journal a should run dry, and the journal and bushing F should consequently expand, their expansion will simply press the portions 9 g of the sleeve G outwardly, while the per-' tions it h ofthe sleeve will yield or ilex, their wise be the case.

llexure taking up the expansion, so that the bushing F isnot bound fast, and so that consequently the bushing is not made to tightly embrace the journal and lock it fast, as would be thccase if it were seated tightly in an unyielding bore of the bearing-frame. As the journal and bearing-bushing F subsequently cool down and contract the outward thrust against the faces q q,-dno to the expansion of the bushing, is relieved, and the elasticity of the portions h It of the bushing (l restores the latter to its normal shape.

It is essential to the fullrealization of the use of my invention that the inner bushing F shall be made of a metal having a higher cocilicient of expansion than that of the journal a, so that as the bearing heats and the journal expands the bushing F shall expand in a greater ratio, and thereby shall cause the journal to run more loosely instead of tightening around the journal, as would other- In practice the shaft is best made of steel and the bushing of gunmetal or phosphor-ln'onze, ,which have a coefficient of expansion about double that of steel. With such a bushing fitted solidly in an unyielding bore in the bearing-frame, as has been practiced prior to my invention, if the bearing heats, the expansion of the bushing, instead of taking place in an outward direction, as it does according to my invention, is forced by reason of the unyielding nature of the bore in the side frame to take lace in an inward direction, so that the bore in the bushing is contracted, while the {ournal is at the same time expanded by the eat, and the two are thereby caused to weld fast. 'lhe construction introduced by myinventlon enables the bushing to expand outwardly, so thatby reason of its expansion at a greater ratio than the journal there is no possibility ICO of its binding the journal or becoming welded to it. The outer or yieldin bushing G is preferably made of a metal having a comparatively-low coefilcient of expansion-such, for example, as exist-iron-but this is not essential.

In order to prevent the relative displace; ment of the bushings, the inner bushing F is held to the bushing G by means of sot-screws i i, (shown best in Fig.5,) which'arc screwed through the outer bushingpartly into the inner one. The outer bushing is held in place by a set-screw j, (shown best in Fig. 3,) which is screwed through the boss 0 and enters the bnshiugG.

'lhe bearing-faces f and g on thcsloeve or bushing G are extended preferably in longitudinal direction, as clearly shown in Fig. 6, so that the yielding portions h h are in the form of longitudinal strips extending between the bearing-faces. In fact, the entire portion of the bushing- G extending from one foot orbearing-face f to the next face 1 is essentially yielding, the only unyielding portions of they ing bore b in the bearing-frame. Owing,

however, to the thickening of the bearingfaces 9 g in the preferred construction, as shown in Fig. 7, the yielding or flexure of the metal is chiefly confined to the intervening portion between these faces and the faces f f. As shown in Figs. 3 and 6, the inner faces g g are made quite short and arranged midway of the length of the bushing G to come in contact with the collar (1, Fig. 9, on the bushing F, while the external feet 01' faces f f extend from end to end of thebushing G. This shortening of the inner faces facilitates the yielding of the bushing G to compensate for any slight tilting of the journal out of true alignment of the bushing. For example, in case the bearing-bores b b in the two end frames A A in Fig. 2 are not brought exactly in line with one another, so that the axes of the bores and the axis of the shaft do not exactly coincide, their want of coincidence will be compensated for by the distortion or flexure of the bushing G, the inner faces 9 g of which will stand at a slight inclination rela tively to the outer faces ffl. This is an importantadvantage, since by the use of my improved bearing it is not necessary that the two bearings shall be bored with great nicety of workmanship, so as to be in exactly the same line, to do which heretofore it has been necessary to bore or counterbore or ream the two bores 12 I) both at one time by the use of a special boring-bar or rea-mer. Instead myinvention permits of the bores being formed by boring the frames A A before they are put together and by the use of any ordinary bor-- ing-machine and jigs. Any want of nice accuracy of alignment, which with a solid bushing as heretofore applied would cause the shaft to bind and heat or cut at itsjournals, will with my improved bearing produce no efiect whatever upon the shaft, which runs as smoothly and freely as if the two bearings were in perfect alignment.

The lubrication of the journal is easily ef fected in the use of my invention. An oilcup H, having a controllable drip-feed, is mounted on top ofeach of the frames A, an oil-ductbeing formed through each frame to conduct the oil from this cup down to the bearing. The oil enters the narrow hollow space or chamber Z, Figs. 3 and 5 on top of.

the bushing G and flows down through an opening t in the upper side of the two bushings G and F, where it communicates with the spiral'grooves e e, by which the oil is distributed over the journal. The oil is kept from) running out of the space Z at the opposite ends byfianges Z, formed onthe ends of the bushing G to close this space. The oil which passes out at the opposite ends of the journal is thrown ofi centrifugally from beads on m. and is caught in annular grooves n '11, formed in the bosses c c, and from these grooves it runs down and flows through the bottom channel 10 into a bore q, extending down through the frame, as shown in Fig. 2,

shown in Fig. 3, in which case the beadsm 'm,

for centrifugally throwing 0d the oil, may

,well be formed on these collars, as shown;

or these beads may be formed by being turned on the shaft itself, as shown at the left-hand bearing in Fig. 2. r

Fig. 10 shows three outside and three inside bearing feet or faces applied to the bushing G instead of four, as are shown in the previous figures. Any number of these feet or faces may be used instead.

Instead of forming the bearing-faces f and g as projecting feet upon the sleeve G, this sleeve may be made as a plain tube and its bearing-faces be determined by projections f f on the interior of the bore or opening in the bearing-frame A and by outward projec'tions' g g on the bushing F, as shown in Fig. 11. The portions of the tube or sleeve G between the projections constitute the yielding or flexible parts to the same'eflect as the portions h h in Figs. 3 to 7.

Although my invention is most advantageous as applied to bearings formed in solid frames which are bored out to admit the shaft through them, yet it is applicable to bearings which are mounted on frames so as to be removable therefrom or adjustable thereon, and to those which are made with a bearing-cap to admit of'the removal of the shaft by lifting it out instead of by drawing it out endwise. Fig-12 shows a pillow-bearing A mounted on top of the frame A and fastened thereto by bolts 3 s; The bearing is made with a removable bearing-cap A ,-of usual art.

In the modification shown in Figs. 13, 14, and 15 the inner bushing F is or may be of the same construction as shown in Figs. 8 and 9, and the bearingframe A and its bore 6 and oil-ducts are of the same construction.

The bushing G, however, is considerably modified, in that its internal bearing-faces g g are merged into one single bearing-face extending entirely around the internal circumference of the bushing at its middle, while its external bearing-faces f f are provided only at its opposite ends, where they are made in the form of flanges extending around the I will proceed to describe some such modifications, leaving other possible modifications to be inferred by those skilled in the bushing and fitting tightly in the bore 1). Be-' tween the outer bearing-faces ff and the inner bearing-face g is a considerable portion of the sleeve which is out of contact both externally and internally, and it is this which forms the yielding or flexible portion of the bushing. As the bushing 1 expands the middle'bearing portion 9 of the bushing G expands also, the expansion being taken up by the flexure of the portions h h. To prevent either the bursting of the middle portion of the bushing (i or its undue resistance to expansion, it is preferably slittcd longitudinally, as shown at a in Fig. 14, so that this slitmay -open out slightly as the inner bushing expands. The respective bushings are held against displacement by set-screws t and j. The oil is introduced through a tube It, which screws into the bushing G and communicates with the-orifice t in the inner bushing.

The construction shown in Figs. 1c and 17 is precisely the reverse of that just described, in that the inner bearing-faces of the bushing G are at its ends, while its outer bearing face is at its middle. The inner bearingfaces are the portions in contact with flanges g on opposite ends of the inner bushing F, while the outer bearing-face f is formed as a collar or band on the exterior of the middle portion of the bushing G.

Fig. 18 shows a further amplification of these last two modifications, the inner bushing F and the yielding bushing G next outside of it, being of the construction last described and a second yielding bushing ti', of the same construction as the bushing G in Fig. 13, is added outside of the bushing G, so

" that the expanding and contracting or angular movements of the inner bushing are coinpcnsated for by the yielding or flexure of both the outer bushings G G.

Fig. 1.) shows a modification embodying, as I believe, the simplest form of which my invention is susceptible. The bushings F and G are here combined into one bushing, which performs the functions of both. This bushing has interior bearing-faces g g at its opposite ends, in which the shaft-journal (1. turns, the bushing being cut away between them.at r, thereby forming an oil-space. On its exterior the bushing has a bearing-face f, extending in the form of a collar around its circumference. The intermediate portions h it constitute the yielding or elastic parts of the bushing. The bushing may be held in place by a set-screw 1:, (shown in dotted lines.)

The several modifications shown in Figs. 13 to 19, inclusive, are equally adapted with the preferred construction first described to allow some deflection of the axis of the shaft from exact alignment or coincidence with the axis of the bore b of the bushing by reason of the distortion of the yielding portion of the metal h h intervening between the external and internal bearing-faces.

I prefer to inakeethe internal bushing 1 of gun-metal and the yielding bushing G of cast-iron, or, in the construction shown in Fig. 19, to make the entire bushing of gunmetal.

I claim as my invention the following-deiined novel features and combinations, substantially as hereinbelore specified, namely: 1: A yielding bushing for journal-bearings, consisting of a tubular sleeve formed with internal and external bearing-faces arranged in dilferent positions with elastic or yielding portions of the sleeve intervening, whereby an expansive thrust against the inner faces will be compensated for by the ilcxure of said intervening yielding portions.

2. A yielding bushing for journal-bearings, consistingof a tubular sleeve formed with internal and external bearing-faces arranged to extend longitudinally of the sleeve in different angular positions, with elastic or yield- .ing portions of the sleeve intervening,whereby an expansive thrust against the inner faces will be compensated for by the ilexure of said intervening yielding portions.

Ajonrnal-bearing consisting of the combination, with the journal and supporting-' frame, of a yielding bushing within which the journal turns, constructed as a tubular sleeve with internal bearing-faces to support the journal and with external bearing-faces seated against the frame, the internal and external t'ac'es being located out of coincideuce with one another, with elastic or yielding portions of the sleeve intervening, whereby the bushing compensates by the flexure of its yielding portions for changes in the size or position of the journal relatively to the frame.

4. A journal-bearing consistingof the conibination, with the journal and supportingframe, of an inner bushing in which the journal has its bearing and a yielding bushing intervening between said bushing and the frame, constructed as a tubular sleeve with internal bearing-faces in contact with the inner bushing and with external bearing-faces seated 'against the frame, the internal and external faces being located out of coincidence with one another, with elastic or yielding portions of the sleeve intervening, whereby the bushing compensates by the flexure of its yielding portions for changes in the size or position of the journal and inner bushing relatively to the frame.

5. A journal-bearing consisting of the combination, with the journal and sup ortingframe, of an inner bushing, in which tiie journal has its bearing, of a metal having a higher coefficient of expansion than the metal of the journal, whereby as the bearing heats the bushing tends to expand in greater ratio than the journal and thereby to loosen the fit of the journal, and ayielding bushing intervening between said bushing and the frame, constructed with internal bearing-faces to support the inner bushing and with external bearing-faces arranged out of coincidence therewith and seated against the frame,

whereby the yielding bushing compensates by its fiexure for changes in the size of the inner bushing.

6; A journal-bearing consisting of .the combination, with the journal and supportingframe, of an inner bushing in which the journal has its bearing and a yielding bushing intervenin gbetween saidbushing and the frame, constructed as a tubular sleeve with external bearing-faces in contact with the frame and internal bearing-faces supporting the inner bushing, said external and internal bearingfaces being arranged the one at the ends and the other at the middle portion of the sleeve, and with elastic or yielding portions intervening between said internal an dexternal bearing-faces, whereby by the flexure or distortion of the intervening portions the bushing compensates for deflections of the journal and inner bushing out of true alignment or coincidence with the axis of the bearing.

7. The combination, with a bearing-frame formed with an oil-duct leading to its bear- -bore, of a bearing-bushing and a yielding bushing intervening between said bushing and the. bore, constructed as a tubular ing-faces extending longitudinally in contact with the bore, and with external flanges extending between said external bearing-faces on the side communicating with the oil-duct to prevent escape of oil, and an oil-duct formed through the two bushings for admitting the oil from said duct therethrough to the journal.

8. The combination, withthe bearing-frame and inner or beating bushing, of an intermediate yielding bushing and a screw or pin uniting the inner to the intermediate bushing, and a screw or pin uniting the intermediate bushing to the bearing-frame, whereby the displacement of the bushings relatively to each other and to the frame is prevented.

In witness whereof I'have hereunto signed my naine in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

JAMES J. WOOD. Witnesses:

ARTHUR C. FRAsER, J NO. E. GAVIN.

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2512556A (en) * 1948-03-10 1950-06-20 Gertrude Wedin Bearing
US2576141A (en) * 1944-12-06 1951-11-27 Robert D Pike Bearing
US2583974A (en) * 1943-08-14 1952-01-29 Caleb E Summers Fuel pump cylinder and piston
US2584719A (en) * 1945-10-20 1952-02-05 Gen Railway Signal Co Railway switch point connection
US2631901A (en) * 1949-12-01 1953-03-17 Curtiss Wright Corp Vibration damper
US2770475A (en) * 1951-10-01 1956-11-13 Arthur W Rafferty Rotative swing joint coupling with replaceable bushing
US2897025A (en) * 1955-12-19 1959-07-28 Crane Co Fuel pump bearing
US2897026A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-07-28 Halex Corp Expansion compensating sleeve bearing unit
US2905511A (en) * 1955-03-28 1959-09-22 Clevite Corp Bearing
US3011840A (en) * 1958-06-23 1961-12-05 Blackburn Engines Ltd Bearing housings for aligned high speed shafts
US3149378A (en) * 1960-10-06 1964-09-22 Fuller Co Apparatus for assembling impeller elements
US3433539A (en) * 1966-12-09 1969-03-18 Gen Motors Corp Bearing retainer
US3679276A (en) * 1970-03-05 1972-07-25 Monsun Tison Ab Self-aligning mounting device, particularly for hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders
US5380100A (en) * 1994-02-04 1995-01-10 Yu; Han J. Squeeze film damper covered by torus shells
US20040129617A1 (en) * 2001-08-23 2004-07-08 Pur Water Purification Products, Inc. Water filter device

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2583974A (en) * 1943-08-14 1952-01-29 Caleb E Summers Fuel pump cylinder and piston
US2576141A (en) * 1944-12-06 1951-11-27 Robert D Pike Bearing
US2584719A (en) * 1945-10-20 1952-02-05 Gen Railway Signal Co Railway switch point connection
US2512556A (en) * 1948-03-10 1950-06-20 Gertrude Wedin Bearing
US2631901A (en) * 1949-12-01 1953-03-17 Curtiss Wright Corp Vibration damper
US2770475A (en) * 1951-10-01 1956-11-13 Arthur W Rafferty Rotative swing joint coupling with replaceable bushing
US2905511A (en) * 1955-03-28 1959-09-22 Clevite Corp Bearing
US2897026A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-07-28 Halex Corp Expansion compensating sleeve bearing unit
US2897025A (en) * 1955-12-19 1959-07-28 Crane Co Fuel pump bearing
US3011840A (en) * 1958-06-23 1961-12-05 Blackburn Engines Ltd Bearing housings for aligned high speed shafts
US3149378A (en) * 1960-10-06 1964-09-22 Fuller Co Apparatus for assembling impeller elements
US3433539A (en) * 1966-12-09 1969-03-18 Gen Motors Corp Bearing retainer
US3679276A (en) * 1970-03-05 1972-07-25 Monsun Tison Ab Self-aligning mounting device, particularly for hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders
US5380100A (en) * 1994-02-04 1995-01-10 Yu; Han J. Squeeze film damper covered by torus shells
US20040129617A1 (en) * 2001-08-23 2004-07-08 Pur Water Purification Products, Inc. Water filter device

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