US3904216A - Variable height transport carriage - Google Patents

Variable height transport carriage Download PDF

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US3904216A
US3904216A US304548A US30454872A US3904216A US 3904216 A US3904216 A US 3904216A US 304548 A US304548 A US 304548A US 30454872 A US30454872 A US 30454872A US 3904216 A US3904216 A US 3904216A
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Prior art keywords
carriage
concrete
wheels
tires
eccentrics
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US304548A
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Charles E Metrailer
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Charles E Metrailer
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62DMOTOR VEHICLES; TRAILERS
    • B62D61/00Motor vehicles or trailers, characterised by the arrangement or number of wheels, not otherwise provided for, e.g. four wheels in diamond pattern
    • B62D61/12Motor vehicles or trailers, characterised by the arrangement or number of wheels, not otherwise provided for, e.g. four wheels in diamond pattern with variable number of ground engaging wheels, e.g. with some wheels arranged higher than others, or with retractable wheels
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G11/00Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs
    • E04G11/36Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs for floors, ceilings, or roofs of plane or curved surfaces end formpanels for floor shutterings
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G11/00Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs
    • E04G11/36Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs for floors, ceilings, or roofs of plane or curved surfaces end formpanels for floor shutterings
    • E04G11/48Supporting structures for shutterings or frames for floors or roofs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G19/00Auxiliary treatment of forms, e.g. dismantling; Cleaning devices
    • E04G19/003Arrangements for stabilising the forms or for moving the forms from one place to another

Abstract

Apparatus and method for modular concrete constructions. The apparatus comprises a carriage and a concrete form. It also comprises the combination of a concrete form detachably mounted on a portable carriage the former of which can be set in place and positioned for pouring. The carriage can then be detached from the concrete form, removed for further service and later reunited with the form for transport to a new pour position, as desired. The concrete form per se is comprised generally of a support structure atop which is provided a pour form. The pour form is constituted of a central span and, preferably, a pair of upwardly faced troughs located on opposite sides of the central span. The central span of the pour form can range from flat to highly contoured. The troughs are each provided with a plurality of bottom openings, these being formed between removable panels. In forming a module, wet concrete can be poured upon the central span of the pour form to form a roof, ceiling, or floor while a tubular member or column form can be fitted into the openings of the troughs at the column locations and wet concrete can be poured therein and into the troughs to cast columns and beams for support of the roof, ceiling or floor. After the concrete has set the pour form can be lowered, the troughs freed by removal of the panels at the columns, and the beam forms moved inwardly. The carriage can then be removed to an adjacent location for further pouring.

Description

United States Patent n 1 Metrailer Sept. 9, 1975 [54] VARIABLE HEIGHT TRANSPORT CARRIAGE [76] Inventor: Charles E. Metrailer, 36l3 Government St., Baton Rouge, La. 70802 [22] Filed: Nov. 7, l972 [2|] Appl. N0.: 304,548
Related US. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 203,273, Nov. 30, l97l, Pat. No.
[52] US. Cl 280/43; 280/4324 [51] Int. Cl B62d 61/12 [58] Field of Search 280/43.l7, 43. I8, 43.23, 280/4324, 47, 34 R, 43; l80/24.02, 24.03
[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,864,625 [2/1958 Clements 280/4323 X 3,l62,459 l2/l964 Marmorinc ct al. 280/4323 X 3,269,744 8/[966 Dobson 280/4323 X Primary Examiner David Schonberg Assistant ExuminerM. Forman Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Llewellyn A. Proctor [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus and method for modular concrete constructions. The apparatus comprises a carriage and a concrete fonn. It also comprises the combination of a concrete form detachably mounted on a portable car' riage the former of which can be set in place and positioned for pouring. The carriage can then be detached from the concrete form, removed for further service and later reunited with the form for transport to a new pour position, as desired. The concrete form per se is Comprised generally of a support structure atop which is provided a pour form. The pour form is constituted of a central span and, preferably, a pair of upwardly faced troughs located on opposite sides of the central span. The central span of the pour form can range from flat to highly contoured. The troughs are each provided with a plurality of bottom openings, these being formed between removable panels. In forming a module, wet concrete can be poured upon the central span of the pour form to form a roof, ceiling, or floor while a tubular member or column form can be fitted into the openings of the troughs at the column locations and wet concrete can be poured therein and into the troughs to cast columns and beams for support of the roof, ceiling or floor. After the concrete has set the pour form can be lowered, the troughs freed by removal of the panels at the columns, and the beam forms moved inwardly. The carriage can then be removed to an adjacent location for further pouring.
4 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures SHEET PATENTEDSEP 91% PATENTED 35F 9 i975 SHEET PATENTEBSEP 91915 3,904,216
SHEET 4 Fig. 4
PATENTED 9 i975 SHEET SHEET PATENTEDSEP SW5 PATENTEB SEP 9 975 SHEET PATENTEUSEP W5 SHEET I J m '.v o
mums/N PATENTEDSEP 9% SHEET w m 75 q 77 a I 2 AU VARIABLE HEIGHT TRANSPORT CARRIAGE This is a division of Application Ser. No. 203,273 filed Nov. 30, l97l and now U.S. Pat. No. 3,744,945.
Portable carriages, the upper portion of which is provided with collapsible wall structures, or forms, for use in building or repairing arches, tunnels, and the like are known to the art. In a typical structure of such type, a railway flat car, or similar transportable carriage, is provided with a permanently attached elevatable form, usually of oval contour, for providing temporary support for stone, brick, concrete block, masonry or plastic like masses such as concrete. In a typical construction, a flat foundation slab is laid and rails are constructed thereon. The carriage is placed on the rails, the material to be used in the repair or construction is placed on the form, and the latter is used to elevate and place the materials in the proper position for the repair or construction. Where, e.g., a tunnel is being constructed of concrete, the wet concrete is thrust upward and held in place against the top of the tunnel until the concrete has set. The form is then collapsed, perhaps lowered and the carriage then moved with the form intact to an adjacent position to form another segment of the tunnel.
Such carriages have proven successful in the past for the repair and construction of sewers, tunnels and the like. They have saved time, labor and expense, particu larly in concrete construction when contrasted with the use of forms which must be built and then torn down for each individual pour. The devices nonetheless have limited utility, and only in recent years have devices of such character been sufficiently improved that they have become acceptable in non-tunnel construction.
In US. Pat. No. 3,320,646 to A. H. Wilkins, for example. a portable carriage, equipped with an elevated pour section, with pivotally connected end portions, is employed for casting monolithic concrete roof struc tures. The roof section or roof modules that are formed are set on prefabricated pillers, and the carriage is moved from one pair of prefabricated pillars to another as a roof section is formed. This and other such prior art devices have their limitations.
Among the objects of this invention are:
To provide new and improved apparatus and method for modular constructions.
To provide a transportable concrete form with de tachablc carriage, both of unique design, the concrete form of which can be set in place for receipt of plasticlike masses such as concrete and the like, for setting and converting same to desirable modular construction forms, including not only roofs, ceiling, floors and the like, but also beams and columns.
To provide the apparatus combination such as described wherein the carriage can be readily detached from the concrete form, removed for further service and later reunited with the concrete form for transport thereof, such combination being particularly useful for simultaneously pouring the above construction forms, including specifically floors, roofs, beams and columns whereupon the form can be released from the set con crete and transported by the carriage across a foundation or floor for different continous modular pours, and then moved, if desired, to the next upper level for further pouring,
These objects and others are achieved in accordance with the present invention the apparatus embodiment of which comprises a concrete form and carriage, particularly the combination of a concrete form and detachable carriage, as generally described. In operation, the concrete form is transported to and set in place by the carriage which is particularly adapted by two different sets of wheels, one set mounted at right angles to the other, to provide mobility for the setting and alignment of the concrete form. The concrete form is comprised of a concrete pour form, or forms, mounted on structural elements, including vertical posts supported on the carriage frame, by virtue of which the concrete pour form, or forms, can be supported and elevated or lowered with respect to the carriage, this providing flexibility such that the pour form, or forms, can be readily positioned for pouring. In position, the concrete form, in a preferred embodiment, is additionally supported by vertical shoring members. The carriage can be separated from the concrete form after the latter is positioned, removed for further service, and later reattached with the concrete form to transport the latter to a new pour position or location.
The invention, and its principle of operation, will be more fully understood by reference to the following detailed description of a specific embodiment, and to the attached drawings to which reference is made in the description. In the description, similar numbers are used to represent similar parts or components.
In the drawings:
FIG. I is a side elevation ofa preferred type of portable carriage and concrete form or concrete form as sembly, the preferred combination being shown in position for pouring concrete.
FIG. 2 is a plan view showing the carriage, or carriage assembly, which can be used for transport and position ing of a workpiece, particularly the concrete form, or concrete form assembly.
FIG. 3 is a fragmentary isometric view showing the vertical posts, shoring members and other telescoping components which constitute the upper portion of the concrete form support structure.
FIG. 4 is a isometric view showing the concrete pan form sections and beam forms of the concrete form assembly, or pour forms, installed over the supporting members ready for pouring concrete.
FIG. 5 is a plan view showing a contiquous pair of concrete pan form sections ready for pouring a monolithic self-supporting concrete structure including four columns two beams and central span.
FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view showing the telescoping mechanism for retracting the main beam forms which carry concrete pour forms of the type used for forming beams and columns.
FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view showing the removable section of the concrete pour form at columns used for pouring beams; FIG. 7A is a plan view of the said removable section at columns; and FIG. 7B is a cross-sectional view of said removable Section at columns.
FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view showing the carriage break away unit which allows the carriage to be removed from the concrete form support section.
FIG. 9 is an enlarged side view showing details of the eccentric axle by virtue of which the various wheels are attached to the frame member, and FIG. 9A is a front view of the same eccentric axle.
FIG. 10 is an end elevation view of the carriage and form support frame with a preferred type of arch form.
FIG. 11 is an end elevation view showing the carriage supporting the arch form with beam forms replaced with curved section as used to pour tunnels, drainage structures. or quonset type building structures.
FIG. 12 is a fragmentary elevation view showing one of the removable vertical support members or shoring members for the beam forms.
FIG. I3 is a fragmentary elevation view showing one of the vertical support members used in supporting the pan form frames.
FIG. 14 is a diagramatic representation of a series of views showing a step by step sequence of lowering the carriage and form assembly for removal after concrete has cured sufficiently.
With reference to FIG. 1 of the drawings, reference character I designates a concrete slab on grade or the floor slab of lower floors in a multi-story building made in accordance with the present invention. The horizontally oriented slab 2 is constructed a unitary member having a plurality of horizontally disposed ribbed lower sections, and it is abutted by vertically disposed rein forced beam members 3 disposed in parallel planes. The beam members 3 are supported by vertically ori ented columns 0, also made in accordance with the present invention. The reinforcing members 3, as well as the horizontal slab 2 and columns 0, include internally disposed steel reinforcing (not shown) as is wellknown in the building art, which reinforces these portions of the floor normally in tension. The design of the particular floors will, of course, be varied with the requirements of the building, in accordance with established engineering procedures, and need not be further elaborated upon in this disclosure.
The apparatus of this invention is comprised generally of a carriage l and a transportable concrete form I00. The portable carriage I0 and transportable con crete form 100, which is detachably mounted on the carriage 10, are preferably used in combination. The body of the portable carriage per se (FIG. 2) is constituted generally of a reinforced frame body fitted with wheels. and means whereby the said carriage can be at tached to a vehicle and towed to a work site. The concrete form 100, which is adapted for transport upon the carriage I0, is constituted generally of a frame structure on the top of which is supported a pour form, including a central portion or span and upwardly faced troughs or trough-like members. with a plurality of bottom openings. located alongside the central span for receipt of poured concrete. The pour form of the transportable concrete form 100 is constituted generally of a central span 4 and upwardly faced troughs or troughlike members 5 for receipt of poured concrete. The frame structure per se comprises a plurality of telescoping tubular shaped vertical posts 8 secured together by supporting horizontal posts which connect to top and bottom portions of adjacent vertical posts 8. Diagonal reinforcing members are also connected to the bottom and top portions of vertical posts 8, these being employed to further support and strengthen the frame structure. Shoring members 9, constituted of telescoping tubular members similar in purpose and function to vertical posts 8 are also provided to support the troughs 5. Jacks 13 are provided within the lower terminal ends of each of the several vertical posts 8 as well as within the lower terminal ends shoring members 9 which are used to support the troughs S.
Referring specifically to FIGS. 3 and 4, it will be observed that the pour form, which includes central span 4 and upwardly faced troughs 5, rests upon and are supported by horizontal beams 6, 7. Beams 7 are parallelly alligned, one with respect to another, and are directly perpendicularly affixed to the top terminal ends of the innermost tubular members of vertical posts 8. Beams 6, on the other hand, are also parallelly alligned one member with respect to the other, but lie at right angles to beams 7, and are affixed to the upper sides thereof. The beams 6, 7 also contain smaller telescoping tubular members 23, 21, respectively. The terminal ends of the latter tubular members 21 are U-shaped to support troughs 5, and both tubular members 23, 21 are supported by shoring members 9 affixed to the ends thereof. The shoring members are particularly useful where, as observed by reference to FIG. 4, the troughs 5 are projected outwardly and the central span 4, which comprises a concrete form element, are loaded with wet concrete.
The design and function of the vertical posts 8 and the shoring members 9 are quite similar and accordingly a complete description of one each of these elements will describe all of the several elements employed. Referring specifically to FIGS. 12 and 13, which describes these members in detail, it will be observed that each vertical post 8 and shoring member 9 includes a pair of telescoping tubular members 14, 19 (the former being of smaller size than the latter) and the length of each member 8 and member 9 is adjustable. Ajack is located at the lower terminal end of each member. a jack including a foot or platform member 11, having a nut 16 welded on the upper side thereof, which engages with externally threaded member 13. The platform member II is fastened to the threaded member I3 by means of pin I2. Members 15 are nuts attached permanently within tubular member 14. Member I3 provides tool-engaging means 16 for elongating and contracting the length of vertical posts 8 and shoring members 9 by rotation of the said member 13 which moves it upwardly or downwardly within the tubular member 14. The telescoping tubular members [4, 19 are also provided with means for lengthening and shortening the vertical posts 8 or shoring members 9. The pins I7 are thus removable passing through tubular members I9, 14 and shank members 18, 20. Members I4, I8 have a plurality of lateral openings within which the pins I7 can be fitted or removed thus permitting elongating and contracting vertical posts 8 and shoring members 9 in uniform increments. Member 20 is an attaching lug or shank which permits attachment of member I9 to beam form 5. Member I8 is also a lug or shank which is permanently attached to member 7.
The troughs 5 are designed in such manner that both beams and columns can be cast simultaneously. the required structural elements of which operation is best shown by specific references to FIGS. 7, 7A and 7B. A trough 5 is thus provided with oppositely desposed paired removable panels 26, 27 each of which is provided with bottom semi-circular shaped notched lower edges and downwardly projected surrounding walls 30 which, when fitted together with fastner 29, form a circular opening with an enclosing downwardly projecting collar. The panels 26, 27 overall are generally of U- shaped cross-section when fitted together and each of the upper-edges are welded to tubular member 3I to form a contiguous tubular edge member 25 through which a slightly smaller tubular member 24 can be passed to hold or secure the panels 26, 27 in place. By such construction the upper portion of a tubular member of column pour form (not shown) can be secured within the opening formed between walls 30. The tubular member and the trough 5 itself can then be filled with wet concrete to form beams and columns. After the concrete has cured the panels 26, 27 at columns can be removed by withdrawal of bar 24 and fastner 29. The outer wall constituting the tubular column form member can then be removed from the concrete columns after which trough S can be lowered below the poured set of concrete beams and pushed inwardly to clear columns by telescoping tubular members 21 back within the members 7.
In accordance with the best mode of practicing the present invention, in preference to manual manipula tion, mechanical means are provided wherein both troughs 5 can be simultaneously projected or withdrawn, after panel members 26, 27 have been removed or swung away from the poured set columns. A series of miter gear boxes 32, aligned for convenience upon a fixed tubular member 22, are communicated one with another via a shaft 33 and each can be operated by rotation of the shaft 33 to extend or retract the troughs 5. One such unit is described by reference to FIG. 6. A shaft 37, having threads of opposite cast, can thus be fitted within tubular members 7, 21, aligned with the axis of the tubular members via passage through bushings 38, affixed within tubular members 7, and thread ably engaged with nuts 39 affixed within tubular member 21. The shaft 37 is fitted with a sprocket 35 and coupled via a chain 36 with a parallely aligned drive shaft 34 provided with a similar sprocket 35, the latter being driven through a miter gear box 32 affixed upon the tubular member 22. Rotation of the shaft 33, e.g. by rotation of the nut 40 affixed thereon as by operative engagement therewith of a machine tool, will produce rotation of shaft 34 and, consequently rotation of shaft 37. Rotation of shaft 37 in one direction, on the one hand, will cause tubular members 21 to telescope inwardly and, conversely. rotation in the opposite direction will cause the tubular members 21 to telescope outwardly.
The carriage 10, best described by specific reference to FIG. 2, is preferably used in combination with the concrete form 100 detachably mounted thereon, but is also susceptable for use in other services for transporting or positioning other different types of equipment or workpieces which need not be described herein. The frame of the carriage is constructed of a channel frame 43 resembling a parallelogram. The structure of channel members 43 is reinforced by the inner channels 43:! which are perpendicular to intersect and connect with the side channels 43. Additional structural support is added by channel members 49 and 4911. Two independent sets of wheels are mounted on the carriage 10. A set, generally, of three wheels 42a, and a second set. generally, of three wheels 4211, are rotatably mounted upon eccentric axles 44 which are secured to frame 43. By utilizing two sets of three wheels independently mounted at right angles with one another, the carriage has infinite mobility for the positioning and align' ment of workpieces, particularly the concrete form 100.
The carriage 10 is engaged to the form support structure at points marked 8 and Sr as shown by reference to FIG. 2. The means of engagement or disengagement from the form support structure is best illustrated by reference to this figure and to FIG. 8, the structural elements of which are as follows: Member 45 is a tubular segment which is permanently attached at a corner of frame 43 of the carriage. With the members 45 and engaged and the carriage wheels 42 inflated, a foot 11 of each of the vertical support members 8 and Sr rests on the floor or foundation. Vertical support members 8r are retracted with foot members 11 removed. Member 13 is retracted within member 14 and with pin I? removed member 14 is retracted within member 19 (See FIG. 13). The remaining vertical support members 8 remain to support the weight of the form support structure. The carriage 10 is separated from the con crete form 100 by deflating tires 42. On deflating tires 42, lug 50 will lower and become disengaged with socket 45 and the carriage can be removed from beneath the form support structure. Members 8r are then extended and adjusted to provide further support for the concrete form on subsequent pouring of the concrete. Towing eye 48 is utilized in manuvering the carriage laterally while tires 42 are supporting. Control console 46, mounted on frame 43 is a means of rapidly varying air pressure to tires 42a and 421) through air tubing members 47. Member 41 is a detachable towing arm utilized in transporting the carriage, or both the carriage support structure and concrete form, via high way from one jobsite to another with the carriage supported on the pair of rear wheels 42a (dual tires optional), while the other wheels are retracted.
A key and novel feature of the present invention relates to the method of raising and lowering the carriage 10, and supported concrete form 100, by rapid infla tion and deflation of the pneumatic tires in combination with the adjustable eccentrics on which the wheels are mounted upon the carriage. The means by which one set of wheels 42a supports the carriage while the other set of wheels 42!) is non-supporting, and vice versa, is best shown by specific reference to FIGS. 9 and 9A. Each wheel is thus affixed to the carriage frame or channel 43 by use of an eccentric wheel mounting device such as described by reference to these figures. An eccentric member 44 is mounted upon the carriage frame 43 and a spindle 51, which carries a wheel, is permanently attached to eccentric member 44. Eccentric member 44, permanently attached to the bolt 52 which is pivotally mounted upon the channel 43 via passage of bolt 52 through the bearing element or sleeve 56 mounted within an opening through the channel, and the bolt 52 is held in place by the washer 53A and the nut 53. A collar 54, permanently affixed upon channel 43 on the side channel 43 opposite the eccentric member 44, is slotted at desired increments to permit adjustment of the wheels at different levels of elevation. In this instance 90 increments are provided, thus permitting the spindle 51 to be ele vated or lowered by latching the said spindle 51 in one or the other of four position levels by passage of the pin through the openings formed between the slots of collar 54 and the washer 53A. and through an opening through the bolt 52.
The manner in which a set of wheels is lowered or raised relative to another to lower or elevate the carriage 10 is illustrated by reference to FIG. 14. Five dif ferent positions which illustrate the lowering (or raising) of the carriage 10 is described as follows:
Position 1: This figure illustrates the carriage resting on wheels 42!: as would be the position of the carriage at maximum height. The sets of eccentrics of wheels 42a are in raised position and those of 42b are in lowered position. The tires mounted on wheels 42b are inflated and are in the down position.
Position 2: The tires of wheels 42b are deflated until the carriage weight is supported on wheels 42a. As soon as Wheels 420 are supporting the weight the eccentrics of wheels 42b are loosened and 42b is reinflated and 42a partially deflated causing 42b to rotate 90 to the horizontal position, and the eccentrics on 42b are then locked in this position.
Position 3: The tires of wheels 420 are further deflated until the carriage weight is again supported on wheels 42b. The eccentrics of wheels 42a are loosened and 42a is reinflated and 42b partially deflated causing 42a to rotate 90 to the horizontal position and the eccentrics on 42a are locked at this position.
Position 4: The tires of wheels 42b are again further deflated until the carriage weight is supported by wheels 42a. The eccentrics for wheels 4217 are loosened and 42b is reinflated and 42a partially deflated causing 42b to rotate 90 to the up position and the eccentrics on 42b are locked at this position.
Position 5: The tires of wheels 420 are again further deflated until the weight of the carriage is supported on wheels 42b. The eccentrics for wheels 42a are then loosened and 42a is reinflated and 42b deflated causing 42a to rotate 90 to the up position and the eccentrics on 42a are locked at this position. Further lowering can be done by deflating the tires of wheels 42b.
To elevate the carriage the above procedure is merely reversed. In order to accomplish the above procedures rapidly an air console 46 design will incorporate two levers with deflate, inflate, and off positions, so each set of 3 tires can be inflated or deflated simultaneously.
In an operation, the concrete form 100, mounted on the carriage 10, is brought to a job site for use usually after the columns, footings, or foundations and floor slab 1 has been completed. An initial concrete module comprising a roof, ceiling or floor supported upon columns and beams is begun after the concrete form 100 has been set in place, detached from the carriage, supported and positioned for pouring as described. The carriage is disengaged from the concrete form 100 and can be used to transport and position other concrete forms for pouring.
When the concrete has sufficiently cured to be self supporting the carriage 10 can be re-engaged with the concrete form structure 100 by reversing the removal procedure described above, as suggested. The concrete form structure is then lowered so the beam forms or troughs 5 will pass below the poured concrete beam as described and illustrated by reference to FIG. 14. The removable sections of the troughs 5 at columns (FlGv 7) are removed allowing the said troughs S to be retracted as described in conjunction with FIG. 6. The carriage is then moved to the next position and aligned with the previous construction by overlapping the concrete pour forms over concrete previously poured. The beam forms or troughs 5 are then extended outwardly and the form supports are then raised to thekproper height, the removable trough or beam form sections of columns are reinstalled and the carriage can be disengaged for use with other form sections.
Modified designs of the concrete form, in association with the carriage previously described or a somewhat modified version thereof, are shown by reference to FIGS. 10 and 11. The principle difference between these designs and those previously described relates to the use of a highly contoured or semi-circular arch upon which a roof or ceiling is to be poured, and the difference in structure by virtue of which the beam forms or troughs are disengaged or freed from the poured concrete beams and columns.
Referring specifically to FlG. 10, it will be seen that the carriage l0 and shoring elements 8, 9 are as previously described, but herein are utilized with posts 57, 58 to support the members 59 which are rolled in a semi'circular arch. The members 60 are permanently attached to members 59 and run in perpendicular planes thereto. The troughs or beam forms 61 readily fit upon previously shaped concrete beams 62, and hence continuous pouring of modular shapes by moving the concrete form is quite feasible. The trough or beam form 61 is hinged to the arch shaped member 59 via hinge 63 and can be readily swung free of the poured concrete beams and posts after the concrete 67 has set, as shown in phantom. The hinge 63 in the final position is braced with member 64 secured with pins 65. Member 61 is lowered by removing pins 65 and member 64. Member 61 is interrupted at equal intervals to provide a removable section at column lines similar to that previously described and illustrated by reference to FIG. 7. Members 59 and 60 form a support for form 66 which may be sheet steel, plywood, formboard, etc. after hardening of the poured concrete 67, members 61 are lowered and carriage 10 is lowered by deflating tires 42, allowing the unit to be repositioned for next disposed section of structure. This configuration of the invention is suitable for producing concrete buildings with a plurality of arches running parallel to each other, these being supported by concrete columns 68 or steel columns. as desired.
A carriage and concrete form particularly useful for the construction of a concrete tunnel or drainage structure is described by reference to FIG. 11. The carriage in this instance is provided with only a single set of wheels 42 and, since high elevation of the arch member 59 is unnecessary shoring posts 8 are not needed, and there are no troughs or beam forms. Referring specifically to the figure it will be observed that the basic difference between the structures relates only to the hinged lower section of the arch form by virtue of which the arch can be freed from the poured concrete and moved from one location to another, or positioned for the pour. lt will be observed that the pivotable section is adjoined to member 59 via a hinge. and it is braced with member 69 and secured in place with pins 65. Eye bolt 73 is embeded in slab to attach form 71 at its lower end. Bolt 72 with nuts 76 support the upper end of form 71. After hardening of the concrete, the assembly is lowered by removing pins 65, brace 69 and wedge 77, this permitting the member 70 to swing inwardly and lowering carriage 10 by deflating tires 42 for movement of the assembly to next disposed section. Forms 71 are removed and eyebolt 74 and bolt 72 re main in the concrete structure. Carriage l0 utilizes the break-away feature shown in FIG. 8.
It is thus understood that the invention is a highly useful means and method for constructing reinforced concrete buildings, tunnels, underground shelters or drainage structures utilizing a relatively small number of forms in succession to construct individual sections of the structure. the forms being removable as the concrete supported thereby becomes sufficiently hard to support itself. Practically all of the available forms may be used simultaneously and continuously, with a mini mum of idle time, whereby both material and labor savings are effected.
Having described the invention, what is claimed is:
1. In a carriage readily adaptable for transport of a concrete form or other workpiece, said carriage com prising a frame of channel members, two sets of wheels mounted upon said frame, either set of which is capable of independently supporting the carriage while the other is retracted, one set of which is mounted at a 90 angle relative to the other as determined by the normal direction of movement of the carriage when a set of wheels is in supporting position, the improvement comprising eccentric wheel mounting members equal in number to the number of wheels, each being pivotally mounted via a bolt which extends through a bearing element within the frame of the carriage, each eccentric member carrying on its other end a spindle on which is mounted a wheel provided with a pneumatic tire, the eccentrics of each set of wheels being capable of rotation to permit incremental adjustments and clamping and unclamping of the wheels at different levels of elevation to lower or raise the carriage by an alternate sequence of adjustments of the eccentrics. with deflation and inflation of the tires; lowering the carriage in a series of alternative steps, as when the carriage is at a given height and supported by one set of wheels, the tires of which are deflated, while the other set of wheels, with eccentrics clamped, are in raised position, deflating the tires of the set of supporting wheels and lowering the carriage until the other set of wheels become supporting of the carriage, unclamping the eccentrics of the set of now non-supporting wheels and reinflating the tires to cause the eccentrics to rotate upwardly and then reclamping the eccentrics; and raising the carriage by reversal of this sequence of steps of adjustments of the eccentrics, with deflation and inflation of the tires.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the bolt of an eccentric member is extended through a sleeve constituting the bearing elements is mounted within an opening through a channel member constituting a portion of the frame, the eccentric member being rotatable thereabout, a collar is permanently afi'ixed upon the bolt on the side of the channel opposite the eccentric member, the collar is provided with spaced apart slots and the bolt with a lateral opening so that a pin can be passed therethrough to clamp the eccentric member, or removed to unclamp the eccentric member, in performing the associated functions of deflating and inflating the tires of the wheels mounted thereon to lower or raise the carriage.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the eccentric member is held securely in place within the channel frame of the carriage by means of a washer and nut mounted upon the bolt.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the carriage is provided with means for rapid inflation and deflation of the tires, in the desired sequence.

Claims (4)

1. In a carriage readily adaptable for transport of a concrete form or other workpiece, said carriage comprising a frame of channel members, two sets of wheels mounted upon said frame, either set of which is capable of independently supporting the carriage while the other is retracted, one set of which is mounted at a 90* angle relative to the other as determined by the normal direction of movement of the carriage when a set of wheels is in supporting position, the improvement comprising eccentric wheel mounting members equal in number to the number of wheels, each being pivotally mounted via a bolt which extends through a bearing element within the frame of the carriage, each eccentric member carrying on its other end a spindle on which is mounted a wheel provided with a pneumatic tire, the eccentrics of each set of wheels being capable of rotation to permit incremental adjustments and clamping and unclamping of the wheels at different levels of elevation to lower or raise the carriage by an alternate sequence of adjustments of the eccentrics, with deflation and inflation of the tires; lowering the carriage in a series of alternative steps, as when the carriage is at a given height and supported by one set of wheels, the tires of which are deflated, while the other set of wheels, with eccentrics clamped, are in raIsed position, deflating the tires of the set of supporting wheels and lowering the carriage until the other set of wheels become supporting of the carriage, unclamping the eccentrics of the set of now non-supporting wheels and reinflating the tires to cause the eccentrics to rotate upwardly and then reclamping the eccentrics; and raising the carriage by reversal of this sequence of steps of adjustments of the eccentrics, with deflation and inflation of the tires.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the bolt of an eccentric member is extended through a sleeve constituting the bearing elements is mounted within an opening through a channel member constituting a portion of the frame, the eccentric member being rotatable thereabout, a collar is permanently affixed upon the bolt on the side of the channel opposite the eccentric member, the collar is provided with spaced apart slots and the bolt with a lateral opening so that a pin can be passed therethrough to clamp the eccentric member, or removed to unclamp the eccentric member, in performing the associated functions of deflating and inflating the tires of the wheels mounted thereon to lower or raise the carriage.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the eccentric member is held securely in place within the channel frame of the carriage by means of a washer and nut mounted upon the bolt.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the carriage is provided with means for rapid inflation and deflation of the tires, in the desired sequence.
US304548A 1971-11-30 1972-11-07 Variable height transport carriage Expired - Lifetime US3904216A (en)

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US4302023A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-11-24 Kiesz Lloyd W Dolly with vertically adjustable shelf
US5667230A (en) * 1995-06-02 1997-09-16 Dsc Communications Corporation Rack lift assembly
US5937963A (en) * 1997-06-10 1999-08-17 Scarab Manufacturing And Leasing, Inc. Pivotable wheel mounting system and method thereof
US6668635B2 (en) * 2001-07-09 2003-12-30 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Method of improving steering performance robustness utilizing dimensional non-uniformity in tire/wheel
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US9499338B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2016-11-22 Symbotic, LLC Automated bot transfer arm drive system
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US10633016B2 (en) * 2015-07-13 2020-04-28 Hurdler Motors, Inc. Vehicle, vehicle drive assembly and vehicle steering assembly
US10717484B2 (en) * 2018-04-04 2020-07-21 Fengtao Luo Walking mechanism
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US4302023A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-11-24 Kiesz Lloyd W Dolly with vertically adjustable shelf
US5667230A (en) * 1995-06-02 1997-09-16 Dsc Communications Corporation Rack lift assembly
US5937963A (en) * 1997-06-10 1999-08-17 Scarab Manufacturing And Leasing, Inc. Pivotable wheel mounting system and method thereof
US6668635B2 (en) * 2001-07-09 2003-12-30 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Method of improving steering performance robustness utilizing dimensional non-uniformity in tire/wheel
US9771217B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2017-09-26 Symbotic, LLC Control system for storage and retrieval systems
US11254501B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2022-02-22 Symbotic Llc Storage and retrieval system
US11124361B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2021-09-21 Symbotic Llc Storage and retrieval system
US10759600B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2020-09-01 Symbotic Llc Autonomous transports for storage and retrieval systems
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US10239691B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2019-03-26 Symbotic, LLC Storage and retrieval system
US10207870B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2019-02-19 Symbotic, LLC Autonomous transports for storage and retrieval systems
US9321591B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2016-04-26 Symbotic, LLC Autonomous transports for storage and retrieval systems
US9862543B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2018-01-09 Symbiotic, LLC Bot payload alignment and sensing
US10280000B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2019-05-07 Symbotic, LLC Suspension system for autonomous transports
US9550225B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2017-01-24 Symbotic Llc Bot having high speed stability
US9561905B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2017-02-07 Symbotic, LLC Autonomous transport vehicle
US9676551B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2017-06-13 Symbotic, LLC Bot payload alignment and sensing
US9423796B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2016-08-23 Symbotic Llc Bot having high speed stability
US9327903B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2016-05-03 Symbotic, LLC Suspension system for autonomous transports
US9908698B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2018-03-06 Symbotic, LLC Automated bot transfer arm drive system
US9946265B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2018-04-17 Symbotic, LLC Bot having high speed stability
US9187244B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2015-11-17 Symbotic, LLC BOT payload alignment and sensing
US9156394B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2015-10-13 Symbotic, LLC Suspension system for autonomous transports
US9499338B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2016-11-22 Symbotic, LLC Automated bot transfer arm drive system
US10414586B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2019-09-17 Symbotic, LLC Autonomous transport vehicle
US11273981B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2022-03-15 Symbolic Llc Automated bot transfer arm drive system
US10683169B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2020-06-16 Symbotic, LLC Automated bot transfer arm drive system
US8696010B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2014-04-15 Symbotic, LLC Suspension system for autonomous transports
US8965619B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2015-02-24 Symbotic, LLC Bot having high speed stability
US10822168B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2020-11-03 Symbotic Llc Warehousing scalable storage structure
US8919801B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2014-12-30 Symbotic, LLC Suspension system for autonomous transports
US11078017B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2021-08-03 Symbotic Llc Automated bot with transfer arm
US10894663B2 (en) 2013-09-13 2021-01-19 Symbotic Llc Automated storage and retrieval system
US10633016B2 (en) * 2015-07-13 2020-04-28 Hurdler Motors, Inc. Vehicle, vehicle drive assembly and vehicle steering assembly
US10717484B2 (en) * 2018-04-04 2020-07-21 Fengtao Luo Walking mechanism
GR1010013B (en) * 2020-06-02 2021-05-27 Reko Beton Ιδιωτικη Κεφαλαιουχικη Εταιρεια Sliding panel for the construction of reinforced concrete roof

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