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Publication number
US401113A
US401113A US401113DA US401113A US 401113 A US401113 A US 401113A US 401113D A US401113D A US 401113DA US 401113 A US401113 A US 401113A
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Prior art keywords
carrier
jaws
jaw
barrel
shell
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25CHAND-HELD NAILING OR STAPLING TOOLS; MANUALLY OPERATED PORTABLE STAPLING TOOLS
    • B25C11/00Nail, spike, and staple extractors

Description

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

L. BAUMEISTER.

NAIL EXTRAOTOR.

No. 401,113. Patented Apr. 9, 1889.

vE7/Z7r M /3 UNITED STATES FFICE.

PATENT LEOPOLD BAUMEISTER, OF BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO DAVID F. CROFUT AND GEORGE H. CROFUT.

NAIL-EXTRACTORQ SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 401,113, dated April 9, 1889.

Application filed May 17, 1888. Serial No. 274,134. (No model.)

To all whom it 11mg concern.-

Be it known that I, LEoPoLD BAUMEISTER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Bridgeport, in the county of Fairfield and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Nail-EX- tractors; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention has for its object to produce a device of this class which shall be simple in construction, easy and quick to operate, durable, and practically impossible to get out of repair, the special advantages of my improved construction in operation being that any kind of nails may be withdrawn from any kind of wood without splitting the wood or increasing the size of the hole and without bending or breaking the nail, the wood being first slightly cleared away from under the head of the nail to give firm hold and the movement in drawing the nail being straight out. In order to accomplish this result in the simplest manner possible, I have devised the novel construction of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, numbers be ing used to denote the several parts.

Figure 1 is an elevation of a form of my improved nail-extractor adapted to be used with an ordinary bit-brace; Fig. 2, a longitudinal section thereof; Fig. 3, a bottom plan View; Fig. 4, an elevation of the jaw-carrier detached; Fig. 5, a perspective of the sliding rod and spring-plate detached; Fig. 6, a view of the inner face of one of the jaws; Fig. 7, a view of the screw-pin detached, which holds the jaws in position and serves as a fulcrum for-both jaws; and Fig. 8, a central section of a modified form, in which the nail is drawn out by cam action instead of by the action of a screw.

1 denotes the shell, which is provided with an internal shoulder, 2, an opening, 3, through one side, internal lugs a and 5, the purpose of which will presently be explained, and with prongs 6 on its bottom, which engage the wood, said prongs being preferably beveled on one side, as shown in Fig. 1, for a purpose presently to be explained.

7 denotes a barrel having a shoulder, 8, adapted to rest on the top of the shell and to turn freely thereon, the lower end of the shell preferably resting against shoulder 2 within the shell. At the lower end of the barrel, on the inner side thereof, are strong screwthreads 9,having a quick lead. In the outer side of the barrel is a circular groove, 10, in line with opening 3 in the shell. The two parts are secured together in such a manner as to leave the barrel free to turn independently of the shell, (except as hereinafter specified)-in the present instance by means of a key, 11, which passes through opening 3 in the shell and engages groove 10.

12 denotes the jaw-carrier, which is a cylinder having screw-threads 13 upon its outer side, adapted to engage screw-threads 9 at the lower end of the barrel.

14c denotes a groove in one side of the jawcarrier, which is adapted to be engaged by lug 4, which projects inward from the shell, so that the jaw-carrier is held. against rotary movement, but is free to movelongitudinally within the shell. On the opposite side of the jaw-carrier is a short groove, 15, which is engaged by lug 5, projecting inward from the lower end of the shell, and acts as a stop to limit the downward movement of the jaw carrier.

16 denotes the jaws, which are inwardly curved and toothed at their lower ends, as shown in Fig. 3, and whose inner sides are a concave curve and the outer sides a convex curve, as shown in Fig. 2, the object being to reduce the thickness of the metal near the edges, so that they will act to cutaway the wood from under the head of a nail in use, as will presently be more fully explained.

1 7 denotes a spring between the jaws, which acts to throw them apart; and 18, a threaded pin engaging a correspondingly-threaded opening, 19, in the inner faces of the jaws, half of the opening being formed in each jaw, as clearly shown in Fig. 2. The pin acts to hold the jaws against vertical displacement,

. place.

and also serves as a fulcrum therefor. A slot, 20, (see dotted lines, Figs. 2 and 8,) is provided in the side of the jaw-carrier, through which said screw-pin is inserted and removed.

In assembling, the jaws are placed loosely in the carrier and turned until the threaded opening in the faces of the jaws is in line with opening 19, when the screw is turned in from the outside through said slot. The head of the screw by its engagement with the upper end of the slot serves as a stop to limit the upward movement of the jaws.

Two coil-springs are required to insure the perfect operativeness of the device-one within the jaw-carrier, which acts to force the jaws downward, and consequently to their closed position, and the other to throw the carrier and jaws to their operative position after a nail has been drawn out. In Fig. 2 I have shown the two springs made as one, the two parts being separated by a pin, 21, which is driven in through the jaw-carrier from side to side, passing, of course, through the spring, and making it, in fact, act as two springs. The lower portion of the sprin g or lower spring is designated as 22. The upper end of this spring bears against pin 21 and the lower end against the upper ends of the jaws, one of the jaws being provided with a pin, 23, and the lower end of the spring with a loop engaging said pin, as clearly shown in Fig. 2. The backs of the jaws at their lower ends are provided with inclines 16, which are adapted to engage a circular incline, 12, at the lower end of the jaw-carrier. It will thus be seen that as the jaws are forced downward by the spring inclines 16 will engage incline 12, which will close the jaws firmly together.

24. denotes the upper spring or upper half of the. spring, the lower end of which bears against pin 2]., the upper end being provided with a loop engaging a pin, 25, in a plate, 26, at the lower end of a rod, 27.

28 denotes a support for the spring which projects downward from plate 26 and is inclosed by the spring. The upper end of the barrel is providedwith external screw-threads, and the barrel is closed by a cap, 29, having threads engaging the threads on the barrel.

30 is a stump projecting upward from the cap, which is adapted to be engaged by the jaws or socket of an ordinary brace. Plate 26 is provided with notches 31, either of which is adapted to be engaged bya pin, 32, projecting downward from the under side of. the cap, so that the plate and support 28 are held rigid with the cap.

Rod 27 is provided for convenience in assembling; otherwise spiing 24 would be twisted when the cap is screwed down to It will be noticed that the rod proj ects upward above the end of the stump. In assembling, the rod is pressed downward, so as to carry the plate beyond pin 32, the plate being held in this position until the cap is screwed down tight. The rod is then released and the spring presses the plate up against the. cap, pin 32 dropping intoone of the placed over the nail to be drawn and the shell pressed downward. This forces the jaws up into the jaw-carrier, inclines 16 traveling down incline 12, which allows the jaws to be thrown open by spring 17. As soon as the jaws have passed over the head of the nail the entire device is rotated once or twice toward the left, lug 5 on the interior of the shell being now engaged with the top of groove 15 in the jaw-carrier, so that, the barrel being unable to force the j aw-carrier farther downward, the barrel, jaw-carrier, jaws, and shell can be carried around by the backward (in this instance to the left) rotation of hub 30, the latter being engaged, as already stated, by a bit-brace, or, of course, bya suitable handle, if preferred. This movement causes the jaws to cutaway the wood slightly under the head of the nail, so that the jaws engage the nail firmly .under the head. Prongs 6 at the bottom of the shell may or may not be engaged with the wood. If the nail is a long one or is embedded strongly in the wood, it is best that the prongs should be engaged therewith. As the prongs are beveled on their backs, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, they pass readily over the surface of the wood when the barrel, jaw-carrier, and shell are turned toward the left, and will engage the wood when the rotation of the shell toward the left is stopped. The barrel is now rotated toward the right, theshell remaining stationary. This movement will cause threads 9 at the lower end of the barrel to engage threads 13 on the exterior of the jaw-carrier, the latter being held against rotation by the engagement of lug 4 with groove 14, as, already explained. rapid pitch, the jaw-carrier and jaws are quickly drawn upward into the shell and barrel, which draws the nail straight out of the wood without splitting or marring the wood and without bending or twisting the nail. As the lower end of spring 24 is connected to the jaw-carrierin the present instance by pin 23, pin 18, and slots 20and its upper end is secured to the cap, it follows that said spring will be compressed longitudinally, and also twisted or wound up by the rotation of the barrel as the jaw-carrier and jaws are drawn upward in extracting a nail. As soon as the nail is drawn out the device is lifted, and spring 24 instantly recoils, throwing the jaw- .carrier and jaws down to their normal position,

as in Figs. .1 and 2. The nail is readily extracted from thejaws by aslightlateral move- These threads being of ment, which pushes the jaws up into the carrier and releases the head of the nail.

In the form shown in Fig. 8 the shell is shown as extending upward into the cap and as secured thereto by keys 11 the barrel being adapted to be grasped by the hand and being free to rotate on the shell. No prongs are required in this form, for the reason that the jaw-carrier and jaws only are rotated in cutting away the wood from under the head of a nail. denotes a rod or plunger, which is rigidly but detachably secured to the j awcarrierin the present instance by screwthreads, as shown. 34: is a cam pivoted loosely to the upper end of the plunger and adapted to bear upon the top of the cap. 35 denotes the operating-lever, and 36 a loose finger-button on the operating-lever for convenience in turning it when cutting away the wood from under the head of a nail. The operation is substantially the same as in the other form. The jaws are placed over the head of the nail and pressed upward into the carrier until they open out over the head of the nail. The operator then holds the device firmly in position, ordinarily placing the left hand on the barrel, and rotates the operating-lever, cam, plunger, jaw-carrier, and jaws toward the left by means of the finger-button to cut away the wood from under the head of the nail, as in the other form. The operatingdeveris now lifted over toward the right from the position shown in Fig. 8, the cam engaging the top of the cap. This movement draws the plunger, jaw-carrier, and jaw straight upward, as in the other form, and of course pulls the nail from the wood without twisting or bending it and without marring the wood. A backward movement of the operating-lever returns the jaws to their normal position, and the nail is removed therefrom as in the other form.

Having thus described my invention, I claim- 1. A nail-extractor consisting, essentially, of a shell, a sliding jaw-carrier within the shell, jaws within the carrier projecting below the same, and provided at their extremities with inwardly-turn ed edges adapted to undercut the head of the nail, a spring acting to throw said jaws downward, a spring acting to open the jaws when raised, and means for turning the j aw-carrier and jaws backward to cut away the wood from under the head of a nail and for raising them straight outward to draw the nail.

2. In combination, the shell, the sliding j awcarrier, jaws within the carrier projecting below the same, and provided at their extremities with inwardly-turned edges adapted to undercut the head of the nail, a spring actin g to throw the jaws downward, a spring acting to open the jaws when raised, and means whereby the jaw-carrier and jaws may be r0- tated to cut the wood from under the head of a nail.

3. In combination, the shell, the sliding j awcarrier, pivoted and oscillating jaws within the carrier, a spring acting to throw the jaws downward, a spring acting to oscillate upon their pivots and to open the jaws when raised, a rotatory barrel having a screw-thread engagement with the jaw-carrier, whereby the j aw-carrier and jaws may be raised to extract a nail and a spring connecting and adapted to relatively rotate said carrier and barrel.

4. The combination, with the shell and the barrel adapted to rotate independently thereof, of the sliding jaw-carrier provided with projecting cutting ends, jaws pivoted within but separately from said carrier, provided with projecting cutting ends and havinglongitudinal movement independently thereof, springs 17 and 22, for respectively protruding the jaws and for opening them, and means for rotating and for raising the jaw-carrier and jaws.

5. The combination, with the shell, the barrel rotating independently thereof, the jaws, and the j aw-carrier having slot 20 in one side thereof, of screw-pin 1S, engaging the jaws and lying in said slot, springs 17 and 22, and means, substantially as described, for rotating the jaw-carrier and jaws and for raising them straight upward in the shell,'as and for the purpose set forth.

6. The combination, with the shell, the barrel rotating independently thereof, and the jaw-barrier having incline 12, of the jaws proj ecting below said carrier, provided at their extremities with inwardly-turned edges adapted to undercut the head of the nail and having inclines 16, engaging the incline on the jawcarrier, spring 22, acting to force saidjaws downward, so that they are closed by the inclines, and spring 17, acting to open the jaws when pressed upward.

7. The shell having lug 4, and the jaw-carrier having threads 13 and groove 14, engaging said lug, in combination with the jaws within the carrier projecting below the same,

and provided at their extremities with inwardly-turned edges adapted to undercut the head of the nail, springs to hold said jaws downward and to open them when raised, and the barrel having threads 9, engaging the threads upon the jaw-carrier, as and for the purpose set forth.

8. The shell having lugs 4: and 5, and the j aw-carrier having grooves 14 and 15, engaging said lugs, and screw-threads 13, in combination with the jaws, springs 17 and 22, and the barrel having screw-threads engaging the threads upon the jaw-carrier, as and for the purpose set forth.

9. The shell having opening 3 and lug 4, and the jaw-carrier having groove 14:, engaging said lug, and screw-threads 13, in combination with the barrel having screw-threads engaging the threads upon the jaw-carrier,

spring 24, connecting and adapted to relatively rotate the barrel and jaw-carrier, a groove, 10, and a key engaging opening 3 and groove 10,

whereby the barrel and shell are locked together, leaving the barrel free to rotate.

10. The shell having lug 4, and the jaw-carrier having a groove, 14, engagingsaid lug, screw-threads l3, and incline 12 in combination with the jaws projecting below said carrier, provided at their extremities with inwardly-turned edges adapted to undercut the ICC head of the nail, and having inclines 16, engaging incline 1 2, spring 22, acting to force the jaws downward, so that they are closed by said inclines, spring 17, acting to open the jaws when raised away from the incline, and the barrel having threads engaging the threads upon the jaw-carrier, whereby the jaw-carrier and jaws are raised together when the barrel is rotated forward.

11. The shell having lugs 4 and 5, the jawcarrier having grooves 14 and 15, engaging said lugs, screw-threads 13, and inclines 16, in combination with the jaws having inclines engaging the jaw-carrier, springs 17 and 22, and the barrel having threads engaging threads upon the jaw-carrier, whereby, when the barrel is rotated in one direction, the shell, jaw-carrier, and jaws are carried with it, and when rotated in the opposite direction the jaw-carrier and jaws are drawn upward into the shell and barrel.

12. The combination, with the shell, jaws, and jaw-carrier having screw-threads 13, of the barrel having threads engaging threads 13, cap 29, spring 22, acting to force the jaws downward in the jaw-carrier, and spring 24, connected to the jaw-carrier and to the cap, whereby, when the barrel is rotated to raise the jaw-carrier, spring 24 is twisted, and when the barrel is released said spring will act to throw the jaw-carrier outward to its normal position.

13. The combination, with the shell, the j aw-carrier having threads 13, the barrel having threads engaging threads 13, and the cap,

of spring 24, connected to the cap and t0 the jaw-carrier, whereby, when said barrel is rotated to raise the jaw-carrier, said spring is twisted, and when the barrel is released the spring will act to throw the jaw-carrier downward.

14. The shell, jaw-carrier, barrel, and cap threaded to engage the barrel and having a pin, 32, in combination with plate 26, having a rod projecting upward through the cap and notches engaging said pin, and spring 24, connected to said cap and to the jaw-carrier, whereby, when said rod is pressed inward, the plate is disengaged from the pin and the cap may be turned downward to place without twisting the spring.

15. The combination, with the shell, jawcarrier, and jaws, of the barrel, cap 29, springs 22 and 24, and pin 21, passing through the jaw-carrier, against which said springs bear, substantially as described.

16. The combination, in a nail-extractor, of the shell 1, the sliding jaw-carrier in the same, the rotatory barrel 7, having a screw engagement with the j aw-carrier, spring 24, connecting and adapted to relatively rotate the barrel and carrier, and the grasping jaws within the latter, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses. I

LEOPOLD BAUMEISTER.

WVitnesses:

A. M Woos'rER, STEPH. BAUMEISTER.

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2900169A (en) * 1954-08-24 1959-08-18 Herman E White Bolt puller
US5213311A (en) * 1992-09-24 1993-05-25 Sabo Ronald J Nail extractor
US6755392B1 (en) 2000-11-20 2004-06-29 Lmp Technologies, Llc Nail extractor
US6877401B1 (en) * 2001-09-06 2005-04-12 Reconnx, Inc. Apparatus for extracting fasteners from a host material
US7140087B1 (en) 2001-09-06 2006-11-28 Reconnx, Inc. Methods for extracting fasteners from a host material
US20090243177A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Ginburg David M Locating pin and extraction tool
US20110278513A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2011-11-17 Esposito Adam A Rotary tool accessory for grabbing
US8341818B1 (en) * 2009-04-27 2013-01-01 Ralph Gregory W Nail removal tool
US20130032769A1 (en) * 2011-08-01 2013-02-07 Kittell Jason W Embedded element pulling apparatus
US9604353B1 (en) * 2015-09-24 2017-03-28 Gregory W. Ralph Nail removal tool

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2900169A (en) * 1954-08-24 1959-08-18 Herman E White Bolt puller
US5213311A (en) * 1992-09-24 1993-05-25 Sabo Ronald J Nail extractor
US6755392B1 (en) 2000-11-20 2004-06-29 Lmp Technologies, Llc Nail extractor
US6877401B1 (en) * 2001-09-06 2005-04-12 Reconnx, Inc. Apparatus for extracting fasteners from a host material
US7140087B1 (en) 2001-09-06 2006-11-28 Reconnx, Inc. Methods for extracting fasteners from a host material
US20090243177A1 (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-10-01 Ginburg David M Locating pin and extraction tool
US8341818B1 (en) * 2009-04-27 2013-01-01 Ralph Gregory W Nail removal tool
US20110278513A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2011-11-17 Esposito Adam A Rotary tool accessory for grabbing
US20130032769A1 (en) * 2011-08-01 2013-02-07 Kittell Jason W Embedded element pulling apparatus
US9839999B2 (en) * 2011-08-01 2017-12-12 Happiness Tool Co., Inc. Embedded element pulling apparatus
US9604353B1 (en) * 2015-09-24 2017-03-28 Gregory W. Ralph Nail removal tool

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