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US3916924A - Apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers - Google Patents

Apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers Download PDF

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Publication number
US3916924A
US3916924A US42926173A US3916924A US 3916924 A US3916924 A US 3916924A US 42926173 A US42926173 A US 42926173A US 3916924 A US3916924 A US 3916924A
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Prior art keywords
container
containers
pesticide
nozzle
rinse
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Gowan Francis E Mc
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Gowan Francis E Mc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B1/00Nozzles, spray heads or other outlets, with or without auxiliary devices such as valves, heating means
    • B05B1/14Nozzles, spray heads or other outlets, with or without auxiliary devices such as valves, heating means with multiple outlet openings; with strainers in or outside the outlet opening
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B9/00Cleaning hollow articles by methods or apparatus specially adapted thereto
    • B08B9/08Cleaning containers, e.g. tanks
    • B08B9/0804Cleaning containers having tubular shape, e.g. casks, barrels, drums
    • B08B9/0813Cleaning containers having tubular shape, e.g. casks, barrels, drums by the force of jets or sprays
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B9/00Cleaning hollow articles by methods or apparatus specially adapted thereto
    • B08B9/08Cleaning containers, e.g. tanks
    • B08B9/093Cleaning containers, e.g. tanks by the force of jets or sprays
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/4238With cleaner, lubrication added to fluid or liquid sealing at valve interface
    • Y10T137/4245Cleaning or steam sterilizing
    • Y10T137/4259With separate material addition

Abstract

Apparatus for emptying containers such as containers of the type that have been used for holding pesticides, and whereby such apparatus when inserted into a pesticide container of rigid construction produce a closed system between the pesticide container and the mixing tank and thereby substantially reduce the hazards associated with pesticide mixing and wherein the containers are also rinsed to make them sufficiently non-toxic, whereby such containers can be more easily disposed of in dumps or the like. The present invention also permits pesticide users to evacuate the material from the container so that the container can be rinsed more easily and quickly as compared to existing apparatus that have heretofore been used.

Description

Mc Gowan Nov. 4, 1975 APPARATUS FOR EMPTYING AND RINSING CONTAINERS [76] Inventor: Francis E. Mc Gowan, 2773 Curtis Way, Sacramento, Calif. 95818 22 Filed: Dec. 28, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 429,261

[52] US. Cl 134/95; 134/102; 134/168 R; 134/171; 141/286 [51] Int. C13... B08B 3/02; B08B 9/08; B08B 15/04 Primary Examiner-Robert L. Bleutge Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Blair & Brown [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for emptying containers such as containers of the type that havebeen used for holding pesticides, and whereby such apparatus when inserted into a pesticide container of rigid construction produce a closed system between the pesticide container and the mixing tank and thereby substantially reduce the hazards associated with pesticide mixing and wherein the containers are also rinsed to make them sufficiently nontoxic, whereby such containers can be more easily disposed of in dumps or the like. The present invention also permits pesticide users to evacuate the material from the container so that the container can be rinsed more easily and quickly as compared to existing apparatus that have heretofore been used.

3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures [58] Field of Search 141/91, 286, 95; 134/99, 134/100, 101, 102, 166 R, 167 R, 168 R, 169 R, 171, 172

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,824,425 9/1931 Canton 141/286 X 2,213,627 9/1940 De Baugh 134/167 R 2,707,474 5/1955 Wiginton 134/102 2,845,934 8/1958 Payson 134/169 R X 3,120,237 2/1964 Lang 137/171 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 549,303 4/1932 Germany 141/286 MIX TANK 44 SOLVENT 34 53 v v 40 f NURSE TANK (H2O) AC DE DC Pom/ER U.S. Patent N0v.4, 1975 Sheet 1 of3 3,916,924

FIG. 1.

43 ,M/X TANK 4/ 42 0/ 3 m 6 2 w w mm f H Ina ll H M v c 5 a. II llj K 3 N A w T 5 5 O/ S 3 3 %6 E 3 k U N J J L l i N E w w Sheet 2 of 3 U.S. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 U.S. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 3 of3 3,916,924

APPARATUS FOR EMPTYING AND RINSING CONTAINERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers such as containers that have been used for holding liquid pesticides.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Apparatus is provided whereby containers such as pesticide containers of the rigid type can be emptied and rinsed to rinder the containers sufficiently nontoxic so that the containers can be disposed of in dumps and other suitable locations or safely reclaimed. In addition, the present invention permits the handlers of pesticide containers to work under safer conditions since such handlers will not be exposed to toxic materials. In accordance with the present invention, a member is inserted into and locked in the opening of the pesticide container of a suitable size and which member evacuates the contents and from which a rinse solution is provided, and wherein suitable automatic control means can be provided or used for providing an automated system, if desired.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a safe apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers such as pesticide containers whereby such containers can be rendered sufficiently non-toxic so that the containers can be more easily disposed of than has heretofore been possible.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a pesticide container emptying and rinsing device that is rugged in structure and generally foolproof in use and which is simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent in the following specification when considered in the light of the attached drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic view illustrating an automated system utilizing the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged elevational view illustrating a pesticide container with the nozzle and coaxial evacuation tube mounted therein;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view illustrating the nozzle and coaxial evacuation tube and portion of a pesticide container; 7

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 77 of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 88 of FIG. 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral indicates a pesticide container of the rigid type, and the pesticide container 20 includes a bottom wall 21, cylindrical side wall 22, and top wall 23 that has an opening 24 therein, FIG. 3.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a nozzle that is indicated generally by the numeral 25. The numeral 26 indicates an evacuation tube that can be vertically adjusted for different depths'of Containers 20. The numeral 27 indicates an attachment that is adapted to have a hose 28 connected thereto, FIG. 1.

In FIG. 1 there is illustrated schematically an automated system wherein a pump 29 may be connected to the hose 28, and lines or hoses 30 and 31 may bear ranged as shown, and these lines 30 and 31 may have valves 32 and 33 therein for a purpose to be later described. Solenoids 34 and 35 are provided for controlling actuation of the valves 32 and 33. The numeral 36 indicates a nurse tank for water or the like, and the numeral 37 indicates a solvent tank.

A suitable timer 38 is adapted to be electrically connected in a circuit and the timer 38 can be connected to the solenoids 34 and 35 by means of wires or conductors 40. The numeral 39 indicates wires or conductors that can be used for connecting the timer and electrical components to a suitable source of alternating current or direct current power. As shown further in FIG. 1, a mix tank 41 may be provided which has lines or hoses 42 and 43 connected thereto; a pump 44 may be arranged as shown, there being a hose or line 45 provided, and the hose 45 is adapted to be connected to the upper end of the evacuation tube 26.

As shown in FIG. 3, there is provided an expanding seal 47 that is arranged around the exterior of the rinse nozzle and the seal 47 fits into the opening 24 of the container for sealing the container when the nozzle is in place. The numeral 48 indicates an air inlet check valve on the noule. The lower end of the evacuation tube 26 may be inclined or angled as at 49 to permit liquid, both toxicant and rinse, to leave the container and enter the lower end of the tube 26.

Furthermore, as shown in the drawings, the nozzle has a plurality of orifices 50 therein. These orifices 50 may consist of an upper groups of slots or slits 51, an intermediate group of slots 52, lower slots 53, and a bottom group of orifices or jet openings 54 and 55, FIG. 3. These orifices or jet openings may be constructed so that the inner portions are of slightly greater size than the outer portions thereof as shown in FIG. 7, so that the liquid will be discharged up through the orifices in the most advantageous manner. Thus, in FIG. 7 the orifices 51 have their inner portions 56 slightly larger than their outer portions 57 whereby laminar flow will be provided to maintain maximum pressure in the jet of wash solution so that it hits the walls of the container with maximum energy.

As shown in FIG. 4, the nozzle includes an inner body portion 58 that has O-rings 59 snugly seated in recesses 60 therein, and these O-rings and slots are illustrated in FIG. 3. In FIG. 4, the numeral 61 indicates ducting formed in the nozzle and the numeral 62 indicates the portions between the ducting 61. In FIG. 8 the enlarged sectional view illustrates the O-ring 59a which seals 25 to 26 and allows 26 to slide up and down in 25.

In the drawings, the numeral 63 indicates the outer cylindrical wall portion or wall member for the nozzle 25.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that there has been provided apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers such as pesticide containers. In use, with the parts, arranged as shown in the drawings, after the con tainer such as the container 20 has been opened by removing the cap and spout from opening 24, the nozzle 25, in which the evacuation tube 26 is inserted, is placed into the pesticide container 20, by insertion through the opening 24 as shown in the drawings. After the pesticide container has been substantially emptied of pesticide by evacuating such pesticide through the evacuation tube 26, under pull from the mix tank pump 44, whereby such pesticide enters the evacuation tube 26 at its lower end 49 and passes through the hose 45 to the mix tank 41, the nurse tank pump 29 is then activated and rinse liquid from the nurse tank 36 which may be in combination with or followed by solvent from the solvent tank 37 is pumped through the hose 28 and through the nozzle attachment 27 into the nozzle 25, thence through the various orifices 50 to produce jets of rinse liquid 65, 67, whereby this rinse liquid will clean and rinse the insides of the container 20. The toxicant residue now combined in the rinse liquid will enter the evacuation tube 26 through its lower end 49 under pressure from the nurse tank pump 29 and under pull from the mix tank pump 44. This combination of rinse liquid and toxicant residue will flow out through the upper end of the evacuation tube 26, through the hose 45 and be added to the toxicant solution within the mix tank 41, thus capturing any residual pesticide material from the pesticide container 20.

The parts can be made of any suitable material and in different shapes or sizes as desired or required.

It will therefore be seen that in accordance with the present invention there is provided a device that with substantially increased safety both empties pesticide containers of the rigid type and rinses them sufficiently so as to render them sufficiently non-toxic in order to enable the disposal of such pesticide containers in clumps such as dumps of lesser class than class 1 dumps. While it is the intention that this device provide a mechanism for the disposal of pesticide containers, it is to be understood that such disposal may include recycling or reclaiming the steel or other material from which the container, once rinsed to a level of cleanness, could be safely disposed of in a suitable manner.

The device of the present invention provides a closed system such as is illustrated in FIG. 1 when in operation whereby the handlers of pesticide containers are not exposed to the toxic materials. It further allows for the savings of that amount of pesticide paid for but not used, due to inadequate field procedures, which remains within the container after it has been emptied. Because of the large amount or numbers of pesticide containers that are presently used in various areas, it will be seen that the amount of material remaining in empty containers represents a considerable sum of money as well as a serious hazard to the environment. The device allows pesticide users to evacuate the material from the container and rinse the container in a fraction of the time presently required.

When using the device, the device is inserted into the opening of the pesticide container and wherein the opening is indicated by the numeral 24, and the container may be of any suitable size such as a 1 gallon type flat top steel or plastic drum, gallon, 12 gallon, 30 gallon or 55 gallon rigid pesticide container of the type that is used for holding liquid pesticides. The tube 26 through which the pesticide is evacuated has coaxial to it and externally arranged thereof, a nozzle 25, which, when the container has been evacuated of the product, flushes a rinse solution of sufficient volume over the entire inner surface of the container. The rinse is then evacuated by the center tube and passes directly through a closed system into the mixing tank 41 or application equipment tank. This rinse solution and its plumbing are such that during the final phases of the rinse, a solvent can be injected into the rinse solution, thereby effecting a more efficient rinse of the inner surfaces of the container which renders it sufficiently nontoxic to be accepted by less than Class 1 dumps, or disposed of through other methods or means.

There is further provided an expanding seal that fits into the opening of the container to seal the device and thus keep the contents from leaving except by way of the evacuation tube 26. A check valve 48 is built into the rinse nozzle 25 to maintain sufficient internal pressure during evacuation of the contents of the container so that the container is not collapsed by the differential pressure created during evacuation.

Furthermore, the device is adapted to be automated by solenoids and timers as shown in FIG. 1 to assure sufficient evacuation and rinse volumes so as to assure a sufficiently non-toxic container 20. The timing can be preset and changed to suit various containers and their particular problems.

Thus, it will be seen that there has been provided a coaxial automated closed system including the evacuation tube 26 and rinse nozzle for pesticide containers wherein heretofore described problems are substantially overcome or eliminated.

As shown in the drawings such as FIG. 2, wherein there is illustrated the flow of material and the flow of the subsequent rinse, the arrow 64 indicates the direction of the rinse liquid which may be water. The arrows also show injection of solvent common to the toxicant after the rinse liquids efficiency is exhausted, so that further removal of the toxicant can be accomplished. The evacuation tube 26 is such that the toxicant and subsequently the rinse is pumped out therethrough. The hose 28 is attached as at 27. The expanding seal 47 around the exterior of the rinse nozzle fits into the opening 24 of the container and is then expanded to seal the container when the nozzle is in place. The air inlet check valve 48 allows for pressure inside the container to equalize and thus keep the container from collapsing during evacuation. The numeral 65 indicatesby an arrow the jet of rinse solution from the nozzle that washes the interior of the container. The arrow 66 indicates the rinse solution washing down the inside of the container walls. The arrows 67 show the jet and flow of rinse solution washing the evacuation tube. The arrow 68 indicates the direction of evacuation of the liquid, both toxicant and rinse. In FIG. 2 the numeral 69 shows arrows indicating evacuation of the liquid into the lower end of the tube 26.

It will therefore be seen that there has been provided an efficient means for evacuating and rinsing of containers of concentrated materials where the solvent or vehicle can be included in the main body of the mixture.

It is to be noted that it is common practice in the field of agricultural pest control to remove the usual flexible spouts on 1 and 5 gallon rigid containers to increase the opening, thus to facilitate the emptying of the contents. This practice has not met with the approval of certain agricultural authorities such as State agricultural authorities in various locations, because the containers cannot be entirely emptied, and need to be resealed for transport in a safe manner. Nevertheless the practice of removing the flexible spout persists, and this creates a problem. Even with the spout removed, the maximum drainage leaves a certain amount in the container. For example, in a one gallon round steel fiat top, 14 milliliters (ml) may be provided, and in a five gallon rigid container flat top, 40 ml may be left therein and different amounts are left in different containers. Field observations indicate that the amount remaining in rigid pesticide containers for a five gallon container may be in the range of 200 to 600 ml. While under current field practice this condition exists, it need not continue. It has been previously suggested that users of pesticide containers rinse them and pour the rinse directly into the spray or mix tank. Recently, certain agricultural chemical associations have advocated this procedure and recommended that pesticide users rinse with three separate volumes of water, pouring each into the spray or mix tank. The pesticide application industry has objected to this procedure for several reasons, one being that their workers would be unnecessarily exposed to the toxicant each time the can or drum is rinsed. Other objections are the additional time needed to rinse, and the weight of the container with to percent of its volumn, which could be considerable for larger containers (90 to 100 pounds for a 55 gallon drum).

A study of records of pesticide poisonings from various health departments and agricultural organizations shows that the vast majority of serious poisonings are those resulting from people handling pesticides while loading and mixing these materials to be loaded. Thus, of the remaining material in the so-called emptied containers, approximately 98.80 percent is removed with the first wash. Thus, under field conditions, and using a mixture such as 4 lbs. per gallon active ingredient parathion, 400 ml remains in the container, and this is equivalent to 188 grams of parathion. Based on an average mans weight, approximately 190 milligrams (mg) are needed to cause death. The amount being removed in the first wash is 1000 times greater than is necessary to cause death, and it is so toxic that a small amount would most likely cause serious health problems and may cause loss of work for an individual or perhaps a stay in the hospital. At any rate, the hazards are of sufficient magnitude to cause the pesticide application industry to refuse to comply with the present three rinse proposal. Even during the second rinse, approximately 1200 mg are incorporated in the solution, which is slightly less than one magnitude in excess of the 190 mg needed to cause death. Thus, spillage of any appreciable amount could have serious consequences.

Because organo phosphates are cumulative poisons, the chronic low level exposures can and have caused serious health problems. Thus, the third rinse if spilled could, over time and continuous exposure, again cause severe health problems. Therefore if the rinsing and emptying of containers could be accomplished without contact or chance of spillage, the benefits would be obvious.

As a practical matter, the emptying of rigid five gallon pesticide containers can be accomplished easily and quickly. For example, with the spout completely removed, thus increasing the opening to 2.46 inches in diameter, drain times are about 60 seconds. To add the three rinses as suggested by certain agricultural chemical associations would add an additional 3 to 4 minutes.

Because the spout has been removed, the shaking to wash the inner surface would create an additional hazzard which would tend to inhibit proper rinsing. Also, because it would be impractical to measure the recommended volumes of rinse water, guesses would be necessary and this would again decrease the efficiency of the desired results.

Applicants device,assuming draft pump capacities of gallons per minute, will evacuate a 5 gallon pesticide container in 3 to 4 seconds, and the timed solenoid actuated rinse system can deliver sufficient rinse volumes to produce a safe rinsed container so that the entire operation will take less than 30 seconds, that is, for draining and rinsing the container.

The solenoid timed rinse can deliver a preset amount consistently and will obviate the problems associated with guesswork and the like.

Furthermore, under present law of some states it is illegal to dispose of or transport pesticide containers unless rigid criteria are met. These criteria are: sealed containers may be transported to a Class 1 dump site and disposed of there; all pesticide containers used by licensed pest control operators must be kept in an enclosure while awaiting disposal. This latter factor provides an additional cost to the pest control operator or applicator who does not actually purchase or own the container, in most instances. Further, if the containers are transported, then special sealed trucks or the like must be used. Further, in most localities there are few Class 1 dump sites and thus, to dispose of pesticide containers in a legal manner, the applicator must inmany instances, pay for transportation and high dump fees. This added expense, due to the keen competition within the pest control business, cannot be pa s sed on the the customer. Due to this and the ever mounting piles of used containers, it is not uncommon for operators to seek less than legal methods for disposing of containers. In doing this, the already poisonous environmental problems associating with these so-called empty containers areincreased vastly.

Various estimates of non combustible pesticide containers in certain areas have been made, and these amount to very large sums of money. Thus, assuming an average of 400 ml remaining in a 5 gallon container, and that the average formulation is four lbs. of active ingredients per gallon, .or about 47 percent active, then in that 400 ml of material, there is about 188 grams of active material. Thus, there is considerable sums of money involved in-the material that is not removed. In addition, with prior methods, the considerable quantity of pesticides was released somewhere to the environment without good purpose.

As previously noted, the presently accepted practice of disposal is in a Class 1 dump site. In some areas Class 1 dump sites are difficult to find in abundance and expensive to establish and the present invention obviates the use of such Class 1 disposal sites.

Furthermore, if a container were sufficiently clean, it could either be disposed of in a dump site of lesser category than Class l, or crushed and the steel reclaimed, if it were steel. If plastic, a recycling or reclaiming system for plastics can be utilized.

In certain areas, the poisoning of those working with pesticide containers and the container disposal problem have become very pressing issues in conjunction with container cleaning problems.

Furthermore, if pesticide containers are only drained until the material stops flowing, there is still left'a considerable amount of material in the containers and if not rinsed immediately, but allowed to stand, especially in higher temperature zones, the solvents and emulsifiers evaporate in a short time. If this occurs, some of the toxicant becomes airborne creating a serious hazzard downwind, especially if there are large quantities of these containers stored at one location. It is conceivable that under inversion weather conditions, high and dangerous levels of toxicants can result, toxic to both man and his environment, and these may be carried downwind. Further, once the solvents and emulsifiers have evaporated from the container, the toxicant which, in many instances, is highly water insoluble, cannot be washed out, thus creating a serious problem in disposal and removal of toxicants. The present invention obviates these problems. In addition, it removes the toxicants to a level sufficient to render the container safe by a continuous rinse of wash solutions which is pumped directly into the mix tank or tank and the application equipment.

With further regard to the evaporation of toxicants and their solvents from open containers stored in large quantities, public health officials and the like have noted concern about the outcome of the unknown mixtures of the liquid toxicants or their vapors which are created by the present practice, and the present invention will alleviate such concerns.

As shown in the drawings, there is a slight angle at the point 49 in the lower end of the tube 26 that permits the liquid to enter the lower end of the tube 26 from the container.

' With further reference to the orifices, such as the orifices 50 shown in detail in FIG. 7, the object of this arrangement is to get laminar flow to maintain maximum pressure in the jet of wash solution so that it hits the walls of the container with maximum energy. To get this laminar flow, there is needed at least a 1:4 diameter to the tube or orifice length, on a slit orifice. As the orifices are preferably in the form of slits, the construction shown in FIG. 7 accomplishes this.

In FIG. 2, there is illustrated the mechanism inserted in a container and illustrating the spray nozzle 25 with the inlet 27 to the spray nozzle. There is provided in the spray nozzle the O-ring seals 59 as shown in FIG. 3, which seal the evacuation tube exterior surface, thus allowing the evacuation tube to be extended to fit the various container depths. The inner inlet check valve 48 in the nozzle allows air to be drawn into the container during evacuation, thus keeping it from collapsing. The body 58 of the nozzles inner surface has grooves 60 for the O-rings 59. The numeral 63 indicates the outer wall of the nozzle. The numeral 47 indicates the expanding seal which is external to the nozzles outer surface and seals the nozzle to the container.

With further reference to FIG. 4, and 6, FIG. 4 illustrates a portion of the nozzle and the ducting for the rinse solution. Also in FIG. 4, there is illustrated the outer surface of the nozzle wall, and the ducting 61 is arranged between the inner and outer walls of the nozzle. The web portions 62 support the inner wall and attach the inner wall of the nozzle to the outer wall.

In FIG. 5, there is illustrated the space for liquid flow which may be approximately 1.421 inches of area and this may be equal to the area of the evacuation tubes cross section.

FIG. 6 illustrates the bottom end of the nozzle showing the jets in the bottom surface of the nozzle which spray rinse solution on the evacuation tube to clean it.

FIG. 7 illustrates a portion of the outer wall of the nozzle showing the jet orifices and illustrating representative jets. The jets 51 wash the top'of the container and have a vector such that the majority of the water moves radially out across the inner surface of the containers top, thus allowing the water to drain across the top and down the sides as indicated by the arrows in FIG. 2.

In FIG. 1 there is illustrated the flow and procedure of an automated system. Once the coaxial evacuation tube rinse nozzle is inserted into the pesticide container, the loader operator actuates the switch starting the evacuation pump, and this is a timed procedure and is dependent on pump capacity. Once the container is evacuated the rinse solution solenoid opens the valve such as the valve 33 of the nurse tank 36 and at the same time, actuates the water pump which pumps water from the nurse tank through the rinse nozzle which washes the container. All the time the pump 44 of the mix tank 41 is evacuating the rinse. After a predetermined period of time, and if necessary, a second solenoid opens a valve such as the valve 32 from a solvent tank 37, allowing this to be mixed with the water and thus effecting a better rinse.

Presently, there is some consideration being given to the need for redesigning pesticide containers due to poor drainage leaving a considerable amount of the contents in the container. The present invention would, in most cases obviate the need to redesign containers because it would produce a drained and safe container by removing the entire contents. A further problem with current containers which is prompting the consideration for redesign is that during the emptying of the present containers, such as 5 gallon and smaller sizes, there is a great chance, due to slopping, of being poisoned. The present invention will eliminate dangers associated with the pouring of the contents of pesticide containers.

Removal of the contents and rinsing to further remove contents of the container can be thought of as a continuum having two basic steps. Thus, after the concentrated toxicant is pumped out, the rinsing causes a continuous dilution of the remaining material while the rinse is being pumped out. Water being the most common diluent and vehicle for applied pesticides, will only remove the remaining toxicant to a level of solubility peculiar to the toxicant. Beyond this level, water has little effect, and to remove all of the toxicant a solvent which will increase the solubilization of the toxicant is needed.

The evacuation tube 26 may have a cross sectional surface area of approximately 1.35 inches, and may have a capacity of about 5 cubic feet per minute, or sufficient to keep up with pumps in the field. The volume of the nozzle may be sufficient to deliver ample water for rapid and adequate rinsing.

With regard to drums such as 30 and 55 gallon drums, current practice allows for accurate measurements by penetrating the evacuation tube into the liquid contents to a predetermined depth. This procedure can be utilized by marking the evacuation tube of the present invention and extending the evacuation tube through the rinse nozzle to predetermined positions marked on the evacuation tubes exterior and locked into place by a spring loaded positioning device.

Having thus described the preferred embodiment of the invention it should be understood that numerous structural modifications and adaptations may be re sorted to without departing from the spirit of the inven tion.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device providing a closed system for emptying and rinsing pesticide containers by eliminating exposure to toxic liquids during the evacuation and rinsing of the container said jet orifices including upper slots arranged on an upward slant, and said orifices including intermediate horizontally disposed slots, and said orificies further including downwardly disposed downwardly inclined slots all of said slots being located high on the nozzle, adjacent the container seal of the type that have an opening in the top thereof, an evacuation tube being vertically adjustable while still maintaining a closed system and including an inclined portion on the lower end thereof for permitting liquid to enter the lower end of the tube to leave the container, a nozzle mounted in said opening, said nozzle including a hose attachment, said nozzle including a seal fitting in the opening of the container for sealing the container and providing a closed system when the nozzle is in place, an air inlet check valve for said nozzle, and said nozzle being provided with a plurality of jet orifices located above the liquid level in the container.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1, and further including a hose having a pump connected thereto, a solvent and nurse tank having lines connected thereto for supplying rinse fluid to the container, solenoid actuated valves in said lines, a timer connected to said solenoid valves, a conduit connected to the upper end of the evacuation tube and having a pump and mix tank operatively connected thereto to receive fluid evacuated from the container.

3. A device as claimed in claim 2, wherein the device is adapted to be used for emptying and rinsing rigid pesticide containers.

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. I 3, 916, 924

DATED November 4, 1975 lN\/ ENTOR(S) Francis Ea McGowan It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below: Claim 1 should read as follows:

1. In a device providing a closed system for emptying and rinsing pesticide containers by eliminating exposure to toxic liquids during the evacuation and rinsing of the container of the type that have an opening in the top thereof, an evacuation tube being vertically adjustable while still maintaining a closed system and including an inclined portion on the lower end thereof for permitting liquid to enter the lower end of the tube to leave the container, a nozzle mounted in said opening, said nozzle including a hose attachment, said nozzle including a seal fitting in the opening of the container for sealing the container and providing a closed system when the nozzle is in place, an air inlet check valve for said nozzle, and said nozzle being provided with a plurality of jet orifices located above the liquid level in the container, said jet orifices including upper slots arranged on an upward slant, and said orifices including intermediate horizontally disposed slots, and said orifices further including downwardly disposed downwardly inclined slots all of said slots being located high on the nozzle, adjacent the container sealo Signed and Scaled this [SEAL] seventh y of September 1976 Arrest:

RUTH C. MASON Arresting Officer C. MARSHALL DANN nmmissiuner ujlarems and Trademarks

Claims (3)

1. In a device providing a closed system for emptying and rinsing pesticide containers by eliminating exposure to toxic liquids during the evacuation and rinsing of the container said jet orifices including upper slots arranged on an upward slant, and said orifices including intermediate horizontally disposed slots, and said orificies further including downwardly disposed downwardly inclined slots all of said slots being located high on the nozzle, adjacent the container seal of the type that have an opening in the top thereof, an evacuation tube being vertically adjustable while still maintaining a closed system and including an inclined portion on the lower end thereof for permitting liquid to enter the lower end of the tube to leave the container, a nozzle mounted in said opening, said nozzle including a hose attachment, said nozzle including a seal fitting in the opening of the container for sealing the container and providing a closed system when the nozzle is in place, an air inlet check valve for said nozzle, and said nozzle being provided with a plurality of jet orifices located above the liquid level in the container.
2. A device as claimed in claim 1, and further including a hose having a pump connected thereto, a solvent and nurse tank having lines connected thereto for supplying rinse fluid to the container, solenoid actuated valves in said lines, a timer connected to said solenoid valves, a conduit connected to the upper end of the evacuation tube and having a pump and mix tank operatively connected thereto to receive fluid evacuated from the container.
3. A device as claimed in claim 2, wherein the device is adapted to be used for emptying and rinsing rigid pesticide containers.
US3916924A 1973-12-28 1973-12-28 Apparatus for emptying and rinsing containers Expired - Lifetime US3916924A (en)

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Cited By (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US4039351A (en) * 1975-09-22 1977-08-02 Butler Calvin J Container washer attachment
US4088245A (en) * 1977-04-21 1978-05-09 Leonard Brown Pesticide dispenser with calibrated tubular outlet probe
US4092993A (en) * 1975-06-19 1978-06-06 Terminator Products, Inc. Method and apparatus for preparing chemical solutions
US4106155A (en) * 1976-10-06 1978-08-15 Cortex Research Corporation Apparatus for washing contaminated laboratory containers
US4108336A (en) * 1977-06-20 1978-08-22 Anderson Jr David L Probe for extracting toxic fluids from an hermetically sealed container
US4144901A (en) * 1977-06-23 1979-03-20 Terminator Products, Inc. Probe system for containers
US4254805A (en) * 1979-03-08 1981-03-10 Load Safe Systems, Inc. Closed chemical mixing system
US4311112A (en) * 1979-07-04 1982-01-19 Volkswagenwerk Aktiengesellschaft Installation for applying a layer of a corrosion-inhibiting material
US4635665A (en) * 1983-02-01 1987-01-13 Eisai Co., Ltd. Washing apparatus
US4668227A (en) * 1985-05-08 1987-05-26 Kay Dennis M Stoma hygiene system and process therefor
EP0249377A1 (en) * 1986-06-06 1987-12-16 Donald F. Dutertre Handling device for agricultural chemicals and the like
DE3621142C1 (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-01-28 Loeffeld Geb Altenau Process and device for cleaning hollow articles, such as vessels or pipes
US4741368A (en) * 1986-09-02 1988-05-03 Fmc Corporation Returnable container for liquid chemicals and fitting therefor
US4754771A (en) * 1985-07-17 1988-07-05 Hybritech Incorporated Apparatus for washing beads
US4915119A (en) * 1986-04-21 1990-04-10 Dober Chemical Corporation Cleaning apparatus and method
GB2226491A (en) * 1988-12-03 1990-07-04 Nat Res Dev Tank-flushing assemblies
US4941131A (en) * 1989-06-07 1990-07-10 Picker International, Inc. Flush for fluid mixing and dispensing system
US5033492A (en) * 1989-12-20 1991-07-23 Mertens Darrell W Rinsing apparatus for containers
US5117857A (en) * 1989-06-12 1992-06-02 Monsanto Company Transfer and rinse unit
US5184634A (en) * 1990-08-24 1993-02-09 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Cup cleaning apparatus
US5186760A (en) * 1987-11-17 1993-02-16 Slt Labinstruments Gesellschaft M.B.H. Cleaning device for cuvettes
US5282889A (en) * 1986-04-21 1994-02-01 Dober Chemical Corporation Method for cleaning a piece of equipment
US5415190A (en) * 1994-03-02 1995-05-16 Ionescu; John Carbon monoxide cleaning apparatus
US5449009A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-09-12 Sherwood Medical Company Fluid disposal system
US5595201A (en) * 1994-12-05 1997-01-21 Dober Chemical Co. Apparatus and methods for automatically cleaning multiple pieces of equipment
US5637103A (en) * 1993-03-17 1997-06-10 Kerwin; Michael J. Fluid collection and disposal system
US5664594A (en) * 1994-12-29 1997-09-09 Sherwood Medical Company Cleaning device for ventilator manifold and method of use thereof
US5741237A (en) * 1995-04-10 1998-04-21 Walker; Kenneth Gordon System for disposal of fluids
US5807359A (en) * 1993-06-08 1998-09-15 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
EP0966211A1 (en) * 1996-06-05 1999-12-29 Alberto Bazan Method for emptying and cleaning flexible bags
WO2000058010A1 (en) * 1999-03-27 2000-10-05 Smithkline Beecham Plc System for washing particles out of a source into a receptacle
WO2001007178A1 (en) * 1999-07-26 2001-02-01 Charles Montague Copping A vessel cleaning apparatus
US6244311B1 (en) 1994-12-29 2001-06-12 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6263887B1 (en) 2000-01-14 2001-07-24 Dornoch Medical Systems, Inc. Liquid waste disposal and canister flushing system and method
US6358232B1 (en) 1994-12-29 2002-03-19 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6371137B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2002-04-16 Robert A. Heath Tank cleaning apparatus
US6488675B1 (en) 1996-01-24 2002-12-03 Fred R. Radford Contaminated medical waste disposal system and method
US6499495B2 (en) 2001-01-24 2002-12-31 Allegiance Corporation Waste treatment system for suction canisters
US6626877B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2003-09-30 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
US6652495B1 (en) 1995-04-10 2003-11-25 Kenneth Gordon Walker System for disposal of fluids
US6672477B2 (en) 2001-01-12 2004-01-06 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for disposing of bodily fluids from a container
EP1684922A2 (en) * 2003-11-20 2006-08-02 David B. Gregory Cleaning system and method of use
US7585292B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2009-09-08 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and draining of same
US7674248B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2010-03-09 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
EP2036676A3 (en) * 2007-09-13 2011-04-06 Messer Group GmbH Device for treating barrels with carbon dioxide particles
JP2012088316A (en) * 2010-10-15 2012-05-10 Leica Biosystems Nussloch Gmbh Device and method for safely emptying and filling reagent container
US20130174876A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2013-07-11 Nibiru Pty Ltd Cleaner
WO2012135099A3 (en) * 2011-03-25 2014-04-03 Bayer Intellectual Property Gmbh Portable automated mini-bulk container rinsing system and method providing closed system mini-bulk container rinsing for mini-bulk container reuse or disposal
US20150053297A1 (en) * 2012-04-02 2015-02-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Container wand assembly

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US2845934A (en) * 1953-04-29 1958-08-05 Portland Company Apparatus for use in cleaning the interiors of barrels
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Cited By (65)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4092993A (en) * 1975-06-19 1978-06-06 Terminator Products, Inc. Method and apparatus for preparing chemical solutions
US4039351A (en) * 1975-09-22 1977-08-02 Butler Calvin J Container washer attachment
US4106155A (en) * 1976-10-06 1978-08-15 Cortex Research Corporation Apparatus for washing contaminated laboratory containers
US4088245A (en) * 1977-04-21 1978-05-09 Leonard Brown Pesticide dispenser with calibrated tubular outlet probe
US4162745A (en) * 1977-06-20 1979-07-31 Anderson David L Jr Substantially drip-proof probe for extracting toxic fluids from hermetically sealed containers
US4108336A (en) * 1977-06-20 1978-08-22 Anderson Jr David L Probe for extracting toxic fluids from an hermetically sealed container
US4144901A (en) * 1977-06-23 1979-03-20 Terminator Products, Inc. Probe system for containers
US4254805A (en) * 1979-03-08 1981-03-10 Load Safe Systems, Inc. Closed chemical mixing system
US4311112A (en) * 1979-07-04 1982-01-19 Volkswagenwerk Aktiengesellschaft Installation for applying a layer of a corrosion-inhibiting material
US4635665A (en) * 1983-02-01 1987-01-13 Eisai Co., Ltd. Washing apparatus
US4668227A (en) * 1985-05-08 1987-05-26 Kay Dennis M Stoma hygiene system and process therefor
US4754771A (en) * 1985-07-17 1988-07-05 Hybritech Incorporated Apparatus for washing beads
US5507305A (en) * 1986-04-21 1996-04-16 Franklin; Robert V. Cleaning apparatus and method
US5282889A (en) * 1986-04-21 1994-02-01 Dober Chemical Corporation Method for cleaning a piece of equipment
US5353821A (en) * 1986-04-21 1994-10-11 Dober Chemical Corporation Cleaning apparatus and method
US4915119A (en) * 1986-04-21 1990-04-10 Dober Chemical Corporation Cleaning apparatus and method
EP0249377A1 (en) * 1986-06-06 1987-12-16 Donald F. Dutertre Handling device for agricultural chemicals and the like
US4905871A (en) * 1986-06-06 1990-03-06 Dutertre Donald F Handling device for agricultural chemicals and the like
DE3621142C1 (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-01-28 Loeffeld Geb Altenau Process and device for cleaning hollow articles, such as vessels or pipes
US4741368A (en) * 1986-09-02 1988-05-03 Fmc Corporation Returnable container for liquid chemicals and fitting therefor
US5186760A (en) * 1987-11-17 1993-02-16 Slt Labinstruments Gesellschaft M.B.H. Cleaning device for cuvettes
GB2226491A (en) * 1988-12-03 1990-07-04 Nat Res Dev Tank-flushing assemblies
GB2226491B (en) * 1988-12-03 1992-09-02 Nat Res Dev Tank-flushing assemblies
US4941131A (en) * 1989-06-07 1990-07-10 Picker International, Inc. Flush for fluid mixing and dispensing system
US5117857A (en) * 1989-06-12 1992-06-02 Monsanto Company Transfer and rinse unit
US5033492A (en) * 1989-12-20 1991-07-23 Mertens Darrell W Rinsing apparatus for containers
US5184634A (en) * 1990-08-24 1993-02-09 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Cup cleaning apparatus
US5637103A (en) * 1993-03-17 1997-06-10 Kerwin; Michael J. Fluid collection and disposal system
US5807359A (en) * 1993-06-08 1998-09-15 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
US7115115B2 (en) 1993-06-08 2006-10-03 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
US6368310B1 (en) 1993-06-08 2002-04-09 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
US6673055B2 (en) 1993-06-08 2004-01-06 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
US5931822A (en) * 1993-06-08 1999-08-03 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction system
US5449009A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-09-12 Sherwood Medical Company Fluid disposal system
US5736098A (en) * 1993-09-30 1998-04-07 Sherwood Medical Company Method for a servicing fluid disposal system
WO1995023658A1 (en) * 1994-03-02 1995-09-08 John Ionescu Carbon monoxide cleaning apparatus
US5415190A (en) * 1994-03-02 1995-05-16 Ionescu; John Carbon monoxide cleaning apparatus
US5595201A (en) * 1994-12-05 1997-01-21 Dober Chemical Co. Apparatus and methods for automatically cleaning multiple pieces of equipment
US6494869B1 (en) 1994-12-29 2002-12-17 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6358232B1 (en) 1994-12-29 2002-03-19 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US6244311B1 (en) 1994-12-29 2001-06-12 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for removing and disposing of body fluids
US5664594A (en) * 1994-12-29 1997-09-09 Sherwood Medical Company Cleaning device for ventilator manifold and method of use thereof
US20040102743A1 (en) * 1995-04-10 2004-05-27 Walker Kenneth Gordon System for disposal of fluids
US5741237A (en) * 1995-04-10 1998-04-21 Walker; Kenneth Gordon System for disposal of fluids
US6652495B1 (en) 1995-04-10 2003-11-25 Kenneth Gordon Walker System for disposal of fluids
US20080281283A1 (en) * 1995-04-10 2008-11-13 Kenneth Gordon Walker System for disposal of fluids
US6488675B1 (en) 1996-01-24 2002-12-03 Fred R. Radford Contaminated medical waste disposal system and method
EP0966211A1 (en) * 1996-06-05 1999-12-29 Alberto Bazan Method for emptying and cleaning flexible bags
EP0966211A4 (en) * 1996-06-05 2001-01-03 Alberto Bazan Method for emptying and cleaning flexible bags
US6371137B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2002-04-16 Robert A. Heath Tank cleaning apparatus
WO2000058010A1 (en) * 1999-03-27 2000-10-05 Smithkline Beecham Plc System for washing particles out of a source into a receptacle
WO2001007178A1 (en) * 1999-07-26 2001-02-01 Charles Montague Copping A vessel cleaning apparatus
US6263887B1 (en) 2000-01-14 2001-07-24 Dornoch Medical Systems, Inc. Liquid waste disposal and canister flushing system and method
US7674248B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2010-03-09 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
US6626877B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2003-09-30 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and methods for draining same
US7585292B2 (en) 2000-03-28 2009-09-08 Bemis Manufacturing Company Medical suction apparatus and draining of same
US6672477B2 (en) 2001-01-12 2004-01-06 Bemis Manufacturing Company Method and apparatus for disposing of bodily fluids from a container
US6499495B2 (en) 2001-01-24 2002-12-31 Allegiance Corporation Waste treatment system for suction canisters
EP1684922A2 (en) * 2003-11-20 2006-08-02 David B. Gregory Cleaning system and method of use
EP1684922A4 (en) * 2003-11-20 2008-12-24 David B Gregory Cleaning system and method of use
EP2036676A3 (en) * 2007-09-13 2011-04-06 Messer Group GmbH Device for treating barrels with carbon dioxide particles
US20130174876A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2013-07-11 Nibiru Pty Ltd Cleaner
JP2012088316A (en) * 2010-10-15 2012-05-10 Leica Biosystems Nussloch Gmbh Device and method for safely emptying and filling reagent container
WO2012135099A3 (en) * 2011-03-25 2014-04-03 Bayer Intellectual Property Gmbh Portable automated mini-bulk container rinsing system and method providing closed system mini-bulk container rinsing for mini-bulk container reuse or disposal
US20150053297A1 (en) * 2012-04-02 2015-02-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Container wand assembly

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