US4074714A - Syringe assembly - Google Patents

Syringe assembly Download PDF

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Publication number
US4074714A
US4074714A US05/776,147 US77614777A US4074714A US 4074714 A US4074714 A US 4074714A US 77614777 A US77614777 A US 77614777A US 4074714 A US4074714 A US 4074714A
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United States
Prior art keywords
syringe
chamber
pressure
adapter
barrel
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Expired - Lifetime
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US05/776,147
Inventor
William J. Binard
Anthony J. Ciarico
Leonard R. Anglada
Bhupendra C. Patel
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Kendall Co
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Kendall Co
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Publication date
Priority to US05/702,164 priority Critical patent/US4030497A/en
Application filed by Kendall Co filed Critical Kendall Co
Priority claimed from US05/852,379 external-priority patent/US4142525A/en
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Publication of US4074714A publication Critical patent/US4074714A/en
Assigned to MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST COMPANY, AS AGENT reassignment MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST COMPANY, AS AGENT SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KENDALL COMPANY, THE
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Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/10Balloon catheters
    • A61M25/1018Balloon inflating or inflation-control devices
    • A61M25/10181Means for forcing inflation fluid into the balloon
    • A61M25/10182Injector syringes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3401Puncturing needles for the peridural or subarachnoid space or the plexus, e.g. for anaesthesia
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/48Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests having means for varying, regulating, indicating or limiting injection pressure
    • A61M5/488Limiting injection pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/10Balloon catheters
    • A61M25/1018Balloon inflating or inflation-control devices
    • A61M25/10184Means for controlling or monitoring inflation or deflation
    • A61M25/10185Valves

Abstract

A syringe assembly comprising, a syringe having a chamber for retaining fluid, and a plunger having one end received in the chamber for pumping fluid out of the chamber. The syringe assembly has means for limiting the amount of pressure generated by the syringe during pumping of fluid.

Description

This application is a division of Ser. No. 702,164 filed July 2, 1976, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,030,497 which is in turn a divisional of Ser. No. 627,982, filed Nov. 3, 1975, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,000,741, which is in turn a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 509,757 filed Sept. 27, 1974, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to pumping devices, and more particularly to syringes.

Syringes are in common use today by physicians, nurses, and other hospital personnel for a variety of purposes. Frequently, syringes have been utilized to pump fluid into a body cavity of a patient or a cavity in a therapeutic device under circumstances where the pressure attained in the cavity should be limited to a predetermined value. For example, during a spinal anesthesia procedure an anesthetic solution is pumped from a syringe through a needle into the sub dural space which is essentially an inelastic pouch, and thus only a specified maximum amount of the solution should be pumped into the space as determined by the pressure in the space. Similarly, various types of cardiovascular catheters are often threaded into blood vessels, after which a balloon adjacent the distal end of the catheter is inflated through use of a syringe. If the balloon is overinflated, particularly when the catheter is placed in a smaller vessel, the vessel may be ruptured. Numerous other catheters, such as endotracheal tubes and Foley catheters, are frequently provided with retention balloons which should not be overinflated, particularly when the balloon is obstructed by a body passage.

Few of the hospital personnel realize the considerable pressures which can be generated by a hand-operated syringe. For example, a 10 c.c. syringe may readily generate pressures in the range of 50°-60° lbs./sq. in., the smaller syringes being capable of developing greater pressures for the same amount of force applied to the syringe plunger. It is thus apparent that considerable care must be exercised by the user when a syringe is utilized to pump fluid into a cavity space where only a limited amount of pressure is desired. In the past, tactile sense has been used when forcing the plunger into the syringe to determine when the maximum pressure has been attained by resistance to plunger movement. Such a procedure produces speculative results, at best, in preventing harm to the patient, particularly since the syringe may readily generate relatively high pressures.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A principal feature of the present invention is the provision of a syringe assembly of simplified construction which prevents damage to a patient during use.

The syringe assembly of the present invention comprises, a syringe having a chamber for retaining fluid, and a plunger having one end received in the chamber for pumping fluid out of the chamber. The syringe assembly has means for limiting the amount of pressure generated by the syringe during pumping of fluid.

Thus, a feature of the present invention is that the syringe assembly prevents generation of an excessive amount of pressure during use to prevent possible damage to the patient.

Another feature of the invention is that the limiting means actuates at a predetermined pressure to relieve pressure in the syringe chamber.

A further feature of the invention is that the syringe assembly may provide means for indicating when the predetermined amount of pressure has been attained.

Still another feature of the invention is that in one embodiment the limiting means is associated with an extension of a syringe barrel defining the syringe chamber.

A feature of the invention is that in one embodiment the limiting means is associated with an adapter for the syringe.

Yet another feature of the invention is that in one embodiment the limiting means prevents movement of the plunger into the syringe chamber when the predetermined amount of pressure has been attained.

A further feature of the present invention is the provision of a method for performing an epidural and a spinal anesthesia procedure.

Further features will become more fully apparent in the following description of the embodiments of this invention and from the appended claims.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of one embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention as attached to a hollow needle;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of pressure limiting means in the syringe assembly of FIG. 1 as actuated above a predetermined pressure;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of the syringe assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention as being applied to a catheter;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of an adapter in another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of an adapter in another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 7--7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of the adapter of FIG. 7 illustrating pressure limiting means as actuated above a predetermined pressure;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of an adapter in another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of the adapter of FIG. 9 illustrating valve means in the adapter as actuated above a predetermined pressure;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 11--11 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a sectional view of an adapter in another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary elevational view of another embodiment of a syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary sectional view of the syringe assembly of FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a front plan view of another embodiment of a syringe assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 18--18 of FIG. 17; and

FIGS. 19 and 20 are fragmentary sectional views of additional embodiments of a syringe assembly of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, there is shown a syringe assembly or syringe means generally designated 20 comprising a syringe 22. The syringe 22 has a hollow barrel 24 having a chamber 26 for retaining fluid. The syringe also has a plunger 28 having a flexible plug 30 adjacent one end 32 of the plunger received in one end of the chamber 26. The plug 30 sealingly engages against the inner surface 33 of the syringe barrel 24, with the plunger being pushed into the chamber 26 to pump fluid out of the chamber.

The syringe 22 has an extension or extension means 34 projecting from an end of the barrel 24 remote the plunger 28, with the extension 34 having a tip 36 receivable in the hub H of a hollow needle N. Of course, the tip 36 of the syringe extension 34 may be connected to any other suitable device, such as a catheter, as described below. The extension 34 has a passageway 38 which communicates with the syringe chamber 26 and the hollow needle N, when attached, and has a flexible balloon 40 which communicates with the passageway 38 through an opening 42 in the wall of the extension 34. The balloon 40 comprises a flexible sleeve which surrounds the extension 34, and has a pair of edges 44a and 44b secured to the outer surface of the extension 34 by suitable means 46a and 46b, such as adhesive. Thus, the balloon or sleeve 40 has its edges 44a and b sealed peripherally around the extension 34, such that it defines a cavity 48 intermediate the sleeve and the outer surface of the extension 34 which communicates through the opening 42 with the passageway 38.

The balloon 40 is constructed to inflate when a predetermined pressure has been reached in the passageway or chamber of the syringe, the particular pressure at which the balloon inflates being selected for the particular use contemplated for the syringe assembly. The pressure at which the balloon inflates may be controlled by a number of factors including the particular material used for the balloon, such as latex, and the thickness, durometer, and elasticity of the balloon, as well as the transverse and longitudinal radii of the balloon, according to the law of Laplace which holds that the pressure required to inflate a balloon is directionally proportional to its tangential tension and inversely proportional to its transverse and longitudinal radii.

In use of the syringe for a spinal anesthesia procedure, the chamber is filled with fluid, such as an anesthetic solution, and the syringe tip 36 is attached to the hub H of the needle N, after which the tip T of the needle may be advanced through the tissue t, the potential epidural space e, and the dura mater d of the patient's body, and inserted into the sub dural space s adjacent the spinal cord s'. The anesthetic solution is then ejected from the syringe chamber 26 into the sub dural space s by pushing the plunger 28 into the syringe chamber. Since the sub dural space is essentially an inelastic blind pouch filled with fluid, as shown in FIG. 1, and under a positive pressure, the balloon 40 of the syringe is selected to inflate at a predetermined pressure greater than the pressure in the sub dural space s. Consequently, as the solution is pumped into the sub dural space, the pressure builds up in the space until it reaches the predetermined pressure, after which the balloon 40 inflates, as shown in FIG. 2, and relieves pressure build up in the space, thus preventing harm to the patient. Accordingly, the balloon 40 serves to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe, and prevents ejection of further fluid into the needle N and sub dural space after the predetermined pressure has been attained. The inflated ballon also serves as an indication to the user that the predetermined amount of pressure in the space or cavity has been reached, and that the plunger should not be pushed further into the syringe chamber 26.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 4, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the extension means 34 includes an adapter 50. If desired, a conventional syringe 22 may be used having a standard luer tip 36'. The adapter 50 has a tip 36 adjacent one end for connection to a catheter C', or other suitable device, such as the needle N, and a recess 52 adjacent the other end of the adapter for attachment to the tip 36' of the syringe 22. A passageway 38 extends longitudinally through the adapter 50, and communicates between the syringe chamber 26 and the catheter C' when the ends of the adapter are connected to the syringe and catheter. The adapter 50 has a flexible sleeve or balloon 40 extending around the adapter and having its ends 44a and b secured peripherally around the outer surface of the adapter by suitable means 46a and b, such as adhesive. The sleeve 40 defines a cavity 48 intermediate the sleeve and the outer surface of the adapter 50 which communicates with the passageway 38 through the opening 42.

In use, after the syringe has been filled with fluid, the adapter 50 is attached to the tip 36' of the syringe 22, and the tip 36 of the adapter 50 is attached to the catheter C'. The catheter may be of a type having a lumen L which communicates between a proximal end P of the catheter and a cavity C" underlying a balloon B adjacent a distal end D of the catheter. For a cardiovascular catheter, as shown, the catheter is previously threaded through a vessel, and the balloon B is inflated through the lumen L by pumping fluid from the syringe chamber 26. When the partially inflated balloon B becomes obstructed by the wall of the vessel, and a predetermined amount of pressure is developed in the cavity C" defined by the balloon B, the flexible sleeve 40 inflates to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe and prevent overinflation of the balloon B, which otherwise might rupture the vessel.

It is apparent that the pressure limiting or indicating means associated with the syringe assembly of the present invention may be incorporated directly onto the syringe itself, as previously described, or may be placed on the adapter which is connected to the syringe. In either case, the device operates in a similar manner to prevent harm to the patient. Thus, for purposes of previous and future discussion, it is immaterial whether the limiting or indicating means is associated with the adapter or the syringe itself in the syringe assembly, with the exception of the devices described in connection with FIGS. 12 and 13.

Another embodiment of the adapter 50 in the syringe assembly 20 is illustrated in FIG. 5, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the adapter 50 includes as outwardly extending thumb 56 having a channel 58 communicating with the passageway 38. The adapter 50 has a flexible sleeve 40 extending peripherally around the thumb 56 and having its edges 44a and b secured peripherally around the thumb by means 46a and b, such as adhesive, thus defining a cavity 48 communicating with the channel 58 and passageway 38 through the opening 42. The sleeve or balloon 40 inflates, as previously described in connection with the syringe assembly of FIGS. 1-4, to limit the amount of pressure generated in the passageway 38 and the syringe chamber.

A further embodiment of the adapter 50 in the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 6-8, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, a balloon 40' has its peripheral edges 44' sealed by suitable means 46', such as adhesive, to an outer surface 60 of the adapter 50 to define the cavity 48, which communicates with the passageway through the opening 42. As shown in FIG. 8, the balloon 40' inflates at a predetermined pressure, as previously described, to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe assembly.

Another embodiment of the adapter 50 in the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 9-11, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, a valve element 64 is supported in a chamber 66, with a head 67 of the valve element 64 having a face 68 for sealing against a seat 70 in the chamber 66. The head 67 has a stem 72 extending from an end of the head remote the face 68, with the stem 72 being received in a cavity 74 in the adapter 50. A helical spring 76 surrounds the stems 72 and extends between a back surface 78 of the cavity 74 and a back surface 80 of the head 67. The adapter 50 has a channel 82 communicating between the passageway 38 and the chamber 66 adjacent the seat 70, and a pair of channels 84a and 84b communicating between the chamber 66 and an outer surface 86 of the adapter 50. As illustrated in FIG. 9, the spring 76 biases the head 67 of the valve element to a first position with the face 68 sealing against the seat 70 to prevent passage of fluid from the channel 82 into the chamber 66. However, when a predetermined amount of pressure is reached in the passageway 38, the spring 74 permits movement of the valve element to a second position with the face 68 of the head 67 spaced from the seat 70, as shown in FIG. 10, and fluid then passess from the passageway 38 through the channel 82, chamber 66, and the channels 84a and b to the outer surface 86 of the adapter 50, as indicated by the direction of the arrows in the drawing. Thus, the valve means is actuated at a predetermined pressure to relieve pressure in the passageway 38, and limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe assembly. The pressure at which the valve means is actuated may be selected by the particular structure of the valve assembly, such as the particular helical spring 74 utilized in the adapter 50.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 14, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the adapter 50 has an outer transparent cylindrical shield 51 defining a chamber 53, and a pair of extensions 55a and 55b extending into the chamber 53 and partially defining the passageway 38'. The tubular sleeve 40 has its ends received on the extensions 55a and b and secured in place by suitable means 46a and b, such as adhesive. The sleeve 40 expands to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe assembly, as previously described, and is visible to the user through the transparent shield to determine when the sleeve has expanded. The shield serves to protect the sleeve, and air is permitted to pass from the chamber 53 through a vent 57 in the shield to permit expansion of the sleeve.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 16, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the flexible balloon or sleeve 40 extends around the syringe barrel 24. The sleeve 40 is secured to an outer surface 152 of the syringe 22 by suitable means 46a and b, such as adhesive, adjacent the edges 44a and b of the sleeve 40, in order to define a cavity 48 intermediate the sleeve 40 and barrel 24 which communicates with the syringe chamber 26 through an opening 42 in the barrel 24. The sleeve 40 inflates above a predetermined pressure, as previously described, to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, a ballon 40' has its peripheral edges 44' sealed by suitable means 46', such as adhesive, to the outer surface 152 of the syringe 22 to define the cavity 48, which communicates with the chamber 26 through the opening 42. The balloon 40' inflates at a predetermined pressure, as previously described to limit the amount of pressure generated by the syringe.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly 20 of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 19, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the extensions 34 described in connection with FIGS. 4-14 may be permanently affixed to the syringe tip 36' by suitable means 150, such as adhesive. As shown in FIG. 20, the extensions 34 may be constructed as an integral part of the syringe 22, if desired.

Another embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 12, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the barrel 24 of the syringe 22 is transparent, and the plunger 28 has a flexible plug 30 adjacent the one plunger end 32 which is received in the syringe chamber 26. The one end 32 of the plunger 28 includes a centrally located transparent member 90 having a cavity 92 facing the syringe chamber 26, with the transparent member 90 being visible through the barrel 24. A flexible diaphragm 94 is supported by the plug 30 and extends across an opening 96 intermediate the cavity 92 in the transparent member 90 and the syringe chamber 26. When a predetermined pressure has been attained in the syringe chamber 26, the diaphragm 94 flexes from a first position adjacent the opening 96, as shown by solid lines in the drawing, to a second position received in the transparent member 90, as shown by dotted lines in the drawing. The diaphragm 94 is thus visible to the user in its second position and serves as an indication that the predetermined amount of pressure has been reached in the syringe chamber, and that the user should cease pumping the syringe.

A further embodiment of the syringe assembly of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 13, in which like reference numerals designate like parts. In this embodiment, the plunger 28 has a flexible plug 30' adjacent the one plunger end 32 which seals against the inner surface 33 of the barrel 24. The plug 30' has an annular slot 100 having one end 102 communicating with the syringe cavity 26, and defining an annular flexible side wall 104 of the plug 30' adjacent the inner surface 33 of the syringe barrel 24. The side wall 104 of the plug 30' flexes responsive to a predetermined pressure in the syringe chamber 26, and engages against the inner surface 33 of the syringe barrel 24 to impede movement of the plunger into the syringe chamber. Thus, when the predetermined amount of pressure is generated by the syringe, resistance to movement of the syringe plunger 28 into the syringe barrel 24 becomes noticeable to the user, and movement of the plunger is then stopped to prevent damage to the patient.

Thus, there has been described a syringe assembly which has means for limiting the amount of pressure generated by the syringe assembly to prevent harm to a patient. In addition, the syringe assembly indicates to the user when the predetermined amount of pressure has been reached.

According to the present invention, methods are also provided for performing an epidural and a spinal anesthesia procedure. In a spinal anesthesia procedure, the tip of a needle, used to perform the procedure, is advanced through the body tissue t, the epidural space e, which is at a slight negative pressure, and the dura mater d into the sub dural space s, which is at a positive pressure, as previously described in connection with FIG. 1. According to a method of the present invention, a balloon of the adapter in the syringe assembly is selected to inflate at a first predetermined pressure less than the pressure in the sub dural space, and a balloon on the syringe, which is removably attached to the adapter, is selected to inflate at a second predetermined pressure greater than the pressure in the sub dural space. When the needle tip T pierces the dura mater d and enters the sub dural space s, fluid in the space actuates the balloon on the adapter due to the higher pressure in the space relative the first predetermined pressure, thus indicating that the needle tip is at the proper location in the space for performing the spinal anesthesia procedure. The adapter may be removed from the needle and syringe, and the syringe is attached to the needle to eject anesthetic solution into the sub dural space. The balloon on the syringe limits the amount of pressure generated by the syringe to prevent harm to the patient, as previously described.

Alternatively, first and second adapters may be used in conjunction with a standard syringe, the first adapter having a balloon inflatable at the first predetermined pressure, and the second adapter having a balloon inflatable at the second predetermined pressure. The balloon of the first adapter is utilized to determine when the needle tip is located in the sub dural space, after which the first adapter is replaced with the second adapter for pumping the anesthetic solution into the space.

A method is also provided for performing an epidural anesthesia procedure with the syringe assembly of the present invention. After the tip of a needle, attached to a syringe or an adapter and syringe, is advanced into the body tissue, the syringe plunger is pushed sufficiently into the syringe chamber to inflate a balloon on the syringe assembly with anesthetic solution from the chamber. The needle tip is then advanced toward the epidural space. When the needle tip enters the epidural space the solution from the syringe assembly flows into the space due to the pressure generated by the inflated balloon relative the negative pressure in the space. Thus, the balloon deflates and indicates to the user that the needle tip is properly located for performing the procedure. The anesthetic solution may then be ejected from the syringe into the epidural space. Accordingly, the method of the invention prevents the user from improperly puncturing the dura mater during the epidural anesthesia procedure.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, as modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

Claims (2)

We claim:
1. A syringe, comprising:
a barrel having a chamber for retaining fluid;
a plunger having one end received in and closing the chamber for pumping fluid out of the chamber, said one end of the plunger having a flexible plug facing the chamber, said plug having slot means defining a flexible sidewall having an enlarged outer portion circumferentially contacting an inner surface of the barrel, and having an intermediate portion of reduced thickness normally spaced from said barrel inner surface, said plug sidewall intermediate portion flexing and engaging against the inner surface of the syringe barrel responsive to pressure in the chamber above a predetermined amount to impede movement of the plunger into the chamber.
2. The syringe of claim 1 wherein said slot means comprises an annular slot having an end communicating with the chamber and defining an annular sidewall of the plug adjacent the inner surface of the barrel.
US05/776,147 1975-11-03 1977-03-10 Syringe assembly Expired - Lifetime US4074714A (en)

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US05/852,379 US4142525A (en) 1977-03-10 1977-11-17 Syringe assembly

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4227534A (en) * 1979-04-30 1980-10-14 International Paper Company Self-inflating urinary catheter
US4245639A (en) * 1979-04-30 1981-01-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Self-inflating urinary catheter
US4346708A (en) * 1981-04-20 1982-08-31 Leveen Harry H Syringe
US5722955A (en) * 1994-08-04 1998-03-03 Epimed International, Inc. Pressure sensing syringe
US5836916A (en) * 1995-10-05 1998-11-17 Children's Medical Center Corporation Combined spinal epidural device
US20050019950A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-01-27 Gierde Douglas T. Method and device for extracting an analyte
US20050166924A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2005-08-04 Ralph Thomas Multiple cannula systems and methods
US20090157044A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2009-06-18 Novodural Pty Ltd Epidural administration systems
US9320846B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2016-04-26 Osprey Medical, Inc. Devices and methods for modulating medium delivery
US9999718B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2018-06-19 Osprey Medical, Inc. Volume monitoring device utilizing light-based systems
US10010673B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2018-07-03 Osprey Medical, Inc. Adjustable medium diverter
US10022497B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2018-07-17 Osprey Medical, Inc. Reservoir for collection and reuse of diverted medium
US10413677B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2019-09-17 Osprey Medical, Inc. Volume monitoring device

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US3094904A (en) * 1961-07-11 1963-06-25 James W Healy Mud pump pistons
US3147753A (en) * 1961-02-08 1964-09-08 Nogier Louis Syringe piston
US3176595A (en) * 1963-05-22 1965-04-06 Galland Henning Mfg Company Plastic piston assembly

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3147753A (en) * 1961-02-08 1964-09-08 Nogier Louis Syringe piston
US3094904A (en) * 1961-07-11 1963-06-25 James W Healy Mud pump pistons
US3176595A (en) * 1963-05-22 1965-04-06 Galland Henning Mfg Company Plastic piston assembly

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4245639A (en) * 1979-04-30 1981-01-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Self-inflating urinary catheter
US4227534A (en) * 1979-04-30 1980-10-14 International Paper Company Self-inflating urinary catheter
US4346708A (en) * 1981-04-20 1982-08-31 Leveen Harry H Syringe
US5722955A (en) * 1994-08-04 1998-03-03 Epimed International, Inc. Pressure sensing syringe
US5836916A (en) * 1995-10-05 1998-11-17 Children's Medical Center Corporation Combined spinal epidural device
EP2322239A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2011-05-18 Mallinckrodt Inc. Improved multiple cannula systems and methods
US8844535B2 (en) 2003-05-06 2014-09-30 Covidien Lp Multiple cannula systems and methods
US20050166924A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2005-08-04 Ralph Thomas Multiple cannula systems and methods
EP1923090A2 (en) 2003-05-06 2008-05-21 Mallinckrodt Inc. Improved multiple cannula systems and methods
US8151798B2 (en) 2003-05-06 2012-04-10 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Multiple cannula systems and methods
US7681576B2 (en) 2003-05-06 2010-03-23 Mallinckrodt Inc. Multiple cannula systems and methods
US20100319705A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2010-12-23 Ralph Thomas Multiple cannula systems and methods
US7943393B2 (en) * 2003-07-14 2011-05-17 Phynexus, Inc. Method and device for extracting an analyte
US20050019950A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-01-27 Gierde Douglas T. Method and device for extracting an analyte
US20090157044A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2009-06-18 Novodural Pty Ltd Epidural administration systems
US9320846B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2016-04-26 Osprey Medical, Inc. Devices and methods for modulating medium delivery
US9999718B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2018-06-19 Osprey Medical, Inc. Volume monitoring device utilizing light-based systems
US10010673B2 (en) 2012-08-28 2018-07-03 Osprey Medical, Inc. Adjustable medium diverter
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