US3900000A - Apparatus for spray coating articles - Google Patents

Apparatus for spray coating articles Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3900000A
US3900000A US41956973A US3900000A US 3900000 A US3900000 A US 3900000A US 41956973 A US41956973 A US 41956973A US 3900000 A US3900000 A US 3900000A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
work piece
voltage
coating material
sub
ionization
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Thomas J Gallen
Original Assignee
Thomas J Gallen
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/025Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns
    • B05B5/04Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by having rotary outlet or deflecting elements, i.e. spraying being also effected by centrifugal forces
    • B05B5/0418Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by having rotary outlet or deflecting elements, i.e. spraying being also effected by centrifugal forces designed for spraying particulate material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/025Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns
    • B05B5/04Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by having rotary outlet or deflecting elements, i.e. spraying being also effected by centrifugal forces
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/025Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns
    • B05B5/043Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns using induction-charging
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/08Plant for applying liquids or other fluent materials to objects
    • B05B5/082Plant for applying liquids or other fluent materials to objects characterised by means for supporting, holding or conveying the objects

Abstract

A sub-ionization spray coating system having a spray gun at ground potential with an ungrounded high speed disc atomizer for spraying ungrounded coating having an electrical potential of one polarity upon an inductively charged workpiece having an electrical potential of an opposite polarity, the potentials of which are substantially lower than those of the prior art.

Description

Unlted States Patent 1 1 1111 3,900,000

Gallen Aug. 19, 1975 [5 APPARATUS FOR SPRAY COATING 2,989,241 6/1961 Badger 118/621 x ARTICLES 3,001,719 9/1961 Sigvardsson 1 18/627 3,104,185 9/1963 Reindl et a1. 118/627 Inventor: Thomas J- Gallen, 1516 Buck 3,113,037 12/1963 Watanabe 239/3 Feasterville, Pa. 19047 3,219,013 11/1965 Pettigrew et a1 118/627 [22] Flled: 1973 Primary ExaminerMervin Stein [21] Appl. No.: 419,569 Assistant ExaminerDouglas Salser Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Leo C. Krazinski [52] US. Cl. 118/630; 118/629; 239/15 51 Int. c1. BOSB 5/02; 1305c 5/04 [57] ABSTRACT 58 Field of Search 118/621, 627, 629, 630; A sub-lomzatlon Spray 999mg System havmg a Spray 1 17/934; 239/3, 5 gun at ground potential with an ungrounded high speed disc atomizer for spraying ungrounded coating [56] References Cited having an electrical potential of one polarity upon an UNITED STATES PATENTS inductively charged workpiece having an electrical po- 2 877 137 3/1 5 J u t 1 118/629 tential of an opposite polarity, the potentials of which uvma e a 2366,8830 H1961 Gengenbach at al- N 118/621 X are substantially lower than those of the prlor art. 2,975,756 3/1961 Reind] et a1. 118/627 10 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure APPARATUS FOR SPRAY COATING ARTICLES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for spray coating articles of manufacture and, in particular, to an arrangement wherein atomized coating particles of one electrical sign are ejected from an atomizer and directed towards inductively charged work pieces of opposite electrical sign.

2. Description of Prior Art l-leretofore, as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,473,946, 3,376,156, 3,113,037, 2,893,894, 2,893,893, 2,794,417, 1,855,869 and others of like import, the voltages employed have been rather high in order to produce ionization of the air and spray particles. But ionization as so produced in the prior art renders it difficult to spray paint work pieces having sharp edges and or recesses. Such ionizing edges pull more finely atomized particles to their emission points than do the uniformly emitting flat or circular surfaces and thereby provide articles with paint build-up on their ionizing edges. In other words, the prior art practice does not produce articles with a uniform coating on all surfaces thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, an object of the invention is to provide an improved method and apparatus for spray coating material (paint or powder) onto any shaped article (conductive or non-conductive) to form a more uniform coating of suitable thickness thereon, and with minimum waste.

Another object is to provide a spray coating arrangement wherein the voltages employed are substantially lower than in the prior art practice with resultant savings in energy.

A further object is to provide a spray coating arrangement that is safer to personnel operating the same.

A still further object is to accomplish the foregoing objects in a simple, practical and economical manner.

Other and further objects will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

In accordance with the present invention, the foregoing objects are generally accomplished by performing the spray coating in a sub-ionization field wherein the voltage is quite low as compared to the high voltages in conventional practice. With the lower voltage used in this invention there is insured a vast improvement in the uniformity of coating thickness on various shaped articles.

Important features of the present invention are:

l. The spray gun is at ground potential for operator safety.

2. The disc atomizer or coating emitting head is insulated from the spray gun and thus not connected to ground.

3. The coating itself is insulated from ground and so introduced into the disc atomizer or emitting head.

4. The coating ejected from the disc atomizer or emitting head has a charge applied to it prior to its entering the atomizer or emitting head, which charge is of an electrical sign opposite to that of the charged work piece, the coating charge being even as low as 1 volt.

5. The movement of air is controlled so as to be moved from the rear of the atomizer or emitting head across the path of the work piece, at a rate that will not overcome attraction of the coating particles by the charged work piece.

6. A conductor having a voltage well above that of the charged coating induces a charge of opposite sign to that of the coating particles onto the work piece. The voltage induced on the work piece is about 15,000 volts at a 10 to 12 inch average distance from the atomizer or emitting head.

The advantages of the above features are many, includl. The atomizing disc or emitting head being insulated from ground receives only the voltage sign deposited on its surface by the charged coating material, which has had either a positive or negative sign of at least 1 volt placed upon it prior to its entrance through the insulated disc or emitting head. Therefore, the field required to attract the atomized coating material can be reduced from an actual 28,000 to 30,000 volts, as required in U.S. Pat. No. 3,376,156, to a field of about 14,000 to 15,000 volts. Thus, it is evident that 14,000 to 15,000 additional volts are required in the above patent to do the work of pulling the opposite voltage sign from ground (which is balanced and equally positive and negative).

2. The same work, that is, additional voltage, is required in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,794,417, 2,893,893, and 2,893,894. The prior art parts being normally grounded, this 14,000 to 15,000 volt minimum is required for deposition of the coating material onto the part. Since grounded parts are equally positive and negative, in the above patents where the coating material is charged to one sign, then the grounded part, being equally positive and negative, would be coated with a 50% efficiency. The field must consequently be strong enough to pull the opposite sign from that on the coating material to a predominant position on the grounded part in order to attract the coating material, with the almost theoretical efficiency as afforded by the above patents. In the above patents the normal field, as described therein, is about 100,000 volts. This high voltage is supplied because said patents require 14,000 to 15,000 volts minimum for emission or deposition, as explained hereinbefore, plus 14,000 to 15,000 volts for attraction and dispersion, as indicated by the invention herein, and the work of atomization, which is performed by ionization of air at the edge of the atomizing disc, can amount to 70,000 volts more or less depending upon the degree of atomization needed.

3. In U.S. Pat. No. 3,376,156 with the field at about 28,000 to 30,000 volts there is a very slight amount of ionization that takes place. This has no significant effect on atomization, as shown by the other hereinbefore mentioned patents, but it is enough to cause some difficulty with work pieces that have sharp edges and or recesses. The ionizing edges pull more finely atomized coating particles to their emission points than do the uniformly emitting flat or circular surfaces. By eliminating the 14,000 to 15,000 voltage required by US. Pat. No. 3,376,156, it is found that there are no ionizing edges whatsoever and the coating material is pulled uniformly by both flat surfaces and edges of the part. This allows a more dense coating material to be applied all over the surface of the part without runs and or tears at the edges. More coating material goes into corners and recesses uniformly because it is not overly attracted to the edges on its way in.

4. Over the years many companies have made conductivity meters to measure the conductivity of the coating material. These have helped in coating formulation to conteract to some extent the coating build-up on ioning edges. Since these ionizing edges are eliminated under the invention herein, there is no difference in coating quality, whether the coating is 1.5 megohms or 5.0 megohms.

5. The fact that the field under the invention herein is about 15,000 volts is a substantial improvement in safety conditions. Since the coating material is charged with only enough voltage to give it an opposite and uniform sign to that of the work piece, as low as one volt, it is evident that the operator can safely handle the atomizer and even the fluid hose itself.

6. Highly conductive paints, powders, aqueous solutions, etc., may thus, in the instant invention, be handled by the specially constructed atomizers with no danger whatever of voltage backing up to the coating container. In practice, the apparatus of this invention has been operated with about 100 volts, as well as 5,000 volts, on the coating material and showed no significant difference in coating operation or quality. It is not how much voltage, but how little voltage that is important in order to control the sign of the coating material, as to positive with relation to negatively charged part, or the reverse.

7. By inductively charging the part, as in US. Pat.

No. 3,376,156, many spray booths may be operated with slightly different field voltages with one power supply operating all booths, and the several fields being controlled by different induction gaps. The high speed atomizer is the only mechanical method of getting particle size down to minimum where the extremely low field of 15,000 volts will attract with an efficiency approaching 100%.

8. The inductively charged work piece and the extremely successful high speed rotary atomizer with paint polarity (sign) being controlled in this invention, as opposed to putting a high voltage on the work piece via charging the atomizer head, is the main difference between this invention and US. Pat. No. 3,113,037. The latter patent eliminates the voltage required for deposition due to not using a grounded electrode, but requires more voltage to aid in atomization. This is because the rotary head squirts jets of paint that would not atomize to the degree necessary at a l5,000 volt field and therefore not be attracted with a high efficiency in view of the paints higher particle size and weight.

9. US. Pat. No. 1,855,869 requires that the work piece have one charge while the atomizer places an opposite charge on the paint, the field being variable in order to prevent arcing between the work pieces being coated and the atomizer. Since atomization at the time of this patent was believed to be caused by air, nevertheless there exists an electrostatic influence on its atomization because the paint fluid is emitted into the field from the end of the fluid tube that acts as one electrode in the field. It will work at its maximum efficiency if only enough air is used to lift or venturi the liquid up the siphon tube to its forward edge and let the electrostatic field do the work of atomization, so that the less air involved the less forward velocity and turbulence given the fluid particles, the more efficiency.

US. Pat. No. 2,698,814 teaches that nonconductive work pieces have been semisuccessfully coated with varying techniques, such as giving the pieces conductive backing or heating or wetting the article. On the contrary the instant invention readily coats non-conductive work pieces. US. Pat. No. 2,698,814 charges the atomizer one sign of high voltage and puts a rake shaped electrode with high voltage of the opposite sign behind the work piece. This is done to electrostatically atomize, disperse, and attract particles of paint to the non-conductive work piece. A principle fault with this patent was because of the detearing effect of the oppositely charged grid. The instant invention paints non-conductive work pieces perfectly and has no grids to detear and cause poor or inadequate coverage.

As far as applicant is aware, the invention herein is the only highly efficient system known that uses voltages below the ionization level in the coating field between the atomizer and the work piece. This invention has been installed and successfully operated in a commercial plastic coating application, with odd size and shape work pieces with a field voltage of 13,000 volts. The invention has been tested on powder, as well, and the main feature that happens with powder and paint, that is more easily seen with powder than with paint is: With paint, as the voltage in the paint is increased, the dispersion is wider and is primarily seen as dryer paint on the work piece, since it is dispersed over a wider area.

With powder, the pattern can be raised in diameter from 4 to 16 or 20 inches by increasing voltage on the powder.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a part of the specification, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic elevational view of a preferred form of spray painting apparatus according to the present invention.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, there is shown a spray gun 10 mounted on a supporting structure 11, both of which are grounded. The spray gun 10 has mounted on its discharging end a disc 12 which is insulated from ground and therefore insulated from the spray gun, as by a plastic washer l3 separating the disc 12 from a grounded motor shaft 14, a plastic shield 16 placed around an end portion 17 of the shaft 14, and a grounded screw 18, insulated from the disc 12, for holding the disc onto the shaft 14. The spray gun 10 is supplied by means of a plastic, non-conductive fluid hose 19 with paint fluid or powder 20 from paint source (not shown). A valve 21 is provided for controlling paint flow and this valve is grounded, as shown. A metallic hose coupling 22, preferably brass, is shown in the hose line and this coupling is energized, through induction, from an electrical conductor 23, by a voltage of negative polarity, the conductor 23 being connected to a negative terminal 24 of a transformer 26, the positive tenninal 27 of which is grounded by a conductor 28.

As is conventional in paint spraying systems, an overhead conveyor 29, similar to that described in US. Pat. No. 3,376,156 and shown here diagrammatically, has suspended therefrom, in seriatim, hooks 31, insulator 32, hooks 33 and a work piece 34. The work piece in this instance may be of plastic or non-conductive material and is energized by induction from an electrical conductor 36 (in a manner similar to that in US. Pat. No. 3,376,156) having a voltage of positive polarity and being connected to a positive terminal 37 of a transformer 38, the negative terminal 39 of which is grounded by the conductor 28, which was also used in grounding the negative terminal 27 of the transformer 26. It has been found taht the voltage at the transformer 38 need be no greater than 28,000 volts and that the induced voltage upon the work piece about 15,000 volts. Also, it has been found that the voltage at the transformer 26 need be no greater than 5,000 volts and that the induced voltage upon the paint material 20 may be as low as 1 volt. Further the distance between the work piece 34 and disc 12 is about inches.

In operation, the spray gun 10 being at ground potential and the paint particles being at a negative potential, since the disc 12 is insulated from the spray gun 10, the paint particles 20 are ejected from the atomizer disc 12 and across the path of the work piece 34. It is to be noted that the electrostatic field developed around the work piece 34 is below ionization. As a result, regardless of the shape of the work piece 34, whether angular with sharp corners, round and smooth, or flat, the coating of the work piece 34 is accomplished in an even thickness and most efficient manner, uniformly covering all surfaces including front, back and sides. As explained hereinbefore, the reduced voltage of about 14,000 volts at the work piece 34 is too low to cause ionization with the unforeseen result that attraction of the paint particles to the work piece 34 coatslall surfacesthereof evenly.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the present invention provides an efficient subionization spray coating system which uniformly coats all surfaces of a work piece, especially those work pieces having sharp edges. It is to be noted that each of the three factors, namely, atomization, dispersion and attraction, used in coating the work piece of this invention is independently controlled. The atomization of the coating particles is controlled by the speed of the disc 12, that is, the greater the speed the greater the attraction. Dispersion of the coating particles is controlled by the voltage applied at the field shown as X on the drawing, that is, between the disc 12 and the drawing, that is, between the work piece 34 and the spray gun screw 18, the attraction increasing as the voltage is increased.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing'any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matters are to be interpreted as illustrative and not in any limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

l. A sub-ionization spray coating system comprising, in combination, a grounded spray gun, a disc rotated by said spray gun for atomizing coating material, means for insulating said disc from said spray gun, a nonconductive hose for supplying said coating material to said disc, means for applying inductively a voltage of one polarity to said coating material while in said hose, whereby said coating material voltage is imparted to said disc to create an electrostatic field between said disc and said spray gun upon discharge of said coating material from said spray gun, a work piece to be coated with said coating material, and means for applying inductively a voltage of opposite polarity to said work piece, whereby an electrostatic field is created between said work piece and said spray gun.

2. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said means for applying an inductive voltage of said one polarity to said coating material includes a transformer having a terminal for said one polarity, a hose coupling attached to said hose, and a conductor having one end connected to said transformer terminal and having its other end disposed at a predetermined distance from said coupling to inductively impart the desired voltage to said coupling and in turn to said coating material within said hose.

3. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 2, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said coupling and coating material is less than 1,000 volts.

4. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 2, wherein said means for applying inductively a voltage of opposite polarity to said work piece includes a transformer having a terminal for said opposite polarity, and a conductor having one end connected to said transformer opposite polarity terminal and its other end disposed at a predetermined distance from said work piece to inductivelyiimpart the desired voltage to said work piece.

5. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 4, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said work piece is less than 15,000 volts.

6. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 5, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said coupling and coating material is less than 1,000 volts.

7. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 6, wherein said coating material is non-conductive.

connecting said second transformer terminals.

Claims (10)

1. A sub-ionization spray coating system comprising, in combination, a grounded spray gun, a disc rotated by said spray gun for atomizing coating material, means for insulating said disc from said spray gun, a non-conductive hose for supplying said coating material to said disc, means for applying inductively a voltage of one polarity to said coating material while in said hose, whereby said coating material voltage is imparted to said disc to create an electrostatic field between said disc and said spray gun upon discharge of said coating material from said spray gun, a work piece to be coated with said coating material, and means for applying inductively a voltage of opposite polarity to said work piece, whereby an electrostatic field is created between said work piece and said spray gun.
2. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 1, wherein said means for applying an inductive voltage of said one polarity to said coating material includes a transformer having a terminal for said one polarity, a hose coupling attached to said hose, and a conductor having one end connected to said transformer terminal and having its other end disposed at a predetermined distance from said coupling to inductively impart the desired voltage to said coupling and in turn to said coating material within said hose.
3. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 2, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said coupling and coating material is less than 1,000 volts.
4. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 2, wherein said means for applying inductively a voltage of opposite polarity to said work piece includes a transformer having a termInal for said opposite polarity, and a conductor having one end connected to said transformer opposite polarity terminal and its other end disposed at a predetermined distance from said work piece to inductively impart the desired voltage to said work piece.
5. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 4, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said work piece is less than 15,000 volts.
6. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 5, wherein said inductively applied voltage to said coupling and coating material is less than 1,000 volts.
7. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 6, wherein said coating material is non-conductive.
8. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 7, wherein said work piece is non-conductive.
9. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 6, wherein said coating material and said work piece are conductive.
10. A sub-ionization spray coating system in accordance with claim 9, wherein each of said transformers has a second terminal, and a grounded conductor interconnecting said second transformer terminals.
US3900000A 1973-11-28 1973-11-28 Apparatus for spray coating articles Expired - Lifetime US3900000A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3900000A US3900000A (en) 1973-11-28 1973-11-28 Apparatus for spray coating articles

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3900000A US3900000A (en) 1973-11-28 1973-11-28 Apparatus for spray coating articles

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3900000A true US3900000A (en) 1975-08-19

Family

ID=23662814

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3900000A Expired - Lifetime US3900000A (en) 1973-11-28 1973-11-28 Apparatus for spray coating articles

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3900000A (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4009829A (en) * 1975-02-11 1977-03-01 Ppg Industries, Inc. Electrostatic spray coating apparatus
FR2348750A1 (en) * 1976-04-21 1977-11-18 Caterpillar Tractor Co System and method for electrostatic painting
US4120261A (en) * 1977-11-25 1978-10-17 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Electrostatic coating system
WO1979000267A1 (en) * 1977-11-09 1979-05-17 Caterpillar Tractor Co Electrostatic coating system
US4343828A (en) * 1980-12-24 1982-08-10 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Electrodynamic painting system and method
GB2124517A (en) * 1982-06-10 1984-02-22 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Electrostatic spraying apparatus
EP0120648A2 (en) * 1983-03-24 1984-10-03 Nordson Corporation Method and apparatus for inductively charging centrifugally atomized conductive coating material
US4628859A (en) * 1985-04-15 1986-12-16 Hines Andrew D Apparatus and workpiece fixture for electrostatic spray coating
US5192369A (en) * 1986-11-20 1993-03-09 British Technology Group Ltd. Apparatus for spraying harvested crops
US5287801A (en) * 1991-07-31 1994-02-22 Clark Gordon A Flavoring food products
US5433387A (en) * 1992-12-03 1995-07-18 Ransburg Corporation Nonincendive rotary atomizer
WO1996035516A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 1996-11-14 Colorcon Limited Electrostatic coating
US5622563A (en) * 1992-12-03 1997-04-22 Ransburg Corporation Nonincedive rotary atomizer
GB2316342A (en) * 1995-05-09 1998-02-25 Colorcon Ltd Electrostatic coating
US5753315A (en) * 1995-09-29 1998-05-19 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Electrostatic coating method
US20020197388A1 (en) * 1996-11-13 2002-12-26 Phoqus Limited. Method and apparatus for the coating of substrates for pharmaceutical use
US20030113445A1 (en) * 2000-02-01 2003-06-19 Martin Trevor Ian Powder material for electrostatic application to a substrate and electrostatic application of the powder material to a substrate
US20030138487A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 2003-07-24 Phoqus Limited Powder coating composition for electrostatic coating of pharmaceutical substrates
US20130156970A1 (en) * 2011-12-15 2013-06-20 Honeywell Asca Inc. Method to Create Uniform Distribution, Minimize Applied Solution Volume and Control Droplet Size of Water and/or Coating Applications for Web Applications

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2877137A (en) * 1952-05-13 1959-03-10 Ransburg Electro Coating Corp Method of electrostatically coating an article
US2966880A (en) * 1956-11-23 1961-01-03 Daimler Benz Ag Control arrangement for electrostatic spray installation
US2975756A (en) * 1958-02-26 1961-03-21 Gen Motors Corp Electrostatic paint spray
US2989241A (en) * 1956-07-16 1961-06-20 Ransburg Electro Coating Corp Apparatus for electrostatic spray coating
US3001719A (en) * 1959-07-30 1961-09-26 Gen Motors Corp Electrostatic coating apparatus with rotary impeller
US3104185A (en) * 1961-11-15 1963-09-17 Gen Motors Corp Centrifugal distributor and electrostatic painting apparatus employing same
US3113037A (en) * 1960-09-19 1963-12-03 Watanabe Tamotsu Methods and apparatus for coating articles by static electricity
US3219013A (en) * 1962-05-04 1965-11-23 Gen Motors Corp Precharging device for electrostatic painting apparatus

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2877137A (en) * 1952-05-13 1959-03-10 Ransburg Electro Coating Corp Method of electrostatically coating an article
US2989241A (en) * 1956-07-16 1961-06-20 Ransburg Electro Coating Corp Apparatus for electrostatic spray coating
US2966880A (en) * 1956-11-23 1961-01-03 Daimler Benz Ag Control arrangement for electrostatic spray installation
US2975756A (en) * 1958-02-26 1961-03-21 Gen Motors Corp Electrostatic paint spray
US3001719A (en) * 1959-07-30 1961-09-26 Gen Motors Corp Electrostatic coating apparatus with rotary impeller
US3113037A (en) * 1960-09-19 1963-12-03 Watanabe Tamotsu Methods and apparatus for coating articles by static electricity
US3104185A (en) * 1961-11-15 1963-09-17 Gen Motors Corp Centrifugal distributor and electrostatic painting apparatus employing same
US3219013A (en) * 1962-05-04 1965-11-23 Gen Motors Corp Precharging device for electrostatic painting apparatus

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4009829A (en) * 1975-02-11 1977-03-01 Ppg Industries, Inc. Electrostatic spray coating apparatus
FR2348750A1 (en) * 1976-04-21 1977-11-18 Caterpillar Tractor Co System and method for electrostatic painting
WO1979000267A1 (en) * 1977-11-09 1979-05-17 Caterpillar Tractor Co Electrostatic coating system
US4158344A (en) * 1977-11-09 1979-06-19 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Electrostatic coating system
US4120261A (en) * 1977-11-25 1978-10-17 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Electrostatic coating system
US4343828A (en) * 1980-12-24 1982-08-10 Caterpillar Tractor Co. Electrodynamic painting system and method
GB2124517A (en) * 1982-06-10 1984-02-22 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Electrostatic spraying apparatus
EP0120648A2 (en) * 1983-03-24 1984-10-03 Nordson Corporation Method and apparatus for inductively charging centrifugally atomized conductive coating material
EP0120648A3 (en) * 1983-03-24 1985-10-16 Nordson Corporation Method and apparatus for inductively charging centrifugally atomized conductive coating material
US4628859A (en) * 1985-04-15 1986-12-16 Hines Andrew D Apparatus and workpiece fixture for electrostatic spray coating
US5192369A (en) * 1986-11-20 1993-03-09 British Technology Group Ltd. Apparatus for spraying harvested crops
US5287801A (en) * 1991-07-31 1994-02-22 Clark Gordon A Flavoring food products
US5662278A (en) * 1992-12-03 1997-09-02 Ransburg Corporation Method for treating non-conductive rotary atomizer
US5433387A (en) * 1992-12-03 1995-07-18 Ransburg Corporation Nonincendive rotary atomizer
US5622563A (en) * 1992-12-03 1997-04-22 Ransburg Corporation Nonincedive rotary atomizer
US5633306A (en) * 1992-12-03 1997-05-27 Ransburg Corporation Nonincendive rotary atomizer
US20040177809A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 2004-09-16 Phoqus Limited Electrostatic coating
WO1996035516A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 1996-11-14 Colorcon Limited Electrostatic coating
US20060280943A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 2006-12-14 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Powder coating composition for electrostatic coating of pharmaceutical substrates
GB2316342B (en) * 1995-05-09 2000-01-12 Colorcon Ltd Electrostatic coating
US6117479A (en) * 1995-05-09 2000-09-12 Phoqus Limited Electrostatic coating
US6406738B1 (en) 1995-05-09 2002-06-18 Phoqus Limited Powder coating composition for electrostatic coating of pharmaceutical substrates
US7070656B2 (en) 1995-05-09 2006-07-04 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Electrostatic coating
US7008668B2 (en) 1995-05-09 2006-03-07 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Powder coating composition for electrostatic coating of pharmaceutical substrates
US20030138487A1 (en) * 1995-05-09 2003-07-24 Phoqus Limited Powder coating composition for electrostatic coating of pharmaceutical substrates
GB2316342A (en) * 1995-05-09 1998-02-25 Colorcon Ltd Electrostatic coating
US5753315A (en) * 1995-09-29 1998-05-19 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Electrostatic coating method
US6783768B1 (en) 1996-11-13 2004-08-31 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Method and apparatus for the coating of substrates for pharmaceutical use
US20050003074A1 (en) * 1996-11-13 2005-01-06 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Method and apparatus for the coating of substrates for pharmaceutical use
US20020197388A1 (en) * 1996-11-13 2002-12-26 Phoqus Limited. Method and apparatus for the coating of substrates for pharmaceutical use
US7153538B2 (en) 1996-11-13 2006-12-26 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Method and apparatus for the coating of substrates for pharmaceutical use
US20030113445A1 (en) * 2000-02-01 2003-06-19 Martin Trevor Ian Powder material for electrostatic application to a substrate and electrostatic application of the powder material to a substrate
US7285303B2 (en) 2000-02-01 2007-10-23 Phoqus Pharmaceuticals Limited Powder material for electrostatic application to a substrate and electrostatic application of the powder material to a substrate
US20130156970A1 (en) * 2011-12-15 2013-06-20 Honeywell Asca Inc. Method to Create Uniform Distribution, Minimize Applied Solution Volume and Control Droplet Size of Water and/or Coating Applications for Web Applications
US8985051B2 (en) * 2011-12-15 2015-03-24 Honeywell Asca Inc. Apparatus for producing a spray of changed droplets of aqueous liquid

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3342621A (en) Electrostatic precipitation process
US3408985A (en) Electrostatic spray coating apparatus
US3195819A (en) Spray nozzle for coating articles
US4962885A (en) Process and apparatus for spraying liquid
US4380320A (en) Electrostatic powder spray gun nozzle
US4215818A (en) Induction charging electrostatic spraying device and method
US4765539A (en) Electrostatic spraying apparatus
US20040050946A1 (en) Method and apparatus for electrostatic spray
US5353995A (en) Device with rotating ionizer head for electrostatically spraying a powder coating product
US3698636A (en) Device for the electrostatic application of protective coatings with synthetic powders by the use of spray guns
US3873024A (en) Apparatus for spraying a plurality of different powders
US4106697A (en) Spraying device with gas shroud and electrostatic charging means having a porous electrode
US5647543A (en) Electrostatic ionizing system
US2658009A (en) Electrostatic coating method and apparatus
US3475198A (en) Method and apparatus for applying a binder material to a prearranged web of unbound,non-woven fibers by electrostatic attraction
US2784114A (en) Spray coating apparatus and method
US5584931A (en) Electrostatic spray device
US4009829A (en) Electrostatic spray coating apparatus
US2270341A (en) Method of coating granular materials
US4011991A (en) Electrostatic powder painting apparatus
US3777981A (en) Spray apparatus and method
US2893894A (en) Method and apparatus for electrostatically coating
US2247963A (en) Apparatus for spray coating articles
US5685482A (en) Induction spray charging apparatus
US2893893A (en) Method and apparatus for electrostatic coating