US3908717A - Apparatus for filling beer cans or the like - Google Patents

Apparatus for filling beer cans or the like Download PDF

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Publication number
US3908717A
US3908717A US431726A US43172674A US3908717A US 3908717 A US3908717 A US 3908717A US 431726 A US431726 A US 431726A US 43172674 A US43172674 A US 43172674A US 3908717 A US3908717 A US 3908717A
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United States
Prior art keywords
filling
gasket
cans
sealing
beer
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US431726A
Inventor
Friedrich Rademacher
Karl Quest
Uwe Knabe
Dieter Unger
Heinz Jordan
Werner Heckmann
Karl Plock
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Holstein und Kappert Maschinenfabrik Phonix GmbH
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Holstein und Kappert Maschinenfabrik Phonix GmbH
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Priority to DE19702042990 priority Critical patent/DE2042990A1/en
Priority to US17567371 priority patent/US3807463A/en
Application filed by Holstein und Kappert Maschinenfabrik Phonix GmbH filed Critical Holstein und Kappert Maschinenfabrik Phonix GmbH
Priority to US431726A priority patent/US3908717A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3908717A publication Critical patent/US3908717A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/06Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus using counterpressure, i.e. filling while the container is under pressure
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/28Flow-control devices, e.g. using valves
    • B67C3/281Profiled valve bodies for smoothing the flow at the outlet of the filling nozzle
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/26Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks
    • B67C2003/2651The liquid valve being carried by the vent tube
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/26Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks
    • B67C2003/2657Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks specially adapted for filling cans
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/26Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks
    • B67C2003/266Means for centering the container with the filling head
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/26Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks
    • B67C2003/2671Means for preventing foaming of the liquid
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67CCLEANING, FILLING WITH LIQUIDS OR SEMILIQUIDS, OR EMPTYING, OF BOTTLES, JARS, CANS, CASKS, BARRELS, OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; FUNNELS
    • B67C3/00Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus; Filling casks or barrels with liquids or semiliquids
    • B67C3/02Bottling liquids or semiliquids; Filling jars or cans with liquids or semiliquids using bottling or like apparatus
    • B67C3/22Details
    • B67C3/26Filling-heads; Means for engaging filling-heads with bottle necks
    • B67C2003/2671Means for preventing foaming of the liquid
    • B67C2003/2674Means for preventing foaming of the liquid by creating a conical shaped flow directed to the container wall at the container neck height
    • B67C2003/268Means for preventing foaming of the liquid by creating a conical shaped flow directed to the container wall at the container neck height by means of a flow channel integral with the filling nozzle

Abstract

The filling devices in an apparatus which fills beer cans orbit about a vertical axis and have upright housings supporting cylindrical centering members which carry deformable gaskets for the mouths of cans. Such cans are supported by a conveyor which orbits with the filling devices and is movable up and down or is held against vertical movement during rotation with the filling devices. The introduction of liquid into the cans takes place subsequent to introduction of a compressed gas, and such gas can be used to bias the gaskets against the mouths of cans during filling. When the filling of a can is completed, the pressure in its interior is increased to facilitate separation from the respective gasket. That supply of beer which remains in a channel of the housing on closing of the beer-admitting valve can be expelled in response to expansion of gas in a chamber which receives such gas by way of the container and is sealed from the container by beer in the channel. The expansion of gas in the chamber takes place in response to opening of a valve which reduces the pressure of gas above the body of liquid in the container. The gasket of each filling device is hollow and/or has an annular groove in the internal and/or external surface to enhance its flexibility.

Description

United States Patent Rademacher et al.
[ 5] Sept. 30, 1975 APPARATUS FOR FILLING BEER CANS OR THE LIKE [75] Inventors: Friedrich Rademacher, Kamen; Karl Quest, Dortmund; Uwe Knabe, Dortmund-Hombruch; Dieter Unger, Waltrop; Heinz Jordan, Dortmund-Korne; Werner Heckmann, Dortmund; Karl Plock, Dortmund-Lucklemberg, all of I Germany [73] Assignee: Holstein & Kappert Maschinenfabrik Phonix GmbH, Dortmund-Lucklemberg, Germany [22] Filed: Jan. 8, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 431,726
Related U.S. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 175,673, Aug. 27, 1971, Pat. No.
[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Aug. 29, 1970 Germany 2042990 [52] U.S. Cl. 141/46; 141/392; 277/206 [51] Int. Cl. B65B 31/00; B67C 3/26 [58] Field of Search 141/1, 4-9, 141/37-67, 104, 234, 236, 281, 282, 287, 165, 311, 312, 368, 392; 277/204, 206, 206.1, 27
[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,112,199 3/1938 Kantor et al 141/287 IZI 11/1966 Benoit 277/206.1
Primary Examiner-Houston S. Bell, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Michael S. Striker 5 7 ABSTRACT the filling devices and is movable up and down or is held against vertical movement during rotation with the filling devices. The introduction of liquid into the cans takes place subsequent to introduction of a compressed gas, and such gas can be used to bias the gaskets against the mouths of cans during filling. When the filling of a can is completed, the pressure in its interior is increased to facilitate separation from the respective gasket. That supply of beer which remains in a channel of the housing on closing of the beeradmitting valve can be expelled in response to expansion of gas in a chamber which receives such gas by way of the container and is sealed from the container by beer in the channel. The expansion of gas in the chamber takes place in response to opening of a valve which reduces the pressure of gas above the body of liquid in the container. The gasket of each filling device is hollow and/or has an annular groove in the internal and/or external surface to enhance its flexibility.
r I lzai 7/1970 Remane l41/287 US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet20f 10 3,908,717
US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet30f 10 3,908,717
ZAW/
fl///////V/// FIG. 4
Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 4 of 10 U8. Patent U.S. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 5 of 10 3,908,717
U.S. Patent Se'pt. 30,1975 I Sheet 7 of 10 3,908,717
US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet80f 10 3,908,717
U.S. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet90f 10 3,908,717
U.S. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 10 of 10 3,908,717
APPARATUS FOR FILLING BEER CANS OR THE LIKE This is a division of application Ser. No. 175,673 filed Aug. 27, l97l, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,807,463 granted Apr. 30, 1074.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to apparatus for filling cans or analogous containers with beer, juice, milk andlor other types of carbonated or non-carbonated liquids. More particularly, the invention relates to improvements in container filling apparatus of the type wherein a supply of liquid to be introduced into metallic cans or like containers is preferably stored in an annular vessel below a cushion of compressed gas and wherein the vessel rotates during the filling of containers.
Presently known apparatus of the just outlined character are normally provided with an entire battery or equidistant filling devices which extend downwardly from the annular vessel and are provided with means for sealing the mouths of containers (such as beer cans ,and hereinafter referred to as cans for short) during introduction of metered quantities of a liquid, such as beer. It is customary to place empty cans onto a conveyor which is provided with means for lifting the cans into sealing engagement with ring-shaped gaskets of the respective filling devices. Since the cans orbit about the axis of rotation of the vessel during introduction of such metered quantities of a liquid, the upper surfaces of the bodies of liquid in the cans are strongly inclined under the action of centrifugal force which acts on decanted liquid, and such inclination presents serious problems during removal of filled cans from the filling apparatus as well as if it is desired to fill each of a series of cans with identical quantities of a liquid. The problems which arise in connection with the inclination of the upper surface of the body of liquid in a filled can are especially serious during downward movement of the can in order to disengage its mouth from the gasket of the respective filling devices.
Additional problems arise in presently known filling apparatus for beer cans or the like when the cans consist of relatively weak (readily deformable) material, such as thin aluminum sheet stock. Thus, the magnitude of forces which are employed to insure a satisfactory sealing action between a gasket and the mouth of a can must be maintained within a very narrow range because, if such forces are too weak, the sealing action is unsatisfactory and the respective can cannot receive any liquid or receives less than the desired quantity of liquid. On the other hand, if the forces are excessive, the can is likely to be deformed so that it must be discarded together with its contents and is likely to contaminate the filling apparatus.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved apparatus for filling metallic cans or analogous containers with beer, juice or other carbonated or uncarbonated beverages in such a way that a relatively weak container is not likely to undergo deformation in the course of the filling operation and that each of a series of successive containers receives the same quantity of liquid.
' vices to seal the mouths of cans or analogous containers preparatory to and during filling.
A further object of the invention is to provide a filling device for beer cans or like containers with novel means for sealing the mouths of containers without the danger of deformation of containers and in such a way that the sealing means can be rapidly and conveniently separated from the mouth of a filled container.
A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus which can be used for proper filling of relatively weak containers or for the filling of containers which are capable of withstanding substantial stresses for the purpose of sealing their interior from the surrounding atmosphere.
One feature of the present invention resides in the provision of an apparatus for filling cans or analogous containers with liquids. In accordance with a first embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises the means for placing the mouth of an empty container (such as an-aluminum can) into sealing engagement with a specially designed gasket (by moving the can against the gasket and/or by moving the gasket against the can), means for raising the pressure in the interior of the thus sealed container by admitting into the container a compressed gas, introducing into the container a metered quantity of a liquid, preferably by gravity flow and preferably while maintaining the liquid at a pressure which is identical with or close to the pressure of gas in the container, and means for thereupon raising the pressure in the container in the space above the liquid level to promote the separation of the mouth from the gasket.
The novel features which are considered as characteristic of the invention are set forth in particular inthe appended claims. The improved filling apparatus itself,
however, both as to its construction and its mode of operation, together with aditional features and advantages thereof, will be best understood upon perusal of the following detailed description of certain specific embodiments with reference to the accompanying drawing. I
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING vice substantially as seen-in the direction of arrowsfrom the line IV-IV of FIG. 3;
FIG. 3 is a similar horizontal sectional view substantially as seen in the direction of arrows from the line III- --III of FIG. 1;
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary axial sectional view of second filli devices;
FIG. 7 illustrates the structure of FIG. 8 but with the gasket in deformed condition;
FIG. 8 is a fragmentary axial sectional view of a further filling apparatus showing the manner in which the upper surface of liquid in a properly mounted can becomes inclined under the action of centrifugal force during filling, and further showing means for reducing the inclination of such upper surface; I
FIG. 9 is a fragmentary axial sectional view of a filling apparatus employing filling devices which constitute modifications of the device shown in FIGS. 1 to 3;
FIG. 10 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view as seen in the direction of arrows from the line X--X of FIG. 9;
FIG. 11 is a fragmentary axial sectional view of still another filling device;
FIG. 12 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view of a gasket which can be used to seal the mouths of cans in the filling apparatus of the present invention;
FIG. 13 is a fragmentary axial sectional view of the gasket as seen in the direction of arrows from the line XIII-XIII of FIG. 12;
FIG. 14 is a similar fragmentary axial sectional view of a modified gasket; and
FIG. 15 is a similar fragmentary axial sectional view of still another gasket.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIGS. 1 to 3 illustrate a filling device or unit which comprises a housing 101 shown as being integral with an annular vessel 102 having a ring-shaped chamber 103 for a supply of beer below a cushion of compressed gas. It is clear, however, that the housing 101 can constitute a discrete part which, with a set of similar housings (not shown), is bolted, screwed or otherwise separably fastened to the underside of the vessel 102. A beer can 104 rests on a conveyor or turntable 111 and is held in requisite position by a preferably semicircular or U-shaped positioning device 112 which may but need not be provided with or replaced by suction heads, suction ports or like means for holding the can 104 by suction.
The housing 101 is surrounded by and guides a substantially cylindrical sealing and centering member 106 which is movable up and down by a shifter (not shown) corresponding to the shifter SH shown in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463 and having prongs extending or extendable into a pair of horizontal slots 108 shown in FIG. 2. These slots are machined into the peripheral surface of the sealing member 106 substantially or exactly diametrically opposite each other. A ring-shaped elastic packing 107 is mounted in an internal groove of the sealing member 106 and'bears against the external surface of the adjacent portion of the housing 101. The aforementioned shifter can move the sealing member 106 up and down, i.e., into and from sealing engagement with the upper end portion of the can 104 on the conveyor 111. The lower end face of the sealing member 106 is provided with a recess 106a corresponding to the recess 70 in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463 and receiving an elastically deformable an nular sealing element or gasket 110. The reference character 109 denotes in FIG. 1 a downwardly and outwardly flaring conical guide surface or centering surface of the sealing member 106.
The housing 101 surrounds an insert-or core 113 and defines therewith an annular liquid admitting channel 114 the lower portion of which flares outwardly and downwardly, as at 114a, in order to insure laminar inflow of beer into the can 104. The core 1 13 may consist of two sections which abut against each other in the plane of the upper end of the conical channel portion 114a. The continuity of the channel 114, as considered in the circumferential direction of the core 113, is interrupted at one point (not specifically shown) where the core is secured to the housing 101.
An internal shoulder 115 of the housing 101 is flush with the upper end face of the core 113 and forms therewith an annular seat for an elastic valve member 116 which is held by the enlarged lower end portion 124 of a tubular carrier 1 18. The internal compartment 119 of this carrier communicates with an external compartment 119a by way of one or more apertures 117 which are machined into the carrier. The compartment 119a surrounds the carrier 118 and is in turn surrounded by the housing 101. The carrier 118.is biased upwardly by a helical spring 118a and can be moved downwardly, against the opposition of the spring 118a, by a suitably configurated stationary cam, not shown, while the illustrated filling device orbits with the vessel 102 and conveyor 111 about a vertical axis. As explained in connection with FIG. 1, of our US. Pat. no. 3,807,463 the vessel 102 preferably supports an entire set of equidistant filling devices each of which is preferably identical with the illustrated filling device and serves to introduce into a can 104 a predetermined quantity of beer during travel with the can between a first transfer station where empty'cans are delivered onto the conveyor 111 and a second transfer station where filled cans are being removed for introduction into a sealing machine, not shown.
The compartments 119, 119a are filled with beer which can flow into the channel 114 and through this channel into a can 104 as soon as the valve member 116 is lifted by the spring 118a.
The core 113 surrounds a gas conveyor conduit or pipe 120 which is secured to the sealing member 106 by a substantially L-shaped supporting member 123. One end of the supporting member 123 has a tapped bore for the externally threaded lower end portion 121 of the pipe 120, and the other end of the supporting member 123 is secured to the sealing member 106 by one or more bolts 125 or analogous fasteners. A lock nut 122 is applied to the underside of the supporting member 123 to prevent unintentional axial displacement of the pipe 120. A ring-shaped flange 121a at the upper end of the externally threaded portion 121 serves as an abutment for the horizontal arm of the supporting member 123.
The upper end portion of the pipe 120 extends into the internal space 126 of a tubular valve body 127 for a valve member (not shown) corresponding to the valve member 5 shown in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463. The upper end portion of the valve body 127 is open and communicates with the upper part of the chamber 103 so that it is always filled with gas which exerts pressure against the upper surface of the supply of beer in the vessel 102.
The supporting member 123 is located in a plane which includes the axis of rotation of the vessel 102. The housing 101 is further provided with an external circumferential groove which is surrounded by an internal groove of the sealing member 106 and defines therewith an annular pressure chamber 128 which communicates with the interior of the can 104 by way of a a bore, cutout or like passage 132. The passage 132 is formed in part in the housing 101 and in part in the core 1 13. A further passage 129 connects the chamber 128 with a pressure reducing valve 130 mounted in a radial nipple or extension 145 of the housing 101. The valve 130 is functional equivalent of the valve 30 shown in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463 and is normally closed.
The pressure reducing valve 130 has a conical seat 130a which is normally engaged by an elastic valve member 131 mounted on a stem 1313 which has an outwardly projecting extension or follower 131a serving to track a cam corresponding to the cam 31A shown in FIG. 1 of our U.S. Pat. No. 3,807,463. A helical spring 131D biases the valve member 131 against the seat 130a. The nipple 145 has a radial port 157 by means of which the passage 129 communicates with the atmosphere when the pressure reducing valve 130 is open.
The upper portion 146 of the annular channel 114 between the core 113 and housing 101 communicates with a substantially radially extending bore 147 which is close to the seat 115 and is machined into the housing 101. The bore 147 communicates with an axially parallel bore 148 (see FIG. 3) which communicates with an expansion chamber 150 in the nipple 145 by way of an inclined port 149 (see FIG. 1). The expansion chamber 150, the port 149 and the bores 147, 148 are filled with gas, e.g., air. A helicalspring 151 in the expansion chamber 150 biases a valve member 152 against the conical seat 153 of a further valve- 142 in the nipple 145. The valve member 152 has an outwardly projecting extension 154 which can be displaced by an enlarged portion or boss 155 of the stem 1318 to thereby move the valve member 152 away from the seat 153. The valves 130 and 142 are mounted in an axial bore 156 of the nipple 145. The boss 155 of the stem 1318 does not abut against the extension 154 of the valve member '152 when the valves 130 and 142 are closed. The chamber 150 communicates with the atmosphere, by way of the port 157 and channels, cutouts and/or bores which are indicated in FIG. 1 by broken lines, when the follower 131a is depressed to such an extent that it opens the pressure reducing valve 130 and also the valve 142. Communication between the port 157 and the expansion chamber 150 is established by way of one or more cutouts in the follower 131a, one or more cutouts or bores in the boss 155, and one or more cutouts or bores in the extension 154. Thus, the expansion chamber 150 can communicate with the atmosphere simultaneously with the passage 129 but the passage 129 begins to communicate with the atmosphere prior to the chamber 150.
' The maximum diameter of the housing 101 exceeds the maximum diameter of the open upper end portion of'the can 104 on the conveyor 111. The same applies for the diameter of the radially outermost surface 10Gb in the recess 106a for the gasket 110. The core 113 is rigid with the housing 101-and hence with the vessel 102. The cross-sectional area of the pressure chamber 128 exceeds the maximurnm area of contact between the gasket 110 and the upper end portion of the can 104, such area of contact being bounded by the innermost and outermost circles of contact between the can and the gasket 110.
The operation of the filling device shown in FIGS. 1 tov 3 is as follows:
The sealing member 106 is illustrated in its lower end position in which the gasket 110 is deformed and is held in sealing engagement with the upper end portion of the can 104. It is assumed that the can 104 already contains a predetermined quantity of beer which was introduced into its interior in the same way as described in connection with FIG. 1, of our US. Pat.'No. 3,807,463 i.e., by first moving the valve member in the valve body 127 to its open position while the valve member 116 continues to seal the compartments 119, 1 19a from the channel 114 and while the valve member 131 dwells in its closed position, and by thereupon opening the valve including the valve member 116so that a'stream of beer can flow into the can 104 to the level of the lower end of the conduit or pipe 120. The
valves including the valve member 116 and the valve body 127 are thereupon closed again. If the filled can 104 is to be removed, the shifter which extends into the slots 108 lifts the sealing member 106. The filled can area of the chamber 128. The interior of the sealing member 106 is assumed to be sealed from the atmosphere and from the chamber 103 of the vessel 102 but is already maintained at atmospheric pressure; In the very instant when the sealing member 106 starts to rise under the action of the shifter, the volume of the chamber 128 decreases because the surface 128a of the sealing member 106 moves upwardly and closer to the surface 128b of the housing 101. The filled can 104 still remains sealed from the atmosphere because the gasket 110 undergoes expansion in response to lifting of the sealing member 106, i.e., the gasket continues to remain for a while in sealing engagement with the mouth of the can 104 on the conveyor 11 1. During expansion of the gasket 110, the volume of the unfilled space above the liquid level in the can104 increases because the inner diameter of the area of contact between the gasket 1 l0 and the mouth of the can 104 increases. The
increase in such volume can be said to approximate the 7 product of the cross-sectional area of the gasket 110 and the length of its upward stroke. The position of'the housing 101 and core 113 with reference to'the can- 104 remains unchanged. The increase in volume of the space above the liquid level in the can 104 brings about a drop in pressure to below atmospheric pressure.
The volume of the chamber 128 decreases in response to upward movement of the sealing member 106 because the housing 101 does not share such upward movement and, therefore, the surface 128a moves closer to the surface 128b.- Such rise in pressure is communicated to the interior of the can 104 by way of the bore or passage 132, i.e., there occurs an equalization of pressures. However, the pressure in the can 104 will rise due to the fact that the rise of pressure in the chamber 128 per unit increment of upward movement of the sealing member 106 exceeds the drop of pressure in the can 104. The rising pressure in the interior of the can 104 above the liquid level biases the can downwardly, i.e., away from sealing engagement with the gasket 110, whereby the can 104 remains on the conveyor 111 to be transferred into the sealing machine at the second transfer station.
As mentioned above, the valve 142 can open in response to opening of the pressure reducing valve 130 which opens when the follower 131a is depressed by a cam corresponding to the cam 31A in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463. The opening of pressure reducing valve 130 results in a drop of pressure in the upper portion of the internal space of the can 104 above the liquid level. Such drop in pressure is due to the fact that the interior of the can 104 above the liquid level is free to communicate with the atmosphere by way of the port 157, space between the seat 130a and the valve member 131, passage 129, chamber 128 and passage 132. Thus, the pressure of gas above the liquid level in the can 104 is reduced to atmospheric pressure in automatic response to opening of the pressure reducing valve 130. The valve 142 remains closed while the boss 155 of the stem 131B reduces the gap between its righthand end face and the extension 154 to zero. Thus, the elevated pressure of gas in the expansion chamber 150, port 149 and bores 148, 147 is communicated to liquid in the channel 114 (whose upper portion 146 communicates with the bore 147) whereby such liquid abruptly or rapidly descends into the can 104. It is to be noted that the valve member 116 is already in sealing engagement with the seat 1 15. The cam which acts upon the follower 131a thereupon shifts the boss 155 to such an extent that the valve member 152 of the valve 142 is moved away from the seat 153 so that the expansion chamber 150 is free to communicate with the atmosphere by way of the port 157. This insures that the pressure in channel 114 drops to atmospheric pressure. All this takes place prior to aforediscussed I lifting of the sealing member 106 by means of the shifter whose prongs extend into the slots 108. The valves 130 and 142 are thereupon closed by the cam which acts on the follower 131a and by the springs 131D, 151. This restores the initial condition of the filling device which is then ready to admit beer into the next can 104, such can being placed or conveyed onto the conveyor 111 downstream of the second transfer station and not later than at the time when the filling device reaches the first transfer station.
The provision of the valve 142 eliminates a serious drawback of many presently known filling devices wherein a supply of liquid remains in the space corresponding to the channel 1 14 subsequent to lifting of the sealing member above and away from the mouth of a freshly filled container. If the liquid is a carbonated beverage, it is likely to release carbon dioxide gas and to produce drops which escape into the filling apparatus subsequent to movement of a freshly filled container away from registry with the filling device.
The release of carbon dioxide gas which is entrapped in beer or other carbonated beverages normally occurs in automatic response to exposure of such beverages to atmospheric air, for example, when the sealing member of a conventional filling device is lifted above and away from a filled beer can. This causes the formation of aforementioned drops which are free to descend into the filling apparatus if a supply of beer remains in the channel of the filling device after the filled can is moved laterally and out of register with the sealing member of such filling device.
The pressure in the expansion chamber 150 rises to reach the pressure in the upper portion of the chamber 103 when the conduit or pipe 120 is free to establish communication between the interior of an empty can 104 and the cushion of gas above the supply of beer in I the vessel 102. The pressure of such gas is communicated to' the expansion chamber 150 by way of the channel 114, bores 147, 148 and port 149. The expansion chamber 150 is sealed from the interior of the can 104 and the pressure therein remains unchanged while the beer is free to flow through the channel 114 because such liquid seals the bore 147 from the interior of the can. When the valve member 1 16 is moved to the illustrated sealing position to terminate the admission of beer into the can 104, and when the valve 130 is thereupon opened to reduce the pressure in the can 104 above the body of beer therein, the expansion chamber 150 insures rapid and complete evacuation of liquid which remains in the channel 114 after closing of the valve member 116. This insures that the apparatus cannot be contaminated by droplets of beer subsequent to movement of the filled can 104 laterally of and away from register wth the filling device of FIG. 1. The expansion chamber 150 contributes to more satisfactory filling of cans 104 because it causes admission into a can 104 of that quantity of liquid which would otherwise remain in the channel 114. Since the can 104 cannot be filled to any desired extent merely by relying on the axial position of the conduit or pipe 120 (this will be explained in connection with FIG. 8), the admission of an additional quantity of beer subsequent to sealing of the lower end of the pipe by liquid in the can 104 insures that the liquid level in a can which has been removed from the filling apparatus embodying the device of FIG. 1 is closer to the mouth thanin cans which are filled in conventional apparatus with orbiting conveyor means for cans.
The quantity of liquid which remains in the channel 114 subsequent to closing the valve member 116 and prior to the opening of the valve 130 can be relatively large (as compared with the volume of a can 104) so that the liquid which is admitted in response to expansion of gas in the chamber 150 can constitute a substantial percentage of the contents of a properly filled can.
It was found that the provision of the expansion chamher insures very effective and reproducible expulsion of liquid from the channel 114, such expulsion being more effective than the evacuating action which rnight be due to capillary effect or other influences.
FIG. 4 illustrates a filling device for beer cans 204. All such parts of this filling device which are identical with or clearly analogous to the corresponding parts of the filling device shown in FIG. 1 are denoted by similar reference characters plus 100. The reference character 237 denotes the annular sealing surface at the underside of the gasket 210 in the recess of the sealing member 206.
The filling device of FIG. 4 is practically identical with the filling device shown in FIG. 6 of our Pat. No. 3,807,463 except that the gasket 210' is a ring-shaped gasket having an l-shaped cross-sectional configuration.
FIG. 5 illustrates on a greatly enlarged scale a portion of a can 204 and a portion of the gasket 210'. The upper end portion or mouth 238 of the can 204 forms an upwardly and outwardly flaring hollow cone the edge portion of which abuts against the surface 237 at the underside of the gasket 210. The remaining portion of the upright wall of the can 204 is of cylindrical shape. The reference character 239 denotes the upper surface of the conical mouth 238.
FIG. 6 shows the gasket 210, of FIG. and a portion of a modified can 204A having a ring-shaped constriction 240 immediately below the conical mouth 238.
FIG. 7 illustrates the manner in which the gasket 210' is deformed in response to the application of axial pressure in the direction indicated by arrow 241, e.g., in response to downward movement of the shifter (not shown) which extends into the circumferential groove 208 of the sealing member 206 shown in FIG. 6 of our Pat. No. 3,807,463. The can 204 of FIG. 7 is assumed to be identical with the can of FIGS. When the sealing member 206 (not shown in FIG. 7) is caused to move downwardly in the direction indicated by the arrow 241, a portion of the surface 237 undergoes deformation because the conical mouth 238 of the can 204 penetrates into the gasket 210'. The vertical broken line 243 denotes the circle along which the mouth 238 contacts the surface 237 prior to deformation of the gasket 210. As the deformation progresses, the innermost circle of sealing engagement between the mouth 238 and the surface 237 travels radially inwardly toward the circle denoted by the reference character 244. The lines 242 denotes an intermediate innermost circle of sealing contact between the mouth 238 and surface 237. The mouth 238 might undergo some deformation (so that its divergence upwardly and outwardly increases) in response to downward movement of the gasket 210'. When a fresh can 204 or 204A is deposited on a conveyor and is properly positioned by a device corresponding the device 112 (which may but I need not have one or more ports an analogous suction transmitting means), the sealing member 206 moves downwardly and thereby causes the surface 237 of the gasket 210 0r 210 to undergo deformation in a manner as shown inFIG. 7. The valve including a valve member corresponding to the valve member 116 of FIG. 1 is closed. The properly centered can 204 or 204A does not move with reference to the housing 201 during the entire interval which elapses while the can is being filled during movement from the first to the second transfer station, i.e., the can 204 or 204A orbits about a vertical axis at the same angular speed as the filling device and the vessel 202.
A valve including the body 227 and valve member 205 shown in FIG. 6 of our Pat. No. 3,807,463 opens as soon as the sealing member 206 reaches its lower end position to deform the surface 237 of the gasket 210 or 210 in a manner as shown in FIG. 7. The pressure in the interior of the can 204 or 204A then rises because such interior is free to communicate with the gas-filled space above the liquid level in the vessel. The pressure in the chamber 228 equals the pressure of gas in the vessel because the chamber 228 communicates with the interior of the can 204 or 204A by way of a bore. The difference between the effective areas of surface 228a, 228b (see FIG. 4) in the chamber 228 is relatively small so that the gas which fills the chamber 228 causes the gasket 210 to bear against the mouth 238 of a can 204 or 204A with a relatively small force. Thus, the pressure of gas which is admitted by way of the conduit or pipe corresponding to conduit 120 of FIG. 1 determines the magnitude of the sealing force acting between the mouth 238 and the gasket 210 or 210.
The valve including the valve member 216 shown in FIG. 1 opens under the action of the spring 118a upon completed equalization of pressure in the chamber 228, in the vessel and in the interior of the can 204 or 204A so that a stream of beer can flow through a chamber corresponding channel 114 of FIG. 1 114a and along the internal surface of the can 204 or 204A to insure a substantially laminar flow. The admission of beer is terminated when the liquid level in the can 204 or 204A reaches the lower end of the conduit or pipe 120. The gas which fills the chamber 228 remains entrapped because the pressure reducing valve corresponding to valve 130 of FIG. 1 opens immediately or shortly after the liquid level reaches the lower end of the pipe corresponding to pipe 120 to thus reduce the gas pressure above the liquid level to atmospheric pressure. Such opening of the valve takes place subsequent to closing of the. valves which admit gas and liquid into the can 204 or 204A, i.e., after the interior of the vessel is completely sealed from the interior of the can. The opening of the valve 230 is effected by a camcorresponding to the cam 31A shown in our Pat. No. 3,807,463. The sealing member 206 is thereupon lifted by the shifter (not shown) so that the gasket 210 or 210 is raised abovethe mouth 238 and the filled can 204 or 204A can be transferred into the sealing machine. The axial movements of the sealing member 206 are shared by gasket 210 or 201.
In accordance with a modification of the filling device shown in FIG. 4, the pressure chamber can accomodate a supply of non-compressible liquid, a plunger or piston and a spring which causes the plunger to bear against the body of liquid. 'Such construction has been found to be particularly satisfactory when the expansion chamber is not filled with a gas. A similar plunger or piston can be installed in the expansion chamber of FIG. 1 to be shifted in a first direction against the resistance of a spring during admission of compressed gas by way of the port 149 and to be moved by the spring in a second direction on opening of the valve 130 to thus expel beer from the channel 114 into the partially filled can 104.
Referring to FIG. 8, there is shown a portion of an additional filling device which is mounted, preferably with several similar filling devices (not shown), at the underside of a vessel 302 having a cylindrical external peripheral surface 302a. The beer can 304 has a mouth which is engaged by a gasket 310 mounted in a vertically movable sealing and centering member 306. The housing is shown at 301, the channel at 314, the conical lower end portion of the channel 314 at 314a, the supporting member for the conduit or pipe 320 at 323, the external threads of the pipe 320 at 321, the fastener for the supporting member 323 at. 325, and the conical centering surface of the sealing member 306 at 309.
The supporting member 323 is L-shaped and is located in a plane extending radially from the axis of rotation of the vessel 302. The horizontal arm of the supporting member 323 has a tapped bore for the externally threaded portion of the conduit or pipe 320 which latter can be adjusted axially in response to rotation with reference to the member 323 to thus change the maximum level of beer in the can 304. FIG. 8 shows the parts 306 and 320 in their lowermost positions, i.e., the gasket 310 is in sealing engagement with the mouth of the can 304. A body of beer is shown in the can 304, as at 300. In the absence of supporting member 323,
the upper surface of the body of beer 300 would assume the configuration indicated by the phantom line 300a, i.e., the level of such surface at a point closest to the axis of rotation of the vessel 302 would be very low relative to the level point of which is remotest from such axis (i.e., nearest to the peripheral surface 302a of the vessel 302). The supporting member 323 insures that, while the can 304 orbits about the axis of the vessel 302, the inclination of the upper surface of the body 300 of beer in the can 304 is much less pronounced (see the curve 300b). The curve 300a is parabola and the inclination of the upper surface of the body 300 in the can 304 is attributable to the action of centrifugal force which acts on the liquid in the can 304 while the latter orbits about the axis of the vessel 302. It is clear that, in the absence of the supporting member 323, the upper surface (curve 300a) would reach the lower end of the conduit or pipe 320 much sooner than when the filling device is provided with the member 323 (see curve 30012). The beneficial effect of the supporting member 323 upon the extent of inclination of the upper surface of the body of liquid in the can 304 is attributed to the mounting of the member 323 in a plane which includes the axis of rotation of the vessel 302 and to the fact that the horizontal arm of the member 323 is located at the outer side of the axis of the pipe 320, i.e., closer to the peripheral surface 302a of the vessel 302. In other words, the supporting member 323 extends across the path of beer which is being discharged from the conical lower end portion 314a of the channel 314 in that region which is remotest from the axis of the vessel 302 and nearest to the peripheral surface 302a.
The filling device of FIGS. 9 and is similar to the filling device of FIGS. 1 to 3. Therefore, all such parts of this filling device which are identical with or clearly analogous to the corresponding parts of the structure shown in FIGS. 1 to 3 are denoted by similar reference characters plus 300.
The difference between the filling devices of FIGS. 1-3 and 9-10 is that the latter device comprises a modified connection between the conduit or pipe 420 and the supporting member 423. The pipe 420 is movable axially of the core 413 in the housing 401 and its lower end portion is provided with several circumferential grooves 420g each of which can receive a bifurcated portion 423b of the horizontal arm of the supporting member 423. The distance between the prongs of the bifurcated portion 423b slightly exceeds the outer diameter of the pipe 420 in each groove 420g. The fastener 425 secures the vertical arm of the substantially L-shaped supporting member 423 to the sealing and centering member 406.
The upper end portion of the pipe 420 extends well into and is movable axially in the lower end portion of the tubular valve body 427. As explained in connection with FIGS. 1-3 the upper end portion of the valve body 427 is in permanent communication with the cushion of compressed gas above the level of the supply of beer in the ring-shaped chamber 403 of the vessel 402. The valve body 427 surrounds and defines a seat for an axially movable valve member (not shown) corresponding to the valve member 5 shown in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463.
The bifurcated portion 423]) of the supporting member 423 can be inserted into any one of the grooves 420g so that the extent to which a can 404 on the conveyor 41 1 can be filled with beer may be varied within a desired range (corresponding to the distance between the uppermost and lowermost grooves 402g in the pipe 420). Otherwise, the operation of the filling device of FIGS. 9-10 is identical with that of the filling device shown in FIGS. 1-3.
The heretofore described filling apparatus exhibit the important advantage that the cans or analogous containers on the conveyors need not be lifted in order to move their mouths into sealing engagement with the gaskets of the respective sealing members. The mass of the lifting means which are used in conventional filling apparatus to raise the empty cans or analogous containers into engagement with the gaskets of the respective sealing members normally considerably exceeds the mass of an empty can. Therefore, the energy requirements of the drive which moves such lifting devices up and down are considerable, especially if the can on the lifting device is to raise the sealing member by way of the gasket. Rapid acceleration of relatively heavy lifting devices in modern highspeed filling apparatus presents many problems, not only as concerns the consumption of energy but also as concerns the wear on moving parts and the generation of noise.
The filling device of FIG. 1 1 comprises a housing 501 for a valve member 516 mounted in the enlarged lower end portion 524 of a vertically reciprocable tubular carrier 518. The seat of the housing 501 is shown at 515. The channel 514 which is normally sealed from the compartments 519 and 519a by the valve member 516 flares conically upwardly and outwardly and serves to admit a stream of beer into a can 504 supported by a conveyor 511. The lower end of the channel 514 terminates in a conically outwardly and downwardly flaring conical surface 501k at the underside of the housing 501.
The conduit or pipe 520 is secured to and is coaxial with the housing 501. The lower end portion of the pipe 520 is provided with a circumferential groove for a split ring 550 serving to retain a substantially conical vertically movable float 551. Thus, the pipe 520 constitutes a" holder for the float 551. When the beer can 504 on the conveyor 511 is empty or when the space below the housing 501 does not accommodate a can, the float 551 rests on the split ring 550 by gravity. The upper portion of the float 551 is bounded by the surface 552 whose conicity corresponds to that of the surface 501/1. Thus, when the float 551 is lifted, it seals the lower end of the channel 514. The conveyor 51 l constitutes a lifting device which can move the can 504 up and down, and the housing 501 is surrounded by a vertically movable sealing and centering member 506 which carries an annular gasket 510 for the mouth of the can 504 on the conveyor 511. The conical surface 509 of the sealing member 506 serves to center the can 504 so as to move its mouth requisite registry with the gasket 510.
The operation of the filling device of FIG. 1 1 is as follows:
If the conveyor 51 1 does not support a can 504 below the housing 501 or when an empty beer can 504 on the conveyor 511 is merely filled with air, the float 551 dwells in the illustrated lower end position and rests on the ring 550. If a can 504 is thereupon placed onto the conveyor 511 and the sealing member 506 is lowered by a shifter (not shown) to move the gasket 510 into sealing engagement with the mouth of the can on the conveyor 51 1, the thus engaged can is ready to be filled with a beer which is decanted from a vessel, not shown,
in the same way as described in connection with FIGS. l-3. Thus, the valve member (not shown) inthe valve body 527 is moved axially to connect the interior of the can 504 with the cushion of compressed gas above the supply of liquid in the vessel so that the pressure in the can equals that in the vessel. The valve member 516 is thereupon moved upwardly to admit beer into the channel 514 and thence into the can 504 by way of the conical clearance between the surfaces 50111 and 552. Such conical gap corresponds to the lower end portion 14a of the channel 14 shown in FIG. 1 of our US. Pat. No. 3,807,463 to insure laminar inflow of beer along the internal surface of the can 504. The upper surface of beer which accumulates in the can 504 rises and ultimately reaches the float 551. The buoyancy of the float 551. The buoyancy of the float 551 causes it to move upwardly along the conduit or pipe 520 and to seal the lower end of the channel 514 when the can 504 contains a predetermined quantity of beer. The valve member 516 is then moved into engagement with the seat 515 to seal the channel 514 from the compartments 519 and 519a. The upper end portion of the filled can 504 is thereupon connected with the atmosphere, for example, by way of the conduit or pipe 520, and the can 504 is removed from the conveyor 511 or is lowered with the conveyor prior to transfer into a sealing machine. The float 551 descends with the can 504 (while the latter is being lowered by the conveyor 51 1) whereby the surface 552 moves away from sealing engagement with the surface 501h and the beer which fills the channel 514 is free to descend into the can 504 before the latter is moved away from registry with the filling device. The latter is then ready for the next filling operation which can be started as soon as the conveyor 511 receives and lifts an empty can 504 to a position in which the mouth of such can may be properly sealed in response to downward movement of the sealing and centering member 506.
FIGS. 12 and 13 illustrate on a larger scale an annular gasket 610 having an I-shaped cross-sectional outline. This gasket has a cylindrical external surface 660 and a cylindrical internal surface 661. These surfaces are respectively provided with concentric circumferentially complete grooves 662, 663 so that the gasket 610 comprises an upper flange 665, a lower flange 666 and a web 667. The upper surface 668 of the flange 665 is parallel with the lower surface 669 of the lower flange 666 in undeformed condition of the gasket 610. The grooves 662, 663 have a rectangular crosssectional outline.
The gasket 710 of FIG. 14 is provided in its cylindrical surfaces 760, 761 with triangular circumferentially complete grooves 762, 763 so that the gasket comprises two mirror symmetrical halves or sections each including a base of rectangular cross-sectional and a tapering part of trapeziform cross-section. The upper and lower surfaces 768, 769 of the two sections are parallel to each other in undeformed condition of the gasket 710.
The gasket 810 of FIG. 15 is similar to the gasket 610 except that the grooves 862, 863 in its cylindrical surfaces 860, 861 have a semicircular outline, i.e., they are bounded by concave surfaces. The reference characters 865, 866 denote the two flanges and the character 867 denotes the web of the gasket 810. The flanges 865, 866 are provided with parallel surfaces 868, 869.
If a gasket (such as the gasket 810 of FIG. 15) is of substantial axial length, each of its cylindrical surfaces (such as the surfaces 860, 861) can be provided with two or more circumferentially complete grooves (such as the grooves 862, 863). It is also within the purview of the invention to employ in the centering and sealing member of the improved filling device gaskets wherein the configuration of groove or grooves in the inner cylindrical surface (such as the surface 761) deviates from the configuration of the groove or grooves in the outer cylindrical surface (such as 760). Still further, if a gasket is of substantial width (i.e., if the distance between its inner and outer cylindrical surfaces is substantial), it might be advisable to provide it with one or more internal endless grooves or channels. Such internal channels or grooves can be provided in addition to or as a substitute for the groove or grooves in its inner or outer cylindrical surface.
The elasticity of gaskets which are used in many presently known falling devices for beer or other types of carbonated or uncarbonated beverages is relatively low This presents serious problems when such devices are used for the filling of relatively weak containers,
such as cans consisting of thin metallic sheet stock. I Many types of cans (especially aluminum cans) are readily crushed in response to the application of relatively small axial stresses, especially prior to filling and prior to scaling of their open ends. Relatively hard gaskets of low elasticity are preferred in many conventional filling devices in order to allow for the application of substantial deforming stresses and to compensate for manufacturing tolerances. The stresses which are needed to deform a relatively hard gasket in a filling device whose component parts (such as the sealing and centering member and the guide means therefor) are not machined with a high degree of precision are likely to exceed those stresses which can be safely withstood by a relatively weak can of aluminum or the like. The gaskets which are produced in a manner described in connection with FIGS. 12-15 much less likely to require the application of stresses in the range which could damage the cans prior to and/or during filling, especially if such gaskets are mounted in sealing members which are maintained in their lower end positions by gases introduced into pressure chambers dimensioned as described in connection with FIGS. 1 to 17. The aforementioned shifters can be designed to gradually lower the sealing members into mere abutment with the mouths of cans or like containers, and the gas in the respective pressure chambers (such as the chambers 28 of FIG. 1) then takes over to insure that the mouths of the containers are properly sealed from the atmosphere during equalization of pressures in the containers and the chamber of the vessel as well as during the introduction of liquids and reduction of gas pressure above the liquid level in each freshly filled container.
The gaskets of FIGS. 12-15 preferably consist of relatively soft elastic material which can undergo requisite deformation in response to the application of forces which are well below those forces that would be likely to cause deformation of the mouth or another portion of a can consisting of thin aluminum sheet or other suitable light metal. The aforediscussed grooves in the cylindrical surfaces of the gaskets and/or in the interior of such gaskets enhance their deformability in response to relatively weak stresses in order to insure the generation of a satisfactory sealing action all the way around along the entire mouth of a beer can or the like. The illustrated design of the gaskets has been found to be of particular advantage because it allows for ready deformation of gaskets which are completely received in annular recesses of substantially rectangular crosssectional outline (see the recess 10611 of FIG. 1).
Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features which fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic and specific aspects of our contribution to the art and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the claims.
What is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims:
1. In a filling device for admission of metered quantities of a liquid into cans or analogous containers, a combination comprising guide means; an annular sealing member movable along said guide means upwardly away from and downwardly toward an empty container therebelow, said sealing member having a lower portion provided with annular recess means; and a deformable annular gasket received in said recess means, said gasket being arranged to sealingly engage the mouth of a container and having an external surface and an internal surface and at least one circumferentially extending groove provided in at least one of said surfaces.
2. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein each of said surfaces is provided with at least one groove.
3. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said groove is of substantially semicircular cross-sectional outline.
4. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said groove is of polygonal cross-sectional outline.
5. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein'said groove is of substantially triangular cross-sectional outline.
6. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein said groove is of substantially rectangular cross-sectional outline.
7. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of said surfaces is provided with a plurality of axially spaced grooves.
8. In a filling device for admission of liquids into cans or analogous containers, a combination comprising guide means; an annular sealing member movable along said guide means upwardly away from and down wardly toward an empty container therebelow, said sealing member having a lower portion provided with annular recess means; and container-engaging deformable annular gasket means provided in said recess means and having at least one internal recess to promote its deformability in response to engagement with the mouth of a container therebelow.

Claims (8)

1. In a filling device for admission of metered quantities of a liquid into cans or analogous containers, a combination comprising guide means; an annular sealing member movable along said guide means upwardly away from And downwardly toward an empty container therebelow, said sealing member having a lower portion provided with annular recess means; and a deformable annular gasket received in said recess means, said gasket being arranged to sealingly engage the mouth of a container and having an external surface and an internal surface and at least one circumferentially extending groove provided in at least one of said surfaces.
2. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein each of said surfaces is provided with at least one groove.
3. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said groove is of substantially semicircular cross-sectional outline.
4. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein said groove is of polygonal cross-sectional outline.
5. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein said groove is of substantially triangular cross-sectional outline.
6. A combination as defined in claim 4, wherein said groove is of substantially rectangular cross-sectional outline.
7. A combination as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of said surfaces is provided with a plurality of axially spaced grooves.
8. In a filling device for admission of liquids into cans or analogous containers, a combination comprising guide means; an annular sealing member movable along said guide means upwardly away from and downwardly toward an empty container therebelow, said sealing member having a lower portion provided with annular recess means; and container-engaging deformable annular gasket means provided in said recess means and having at least one internal recess to promote its deformability in response to engagement with the mouth of a container therebelow.
US431726A 1970-08-29 1974-01-08 Apparatus for filling beer cans or the like Expired - Lifetime US3908717A (en)

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US17567371 US3807463A (en) 1970-08-29 1971-08-27 Apparatus for filling beer cans or the like
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US4385439A (en) * 1977-12-30 1983-05-31 Wilson Greatbatch, Ltd. Method of making a lithium-iodine cell
US4986318A (en) * 1981-11-27 1991-01-22 Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc. Filling valve for counterpressure filling of cans
US4595208A (en) * 1982-09-14 1986-06-17 Alfa-Laval Ab Lining of non-metallic material
US5145008A (en) * 1985-04-05 1992-09-08 Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc. Filling valve for counterpressure filling of cans
GB2192622A (en) * 1985-12-10 1988-01-20 Crown Cork & Seal Co Filling valve for counterpressure filling of cans
GB2192622B (en) * 1985-12-10 1990-06-27 Crown Cork & Seal Co Improved filling valve for counterpressure filler of cans
WO1987003572A1 (en) * 1985-12-10 1987-06-18 Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc. Filling valve for counterpressure filling of cans
EP0455746A1 (en) * 1989-02-02 1991-11-13 Adolph Coors Company Liquid level control apparatus
EP0455746A4 (en) * 1989-02-02 1992-05-13 Adolph Coors Company Liquid level control apparatus
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US6112778A (en) * 1995-04-10 2000-09-05 Servi-Tech, Inc Fill valves, nozzle adapters for fill valves, and methods
US5899244A (en) * 1995-04-10 1999-05-04 Service Tech, Inc. Fill valves, nozzle adapter for fill valves, and methods
US5954100A (en) * 1995-04-10 1999-09-21 Servi-Tech, Inc Fill valves, nozzle adapters for fill valves, and methods
US5582217A (en) * 1995-04-10 1996-12-10 Servi-Tech, Inc. Snift cam and methods
US20140027015A1 (en) * 2011-04-15 2014-01-30 Khs Gmbh Filling element
US20150274332A1 (en) * 2012-10-05 2015-10-01 Gai Macchine Imbottigliatrici S.P.A. Filling devices for isobaric filling machines for filling bottles with alimentary liquids
US10040582B2 (en) * 2012-10-05 2018-08-07 Gai Macchine Imbottigliatrici S.P.A. Filling devices for isobaric filling machines for filling bottles with alimentary liquids
US20160023877A1 (en) * 2013-04-15 2016-01-28 Gai Macchine Imbottigliatrici S.P.A. Filling devices for filling machines for level filling of bottles and filling machines containing such devices
US10040678B2 (en) * 2013-04-15 2018-08-07 Gai Macchine Imbottigliatrici S.P.A. Filling devices for filling machines for level filling of bottles and filling machines containing such devices
EP3124429A1 (en) * 2015-07-30 2017-02-01 Weightpack S.r.l. Variable flow dispensing valve
US9914629B2 (en) 2015-07-30 2018-03-13 Weightpack S.R.L. Variable flow dispensing valve

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