US3901158A - Hypodermic projectile - Google Patents

Hypodermic projectile Download PDF

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Publication number
US3901158A
US3901158A US82413669A US3901158A US 3901158 A US3901158 A US 3901158A US 82413669 A US82413669 A US 82413669A US 3901158 A US3901158 A US 3901158A
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Prior art keywords
drug
projectile
target
wall
shatterable
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Thomas E Ferb
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FERB BROTHERS 10 PEACOCK FARM RD LEXINGTON MA 02173 AND 15 WEST HIGH ST SOMERVILLE NJ 08876 A PARTNERSHIP
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Thomas E Ferb
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Assigned to FERB BROTHERS, 10 PEACOCK FARM RD., LEXINGTON, MA. 02173 AND 15 WEST HIGH ST., SOMERVILLE, NJ. 08876, A PARTNERSHIP reassignment FERB BROTHERS, 10 PEACOCK FARM RD., LEXINGTON, MA. 02173 AND 15 WEST HIGH ST., SOMERVILLE, NJ. 08876, A PARTNERSHIP ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. Assignors: FERB, THOMAS E.
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B12/00Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material
    • F42B12/02Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect
    • F42B12/36Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect for dispensing materials; for producing chemical or physical reaction; for signalling ; for transmitting information
    • F42B12/46Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect for dispensing materials; for producing chemical or physical reaction; for signalling ; for transmitting information for dispensing gases, vapours, powders or chemically-reactive substances
    • F42B12/54Projectiles, missiles or mines characterised by the warhead, the intended effect, or the material characterised by the warhead or the intended effect for dispensing materials; for producing chemical or physical reaction; for signalling ; for transmitting information for dispensing gases, vapours, powders or chemically-reactive substances by implantation, e.g. hypodermic projectiles

Abstract

A hypodermic projectile which is adopted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human upon contact therewith, the projectile including a hollow body having a thin, readily frangible, front wall and a rigid rear wall with a liquid drug in between. Also present in the hollow body is a gas, under pressure, which forces the drug out of the projectile when the front wall shatters. The thin front wall shatters on contact with an animal or human having a plurality of sharp cutting edges which penetrate the skin and any covering on the body, thereby facilitating entry of the drug into the animal or human being treated.

Description

atent I 1 Aug. 26, 1975 HYPODERMIC PROJECTILE Thomas E. Ferb, 144 Sunrise Ter., State College, Pa. 16801 Filed: May 13, 1969 Appl. No: 824,136

Inventor:

U.S. Cl 102/92; 128/DIG. 11 Int. Cl. F42b 5/12; F42b 11/30 Field of Search 102/92, 92.7, 39, 1 M;

128/DIG. 11

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,517,554 12/1924 Fulcher 102/39 1,819,090 8/1931 Goss 102/39 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 189,176 1937 Switzerland 102/927 Primary ExaminerRobert F. Stahl Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Browdy and Neimark A hypodermic projectile which is adopted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human upon contact therewith, the projectile including a hollow body having a thin, readily frangible, front wall and a rigid rear wall with a liquid drug in between. Also present in the hollow body is a gas, under pressure, which forces the drug out of the projectile when the front wall shatters. The thin front wall shatters on Contact with an animal or human having a plurality of sharp cutting edges which penetrate the skin and any covering on the body, thereby facilitating entry of the drug into the animal or human being treated.

ABSTRACT 5 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures OOO PATENTED AUG 2 61975 gH/UQ Yyto/p HO 5 FERB HYPODERMIC PROJECTILE The present invention relates generally to drug administering devices and, more particularly, to a drugged bullet capable of being used with conventional weapons, being conventional in appearance, and having handling characteristics associated with common type shells, cartridges and the like.

Whereas, it is often desirable to merely temporarily incapacitate a victim rather than to inflict a fatal wound thereto, drugged projectiles have been advantageously used in the past, especially in connection with tagging procedures concerning the migrational study of animals. The handling of such devices is, however, inexpedient, and the use thereof by police, and other law enforcement agencies has been limited. This is because those devices comprising the prior art are not suitable for use in conventional firearms in lieu of common caliber type bullets inasmuch as careful preparation and especial expertise in their use is required.

The present invention ofi'ers many advantages and improvements over similar prior art devices in that it discloses a hypodermic projectile which may readily be used in all well-known type firearms whether revolver, rifle, or air gun. The projectile provides an easily shatterable front nose section which instantly splinters on contact with an animal or human, the splinters providing a plurality of sharp cutting edges which penetrate the skin and any covering thereon, for easy administering of the drug. A compressed gas, stored in the projectile along with the drug, forces the drug out through the shattered nose portion and into contact with the skin. Also mixed with the drug and the compressed gas is another component which has the property of being almost instantaneously absorbed through the pores of the skin, and of carrying with it any other ingredients with which it is mixed. Such a component is dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

Accordingly, and consonant with the foregoing, an object of the invention is the provision of a hypodermic projectile which can be readily substituted for ordinary bullets and therefore be used in place thereof in conventional revolvers, rifles, air guns, and the like.

Another object is the provision of a hypodermic projectile that may be used on humans and animals.

Still another object is the provision of a hypodermic projectile having a readily frangible nose section which shatters on contact with humans or animals.

Yet another object is the provision of a hypodermic projectile whose shattered nose section forms a plurality of sharp cutting edges which easily penetrate any covering on the skin of the recipient.

Yet another object is the provision of a hypodermic projectile which contains an incapacitating drug and compressed gas to force the drug out through the shattered nose portion of the projectile, against the skin of the human or animal.

Still another object is the provision of a hypodermic projectile which has an incapacitating drug dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide to speed absorption of the drug by the pores of the recipients skin.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the figures thereof and wherein FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of the hypodermic projectile shown in ejected relation with respect to a conventional shell casing.

FIG. 2 shows a cross-sectional elevational view of the hypodermic projectile including the various elements in assembly form.

FIG. 3 shows a cross-sectional elevational view of the projectile subsequent to impact with a target body.

Referring now to the drawings there is shown in FIG. 1 a perspective view of the hypodermic projectile wherein there is a hollow body or projectile 10 having a readily shatterable front end 12 and a rear wall 14, a drug-holding portion 16 being, as shown, disposed between the front end and rear wall, said drug-holding portion being adapted to contain a predetermined dosage of liquid drug.

Also inserted into the drug holding portion 16, and adapted to mix with the liquid drug and substantially fill the area of portion 16, there is a quantity of some inert gas as used in aerosol spray cans, such as, for example,

argon.

A third ingredient is employed to complete the hypodermic drug solution filling the projectile and this ingredient is dimethyl sulfoxide, (DMSO). DMSO has many unusual properties which materially aid in the operation of the invention. One of these properties is that it is more or less a universal solvent and therefore will take into solution just about any drug which it is desirable to use, depending upon the target animal and the purpose of its use. Another unusual, and important, property of DMSO, is that once in contact with the skin of a human or animal, it not only is almost instantly absorbed into the pores of the animal, but it will also carry with it any other material which is in solution with it. The function and operation of this ingredient will be described more fully hereinafter.

Returning again to the structure of the projectile, it can be seen that while the hollow body 10 has a shatterable front end 12, that it has a substantially heavier gage side walls 18 and rear wall 14. The heavy side walls 18 may terminate at their forward end in a series of sharp cutting edges 20. The front end 12 of the projectile can be made of thin, brittle plastic or glass, while the body of the projectile with the cutting edges could be of the same material, but thicker and stronger. The ideal material would be a heat sealing plastic so that the projectile could be easily and cheaply constructed.

Inasmuch as the hollow body 10 of the projectile is always, prior to firing, substantially disposed between the side and rear walls of an outer casing 22, said projectile can be handled and utilized in the manner of a conventional bullet and is, therefore, shown as a component of an ordinary-appearing cartridge 24, as shown assembled and disassembled in FIGS. 2 and 1, respec tively.

Accordingly, shell casing 22 is employed to substantially envelope the projectile as shown in FIG. 2. More specifically, the projectile, or hollow body 10, is removably secured, preferably by the usual press-fit within the casing 22, front end portion 12 being arranged to partially project from opening 26 of said casing. Further, as illustrated, an explosive powder charge 28 is contained between the rear wall 14 of the projectile and wall 30 of the casing. To establish a slidable, sealing and tight relation between side walls 18 of hollow body 10 and inner wall 32 of the shell casing 22, sealing means or O-rings 34 and 36 are recessedly disposed annularly of said hollow body, as shown. It will be appreciated that although O-ring type seals such as 34 and 36 are preferred herein, other devices which may be suitably utilized to such ends are contemplated.

The cartridge 24, in the form shown in FIG. 2 may be of currently used calibers or of other suitable sizes as may be desirable. The powder charge 28 can be varied depending upon the effective ranges desired. Further, projectile 10 may be suitably fired by gas, spring or other advantageous propulsive mechanisms and may be, therefore, utilized with or without a shell casing depending upon the thrust-producing means utilized.

In FIG. 3 there is shown a view of the projectile as it appears immediately after contact with a target. As can be seen the thin front end section 16 of the projectile 10 has already shattered on contact with the target, exposing a plurality of sharp cutting edges 20 forming a portion of the thicker side walls 18 of the projectile. These sharp cutting edges 20 are sufficiently long to pierce any covering such as fur or clothing 38 on the target, while the compressed gas has blown the drug solution out of the hollow area 16 of the projectile and against the skin of the target animal, where it is immediately absorbed.

In operation, the projectile l0, loaded with a compressed gas, DMSO, and a liquid drug of the type required for the particular purpose, is fired from a pistol or rifle of conventional type. Of course, blow guns and other firing instrumentalities may, if desired, be employed. Upon striking a target 38, hollow body or projectile 10 with its relatively thin front portion 12 will be appreciably slowed down or halted, but with sufficient force to break the front end 12, exposing sharp cutting edges 20. These sharp edges become slightly embedded in the skin or hide of target 38. Once the shatterable front end 12 has broken, the compressed gas causes the liquid drug and DMSO solution to exude from the projectile against the target. As stated previously herein, the DMSO, having the peculiar property of being absorbed almost instantly into the pores of an animal or human, and of carrying with it any other material which is in solution with the DMSO, is immediately absorbed by the target. As intended, the target, either animal or human, will promptly be immobilized due to the effect of the drug, such immobilization being temporary rather than lasting, such effect being the desiratum of the present invention.

The pressurized gas in the projectile acts to put pressure on the front wall of the projectile, thus permitting it to break more easily.

The drugs which can be used include the following as examples:

Central Nervous System Depressants Chlorpromazine (tranquilizer) Morphine (narcotic) Curare (skeletal muscle relaxant) Gallamine (skeletal muscle relaxant) Benzoquinonium (skeletal muscle relaxant) Decamethonium (skeletal muscle relaxant) Succinylcholine (skeletal muscle relaxant) Peripheral Nervous System Depressants Atropine Scopolamine Methantheline The most useful drug is curare-type which is effective in very small doses and produces temporary local paralysrs.

From the above description of the structure and operation of the invention it is obvious that the present device offers many improvements over similar devices in the prior art. For example, there is disclosed a hypodermic projectile which may be used in standard firearms, in place of conventional cartridges, and which can be easily and economically constructed from heat sealing plastic. The projectile may, according to the purpose desired, be charged with any well-known incapacitating drug, with any type compressed gas, and with a solvent such as dimethyl sulfoxide, in any proportions, the thin frangible nose portion of the projectile providing an easy method of administering the drug without the use of needles.

Obvious, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood, that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. A hypodermic projectile adapted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human target upon impact therewith comprising:

a hollow body having a readily shatterable front wall,

and a rear wall;

a side wall which is less readily shatterable than said shatterable front wall, said side wall joining said front and rear walls;

a drug-holding area between said walls adapted to hold a dosage of liquid drugs, the drug being injected into the target upon impact; and

wherein said drug-holding area contains a dosae of an incapacitating drug and a quantity of suitable means for forcing said drug against the target when the front end shatters on impact with the target.

2. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 1 wherein said drug holding area contains a solvent along with said incapacitating drug and said means for forcing said drug against the target; and wherein said means for forcing the drug against the target comprises compressed gas.

3. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 1 wherein the drug holding area contains a quantity of dimethyl sulfoxide along with said incapacitating drug and said means for forcing the drug against the target, and wherein said incapacitating drug is an hypnotic drug and said means for forcing the drug against the target comprises compressed inert gas.

4. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 3 in combintion with a shell casing, said shell casing having a wall at one end and an opening at the other end, said projectile being removably secured within said shell casing whereby said shatterable front end is disposed at said opening of the shell casng; and

an explosive charge contained between said rear wall of the projectile and said wall at one end of the shell casing.

5. A hypodermic projectile adapted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human target upon impact therewith comprising:

a hollow body having a readily shatterable front wall,

and a rear wall;

a side wall which is less readily shatterable than the shatterable front wall, said side wall joining the front and rear walls;

a junction seam between the front wall and the side wall, said seam having a jagged configuration and adapted to form sharp cutting edges when the front wall shatters on contact with a target; and

a drug-holding area between said walls adapted to hold a dosage of liquid drug, the drug being injected into the target upon impact.

Claims (5)

1. A hypodermic projectile adapted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human target upon impact therewith comprising: a hollow body having a readily shatterable front wall, and a rear wall; a side wall which is less readily shatterable than said shatterable front wall, said side wall joining said front and rear walls; a drug-holding area between said walls adapted to hold a dosage of liquid drugs, the drug being injected into the target upon impact; and wherein said drug-holding area contains a dosae of an incapacitating drug and a quantity of suitable means for forcing said drug against the target when the front end shatters on impact with the target.
2. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 1 wherein said drug holding area contains a solvent along with said incapacitating drug and said means for forcing said drug against the target; and wherein said means for forcing the drug against the target comprises compressed gas.
3. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 1 wherein the drug holding area contains a quantity of dimethyl sulfoxide along with said incapacitating drug and said means for forcing the drug against the target, and wherein said incapacitating drug is an hypnotic drug and said means for forcing the drug against the target comprises compressed inert gas.
4. A hypodermic projectile as set forth in claim 3 in combintion with a shell casing, said shell casing having a wall at one end and an opening at the other end, said projectile being removably secured within said shell casing whereby said shatterable front end is disposed at said opening of the shell casng; and an explosive charge contained between said rear wall of the projectile and said wall at one end of the shell casing.
5. A hypodermic projectile adapted to inject a liquid drug into an animal or human target upon impact therewith comprising: a hollow body having a readily shatterable front wall, and a rear wall; a side wall which is less readily shatterable than the shatterable front wall, said side wall joining the front and rear walls; a junction seam between the front wall and the side wall, said seam having a jagged configuration and adapted to form sharp cutting edges when the front wall shatters on contact with a target; and a drug-holding area between said walls adapted to hold a dosage of liquid drug, the drug being injected into the target upon impact.
US82413669 1969-05-13 1969-05-13 Hypodermic projectile Expired - Lifetime US3901158A (en)

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2432701A1 (en) * 1978-08-03 1980-02-29 Grenet Edouard Projectiles contg. a soporific agent - such as narcotic, hypnotic or anaesthetic, in the form of granules coated with water-soluble non-toxic substance
US4597580A (en) * 1980-12-08 1986-07-01 Gassie Jon M Poison dart
US4686905A (en) * 1985-07-26 1987-08-18 Attila Szabo Cartridge for frangible projectile
US4899660A (en) * 1988-04-11 1990-02-13 Rainier International, Inc. Training round for firearm
US5016536A (en) * 1988-04-11 1991-05-21 Rainier International, Inc. Non-lethal practice round for automatic and semiautomatic firearms
US5193421A (en) * 1992-06-16 1993-03-16 Atwood Industries, Inc. System and method for presetting tooling
US5259319A (en) * 1992-03-20 1993-11-09 Richard Dravecky Reusable training ammunition
US5614657A (en) * 1994-12-07 1997-03-25 Harada; Shintaro Three dimensionally measuring apparatus
US6223658B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2001-05-01 Steven P. Rosa Non-lethal weapon firing a frangible, weighted paint ball
US6401591B1 (en) * 2001-01-04 2002-06-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Neutralization chemical injection penetrator
GB2379390A (en) * 2001-09-11 2003-03-12 Caretek Medical Ltd A needle-less drug delivery device
US20030054044A1 (en) * 2001-09-11 2003-03-20 Potter David Stuart Novel drug delivery technology
US20030159612A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2003-08-28 Terrance Ziemack Ballistic implant system and methods
US6675789B2 (en) 1999-12-09 2004-01-13 Nch Corporation Control agent delivery system
US20040047872A1 (en) * 1996-11-14 2004-03-11 The Government Of The United States, As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Indicators for monitoring the technique of transcutaneous immunization
US6736070B2 (en) 2002-03-06 2004-05-18 Joseph C. Baltos Passive action security systems
US6772694B1 (en) 2001-08-15 2004-08-10 Nch Corporation Method for selectively dispersing or delivering a control agent
US20050188886A1 (en) * 1996-11-18 2005-09-01 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Non-lethal projectile systems
US20060011090A1 (en) * 2004-04-09 2006-01-19 Pepperball Technologies, Inc., A Delaware Corporation Primer launched projectile systems
US7013810B1 (en) * 1999-05-24 2006-03-21 Richard Ian Brydges-Price Projectile for delivery of a tranquilliser
US20060161111A1 (en) * 2002-08-05 2006-07-20 Potter David S Drug delivery system
US20070101891A1 (en) * 2001-09-05 2007-05-10 Rastegar Jahangir S Deployable bullets
US20080017179A1 (en) * 2004-05-12 2008-01-24 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Compressed Gas Cartridge Puncture Apparatus
US20090030442A1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2009-01-29 Charles David Ogilvy Potter Disposable assembly containing a skin piercing element
US20090071459A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2009-03-19 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for use in distributing irritant powder
US20100294160A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2010-11-25 Rheinmetall Waffe Munition Gmbh Projectile
US20110023743A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2011-02-03 Rheinmetall Waffe Munition Gmbh Projectile
WO2011042542A1 (en) 2009-10-08 2011-04-14 Azurebio, S. L. Formulation of drugs and vaccines in the form of percutaneous injectable needles
US9200877B1 (en) * 2012-05-02 2015-12-01 Darren Rubin Biological active bullets, systems, and methods
US20160153757A1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2016-06-02 Joshua Mahnke Projectile with Enhanced Ballistics
US9541357B2 (en) 2010-08-14 2017-01-10 Daniel L. Klement High visibility ammunition casings

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1517554A (en) * 1923-03-17 1924-12-02 Gordon S Fulcher Ammunition
US1819090A (en) * 1930-04-07 1931-08-18 Byron C Goss Gas containing projectile or long range tear gas shell

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1517554A (en) * 1923-03-17 1924-12-02 Gordon S Fulcher Ammunition
US1819090A (en) * 1930-04-07 1931-08-18 Byron C Goss Gas containing projectile or long range tear gas shell

Cited By (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2432701A1 (en) * 1978-08-03 1980-02-29 Grenet Edouard Projectiles contg. a soporific agent - such as narcotic, hypnotic or anaesthetic, in the form of granules coated with water-soluble non-toxic substance
US4597580A (en) * 1980-12-08 1986-07-01 Gassie Jon M Poison dart
US4686905A (en) * 1985-07-26 1987-08-18 Attila Szabo Cartridge for frangible projectile
US4899660A (en) * 1988-04-11 1990-02-13 Rainier International, Inc. Training round for firearm
US5016536A (en) * 1988-04-11 1991-05-21 Rainier International, Inc. Non-lethal practice round for automatic and semiautomatic firearms
US5259319A (en) * 1992-03-20 1993-11-09 Richard Dravecky Reusable training ammunition
US5193421A (en) * 1992-06-16 1993-03-16 Atwood Industries, Inc. System and method for presetting tooling
US5614657A (en) * 1994-12-07 1997-03-25 Harada; Shintaro Three dimensionally measuring apparatus
US20040047872A1 (en) * 1996-11-14 2004-03-11 The Government Of The United States, As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Indicators for monitoring the technique of transcutaneous immunization
US20050188886A1 (en) * 1996-11-18 2005-09-01 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Non-lethal projectile systems
US6223658B1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2001-05-01 Steven P. Rosa Non-lethal weapon firing a frangible, weighted paint ball
US7013810B1 (en) * 1999-05-24 2006-03-21 Richard Ian Brydges-Price Projectile for delivery of a tranquilliser
US6675789B2 (en) 1999-12-09 2004-01-13 Nch Corporation Control agent delivery system
US6401591B1 (en) * 2001-01-04 2002-06-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Neutralization chemical injection penetrator
US6772694B1 (en) 2001-08-15 2004-08-10 Nch Corporation Method for selectively dispersing or delivering a control agent
US20070101891A1 (en) * 2001-09-05 2007-05-10 Rastegar Jahangir S Deployable bullets
US7234399B2 (en) * 2001-09-05 2007-06-26 Omnitek Partners, Llc Deployable bullets having high voltage electrodes
US7231875B2 (en) * 2001-09-05 2007-06-19 Omnitek Partners Llc Deployable bullets having a tranquilizer
GB2379390B (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-01-26 Caretek Medical Ltd A novel drug delivery technology
US20050013840A1 (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-01-20 Potter Charles David Ogilvy Drug delivery technology
GB2379390A (en) * 2001-09-11 2003-03-12 Caretek Medical Ltd A needle-less drug delivery device
US20070275044A1 (en) * 2001-09-11 2007-11-29 Potter David S Novel drug delivery technology
US8574188B2 (en) 2001-09-11 2013-11-05 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Drug delivery technology
US8088406B2 (en) 2001-09-11 2012-01-03 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Pioneer projectile drug delivery technology
US20030054044A1 (en) * 2001-09-11 2003-03-20 Potter David Stuart Novel drug delivery technology
US7727223B2 (en) 2001-09-11 2010-06-01 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Drug delivery technology
US7615234B2 (en) 2001-09-11 2009-11-10 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Drug delivery technology
EP2065063A1 (en) 2001-09-11 2009-06-03 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Needleless injection device
US20030159612A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2003-08-28 Terrance Ziemack Ballistic implant system and methods
US6736070B2 (en) 2002-03-06 2004-05-18 Joseph C. Baltos Passive action security systems
US7862543B2 (en) 2002-08-05 2011-01-04 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Drug delivery system
US20060161111A1 (en) * 2002-08-05 2006-07-20 Potter David S Drug delivery system
WO2005008166A3 (en) * 2003-02-20 2005-11-17 Joseph Charles Baltos Passive action security systems
WO2005008166A2 (en) * 2003-02-20 2005-01-27 Joseph Charles Baltos Passive action security systems
US20060011090A1 (en) * 2004-04-09 2006-01-19 Pepperball Technologies, Inc., A Delaware Corporation Primer launched projectile systems
US20080017179A1 (en) * 2004-05-12 2008-01-24 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Compressed Gas Cartridge Puncture Apparatus
US20090030442A1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2009-01-29 Charles David Ogilvy Potter Disposable assembly containing a skin piercing element
US9072472B2 (en) 2005-02-07 2015-07-07 Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Limited Disposable assembly containing a skin piercing element
US7752974B2 (en) 2007-09-18 2010-07-13 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for use in distributing irritant powder
US20090071459A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2009-03-19 Pepperball Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for use in distributing irritant powder
US20100294160A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2010-11-25 Rheinmetall Waffe Munition Gmbh Projectile
US8408139B2 (en) * 2007-11-23 2013-04-02 Rheinmetail Waffe Munition GmbH Projectile
US8413585B2 (en) 2007-11-23 2013-04-09 Rheinmetall Waffe Munition Gmbh Projectile
US20110023743A1 (en) * 2007-11-23 2011-02-03 Rheinmetall Waffe Munition Gmbh Projectile
WO2011042542A1 (en) 2009-10-08 2011-04-14 Azurebio, S. L. Formulation of drugs and vaccines in the form of percutaneous injectable needles
US9541357B2 (en) 2010-08-14 2017-01-10 Daniel L. Klement High visibility ammunition casings
US9200877B1 (en) * 2012-05-02 2015-12-01 Darren Rubin Biological active bullets, systems, and methods
US20160153757A1 (en) * 2014-04-30 2016-06-02 Joshua Mahnke Projectile with Enhanced Ballistics
US9709368B2 (en) * 2014-04-30 2017-07-18 G9 Holdings, Llc Projectile with enhanced ballistics
USD863492S1 (en) 2014-04-30 2019-10-15 G9 Holdings, Llc Projectile
USD868199S1 (en) 2014-04-30 2019-11-26 G9 Holdings, Llc Projectile

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