US3911584A - Apparatus for tracing patterns for the garment industry - Google Patents

Apparatus for tracing patterns for the garment industry Download PDF

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US3911584A
US3911584A US40644473A US3911584A US 3911584 A US3911584 A US 3911584A US 40644473 A US40644473 A US 40644473A US 3911584 A US3911584 A US 3911584A
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garment
drafting
arc
generally
straight line
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Camille Albert Ajus
Marguerite Nicolas Ajus
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Camille Albert Ajus
Marguerite Nicolas Ajus
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H3/00Patterns for cutting-out; Methods of drafting or marking-out such patterns, e.g. on the cloth
    • A41H3/002Set squares or rulers for drafting patterns

Abstract

A device for designing a pattern for a garment, which device includes a table representing a key figure for each of a plurality of predetermined human body measurements, a first set of scales identified by key figures for defining predetermined measurements of the pattern, a plurality of cut-outs through the board carrying a second set of scales on their edges identified by corresponding key figures. The device is characterized in that one of the cut-outs is a dart indicating cut-out for designing a variable angle for determining a desired dart width.

Description

United States Patent Ajus et a1. Oct. 14, 1975 [54] APPARATUS FOR TRACING PATTERNS 1,204,900 11/1916 Picken 33/ 11 FOR THE GARMENT INDUSTRY FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [76] Inventors: Camille Albert Ajus; Marguerite 21,408 11/1896 United Kingdom 33/11 Nicolas Ajus, both of 910 Lamer, Apt. 5, Ville St- Laurent, Quebec, Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter Canada Assistant ExaminerCharles E. Phillips [22] Filed: Oct 15, 1973 Attorney, Agent, or FirmLawrence I. Field [2]] Appl. No.: 406,444 57 ABSTRACT Related US. Application Data A device for designing a pattern for a garment, which [63] continuation in pan of 3190i April 7, device includes a table representing a key figure for 1971, abandone each of a plurality of predetermined human body measurements, a first set of scales identified by key figures 52 US. Cl. 33/11; 33/17 R; 33/174 B for defining predetermined measurements of the P [51] Int. Cl A4lh 3/01 tern, a plurality of Cut-Outs through the board carrying 58 Field of Search 33/11, 17 R a Second Set of Scales on their edges identified y responding key figures. The device is characterized in [56] References Cited that one of the cut-outs is a dart indicating cut-out for UNITED STATES PATENTS designing a variable angle for determining a desired dart width. 325,409 9/1885 Hendrick 33/11 1,011,915 12/1911 Carbonara 33/11 11 Claims, 35 Drawing Figures US. Patent Oct. 14,1975 Sheet1of15 3,911,584

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wvg mww APPARATUS FOR TRACING PATTERNS FOR THE GARMENT INDUSTRY This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 131,905, filed Apr. 7, 1971 now abandoned.

The present invention relates to a garment drafting apparatus. 3

More particularly, the present invention relates to a garment drafting apparatus adapted to be used by one unskilled in the art, this apparatus having new and novel apertures therein.

Garment drafting apparatuses per se, are old in the art and have been used as such in the garment industry for many years. Generally, they comprise a flat boardlike device having apertures within, these apertures adapted to represent the outline of the garment being drawn. These curves and/or straight lines are used to draft the outline of the major curves of a garment of any one size. The individual curves within the apparatus are correlated in such a manner so as to complete a garment of one specified size; these curves being drawn to a predetermined norms" established by the industry. Thus, for example, the garment industry has established sizes whereby it has been found that a certain percentage of the population having a waist measurement of so many inches will also have other body measurements falling within a certain range. For each predetermined size, there may be supplied a different apparatus having curves within adapted to this key body measurement. Thus, when buying clothes, one has the choice of various sizes, each size being proportioned so as to fit the average person. This is the basis on which ready-to-wear clothes are made. While such a device is suitable for the quick drafting of those garments, it is, of course, not suitable for those whose body proportions do not fit within the norms decided by the industry. These people are thus forced to buy made-to-measure" clothes or else adjust the ready-to-wear garments to their own measurements.

In a preferred embodiment, some of these apparatuses have been adapted so as to have measurement indicating means on the individual apertures within the apparatus; these measurement indicating means operating so one can design a garment having varied body proportions. Recently, however, there has been an increase in the popularity of garment-making in the home. While some of the proposed prior art apparatuses are suitable for use by the garment industry and one skilled in the art, there has heretofore been a lack of an apparatus suitable for garment drafting by the ordinary consumer who is unskilled in the art. More particularly, none of the prior art apparatuses are adapted for the complete drafting ofa garment by one unskilled in the art; indeed most of the apparatuses proposed in the prior art require a multitude of operations and/or fittings and/or calculations in order to draft an ordinary garment.

A garment drafting apparatus suitable for use by the consumer should have within one apparatus all the apertures necessary for drafting of many types of garments, have measurement indicating means on the apertures adapted to give a garment proportioned to the individual person, and should not require fittings. and- /or calculations before the pattern is complete. In respect to this last point, two of the more difficult operations in the prior art proposals have related to the drafting of the sleeve curve, the sleeve curve typically having different curvature for the front and back portions, these different curvatures preferably being drawn in one operation. The other most difficult operation in the drafting of a garment relates to the forming of darts; darts being the basic requirement for the good fit and appearance of the finished garment.

To better understand the basis of the present device, reference will be made to several prior art proposals and their methods of operation. Some of the prior art apparatuses are exemplified by U.S. Pat. No. 325,409 issued to Hendricks, US. Pat. No. 845,319 issued to Ricciardi, and British Pat. No. 9896 issued to Gaunt. More particularly, reference will be made to these patents regarding the specific requirements of an apparatus adapted to consumer use as discussed above.

With reference to the desirability of having an apparatus suitable for the drafting of all garments, it may be noted that in the patent issued to Ricciardi, the only reference as to the type of garment which may be drafted from such an apparatus is to a pair of pants. In his patent, Hendricks does not disclose exactly what type of garment is being designed with his apparatus, it however seeming, that his device is intended to be used for a dress pattern. Similarly, the British patent issued to Gaunt specifically states that the only suitable use for the apparatus disclosed therein is in the drafting of ladies and childrens garments. While it may be said that the use of apertures in a stencil drafting device are dictated by the type of garment for which the pattern is being drafted and are an obvious matter of choice, it must be recognized, however, that to provide a multitude of apertures would lead to an unwieldy device. Referring again to Gaunt, an apparatus suitable for designing a dress pattern is disclosed as being 26 inches wide. It would therefore be desirable to provide a stencilling apparatus having the minimum number of apertures, these apertures being adapted to perform essentially the same function as a multitude of apertures could. It is essential, of course, that the minimum number of apertures be adapted to design all types of garments such as dresses, pants, jackets, and the like.

Referring to the second point mentioned above, wherein it is desired to have a measurement indicating means on the individual apertures within the garment drafting apparatus, some of the prior art does disclose such means. For example, in Hendricks, there is provided on the apertures a means of measurement comprising marks indicating the number of inches. Ricciardis patent, however, does not disclose such a measurement indicating means and would clearly be unsuitable for one unskilled in the art. Indeed, Ricciardi discloses in his patent that the details of the garment drafting system would not be comprehensible to one unskilled in the art. The patent to Gaunt also has a provision for measurement indicating means, these measurement indicating means generally being similar to those of Hendricks in that they generally indicate inches in a direct measurement from the body.

Having reference to the drafting of a sleeve curve, this drafting has up until the present required a plurality of operations; even with these operations, a sleeve curve having a different curvature for the front and back portion as it preferred, has not been disclosed. Referring to Gaunt, there is disclosed on page 6, line 34 et seq, a method of drawing a sleeve pattern which is further illustrated in FIG. 5 of the drawings. It will be seen from the above disclosure by Gaunt that a plurality of draft lines, in many operations, etc. are needed to provide for the sleeve curve. It may be furthermore noted that using the method of Gaunt, it is impossible to provide for both the front and back portions of the sleeve curve in the same operation. Furthermore, in Gaunt, there is provided the choice of only three configurations of the sleeve curves depending upon whether the person is an adult, girl, or child.

As mentioned above, the formation of the darts of a garment is one of the most difficult operations in pattern drafting and has heretofore required a multitude of steps and/or fittings and/or calculations. When the formation ofa dart has been mentioned in prior art proposals, it has usually involved the formation of a basic dart and subsequent calculations and transfers thereof. This is very disadvantageous as darts are basic in the drafting and formation of garments; upon these depend the basic fit andlook of the finished product. More specifically, referring to the above-mentioned patent to Gaunt, there is disclosed on page 4, line 12, et seq, a method for marking off the relative widths of the two darts requiring the use of a dart calculator to be used in cooperation with the left and right one-third scale having a central divisional point between them, and left or right one-third scale having a similar divisional point between them, and left or right one-third scale having a similar central division. This dart calculator consists of a column of numerals representing the various measurements the darts are required to take up, reference to these calculators being absolutely necessary. There is furthermore disclosed on page 6, lines 1 et seq, that when French darts or darts of unequal size are used, the first and second French dart scales must be used in combination with a French dart calculator in place of the above described system. Furthermore, it is required to use the apparatus to get the height of the dart. Even further, as disclosed by Gaunt, it is necessary to first of all obtain the basic dart. Having reference to FIGS. 1 and 2 of Gaunt, it will be noted that there are required three separate dart calculator scales, these to be used in conjunction with six dart scales along one edge of the apparatus, and three dart points along another edge. Furthermose, it is required in Gaunt to have these two triangles to form the darts. Even further, in FIG. 4 of this reference, it will be noted that there is no provision for the drawing of the bust side dart which is basic to most feminine garments. Extensive reference has been made to Gaunt, it being felt that this is one of the most complete prior art drafting apparatuses.

It is believed that with the present invention, applicant has designed a garment drafting apparatus which overcomes all the disadvantages of prior art proposals.

It is an object of the present invention to provide for a garment drafting apparatus, this apparatus having means for designing all types of garments, this apparatus being of a manageable size.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide for a garment drafting apparatus, this garment drafting apparatus having measurement indicating means whereby the garment being designed may be adapted to the body proportions of the user.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a garment drafting apparatus having means for the drafting of a sleeve curve, this sleeve curve having different front and back curvatures, the means for the drafting of the sleeve curve being done in one operation.

A still further object of the presentinvention is the provision of a garment drafting apparatus having dart forming means therein, this dart forming means eliminating the need for forming of a basic dart; this dart forming means also eliminating the need for calculations and/or fittings.

Generally, the garment drafting apparatus according to the invention is preferably a board of a quadilateral shape. and comprises a plurality of apertures within said board, said apertures being adapted for the drafting of the outlines of a garment. The apertures also have along their edges key figures at predetermined points, these key figures being correlated by means of a table to the actual measurements of the human body. These key figures thus form the measurement indicating means on the individual apertures. The table according to the present invention, correlates the actual measurements taken from the human body to a'specific key figure as will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter. The contour portion of the apertures are sequentially transferred'onto a cloth drafting material with a predetermined relationship so as to obtain the desired contour of the desired garment.

The apparatuses of the present invention leads to the basically automated method of designing garments with maximum efficiency and economy of material. The apparatus eliminates prior adjusting steps usually needed before completing a garment such as a blouse, dress, coat, pants, and other garment components. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use by those unskilled in the art; it also being adaptable for use on an industrial scale. It has also been found that the apparatus of the present invention may be used to alter patterns bought in a predetermined size so as to fit the individual person. With this apparatus, the elimination of all the mental acts required in prior art is eliminated and a complete garment may be drafted without necessitating the use of fittings and/or adjustments and/or calculations.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become obvious when the accompanying disclosure is read in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of one-quarter of one side of an apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 1A is a plan view of a second-quarter of the side shown in FIG. I;

FIG. 1B is a plan view of a third-quarter of the side shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 1C is a plan view of a fourth-quarter of the side shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the ratus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2A is a plan view of the opposite side of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1A;

FIG. 2B is a plan view of the opposite side of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1B;

FIG. 2C is a plan view of the opposite side of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1C;

FIGS. 3 to 13 show the sequence of the'method of making the front of a bodice of a garment;

FIGS. 14 to 19 and 24 to 27 show the sequence of the method of making sleeves;

FIGS. 20 to 23 show the making pants;

opposite side of the appasequence of the method for FIG. 28 is an enlarged view of the larger aperture used for drafting the sleeve curve and the method of derivation of the aperture; and

FIG. 29 is an enlarged view of the smaller aperture used for drafting the sleeve curve and the method of derivation of the aperture.

In the drawings, reference will be made to the apparatus and method using the apparatus wherein the mea surements of the steps are transferred directly onto the material forming the garment, or alternately, onto tracing material from which the resulting pattern may be applied or transferred to the garment material. In this respect, for simplicity, the garment or tracing material is not illustrated per se in the drawings it being understood that the marking lines illustrated, oulining the patterns, will be on such material in actual practice of the present invention. Still further, for simplicity and ease in understanding the present invention, the marking lines and resulting patterns formed by the marking lines are shown in certain figures as being superimposed on the apparatus of the present invention, whereas in normal practice of the present invention, such marking lines applied to the garment or tracing material are beneath the device which is normally superimposed on such material. In the subsequent description, reference will be made to a substrate surface denoting the tracing, garment or the like material onto which the lines are marked.

The front of the apparatus of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A, these two halves being of a one piece unit. Similarly, FIGS. 2 and 2A show the back side of the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 1A. The preferably quadrilaterally shaped board is indicated generally by reference numeral 10, and made of any suitable material e.g. paperboard, plastic, metal (e.g. aluminum, etc.) or the like. A most preferred shape of the device is a rectangular shape; however, the geometrical configuration may vary as will be appreciated by those skilled in this art upon reading this disclosure. For storage purposes, the device or board is preferably folda'ble along the axis X-X'.

In the device of the present invention illustrated in the drawings, both sides of the board 10 are utilized for the sake of simplicity, since several of the cut-outs or apertures can represent on the respective sides of the device, the front and back configurations of the body, appropriate scales being used with the respective sides to indicate the front and back, as explained hereinafter. However, if desired, rather than utilizing the appropriate reverse configurations of a given cut-out of the device on a given side thereof, the cut-out may be repeated in the device on the said given side by making the device longer in width and/or length and using appropriate indicia.

The board 10 is provided with various scales hereinafter identified, representing linear measurements of various components of the human body. For the sake of simplicity, the above-mentioned scales, which are linear scales, are positioned about the periphery of the board 10 (hence the preferred rectangular shape), and in effect, each of such scales includes a cut-out permitting marking ofa substrate surface the cut-out being the free edge of the board 10. For the sake of compactness, where it is not possible to incorporate such linear scales along the periphery of the board, the appropriate cut-out is made in the board and the scale located interiorly of the side margins as will be evident from the accompanying drawings.

The scales included in the device of the present invention include scale A representing the front armhole depth; scale A representing the rear armhole depth; scale B representing one-half of the diameter of the neck; scale E representing one-quarter of the front bustline; scale E representing one-quarter of the rear or back bustline; scale G representing one-quarter of the front waist; scale B representing one-quarter of the rear waist; scale H representing one-quarter of the front hip measurement; scale H representing onequarter of the rear or back hip measurement; scale I representing one-half of the breast distance (used for womens garments only); scale J representing the complete breast height; scale C representing the total front length of the shoulder; scale C representing the total rear or back length of the shoulder; scale 1 representing the complete armhole depth for sleeves of a first type of construction, for all types of garments; scale 2 representing one-half the sleeve width; scale 3 representing one-quarter the sleeve width for different types of garments; scale 4 representing one-third the armhole depth for garments of a different type of sleeve construction; scale 6 representing the complete crotch length; scale 7 representing one-quarter the hip length for pants and the like; scale 8 representing a scale for the positioning of pleats for pants or the like; and scale 9 representing the complete length of the front crotch edge. The device includes an optional indicia scale K indicating the equivalent between metric and English length measurements.

The board is also provided with a plurality of cut-outs or apertures for defining other measurements of a piece of a garment. The use of the apertures in the apparatus of the present invention will be described hereinafter in greater detail. Thus, there is provided an aperture generally designated by reference numeral D, which is adapted to be used for designing the neckline of a garment. A substantially boomerang shaped cut-out F having curved sides is used to define the front contour of the armhole. This aperture F may also be used to define the crotch curve for trousers, shorts, or the like. A linear aperture associated with scale C is employed in the present apparatus for the drafting of the length of the shoulder ofa garment. Similarly, the aperture generally designated by G and H has the dual purpose of operating to draft the waist and hips of the garment. A further aperture generally designated by W is used for the drafting of the dart curves. Aperture 1, is used in the drafting of the breast distance. Still further, aperture .l is adapted for the drafting of the breast height of a garment. The illustrated apertures are especially designed so as to obtain a curve and/or straight line by one stroke of a marking device e.g. a pen.

In accordance with this invention, there are provided two novel apertures within the apparatus adapted to draft the front and back portion of a sleeve curve. These apertures are of a general S-shaped nature as are indicated by reference numerals 5 and 5A. The smaller of the S-shaped apertures 5A, is adapted to draft the sleeve curve for a smaller sized garment (i.e. the sizes which may generally be represented as running from 2 to 14). The larger of the S-shaped apertures 5, is employed in the drafting of a sleeve curve of a garment having sizes generally ranging from 38 to 54. Both of these S-shaped apertures of the present apparatus are adapted so that one edge of the S-shaped aperture is adapted to operate in conjunction with the other edge to give the complete sleeve curve in one operation. This will become obvious with the following disclosure wherein the construction and use of these novel S- shaped apertures is discussed.

It will be seen that the two generally S-shaped edges of the apertures and 5A comprise intermediate first and second generally straight lines each of which is joined to first and second arcs of first and second circle curves of different radii, which straight lines are, in generally opposed generally parallel relation, and wherein the straight line portions are tangent to the first and second arcs of the first and second circle curves. This in use parallel relationship of the straight line portions of the S-shaped edges of the apertures 5 will best be appreciated from a consideration of FIG. 28 and specifically the lines generated between points 326-328 and 330-332.

Furthermore, in accordance with this invention, a novel aperture is provided, this novel aperture supplying the means for the forming of the darts of a garment not having the inherent disadvantages of prior art apparatus wherein the basic dart had to be formed. This dart aperture W has the general configuration of a quarter segment of a circle and operates in conjunction with a further cut-out generally designated by reference P, having the general configuration ofa right-angled triangle with the base of the right angled triangle being in common with' one of the straight lines defining the quarter segment of the circle. Indicating means 11 are provided on the art of dart aperture W.

The above cut-outs, except for the ones for the darts, are provided on their edges with a scale similar to the scales described with respect to A, A, etc. The scales for A, A, etc. and the cut-out or apertures abovedescribed, are in terms of a key figure. Thus, all of the scales of the cut-outs in terms of those inwardly spaced from the margins of the board, and of those on the margins of the board, contain the same key numbers. In this respect, the device further includes a table N containing the key numbers. The table N supplies a key figure for each true measurement of the mannequin or the person to be clothed. From this key figure, it is possible to identify a length from one of the scales along a corresponding cut-out or side of the board. Thus, knowing previously the exact measurements for a pattern while drawing and permitting the scales to act individually and separately as well as in proportion to a relative size, there will be obtained the correct size of the desired pattern, eliminating all adjusting steps conventionally required in prior art methods.

In other words, with the device of the present invention, it is possible to attain a perfectly designed and fitted garment even for those whose body proportions do not fall within the established normal ranges. There is thus provided a plurality of apertures, each of these apertures having a measurement indicating means, each of these measurement indicating means allowing each individual component of the garment to be drafted according to the actual body measurement of the end user.

In a preferred embodiment, the cut-out F includes a pair of scales indicated generally by reference numerals 100 and 102 on the long curve of the cut-out, which long curve is used for the front of the armhole; while the shorter curve is used for the back. Only one side of the board need be used for cut-out F if desired. but both sides may likwise be employed as explained hereinafter.

In constructing the board, where the cut-outs or linear sides of the board function as cut-outs. preferably all of the cut-outs are so arranged that those applying to the front of a garment are on one side and those applying to the *back" or rear of a garment are on the other side.

STEPS FOR USING THE BOARD FOR DESIGNING THE FRONT BUST OF A GARMENT:

A key number is located on the table N which corresponds to the bust circumference. For example, if the circumference of the bust is appproximately 37 /8 inches, the key figure is 44. For the purpose of simplifying the following explanations, the other dimensions of the mannequin will be taken as corresponding to the same key figure 44, but as explained above, the appropriate key figure for each type of measurement will be selected from the table N. The board 10 is placed with the front bust scales face up as in FIG. 1. Initially, the measurement of the length of the front bust of a person (from the highest point of the shoulder to the waistline) is determined and, a vertical line 104 is drawn on the substrate corresponding to this length, the initial and terminal points of this line being designated O-k (as shown in FIG. 4). Subsequently, the left-hand side of the board 10 is aligned with line 104, the top left hand corner of the board being at the point 0. Without moving the board 10 at the numeral 44 on scales A, B and C, the substrate is marked with dots a, b and c in front of the respective numerals 44. The inclination and the length of the shoulder will then be represented by a line drawn from points 12 to c forming a line 106 (see FIG. 4).

In order to define the neckline, the initial point of the scale D is moved over the point b and the board 10 is rotated until the numeral 44 of the scale D meets the vertical line O-k at d (FIG. 5). The curve line 108 between bd represents he neckline as illustrated in FIG. 6.

With the scale E and from a point a (FIG. 6) which corresponds to the armhole depth, a horizontal line I10 between point a'-e is drafted, the point e corresponding to the number 44 on the scale E (FIG. 6). The line 110 is perpendicular to the line 104 and corresponds to one-quarter of the circumference of the bust. For male and child patterns, the point 44 of the bust scale 102 of cut-out F (as shown in FIG. 8) is placed over the point e and the board is rotated so that the point c meets the contour of the cut-out F. The armhole curve can now be drafted by drawing a curved line 112 between the points c and e. For women, where a different body symmetry than that of a male applies, use is made of the second scale of cut-out F where the key number 44 is located, and from the point e on the bust line a-e, a vertical line 114 is drawn (whose length is not critical). Subsequently, the key numeral 44 of the second scale 100 is placed at a point c and the board 10 is moved until the reference numeral 44 of the first scale 102 intersects line 114 at e. Thereafter, a curved line 112 containing the contours of the cut-out F is drawn between the points c and 2', thereby defining the definitive female armhole curve. This is in contrast to prior art techniques in which a plurality of adjustments were required to obtain such a definitive curve.

Claims (11)

1. A garment drafting apparatus suitable for drafting a garment, said garment drafting apparatus comprising a generally flat stencil board having a pair of opposed flat planar major surfaces, said flat stencil board having a plurality of stencilling apertures including a dart forming aperture therein extending between said opposed major surfaces, whereby each of said surfaces forms an aperture mirror image of the other, said stencilling apertures having along at least one side a measurement indicating means, said measurement indicating means being adapted to allow the drafting of a garment correlated to individual sizes, said garment drafting apparatus including at least first and second generally S-shaped edges for drafting the front and back portion of a sleeve curve respectively, each of said generally S-shaped edges comprising first and second generally straight line portions, and first and second arcs of first and s econd circle curves, said first generally straight line having measurement indicating means thereon, said first generally straight line being joined to said first arc of said first circle curve, said first arc of said first circle curve being joined to said second straight line, said second straight line being of a substantial length and joined to said second arc of Said second circle curve, said second straight line being a tangent to said first and second arcs of said circle curves, said second arc of said second circle curve having a radial center on the side of said second straight line opposed to the side having the radial center of said first circle curve, each of said pair of S-shaped edges comprised of said first and second arcs and first and second straight lines having one of the arcs of a larger radius than the other arc, said pair of generally S-shaped edges cooperating such that the larger arc of said first S-shaped edge for drafting the front portion of a sleeve curve is opposed to the smaller arc of said second S-shaped edge for drafting the back portion of the sleeve curve, the smaller arc of the first S-shaped edge being opposed to the larger arc of the second S-shaped edge, and the second straight line portions are substantially adjacent and substantially parallel through their length.
2. The garment drafting apparatus of claim 1 wherein said two generally S-shaped edges form one aperture of said garment drafting apparatus, said two S-shaped edgess being joined together at opposed ends of the S, said two S-shaped edges thus forming a generally S-shaped aperture.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein there are provided first and second generally S-shaped apertures, said first generally S-shaped aperture being adapted to draft the sleeve curve of a large garment, said second generally S-shaped aperture being adapted to draft the sleeve portion of a smaller garment.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein there is included one aperture having a substantially boomerang shape for representing the front and back of the armhole and the crotches of pants or pant-like garments.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein there is provided an aperture having one edge which is of a generally circular contour.
6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein there is provided at least one linear aperture for defining the length of the shoulder and at least one linear measurement means on the edge of the device for defining one-half the diameter of the neck.
7. A garment drafting apparatus as defined in claim 1, said garment drafting apparatus having means for drafting a dart, said dart forming means comprising a central apex point, said central apex point being adapted to be placed on the breast point of the garment to be drafted, means for drawing first and second straight lines from said breast point, said first straight line being parallel to the waist line, said second straight line being angularly disposed with regard to said first straight line.
8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said dart forming means comprises an aperture, said aperture having the configuration of a quarter segment of a circle, and an indicating means on the arc of said quarter segment of a circle.
9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said dart forming means additionally comprises a right-angle triangle aperture, said right-angle triangle aperture adapted to operate in conjunction with said quarter segment of a circle.
10. In a garment drafting apparatus suitable for drafting a garment comprising a generally flat stencil board having a pair of opposed flat planar major surfaces the improvement wherein said garment drafting apparatus includes at least first and second generally S-shaped edges for drafting the front and back portion of a sleeve curve respectively, each of said generally S-shaped edges comprising first and second generally straight line portions, and first and second arcs of first and second circle curves, said first generally straight line having measurement indicating means thereon, said first generally straight line being joined to said first arc of said first circle curve, said first arc of said first circle curve being joined to said second straight line, said second straight line portion being of a substantial length and joined to said second arc of said second circle curve, Said second straight line being a tangent to said first and second arcs of said circle curves, said second arc of said second circle curve having a radial center on the side of said second straight line opposed to the side having the radial center of said first circle curve, each of said pair of S-shaped edges comprised of said first and second arcs and first and second straight lines having one of the arcs of a larger radius than the other arc, said pair of generally S-shaped edges cooperating such that the larger arc of said first S-shaped edge for drafting the front portion of a sleeve curve is opposed to the smaller arc of said second S-shaped edge for drafting the back portion of the sleeve curve, the smaller arc of the first S-shaped edge being opposed to the larger arc of the second S-shaped edge, and the second straight line portions are substantially adjacent and substantially parallel through their length, said garment drafting apparatus further including means for drafting a dart.
11. In a method of designing a garment in which method are included the steps of providing on a substrate surface pattern lines including pattern lines for sleeves, the improvement comprising providing a garment designing device, the device comprising a generally flat stencil board having a pair of opposed flat planar major surfaces, said flat stencil board having a plurality of stencilling apertures including a dart forming aperture therein extending between said opposed major surfaces, whereby each of said surfaces forms an aperture mirror image of the other, said stencilling apertures having along at least one side a measurement indicating means, said measurement indicating means being adapted to allow the drafting of a garment correlated to individual sizes, said garment drafting apparatus including at least first and second generally S-shaped edges for drafting the front and back portion of a sleeve curve respectively, each of said generally S-shaped edges comprising first and second generally straight line portions, and first and second arcs of first and second circle curves, said first generally straight line having measurement indicating means thereon, said first generally straight line being joined to said first arc of said first circle curve, said first arc of said first circle curve being joined to said second straight line, said second straight line being of a substantial length and joined to second arc of said second circle curve, said second straight line being a tangent to said first and second arcs of said circle curves, said second arc of said second circle curve having a radial center on the side of said second straight line opposed to the side having the radial center of said first circle curve, each of said pair of S-shaped edges comprised of said first and second arcs and first and second straight lines having one of the arcs of a larger radius than the other arc, said pair of generally S-shaped edges cooperating such that, in use, the larger arc of said first S-shaped edge for drafting the front portion of a sleeve curve is opposed to the smaller arc of said second S-shaped edge for drafting the back portion of the sleeve curve, the smaller arc of the first S-shaped edge being opposed to the larger arc of the second S-shaped edge, and the second straight line portions are substantially adjacent and substantially parallel through their length, and utilizing said device to mark on said substrate surface a sleeve length determining the sleeve armhole depth for a garment perpendicular to the length of the sleeve, marking the substrate surface with a line corresponding to the first of said S-shaped edges, said line extending between the top of the sleeve length and the end of the sleeve armhole depth to define the front curve of the sleeve, and marking the substrate surface with a further line corresponding to said second S-shaped edge, said further line also extending between the top of the sleeve length and the end of the sleevE armhole depth for defining the back curve of the sleeve.
US3911584A 1971-04-07 1973-10-15 Apparatus for tracing patterns for the garment industry Expired - Lifetime US3911584A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4502232A (en) * 1983-09-16 1985-03-05 Broders Jack R Carpet layer's wave-form template
FR2560415A1 (en) * 1984-02-27 1985-08-30 Francesetti Odette Method of producing a dressmaking pattern and pattern thus obtained
GB2192458A (en) * 1986-07-08 1988-01-13 Anastasia Vouyouka Tools for marking out a pattern for the manufacture of garments
EP0318439A1 (en) * 1987-11-24 1989-05-31 Alberto Cosenza Template for making patterns for cutting clothes and the like
US4856196A (en) * 1986-10-29 1989-08-15 Ajus Camille A Method and device for constructing sleeves
US5031326A (en) * 1988-05-24 1991-07-16 Huang Ding S Basic formula of active layout drawing in pants tailoring
GB2245815A (en) * 1990-07-03 1992-01-15 Arthur Carl Boyd A template for forming a neckline
US6978549B2 (en) * 2002-06-05 2005-12-27 Ellis Stacey L Patterning system for a selected body type and methods of measuring for a selected body type
US20110048186A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Usaus, Llc Cutting Guide With Seam Allowance Recess

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US325409A (en) * 1885-09-01 Gaements
US1011915A (en) * 1910-11-25 1911-12-19 Paolo Carbonara Combined tailor's drafting chart and square.
US1204900A (en) * 1915-09-07 1916-11-14 Mary B Picken Garment-maker's square.

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US325409A (en) * 1885-09-01 Gaements
US1011915A (en) * 1910-11-25 1911-12-19 Paolo Carbonara Combined tailor's drafting chart and square.
US1204900A (en) * 1915-09-07 1916-11-14 Mary B Picken Garment-maker's square.

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4502232A (en) * 1983-09-16 1985-03-05 Broders Jack R Carpet layer's wave-form template
FR2560415A1 (en) * 1984-02-27 1985-08-30 Francesetti Odette Method of producing a dressmaking pattern and pattern thus obtained
GB2192458A (en) * 1986-07-08 1988-01-13 Anastasia Vouyouka Tools for marking out a pattern for the manufacture of garments
GB2192458B (en) * 1986-07-08 1990-12-12 Anastasia Vouyouka Tools for marking out a pattern for the manufacture of bodices
US4856196A (en) * 1986-10-29 1989-08-15 Ajus Camille A Method and device for constructing sleeves
EP0318439A1 (en) * 1987-11-24 1989-05-31 Alberto Cosenza Template for making patterns for cutting clothes and the like
US5031326A (en) * 1988-05-24 1991-07-16 Huang Ding S Basic formula of active layout drawing in pants tailoring
GB2245815A (en) * 1990-07-03 1992-01-15 Arthur Carl Boyd A template for forming a neckline
GB2245815B (en) * 1990-07-03 1994-04-27 Arthur Carl Boyd A template for forming a neckline
US6978549B2 (en) * 2002-06-05 2005-12-27 Ellis Stacey L Patterning system for a selected body type and methods of measuring for a selected body type
US20110048186A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Usaus, Llc Cutting Guide With Seam Allowance Recess
US20110047804A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Usaus, Llc Cutting guide with seam allowance recess
US9138904B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2015-09-22 USAUS, Inc. Cutting guide with seam allowance recess
US9458566B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2016-10-04 Usaus Holdings Llc Cutting guide with seam allowance recess
US9562317B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2017-02-07 Usaus Holdings Llc Cutting guide with seam allowance recess
US10023993B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2018-07-17 Usaus Holdings Llc Cutting guide with seam allowance recess
US10041206B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2018-08-07 Usaus Holdings Llc Cutting guide with seam allowance recess

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