US3921273A - Method of filling a casing with heat insulating fibers - Google Patents

Method of filling a casing with heat insulating fibers Download PDF

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US3921273A
US3921273A US51287274A US3921273A US 3921273 A US3921273 A US 3921273A US 51287274 A US51287274 A US 51287274A US 3921273 A US3921273 A US 3921273A
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Prior art keywords
heat
vacuum
cylinder
insulating
insulator
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Katsumi Kondo
Fumiyoshi Noda
Mikio Murachi
Yuji Watanabe
Masaru Usui
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Toyota Motor Corp
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Toyota Motor Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C44/00Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling or foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles
    • B29C44/02Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling or foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles for articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles
    • B29C44/12Incorporating or moulding on preformed parts, e.g. inserts or reinforcements
    • B29C44/18Filling preformed cavities
    • B29C44/182Filling flexible bags not having a particular shape
    • B29C44/184Filling flexible bags not having a particular shape and inserting the bags into preformed cavities
    • B29C44/185Starting the expansion after rupturing or dissolving the bag
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D53/00Separation of gases or vapours; Recovering vapours of volatile solvents from gases; Chemical or biological purification of waste gases, e.g. engine exhaust gases, smoke, fumes, flue gases, aerosols
    • B01D53/34Chemical or biological purification of waste gases
    • B01D53/92Chemical or biological purification of waste gases of engine exhaust gases
    • B01D53/94Chemical or biological purification of waste gases of engine exhaust gases by catalytic processes
    • B01D53/944Simultaneously removing carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons or carbon making use of oxidation catalysts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C44/00Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling or foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles
    • B29C44/34Auxiliary operations
    • B29C44/3492Expanding without a foaming agent
    • B29C44/3496The foam being compressed and later released to expand
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N3/00Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust
    • F01N3/08Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous
    • F01N3/10Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous by thermal or catalytic conversion of noxious components of exhaust
    • F01N3/24Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous by thermal or catalytic conversion of noxious components of exhaust characterised by constructional aspects of converting apparatus
    • F01N3/26Construction of thermal reactors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/02Shape or form of insulating materials, with or without coverings integral with the insulating materials
    • F16L59/028Composition or method of fixing a thermally insulating material
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/14Arrangements for the insulation of pipes or pipe systems
    • F16L59/16Arrangements specially adapted to local requirements at flanges, junctions, valves or the like
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2310/00Selection of sound absorbing or insulating material
    • F01N2310/06Porous ceramics
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49345Catalytic device making
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49394Accumulator making
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49398Muffler, manifold or exhaust pipe making
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4981Utilizing transitory attached element or associated separate material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49863Assembling or joining with prestressing of part
    • Y10T29/4987Elastic joining of parts
    • Y10T29/49872Confining elastic part in socket
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49863Assembling or joining with prestressing of part
    • Y10T29/49876Assembling or joining with prestressing of part by snap fit
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49879Spaced wall tube or receptacle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53657Means to assemble or disassemble to apply or remove a resilient article [e.g., tube, sleeve, etc.]

Abstract

Method of filling a casing with heat insulating fibers in which a fibrous heat insulating mass of fixed size is inserted into a space to be filled by vacuum-packing the fibrous mass in a vacuum-resistant bag, which may then be wrapped about an inner cylinder, introducing the bag into an outer cylinder and, after breaking the vacuum seal, allowing the fibrous mass to swell and fill any space within the outer cylinder not occupied by said inner cylinder, if any.

Description

tlnited States Patent Rondo et al.

[ Nov. 25, 1975 METHOD OF FILLING A CASING WITI-I HEAT INSULATING FIBERS Inventors: Katsumi Kondo; Fumiyoshi Noda;

Mikio Murachi; Yuji Watanabe; Masaru Usui, all of Toyota, Japan Assignee: Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha,

Toyota, Japan Filed: Oct. 7, 1974 Appl. No.: 512,872

Foreign Application Priority Data Oct. 9, 1973 Japan 48-113457 U.S. Cl. 29/157; 29/235; 29/423; 29/451; 29/455 Int. Cl. ..B21D 53/00; B21K 29/00; B23? 15/26 Field of Search 29/450, 157 R, 451, 235,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,012,315 12/1961 Stillwagon 29/423 3,035,331 5/1962 Wieman 29/451 UX 3,137,148 6/1964 Kayser 29/450 UX 3,222,777 12/1965 Rutter et al 29/157 R X Primary ExaminerCharlie T. Moon Attorney, Agent, or FirmBrisebois & Kruger [57] ABSTRACT Method of filling a casing with heat insulating fibers in which a fibrous heat insulating mass of fixed size is inserted into a space to be filled by vacuum-packing the fibrous mass in a vacuum-resistant bag, which may then be wrapped about an inner cylinder, introducing the bag into an outer cylinder and, after breaking the vacuum seal, allowing the fibrous mass to swell and fill any space within the outer cylinder not occupied by said inner cylinder, if any.

7 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheetlofll 3,921,273

FIG. 2

US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet 2 0f 11 3,921,273

US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet 3 of 1] U.S. Patent THE THICKNESS OF A 20mm THICK ROCK WOOL AFTER VACUUM PACKING UNDER VARIOUS VACUUM PRESSIRES 09/9 oe 0.932 os'l VACUUM PRESSURE K /cn?) US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 SheetSoflI 3,921,273

FIG. IO

THE THICKNESS OF A VACUUM PACKED 20mm THICK ROCK WOOL AFTER THE VACUUM IS RELEASED THICKNESS AFTER THE VACUUM IS RELEASED( mm) 51 VACUUM PRESSURE Kg/cm US. Patent N0v.25, 1975 Sheet6ofll 3,921,273

CERAMIC FIBER THE THICKNESS OF I25mm THICK BLANKETS WITH VARIOUS DENSITIES AFTER VACUUM PACKING UNDER VARIOUS VACUUM PRESSURES VACUUM PRESSURE Kg/cm 1 AFTER THE VACUUM IS RELEASED THICKNESS AFTER THE VACUJM IS RELEASED( mm) \ACUUM PRE$SURE K /m?) THE THICKNESS OF 25mm THICK CERAMIC FIBER BLANKETS WITH VARIOUS DENSITIES AFTER VACUUM PACKING UNDER VARIOUS VACUUM PRESSURES VACUUM PRESSURE Kg/cm U.S. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet 9 ofll 3,921,273

THE THICKNESS OF VACUUM PACKED 25mm THICK CERAMIK FIBER BLANKETS WITH VARIOUS DENSITIES AFTER THE VACUJM IS RELEASED 5 3 2 l 6 5 4 2 2 2 0 mm mm W I I A V ommqm mm m DDO wIk mmhud wwwzv Ik VACUUM PRESSUIRE (Kg/0m US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY (Kccl/m-Hr c Sheet 10 0f11 FIG. l5

THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES OF CERAMIC FIBER BLANKETS WITH VARIOUS DENSITIES DENSITY (g/cm 260 460 660 860 who TEMPERATURE (0) US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheetllofll 3,921,273

METHOD OF FILLING A CASING WITI-I HEAT INSULATING FIBERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Automobile exhaust gas purifiers such as manifold reactors or catalytic converters should comprise a heat insulator which can withstand high temperature, because the inside of such a device has to be kept warm so that its exhaust gas purifying ability may be improved and the heat released from such a device has to be prevented from affecting adjacent parts of the automobile.

The so-called ceramic fibers, which are fibrous heat insulators for high temperature use constitute one of the materials available for this purpose. Fibers of alumina-silica can withstand a maximum working temperature of l200l400C; one of silica can withstand lOOC; one of potassium titanate can withstand about l0OOC; and one of zirconia can withstand l800C. Slag wool is also available, but the working temperature it can withstand is low, i.e., about 600C.

These fibrous materials have a heat insulating ability two to three times as high as that of heat resistant, heat insulating brick; a bulk specific gravity of 0.05-0.25 g/cm", which is about /8 of that of the heat insulating brick; and are flexible and vibration-resistant, so as to be quite free from the possibility of being broken by heat shock. Being less resistant to wind velocity, however, they usually need a heat-resistant metal plate applied on the heating surface and are sandwiched between the metal plate and the outer shell, when they are used in a manifold reactor. When they are used in a catalytic converter, they fill the space between the catalyst carrier and the outer shell. In any case, the fibrous heat insulator has to fill a very narrow space. To do this efficiently without sacrificing performance, various methods have been worked out. To give some examples, there are:

l. The method of inserting a bulky heat insulator through the end of the space between the heat insulating inner cylinder and outer cylinder;

2. The method of introducing into the outer cylinder an inner cylinder wrapped with a felt-like heat insulator, or sheathing the inner cylinder with an outer cylinder split into two parts; and

3. The method of inserting a stainless steel, foilpacked fibrous heat insulator. There are, however, many drawbacks in these methods. For example:

I. The efficiency is poor;

2. The fill density becomes uneven; and

3. It is expensive.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a method of filling a narrow heat insulating space in an exhaust gas purifier such as a manifold reactor. According to the present invention, the reactor can be filled with a fibrous heat insulator with extremely high efficiency and uniformity, thereby substantially increasing the work efficiency. Moreover, since the space can be filled to a high density with the fibrous heat insulator, its heat insulating capacity can be improved and accordingly the purifying performance of the exhaust gas purifier can be increased, while the amount of heat released can be decreased.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows the'assembly comprising the engine. the manifold reactor. the exhaust pipe and the muffler.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the manifold reactor fitted to the engine. with part of the reactor wall shown broken away.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through the manifold reactor. I

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line lI-ll of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an oblique view of a heat insulator with specified portions stamped out.

FIG. 6 is an oblique view of the heat insulator of FIG. 5 as vacuum-packed.

FIG. 7 is a partial sectional view taken through a vacuum-packed heat insulating inner cylinder attached to a heat insulator.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of a heat insulating cylinder accessory.

FIGS. 914 are diagrams showing the thickness of a heat insulator when it is vacuumpacked and when the vacuum seal is broken.

FIG. 15 is a diagram showing the thermal conductivities of ceramic fiber blankets with various densities.

FIG. 16 is a partially fragmented oblique view of a heat insulated exhaust pipe.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, which relies on the compressibility of a fibrous heat insulating material, the fibrous heat insulating material is placed in a heatresistant film bag; the bag is depressurized to compress and reduce the volume of the fibrous heat insulator; the heat insulating material which has been thus compressed and reduced in volume is inserted into the space to be insulated from heat; and then the vacuum seal of said bag is broken to expose its contents to atmospheric pressure, so that said insulating material expands to fill said space.

According to the present invention, the same purpose may also be attained by placing fibrous heat insulating material, which has been cut to the size of a space to be filled, into a vacuum-resistant film bag; vacuum-packing the resulting assembly; inserting it into the space to be filled; and then breaking the seal of the package. In the case of a manifold reactor or a catalytic converter having an intricate configuration of inner and outer cylinders, unlike the case of an ordinary heat insulated pipe in which a heat insulator is introduced between outer and inner cylinders having smooth surfaces, it would be advisable to apply a laminated layer of the fibrous heat insulating material on the surface of the inner cylinder, insert the whole inner cylinder into a film bag which is then hermetically sealed for vacuum-packing; and then break the seal of the vacuum-package after having introduced it into the outer cylinder.

As understood from the above, the hermetically sealed bag to be used in the present invention should desirably be flexible and for this purpose the flexible plastic film should be one that does not break when vacuum-packed. For instance, nylon, polyethylene, polypropylene films, etc. may be used singly or as a laminated sheet. Preferably, the film should vanish when burned.

In addition to the above-mentioned ceramic fiber as a fibrous heat insulator, anything fibrous with elasticity may be used for the present invention.

Tables 1-3 give the characteristic values of a few examples of the fibrous heat insulator. FIGS. 9-14 show the thicknesses of these materials when they are vacuum-packed under various pressures and when their hermetic seal is broken. FIG. shows the thermal conductivities of ceramic fiber blankets with various densities.

TABLE I Characteristic values of ceramic fiber blankets Item Characteristic values Fiher diameter 2.8 average S-fihcr produced by Shin-Nihnn Scitetsu Kagaku TABLE 3 Characteristic values of silica fiber Items Characteristic values Fiber diameter l.3p. average Fiber length mm average True specific 2.52

gravity Melting point 17 l 3C Chemical SiO, 98% Na O 0.371

Composition Others 1.77:

product at Nihun Glass Fiher Co.

FIG. 9 illustrates the thickness of a rock wool mass, initially measuring 20 mm thick, 100 mm wide and 100 mm long, after vacuum-packing under various vacuum pressures. As seen therefrom, the thickness of the rock wool is reduced to about /3 ofits initial value. The term vacuum pressure" as used here means the difference between atmospheric pressure and the pressure attained after the maximum depressurization. As shown in FIG. 10, when the hermetic seal is broken, the thickness of the mass is restored at most to about twice the thickness when vacuum-packed. The vacuum-resistant film used was a 50a thick polyethylene film laminated to a 15p. thick nylon film. The same film was used in all other cases.

FIG. 11 illustrates the thicknesses of ceramic fiber blankets (as listed in Table 1) with various densities measuring l2.5 mm thick. mm wide and 100 mm long. after vacuum-packing under various vacuum pressures.

FIG. 12 illustrates the thicknesses of those blankets in FIG. 11 after the hermetic seal is broken. As seen from FIG. 11, vacuum-packing reduces the thickness of the ceramic fiber blanket to as little as A of the initial value; when the hermetic seal is broken, a substantial increase from the vacuum-packed thickness takes place as indicated in FIG. 12.

FIGS. 13 and 14 respectively show the vacuumpacked thickness and the vacuum-broken thickness of the ceramic fiber blankets in FIGS. 11 and 12 when they are initially made 25 mm thick.

As described above, the fibrous heat insulator can be compressed to a fraction of its original thickness by vacuum-packing. When the vacuum pressure is l kg/cm the compressive pressure rises to a maximum, i.e., l kg/cm A vacuum-packed fibrous heat insulator, when the vacuum has been broken, swells from several tens to one hundred per cent in the direction of its thickness. Therefore, when the vacuum of a vacuum-packed heat insulator that can swell to twice its vacuum-packed thickness is within a space 1.5 times the thickness of the insulator, the insulator will swell to fill the space, and still have an extra capacity to expand. Thus with high density retained, the heat insulator will have a low thermal conductivity, an excellent insulating performance and excellent resistance to vibration, as illustrated in FIG. 15. There is another advantage, in that even when the dimensions of the inner or the outer cylinder change due to the temperature variations, the insulator can correspondingly swell, showing no great change in heat insulating performance.

Several specific embodiments of the present invention will now be described.

EXAMPLE 1 In FIGS. 1-4 showing the engine, manifold reactor, exhaust pipe and muffler reference numeral l indicates the engine; 2 indicates the manifold reactor in which CO and HC among the harmful emissions from the engine 1 are burned and transformed into harmless CO and water; and 3 indicates'the exhaust pipe which carries the exhaust gas out of the exhaust port of the manifold reactor 2 to the muffler 4.

In the engine 1, leis the combustion chamber of the engine, in which the gasoline and the air react with each other in an explosion which generates the exhaust gas. When the exhaust valve In opens, the exhaust gas passes out through the exhaust port If. Reference number lg indicates the valve seat, 1c the water-cooled jacket for cooling the cylinder head lb. 1d indicates an air inlet pipe through which an air pump introduces air to the exhaust port lfto promote the re-combustion of the exhaust gas expelled through the exhaust port If, and 1h indicates a gasket. A mixture of the air introduced through the air pipe 1d and the exhaust gas passes into the cylindrical exhaust gas inlet 5 of the manifold reactor 2 and then enters the cylindrical combustion chamber 6. The exhaust gas which has been burned again in the combustion chamber 6 passes through the cylindrical gas outlet 19 into the exhaust pipe 3, and, with the noise muffled by the muffler 4, passes out of the tail pipe 4'.

In the above arrangement the gas temperature in the re-combustion chamber 6 reaches 900l0O0C. In order to shield the surrounding parts from this heat, the space between the inner cylinder 7 and the outer cylinder 8 is filled with fibrous heat insulators 9, 9. Reference numeral 10 indicates a cylindrical heat insulating duct for preventing the material of the heat insulators 9, 9' from dispersing into theexhaust gas. This duct is welded to the inner cylinder 7 and the outer cylinder 8 at the exhaust gas inlet and outlet.

The method of filling the heat insulators 9, 9' in this embodiment will now be described.

A ceramic fiber blanket having the properties indicated in Table l (a product of lsolite Industry K.K., trade name Kao-woo] blanket, having a density of 0.128 g/cm and a thickness of 12.5 mm) is cut into a piece of such size that it can be wrapped around the heat insulating inner cylinder 7. After cutting a hole therein for the heat insulating duct 91) of the exhaust gas inlet and for the heat insulating duct 9c of the exhaust gas outlet, a blanket 9a, as illustrated in FIG. 5 is obtained. This blanket 9a is wrapped around the inner cylinder 7 which has the side cover 7 of the inner cylinder and the heat insulating duct 10 welded thereto, and the end faces 9e, 9e of the blanket are joined together and attached by means of a tape or the like. In addition, a blanket heat insulator 9 of the disk type is prepared with a hole provided therein for receiving the bolt 16 to support theinner cylinder 7 and this is pressed and fitted against the end cover 7' of the inner cylinder.

The inner cylinder 7, thus firmly wrapped in a blanket, is placed in avacuum-resistant bag (such as the one mentioned above) and vacuum-packed under a vacuum pressure of 1 kg/cm. For this purpose, a vacuum-packer Model A-450-L produced by Furukawa.

Seisakus ho is employed; and this machine is also used in the following examples.

FIG. 7 illustrates the reactor in a vacuum-packed state. In FIG. 7, reference numeral 20 is a vacuumresistant bag, 21 is the hermetic seal, and 21 is the sealed bottom of the bag. As a result of such a vacuumsealing, the thickness of the heat insulating layer can be reduced to 4.9 mm, including the thickness of said vacuum-resistant bag.

The vacuum-packed product illustrated in FIG. 7 is introduced into the outer cylinder 8 and heated at 500C for minutes to burn away the vacuum-resistant bag. Thus released from vacuum, the blanket swells and uniformly fills the 8 mm gap between the inner and outer cylinders 7, 8. Then the heat insulating duct 10 and the heat insulating outer cylinder 8 are welded toh gether, and the end cover 8' is welded to the outer cylinder 8, thereby completing the heat insulating cylinder accessory (FIG. 8). The blanket 9' may be inserted in a conventional way before the end cover 8 is welded to the outer cylinder 8.

and the bolt 16 are made of stainless steel. .lIS-SUS 3105; the bolt 12 is made of stainless steel .IlS-SUS- 304; and the outer shell I1 and the end cover 15 are made of cast iron (FCC-23).

. EXAMPLEZ The same ceramic fiber blanket as in Example I is used and by subjecting it to the same treatment as in Example I, a blanket 9a (FIG. 5) to be wrapped around the inner cylinder 7 is prepared.

This blanket 9a is placed in a vacuum-resistant bag 20 (the same as above) of polyethylene laminated to nylon, and is vacuum-packed. The vacuum-packed product has its parts corresponding to the heat insulating ducts 9b, for inlet and outlet of the exhaust gas in the blanket 9a heat-sealed; and with openings for receiving the heat insulating ducts stamped out, a vacuum-package as illustrated in FIG. 6 is obtained.

This vacuum-package is wrapped around the inner cylinder 7, fastened with a tape or thelike and inserted into the outer cylinder 8, after which it is treated as in Example 1, thereby making a heat insulating cylinder accessory and completing a manifold reactor.

In this embodiment the heat insulator 9' to fill the end of the heat insulating cylinder may be vacuumpacked before insertion just as in Example 1, or it may be inserted in a conventional way.

In the present example, in which only the blanket is vacuum-packed, its original thickness of 12.5 mm can be reduced to 4.5 mm, including the thickness of the bag, which is thinner than in Example I.

A heat insulating cylinder accessory prepared as in Examples I and 2 was compared in a vibration test with a heat insulating cylinder accessory prepared by inserting a 7 mm thick ceramic fiber blanket of the same quality as in Example 1 by a conventional method. The test conditions were as described below, and after the test, each accessory was cut open for investigation. The results show that the products of Examples 1 and 2 were uniformly filled, but the conventional product had its blanket loosened, bulky and bent toward the bottom of the accessory.

normal to the diameter of heat insulating cylinder and up and down Vibrational directions:

EXAMPLE 3 In this example, a method of filling a heat insulated exhaust pipe is described, a partially cut away oblique view thereof being shown in FIG. 16, with a heat insulator. In FIG. 16, reference numeral 22 indicates an outer cylinder made of JIS-STKM-l 1 steel, 23 an inner cylinder made of JIS-SUS-304 steel, and 25 a flange made of JIS-SUS-304 steel, while 26 indicates the bolt hole.

First, a rock wool pad, 0.14 g/cm in density and 20 mm in-thickness (a product of Shin-Nippon Seitetsu Kagaku, see Table 2) is wrapped around the inner cylinder 23, which has a flange 25 welded thereto at 23a; the butt joint is firmly taped; and the resulting assembly 7 is inserted into a heat resistant film bag (the same type as in Example I). It is then vacuum-packed to a vacuum pressure of l kg/cm Vacuum-packing reduces the thickness of the wool pad to 6.4 mm.

Next the resulting vacuumpackage is introduced into the outer cylinder 22, and heated at 500C for minutes to burn away the vacuum-resistant film bag. Thus released from the vacuum, the heat insulator 24 fills the space between the inner and outer cylinders.

The outer diameter of the inner cylinder is 40 mm, the inner diameter of the outer cylinder is 56 mm, and the thickness of the heat insulating space between the two cylinders is 8 mm.

EXAMPLE 4 A 25 mm thick rock wool pad of the same quality as in Example 3 is used as the heat insulator. A layer of this wool is cut into a piece of specified size, which is inserted into a vacuum-resistant bag (of the same type as above) and vacuum-packed, to a vacuum pressure 1 kglcm Thus vacuum-packed, the thickness, including that of the bag. can be reduced to 6.5 mm.

Next the resulting vacuum-package is wrapped around the inner cylinder 23 having the flange 25 welded thereto, the butt joint is firmly taped, the inner cylinder 23 thus treated is introduced into the outer cylinder and heated at 500C for minutes to burn away the vacuum-resistant bag. Thus released from vacuum, the space between the two cylinders is filled with the heat insulator, thereby producing a heat insulated exhaust pipe.

In the conventional practice of wrapping the heat insulator around the surface of the inner cylinder and simply forcing the inner cylinder into the outer one, a heat insulator about 4 mm thick at the most is available for the manufacture of the above-mentioned heat insulated exhaust pipe. Thus in comparison between the products of Examples 3, 4 and the conventional product in a vibration test (the conditions being the same as above), the conventional product was found to be extremely one-sided, resulting in a heavy drop in its heat insulating effect, whereas the products according to the present invention were free from such a defect.

As described above, the present invention makes the filling of the heat insulator easy so that the fibrous heat insulator can be filled to such high density that the filled layer can exhibit excellent anti-vibration characteristics and heat insulating properties. Moreover, the present invention eliminates the sanitary problem of fine particles of the fibrous heat insulator becoming scattered into the air at the work site, and many other benefits accrue from the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Method of manufacturing a heat insulator which comprises the steps of introducing between an outer casing and an inner casing an insert comprising a mass of fibrous material which has been compressed by vacuum-packing it in a hermetically sealed bag, and then unsealing said bag to permit said material to expand within said casing.

2. Method as claimed in claim 1 which comprises the step of first wrapping said sealed bag containing said mass of fibrous material about an inner casing to form the insert introduced into said outer casing.

3. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is sealed in such a way that it may be unsealed by the application of an amount of heat insufficient to damage said fibrous mass and casing, and comprising the step of applying said amount of heat to said insulator after said bag has been introduced into said casing.

4. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is made of a material which is destroyed by the application thereto of an amount of heat insufficient to damage said casing and fibrous mass, and comprising the step of applying said amount of heat to said insulator after said bag has been introduced into said casing.

5. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said fibrous material is selected from the group consisting of rock wool, silica fiber, ceramic fiber, and mixtures thereof.

6. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is made from a plastic selected from the group consisting of nylon, polyethylene, polypropylene, and combinations thereof.

7. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which the fibrous mass is caused to fill the space between inner and outer cylindrical casing encircling a passage for the gas exhausted from an automotive engine.

Notice of Adverse Decision in Interference In Interference No. 100,636, involving Patent No. 3,921,273, K. Kondo, F. Noda, M. Murachi, Y. Watanabe and M. Usui, METHOD OF FILLING A CASING WITH HEAT INSULATING FIBERS, final judgment adverse to the 1 patentees was rendered Dec. 7, 1983, as to claim 1.

[Official Gazette June 5, 1984.]

Claims (7)

1. Method of manufacturing a heat insulator which comprises the steps of introducing between an outer casing and an inner casing an insert comprising a mass of fibrous material which has been compressed by vacuum-packing it in a hermetically sealed bag, and then unsealing said bag to permit said material to expand within said casing.
2. Method as claimed in claim 1 which comprises the step of first wrapping said sealed bag containing said mass of fibrous material about an inner casing to form the insert introduced into said outer casing.
3. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is sealed in such a way that it may be unsealed by the application of an amount of heat insufficient to damage said fibrous mass and casing, and comprising the step of applying said amount of heat to said insulator after said bag has been introduced into said casing.
4. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is made of a material which is destroyed by the application thereto of an amount of heat insufficient to damage said casing and fibrous mass, and comprising the step of applying said amount of heat to said insulator after said bag has been introduced into said casing.
5. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said fibrous material is selected from the group consisting of rock wool, silica fiber, ceramic fiber, and mixtures thereof.
6. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which said bag is made from a plastic selected from the group consisting of nylon, polyethylene, polypropylene, and combinations thereof.
7. Method as claimed in claim 1 in which the fibrous mass is caused to fill the space between inner and outer cylindrical casing encircling a passage for the gas exhausted from an automotive engine.
US3921273A 1973-10-09 1974-10-07 Method of filling a casing with heat insulating fibers Expired - Lifetime US3921273A (en)

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FR2438160A1 (en) * 1979-03-07 1980-04-30 Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag
US4240193A (en) * 1979-05-18 1980-12-23 Coachmen Industries, Inc. Method of stuffing compressible products into flexible covers
FR2465506A1 (en) * 1979-09-24 1981-03-27 Monsanto Co Method for assembly of permeation devices
US4273161A (en) * 1974-10-09 1981-06-16 Ameron, Inc. Insulated plastic pipe product and method
US4272874A (en) * 1977-10-28 1981-06-16 Coachmen Industries, Inc. Apparatus for stuffing compressible products into flexible covers
US4393569A (en) * 1980-05-02 1983-07-19 J T Thorpe Company Method of installing defractory ceramic fiber module
US4489473A (en) * 1981-04-17 1984-12-25 Isolite Babcock Refractories, Co., Ltd. Method for installing thermal insulation materials on the inner surface of a duct
US4581804A (en) * 1975-09-12 1986-04-15 Ameron, Inc. Method for making insulated pipe
FR2575533A1 (en) * 1984-12-31 1986-07-04 Emh Device forming a rotary joint for cryogenic liquid
US4644627A (en) * 1985-09-12 1987-02-24 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank for liquids
US4653170A (en) * 1986-01-10 1987-03-31 Kelson Arnold A Method for handlebar grip installation
US4730381A (en) * 1986-03-27 1988-03-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of making plural-chambered dispensing device exhibiting constant proportional co-dispensing
US4736509A (en) * 1987-01-29 1988-04-12 Nelson Thomas E Method of making water heater construction
US4744137A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-05-17 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank for liquids
US4780946A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-11-01 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank with beaded spacer means
US4780947A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-11-01 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank with channeled spacer means
US4844049A (en) * 1988-04-04 1989-07-04 Nelson Thomas E Water heater device
US4901676A (en) * 1988-04-04 1990-02-20 Soltech, Inc. Sealing and insulation device for the space between spaced apart surfaces
US4911142A (en) * 1987-01-29 1990-03-27 Soltech, Inc. Water heater construction
US4934032A (en) * 1988-04-04 1990-06-19 Soltech, Inc. Method of water heater construction
US4958620A (en) * 1987-01-29 1990-09-25 Sotech, Inc. Water heater construction
US5575067A (en) * 1995-02-02 1996-11-19 Hexcel Corporation Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber reinforced heat exchanger tube
US6148519A (en) * 1998-09-18 2000-11-21 Donaldson Company, Inc. Apparatus for installing a packing material in a muffler assembly; and methods thereof
US6298660B1 (en) * 1999-06-30 2001-10-09 Siemens Canada Limited Low thermal inertia integrated exhaust manifold
US6412596B1 (en) 2001-02-01 2002-07-02 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Process for filling a muffler and muffler filled with fibrous material
US6446750B1 (en) 2001-03-16 2002-09-10 Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc. Process for filling a muffler shell with fibrous material
US6581723B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2003-06-24 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Muffler shell filling process, muffler filled with fibrous material and vacuum filling device
US6607052B2 (en) 2001-09-12 2003-08-19 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Muffler shell filling process and muffler filled with fibrous material
US6668972B2 (en) 2000-11-07 2003-12-30 Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc. Bumper/muffler assembly
US20070240932A1 (en) * 2006-04-12 2007-10-18 Van De Flier Peter B Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system with integrated reflective chamber
US20070240934A1 (en) * 2006-04-12 2007-10-18 Van De Flier Peter Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system
US20090183502A1 (en) * 2005-08-09 2009-07-23 Faurecia Systemes D'echappement Exhaust pipe
US20090232592A1 (en) * 2008-03-17 2009-09-17 Kevin Virgil Gudorf Cast end cap mounting module
US20100239468A1 (en) * 2009-03-23 2010-09-23 Ibiden Co., Ltd. Exhaust gas purifying apparatus and method for manufacturing exhaust gas purifying apparatus
US20100307863A1 (en) * 2007-12-14 2010-12-09 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Composite muffler system thermosetable polymers
US20100307632A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Nilsson Gunnar B Apparatus For And Process Of Filling A Muffler With Fibrous Material Utilizing A Directional Jet
US20120055140A1 (en) * 2010-09-02 2012-03-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Exhaust treatment system and method of assembly
US20140227160A1 (en) * 2013-02-14 2014-08-14 Basf Se Material and method for sealing off cavities
US9616406B2 (en) 2013-02-14 2017-04-11 Basf Se Installing monoliths in a reactor for conducting heterogeneously catalyzed gas phase reactions

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US6317959B1 (en) * 1999-02-16 2001-11-20 Owens Corning Sweden A.B. Process and apparatus for packing insulation material in a passage between first and second elements
KR100540522B1 (en) * 2000-04-21 2006-01-10 마쓰시타 레키 가부시키가이샤 Vacuum insulating material and device using the same
US6598283B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2003-07-29 Cabot Corporation Method of preparing aerogel-containing insulation article
US8474115B2 (en) * 2009-08-28 2013-07-02 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Apparatus and method for making low tangle texturized roving
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Cited By (47)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4273161A (en) * 1974-10-09 1981-06-16 Ameron, Inc. Insulated plastic pipe product and method
US4581804A (en) * 1975-09-12 1986-04-15 Ameron, Inc. Method for making insulated pipe
US4272874A (en) * 1977-10-28 1981-06-16 Coachmen Industries, Inc. Apparatus for stuffing compressible products into flexible covers
FR2438160A1 (en) * 1979-03-07 1980-04-30 Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag
US4240193A (en) * 1979-05-18 1980-12-23 Coachmen Industries, Inc. Method of stuffing compressible products into flexible covers
FR2465506A1 (en) * 1979-09-24 1981-03-27 Monsanto Co Method for assembly of permeation devices
US4308654A (en) * 1979-09-24 1982-01-05 Monsanto Company Methods for assembling permeators
US4393569A (en) * 1980-05-02 1983-07-19 J T Thorpe Company Method of installing defractory ceramic fiber module
US4489473A (en) * 1981-04-17 1984-12-25 Isolite Babcock Refractories, Co., Ltd. Method for installing thermal insulation materials on the inner surface of a duct
US4844514A (en) * 1984-12-31 1989-07-04 Entreprise D'equipments Mecanique Et Hydrauliques E.M.H. Rotary joint device for a cryogenic liquid
FR2575533A1 (en) * 1984-12-31 1986-07-04 Emh Device forming a rotary joint for cryogenic liquid
EP0188161A1 (en) * 1984-12-31 1986-07-23 Entreprise D'equipements Mecaniques Et Hydrauliques (E.M.H.) Swivel seal for a cryogenic liquid
US4644627A (en) * 1985-09-12 1987-02-24 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank for liquids
US4744137A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-05-17 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank for liquids
US4780946A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-11-01 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank with beaded spacer means
US4780947A (en) * 1985-09-12 1988-11-01 Palazzo David T Method of making double wall storage tank with channeled spacer means
US4653170A (en) * 1986-01-10 1987-03-31 Kelson Arnold A Method for handlebar grip installation
US4730381A (en) * 1986-03-27 1988-03-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of making plural-chambered dispensing device exhibiting constant proportional co-dispensing
US4736509A (en) * 1987-01-29 1988-04-12 Nelson Thomas E Method of making water heater construction
US4911142A (en) * 1987-01-29 1990-03-27 Soltech, Inc. Water heater construction
US4958620A (en) * 1987-01-29 1990-09-25 Sotech, Inc. Water heater construction
US4901676A (en) * 1988-04-04 1990-02-20 Soltech, Inc. Sealing and insulation device for the space between spaced apart surfaces
US4934032A (en) * 1988-04-04 1990-06-19 Soltech, Inc. Method of water heater construction
US4844049A (en) * 1988-04-04 1989-07-04 Nelson Thomas E Water heater device
US5575067A (en) * 1995-02-02 1996-11-19 Hexcel Corporation Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber reinforced heat exchanger tube
US6148519A (en) * 1998-09-18 2000-11-21 Donaldson Company, Inc. Apparatus for installing a packing material in a muffler assembly; and methods thereof
US6298660B1 (en) * 1999-06-30 2001-10-09 Siemens Canada Limited Low thermal inertia integrated exhaust manifold
US6668972B2 (en) 2000-11-07 2003-12-30 Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc. Bumper/muffler assembly
US6412596B1 (en) 2001-02-01 2002-07-02 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Process for filling a muffler and muffler filled with fibrous material
US6446750B1 (en) 2001-03-16 2002-09-10 Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc. Process for filling a muffler shell with fibrous material
US6581723B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2003-06-24 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Muffler shell filling process, muffler filled with fibrous material and vacuum filling device
US6607052B2 (en) 2001-09-12 2003-08-19 Owens Corning Composites Sprl Muffler shell filling process and muffler filled with fibrous material
US20090183502A1 (en) * 2005-08-09 2009-07-23 Faurecia Systemes D'echappement Exhaust pipe
US7934580B2 (en) 2006-04-12 2011-05-03 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system
US20070240932A1 (en) * 2006-04-12 2007-10-18 Van De Flier Peter B Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system with integrated reflective chamber
US7942237B2 (en) 2006-04-12 2011-05-17 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system with integrated reflective chamber
US20070240934A1 (en) * 2006-04-12 2007-10-18 Van De Flier Peter Long fiber thermoplastic composite muffler system
US20100307863A1 (en) * 2007-12-14 2010-12-09 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Composite muffler system thermosetable polymers
US20090232592A1 (en) * 2008-03-17 2009-09-17 Kevin Virgil Gudorf Cast end cap mounting module
US9644522B2 (en) * 2008-03-17 2017-05-09 Faurecia Emission Control Technologies, USA, LLC Cast end cap mounting module
US8388899B2 (en) * 2009-03-23 2013-03-05 Ibiden Co., Ltd. Exhaust gas purifying apparatus and method for manufacturing exhaust gas purifying apparatus
US20100239468A1 (en) * 2009-03-23 2010-09-23 Ibiden Co., Ltd. Exhaust gas purifying apparatus and method for manufacturing exhaust gas purifying apparatus
US20100307632A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Nilsson Gunnar B Apparatus For And Process Of Filling A Muffler With Fibrous Material Utilizing A Directional Jet
US8590155B2 (en) 2009-06-03 2013-11-26 Ocv Intellectual Capital, Llc Apparatus for and process of filling a muffler with fibrous material utilizing a directional jet
US20120055140A1 (en) * 2010-09-02 2012-03-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Exhaust treatment system and method of assembly
US20140227160A1 (en) * 2013-02-14 2014-08-14 Basf Se Material and method for sealing off cavities
US9616406B2 (en) 2013-02-14 2017-04-11 Basf Se Installing monoliths in a reactor for conducting heterogeneously catalyzed gas phase reactions

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
USRE32258E (en) 1986-10-07 grant
JPS5063549A (en) 1975-05-30 application
JPS5728837B2 (en) 1982-06-18 grant
JP1138149C (en) grant

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