US3889859A - Pack frame and sack therefor - Google Patents

Pack frame and sack therefor Download PDF

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US3889859A
US3889859A US36996173A US3889859A US 3889859 A US3889859 A US 3889859A US 36996173 A US36996173 A US 36996173A US 3889859 A US3889859 A US 3889859A
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bar
side
hip
upper
pack
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Mark T Joseph
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Samsonite Corp
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Samsonite Corp
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Assigned to SAMSONITE CORPORATION reassignment SAMSONITE CORPORATION MERGER (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BCI SAMSONITE CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE. (CHANGED INTO), SAMSONITE CORPORATION, A CORP. OF CO (MERGED INTO)
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/04Sacks or packs carried on the body by means of two straps passing over the two shoulders
    • A45F3/08Carrying-frames; Frames combined with sacks

Abstract

A pack frame having a pair of tubular side bars, a straight tubular shoulder strap attachment bar and a rearwardly bowed, tubular waist bar. A rearwardly extending pack spreader bar which is inserted in a surrounding sleeve of a sack attached to the frame is mounted at the upper ends of the side bars, not only maintains the top of the sack in spread position but also provides a support for heavier articles placed on top of the sack. Such articles may be lashed to a removable U-shaped upper extension bar, the sides of which are telescoped into the upper ends of the side bars. An L-shaped hip tube having an upright post and a forwardly extending arm is mounted adjacent the lower end of each side bar and extends forwardly alongside the hip of the user. A joint for connecting each hip tube and the side bar is adjustable upwardly and downwardly along the side bar, while a series of differently angled holes in the post of the hip tube permits the angle of the hip tube to be varied, through a removable pin which also extends through the joint. In addition, the hip tube post may be placed in the joint to extend either upwardly or downwardly, to accommodate a considerable variation in the shoulder to hip dimension of a user. A hip strap, which includes an outer strap and an inner padding, is tightened about the hips of the user, while a pin carried at each side of the hip strap extends through a grommet at the lower end of the corresponding shoulder strap and through the corresponding hip tube, so that the weight of the pack is concentrated at the sides of the hips of the user, rather than on the shoulders. The upper ends of the shoulder straps are also adjustable laterally along the shoulder strap attaching bar. A removable, generally U-shaped lower extension bar, having an outwardly bowed lower cross member, is telescoped into the lower ends of the side bars, so that light but bulky articles may be lashed thereto. The sack has a forwardly extending flap at each side for attachment to the frame side bars and a sleeve extending around the sides and rear of the top, for encircling the pack spreader bar. A panel in the rear wall of the pack is attached by a pair of laterally spaced zippers which open from the top downwardly, while a pair of pouches inside the sack are attached to the front wall thereof and provided with drawstrings. These pouches will lie flat against the front wall of the sack when empty. A map pocket is mounted on the rear of the panel, while a pair of side pockets are provided with diagonally extending zippers, each having a pair of slides for access to a limited area of a side pocket at any vertical position.

Description

United States Patent [191 Joseph 1 PACK FRAME AND SACK THEREFOR [75] Inventor: Mark T. Joseph, Denver, C010.

[73] Assignee: Samsonite Corporation, Denver,

[22] Filed: June 14, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 369,961

[52] US. Cl. 224/8 R; 224/25 A [51] Int. Cl. A45f 3/00 [58] Field of Search 224/8 R, 25 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,822,117 2/1958 Mack 224/8 R 3,206,087 9/1965 Tyrrell 224/8 R 3,355,075 11/1967 Dean 224/25 A 3,653,566 4/1972 Owens 224/25 A 3,733,017 5/1973 Pletz 224/8 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,354,399 3/1963 France 224/25 A 813,280 1/1936 France 224/8 R 496,306 11/1938 United Kingdom 224/8 R Primary ExaminerRobert J. Spar Assistant ExaminerRoss Weaver Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Horace B. Van Valkenburgh; Frank C. Lowe [5 7] ABSTRACT A pack frame having a pair of tubular side bars, a straight tubular shoulder strap attachment bar and a rearwardly bowed, tubular waist bar. A rearwardly extending pack spreader bar which is inserted in a surrounding sleeve of a sack attached to the frame is mounted at the upper ends of the side bars, not only maintains the top of the sack in spread position but also provides a support for heavier articles placed on top of the sack. Such articles may be lashed to a removable U-shaped upper extension bar, the sides of which are telescoped into the upper ends of the side 1 June 17, 1975 bars. An L-shaped hip tube having an upright post and a forwardly extending arm is mounted adjacent the lower end of each side bar and extends forwardly alongside the hip of the userv A joint for connecting each hip tube and the side bar is adjustable upwardly and downwardly along the side bar, while a series of differently angled holes in the post of the hip tube permits the angle of the hip tube to be varied, through a removable pin which also extends through the joint. In addition, the hip tube post may be placed in the joint to extend either upwardly or downwardly, to accommodate a considerable variation in the shoulder to hip dimension of a user. A hip strap, which includes an outer strap and an inner padding, is tightened about the hips of the user, while a pin carried at each side of the hip strap extends through a grommet at the lower end of the corresponding shoulder strap and through the corresponding hip tube, so that the weight of the pack is concentrated at the sides of the hips of the user, rather than on the shoulders. The upper ends of the shoulder straps are also adjustable laterally along the shoulder strap attaching bar. A removable, gener ally Ushaped lower extension bar, having an outwardly bowed lower cross member, is telescoped into the lower ends of the side bars, so that light but bulky articles may be lashed thereto.

The sack has a forwardly extending flap at each side for attachment to the frame side bars and a sleeve extending around the sides and rear of the top, for encircling the pack spreader bar. A panel in the rear wall of the pack is attached by a pair of laterally spaced zippers which open from the top downwardly, while a pair of pouches inside the sack are attached to the front wall thereof and provided with drawstrings. These pouches will lie flat against the front wall of the sack when empty. A map pocket is mounted on the rear of the panel, while a pair of side pockets are provided with diagonally extending zippers, each having a pair of slides for access to a limited area of a side pocket at any vertical position.

3 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUN 1 7 1915 '5 SHEET PATENTEDJUN 17 I975 SHEET Fig. /4

PACK FRAME AND SACK THEREFOR This invention relates to pack frames and sacks therefor. More particularly, this invention relates to a pack frame and sack which is particularly adapted to be utilized by campers, hunters, fishermen, mountain climbers and the like.

An object of this invention is to provide a pack frame which is adjustable with respect to the body of the user. For this purpose, the upper ends of the shoulder straps of the pack frame of this invention are adjustable in accordance with the width of the shoulders of the user, and more particularly, a hip strap is adjustable not only upwardly and downwardly so as to vary the longitudinal distance of the hip strap from the shoulders, but also to accommodate variations in the girth of the hips of the user. Such adjustability accommodates numerous variations in both the height and the body dimensions of various users.

Another object of this invention is to provide a pack frame by which a major portion of the load thereof is carried by the hips of the user. For this purpose, the hip strap is padded and is tightened about the hips of the user, in a position engaging the hip bones, with the hip strap being positioned accurately by the above mentioned adjustability. In addition, the load is transferred to the hip strap at each side, rather than primarily to the back or shoulders of the user, thereby, in effect, causing the load to tip rearwardly from the body of the user and the shoulder straps merely maintaining the balance of the load, i.e., primarily resisting a rearward force, rather than a downward force.

A further object of this invention is to distribute the load on the shoulder straps in such a manner that the area below the shoulders, and particularly under the arms, is neither pinched nor squeezed during use. For this purpose, the lower ends of the shoulder straps are carried at a point forwardly of the main portion of the pack frame.

A further object of this invention is to provide a sack which is especially adapted to fit the pack frame; which provides additional accessibility to articles carried in the sack; which permits a concentration of weight at a reasonably high position on the pack frame; and which permits variation in both the location and extent of the load or articles to be carried.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pack frame which, in cooperation with the sack of this invention, provides a fixed support for articles mounted above the sack, as well as an adjustable extension of the lower end of the pack frame, so as to accommodate articles of considerable bulk, but relatively light in weight, such as sleeping bags, foam pads and the like.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a pack frame and sack therefor which is rugged in construction but light in weight and will withstand the rigors of hard usage, but is readily adjustable for use by different users.

Additional objects and the novel features of this invention will become apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a front perspective view of a pack constructed in accordance with this invention, which includes a frame and a sack.

FIG. 2 is a side perspective view of the pack on a FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the frame for the pack.

FIG. 4 is a vertical section, on an enlarged scale and taken along line 4-4 of FIG. I, at the location of a pin which attaches a shoulder strap and a waist strap to a hip tube.

FIG. 5 is a front elevation of a side bar of the frame.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation of the side bar.

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a waist bar of the frame.

FIG. 8 is a bottom plan view of a shoulder strap bar.

FIG. 9 is a side elevation of the right hand adjustable hip tube showing also, in exploded arrangement, resilient plugs for the ends of the hip tube, with one plug in section.

FIGS. 10, I1 and I2 are transverse sections, on an enlarged scale, taken respectively along lines 10--l0, 11-11 and l2l2 of FIG. 9.

FIG. 13 is a top plan view, on an enlarged scale, of a joint for connecting the hip tube to the lower portion of a side bar of the frame.

FIG. 14 is a side elevation of the joint shown in FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a transverse, fragmentary section, on an enlarged scale and taken along line 15-15 of FIG. 3 through a joint for attaching a pack spreader bar and a top U-bar to a side bar of the frame.

FIG. 16 is a rear view ofa bottom U-bar of the frame.

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of the bottom U-bar.

FIG. 18 is a side elevation of the bottom U-bar.

FIG. 19 is a rear view of the sack with a center compartment of the sack open to show parts inside such compartment.

FIG. 20 is a side view of the sack per se, showing the manner of access to a side pocket and one of the strips by which the sack is attached to the frame.

As illustrated in FIGS. l3, a pack frame F, to which a sack S is attached, may be carried by a user or person P, with smaller articles in the various pockets provided on sack S, as will be described later, which may be articles to which relatively ready access is desired, such as a compass, matches, dark glasses when not in use, maps and the like. Other articles, such as food, clothing and the like, knives, hatchets and the like are carried inside the sack. Bulky but relatively heavy articles, such as a folded tent, an air mattress (if carried) and the like may be placed on top of the sack S and attached, as by cords or other type of lashing, to an upper extension bar U, which is also removable, if not desired for use, as explained later. Other bulky but lighter articles, such as down or other lighter types of sleeping bags, foam pads and the like may be rolled or folded and attached to the frame, under the sack S, as by lashing by cords or the like to frame side bars B and/or a lower extension bar L, which is also adjustable upwardly and downwardly, in a manner described later.

As in FIGS. 1 and 3, the pack frame F of this inven tion includes a pair of side bars B, of a special configuration described later and between which extends, at an appropriate position, a shoulder strap bar D, to which the upper ends of shoulder straps E are attached. A rearwardly bowed waist bar A extends between the side bars, at a lower position. The generally U-shaped but rearwardly bowed lower extension bar L is adjustable upwardly and downwardly in the lower ends of the side bars, while the upper U'shaped bar U is releasably secured in the upper ends of the side bars B. Also, a pair of rods 9 may extend between the shoulder strap bar D and the waist bar A, to rigidify the frame structure.

In accordance with this invention, a pair of angular hip tubes T, one on each side of the lower end of the pack frame, are removably and adjustably attached to the lower ends of the side bars 8 by a special joint J, which is adjustable upwardly and downwardly along the corresponding side bar. In addition, the angular hip tubes T may be reversed in position with respect to the joints J, as between the position of FIG. 2 and that of FIG. 3, to accommodate a shorter or longer torso of the user. Furthermore, the lateral inclination of the hip tubes T may be adjusted to increase or decrease the width between the ends of the hip tubes, to accommodate narrower or wider hips of a user, Thus, the hip tubes T, to the ends of which are not only secured the lower ends of the shoulder straps E, but also the opposite sides of a hip strap H, accommodate, by adjustment of the hip tubes only, variations not only in the length of the torso, but also the girth at the hips of the user, In addition, the attachment of the hip strap H at each side to the end of the corresponding hip tube T, causes the weight of the pack to be transferred to the hip strap at each side and thus the pack to tend to tip rearwardly with the consequence that the shoulder straps primarily resist a rearward rather than a downward force.

The upper ends of the shoulder straps E are secured to the shoulder strap bar D, as by a pin 10 inserted through a selected hole 11 in the shoulder strap bar, shown in FIG. 3, and secured by a suitable fastening device, such as a device similar to a cutter pin or the spiral rings 12 shown, of a conventional nature. It will be noted that similar pins 10 and rings 12 are utilized to attach the joint J to the lower portion of a side bar B, as well as a hip tube T to the joint J. Similar pins 10 and rings 12, or other suitable fastening devices, are utilized to attach a joint J' to the upper end of the side bar B for optional attachment of the upper extension bar U and attachment of the pack spreader bar C, which, in accordance with this invention, maintains the top of the pack in a spread position and serves the additional function of supporting articles which may be placed on top of the pack and lashed to the upper extension bar U.

Similar pins 10 and rings 12 or the like are utilized in attaching the lower extension bar L to the lower end of the side bars B. However, the joints J", by which the ends of the shoulder strap bar D and the waist bar A are attached to the side bars B, are preferably secured by rivets 13, since due to the adjustability provided by the hip tubes T, it is unnecessary to adjust either the shoulder strap bar D or the waist bar A. The use of rivets 13 also tends to impart additional rigidity to the frame structure.

As in FIG. 1, an apertured webbing 14 may be stretched around the side bars at a position below the shoulder bar D, with each end of the webbing being provided with a grommet 15 for tightening the web' bing, as by a cord 16 which is preferably extended several times between the grommets and then tied together, as at the center. The purpose of the webbing is to provide an air space between the back of the user and the sack S, and also to provide a smoother surface for contacting the back of the user, as to prevent articles within the sack S, which might become canted or twisted to present a sharp edge, from causing discomfort to the back of the user. It will be noted that the knot in the cord 16 is approximately at the center of the back of the user, in which there is a depression or indentation running longitudinally.

Each shoulder strap E, as in FIG. 1, may include an upper strap 17, preferably formed of a sleeve of tightly woven webbing, such as nylon, enclosing a pad, as of synthetic rubber or plastic foam of the type known as Ensilite," or other resilient material, to provide comfort for the shoulders of the user. At its upper end, each strap 17 is provided with a grommet 18 through which the pin 10 for attaching the shoulder strap to the shoulder strap bar D extends. At its front lower end, the sleeve of upper strap 17 is attached, as by stitching, to an extension strap 19, such as formed of webbing, which is adjustably secured to a lower strap 20 by a buckle 21.

The hip strap H may include a webbing strap 22, the length of which is adjustable by a buckle 23, to which one end of the waist strap is attached and through which the other end extends. To the inside of strap 22 is attached padding 24 which may consist of a fabric covering enclosing a foam rubber or similar pad, to provide comfortable engagement of the hip strap with the body of the user, with strap 22 being attached to padding 24 by stitching 25 of FIG. 4, adjacent both the upper and lower edges, except below the position of one or two pair of grommets 26 at each side, to permit insertion of a pin 10 for attachment to the hip tube T and shoulder strap E Pin 10, with a washer 27 beneath its head to engage the grommet and a similar washer preferably being placed below each grommet 18 at the upper end of the shoulder strap, extends through the grommet 26, then through a similar grommet 28 at the lower end of the lower shoulder strap 20, and then through a selected one of a pair of spaced holes 29 at the outer end of hip tube T, shown also in FIG, 9. As will be evident, the girth which the waist strap will encompass is adjusted by buckle 24, as well as the lateral position of the hip tubes T, which may be moved closer together or further apart, in a manner described later, and the selection of alternate grommets 26. As will be evident from FIG. 1, the weight of the pack is essentially concentrated over the extended ends of ths hip tubes T which bears downwardly through the hip strap H on the hips of the user and therefore permits the hips to support primarily the weight of the pack and its contents, rather than concentrating the load on the shoulders.

The side bars B, shoulder strap bar D, waist bar A and hip tubes T are preferably formed of lightweight tubing, such as aluminum of a greater diameter than other parts, also made of tubing, such as pack spreader bar C, upper extension bar U and lower extension bar L, formed of lightweight tubing having an outside diameter corresponding to the inside diameter of side bars B, so that bars U and L will fit into the side bars. Rods 9 may be solid but considerably smaller in diameter. Joints J, J and J" may also be formed of lightweight metal, such as aluminum, which is cast or molded and then polished on the outside and holes therethrough machined or reamed to size.

Each side bar B, as in FIGS. 5 and 6, includes a slight forward curve 30, which is positioned below the shoulder strap bar D, as in FIG, 3, and a slight rearward curve 31, which is positioned just above the waist bar A, as in FIG. 3, with the webbing 13 of FIG. 1 being positioned immediately below the curve 30. The curve 31 positions the lower end of the pack frame away from the buttocks of the user, while the curve 30 permits the upper portion of the frame to tip slightly toward the head of the user, to position the heavier weight carried by the upper portion of the frame closer to the body of the user and the center of gravity of the pack and its load closer to the ends of hip tubes T. At its upper end, each side bar B is provided with a hole 32, for attachment of the joints J' of FIG. 3, by which the pack spreader bar C is attached, and in conjunction with which the upper bar U may be attached. Disposed at spaced positions along each bar are a series of holes 33 for receiving a pin or rivet, for attachment of the sack S, in manner described later, while a rivet hole 34 in each bar accommodates a rivet 13, for attachment of the joints J" for the shoulder strap bar D. Just below the curve 31 is an oblique hole 35 which accommodates a rivet 13, for attachment of joints J' for the waist bar A, while a series of spaced holes 36 continue down- .wardly toward the lower end of each side bar, for upward and downward adjustment of the joint J carrying the corresponding hip tube T, with the lowermost hole 36 normally being used for attachment of the lower bar L.

The waist bar A, as in FIG. 7, is provided with a hole 37 adjacent each end for a rivet 13 for attachment to joint J", as in FIG. 3, and spaced, intermediate holes 38 which extend only through the upper surface of the bar to receive the lower ends of reinforcing rods 9.

The shoulder strap bar D, as in FIG. 8, is provided, at each end, with a rivet hole 37 for attachment to joint J", and a pair of spaced, centrally located holes 38 which extend through the lower surface only of the bar and receive the upper ends of the reinforcing rods 9. The holes 11, by which the shoulder straps E may be attached and adjusted to different lateral postions, are spaced outwardly from each side of the holes 38, as shown. Any desired number of holes 11 may be utilized, although the three holes shown are normally satisfactory.

Each hip tube T, as in FIGS. 9-12, is provided with an upper post 40, a curved section 41 and an extending arm 42 which extends slightly upwardly when the post 40 extends upwardly through joint J, as in FIG. 3, but tips slightly downwardly when the post 40 extends downwardly through joint J, as in FIG. 2. The holes 29 are positioned along the outer end of arm 42. A series of holes 43, 44 and 45 in post 40, with the holes 44 being transversely centered and the holes 43 and 45 above and below hole 44, but angled, in an inward direction, slightly forwardly and rearwardly, respectively, as in FIGS. -12, permit the hip tube T, when the post 40 extends upwardly through joing J, to be tipped inwardly through pin 10 in hole 43, but to be tipped outwardly through pin 10 in hole 45, in order to accommodate different widths of the hips of a user. Conversely, when post 40 extends downwardly through joint J, pin 10 in hole 43 causes the hip tube to be tipped outwardly and pin 10 in hole 45 causes the hip tube to be tipped inwardly. A thin plastic sleeve may be shrunk over post 40 to minimize marking or scratching of the surface due to frequent insertion of pin 10 into different holes 43, 44 or 45. Each end of the hip tube T is closed by a resilient plug 46, so as to avoid contact by the user or an article with the end of the tube. Plug 46 is provided with a stepped shoulder 47, convex on the outside, for clamping engagement with the inside of the tube T, as well as an inwardly extending, central projection 48 of reduced diameter to facilitate handling the plug during molding thereof, as of a resilient plastic, such as polyethylene.

Each hip tube joint J, as in FIGS. 13 and 14, comprises a generally rectangular block having rounded ends, each corresponding in shape to half the diameter of one of a pair of circular, longitudinal holes 51 therethrough, one of which engages a side bar B and the other engages post 40 of the corresponding hip tube T. Transverse holes 52 centrally intersect the longitudinal holes 51, for receiving a pin 10 for attachment to side bar B and post 40, respectively.

Joint J, as in FIG. 15, is formed from a generally rectangular block 53, one end 54 of which is semicircular to correspond in shape to a longitudinal hole 55 into which the upper end of a side bar B extends, from below. The lower ends of the upper bar U extend into the joint, from above, each fitting inside the corresponding side bar B. The opposite end of the joint J is proved with a transverse hole 56 which extends into the joint in a direction to intersect perpendicularly the longitudinal hole 55 and receives the inner ends of the pack spreader bar C. A pair of holes 52 extend completely through the block and centrally intersect each of holes 55 and 56, respectively, for attaching the joint to the side bar B and upper bar U, and the pack spreader bar C, respectively. Thus, a pin 10 is placed in each of the holes 52, being retained in position by a ring 12 or other suitable device for preventing the pin from coming out. As will be evident, upper bar C may be removed by first removing the attaching pins 10, lifting bar U out and then replacing the pins 10. The joints J" of FIGS. 1 and 3, by which shoulder strap bar D and waist bar A are attached between the side bars B, are essentially the same in construction as the joint J, except that the holes for rivets 13 which attach the bars D and A to the joint, may extend upwardly through the joint, rather than laterally.

The pack spreader bar C, as in FIG. 3, comprises a pair of posts 58, the ends of which fit into the respective joints J, as in FIG. 15, and a cross bar 59, with a round corner, as shown, between the posts and the cross bar. A transverse hole 60, as in FIG. 15, is provided adjacent each end of a post 58, corresponding in size to the holes 52 in the joint .I' and the holes 32 at the upper ends of the side bar B, since each is adapted to receive a pin 10, as in FIG. 3.

The upper extension bar U is similar in construction to the pack spreader bar C, having a pair of posts 61 and a cross bar 62, with rounded corners, as shown, connecting each post with the cross bar. The lower end of each post 61 extends into the upper end of a corresponding side bar B, as in FIG. 15, while a hole through which a pin 10 extends is provided adjacent the lower end of each post 61, similar to hole in each post 58 of pack spreader bar C.

The lower U-shaped bar L, which is removable but normally fits within the lower end of each side bar B to provide an extension for the frame of the pack for attachment of relatively light but bulky articles, as described previously, is offset rearwardly, as in FIGS. 1-3 and 16-18. Thus, the lower bar L may comprise a pair of upright posts 64, each connected by a compound curved section 65 with a rearwardly bowed, lower cross bar 66. As will be evident, articles attached to the lower end of the pack frame will be at least partially supported by the bowed cross bar 66. Each post 64 is provided with a series of transverse holes 67, by which the lower bar L may be attached to the lower end of each side bar B through a pin 10 which is inserted through one of the holes 36 of FIGS. and 6 of the side bar B, most conveniently the lowermost hole, with the vertical position of the lower bar L adjusted by a selection of one of the holes 67 of FIGS. 16 and 18. In FIG. 3, the lower bar L is shown as extending upwardly within the lower ends of the side bars B to the maximum extent, while in FIG. 2, the lower bar L is shown as adjusted further downwardly. As will be evident. the lower bar L may be adjusted, both in accordance with the size of the article or articles which are lashed to the frame below the sack S, as well as to correspond generally to the length of the torso of the user.

Although any suitable sack may be attached to the frame F, or the frame utilized without a sack and equipment only lashed to the frame, it is preferable to utilize a sack with the frame, the sack S being particularly adapted for this purpose. As in FIGS. 1, 2, 19 and 20, the sack S may be formed of a suitable material, such as a sufficiently heavy nylon cloth to withstand the rigors of wear and hard usage, from pieces cut to a suitable size and shape and sewed together in any suitable manner, to provide side walls 70, a front wall 71, a top wall 72, a rear wall 73 and a bottom wall 74. The side and rear walls are joined to the top wall in a manner which provides a sleeve 75 which extends around the sides and rear of the top wall and is open at the front, for insertion of the pack spreader bar C of FIG. 3, prior to its attachment to the frame at the joints 1'. Of course, the pack spreader bar C is preferably inserted in the sleeve 75 while the sack S is empty. The front edge of each side wall 70 is also provided with an upright strip 76. conveniently double walled, in view of the load imposed therein, and desirably integral with the side walls and front wall. Each strip 76 is provided with a series of grommets 77, spaced apart in the same relation as the holes 33 of FIGS. 5 and 6 in the side bars B, so that a pin may be inserted through the corresponding grommet 77 in each strip 76, preferably from the inside to the outside, so that the sack S will be se curely attached to the frame. When the pins 10 are utilized. a restraining device, such as a ring 12, is utilized with each to prevent the pin from coming out. Alternatively, each strip 76 may be attached to the corresponding side bar B by a series of rivets 13, as in FIG. 2, also extending through the holes 33 in the corresponding side bar and a grommet 77.

For more convenient access to the interior of the sack, the rear wall 73 may be provided with a panel 78 which, as in FIG. 19, may be dropped downwardly by unfastening a zipper 79 at each edge of the panel. Although the panel 78 is shown in fully open position in FIG. 19, it will be understood that the panel may be opened partially from the top, until access to a desired article has been obtained. In order to protect the zippers 79 from the exigencies of weather conditions, a longitudinal flap 80, as in FIG. 2 and such as a sleeve of the same fabric as the pocket but stuffed with a suitable material, is adapted normally to cover each zipper, but is merely moved aside as the zippers are opened or closed. The interior of the sack may be provided with a series of pouches 81, each attached at its front sides and bottom to the front wall 71 and closeable at the top by a drawstring 82, provided with a conventional drawstring locking device 83. As will be evident, when larger articles are to be placed inside the sack S, either one or both ofthe pouches 81 may be unfilled, and thus merely pressed against the front wall of the sack by such articles. Thus, the pouches 81, while being adapted to be utilized in securely containing a series of smaller articles, do not interfere with the placement of an article, even as large as the inside of the sack S, within the sack.

For convenience, a map pocket 85 may be attached to the rear side of panel 78, as in FIG. 2, with a top cover 86 for the map pocket being adapted to be attached to the rear upper edge thereof in a quickly releasable manner, as by strips of Velcro For additional convenience in access to smaller articles stored in the pack, a side pocket 87 is attached to each side wall of the sack. For readier access to the articles stored in the side pocket 87, a zipper 88 extends diagonally downwardly across the outside of the pocket, each zipper 88 being provided with a pair of zipper slides 89, so that the opening provided by the Zipper 88 into the side pocket 87 may be restricted to a small area which is movable to different vertical positions, as well as the entire area of the inside pocket. This combination of a diagonal zipper and the two slides for the zipper permits not only articles to be inserted in the pocket with facility, but articles other than the articles being removed or inserted in the pocket to be retained in the pocket with a reduced possibility of falling out. One difficulty with side pockets which are accessible only from the top is that many times a large proportion of the contents of the pocket must be removed before a desired article is found. Also, a normally vertical zipper in a side pocket, which opens only from the top to bottom, often permits a number of articles to spill out of the pocket when an article to be removed is found to be at or near the bottom of the pocket. Thus, the diagonal zipper with two slides overcomes each of the above difficulties in previous types of side pockets.

Again, to protect the zipper 88 from the exigencies of adverse weather, a flap 90, similar in construction to flaps 80, is adapted to overlie the zipper 88, but is merely pushed aside when either or both of the zipper slides are moved. The flap 90 additionally protects the zipper, as from rain or snow, because of its diagonal po sition.

From the foregoint, it will be evident that the pack frame and sack therefor of this invention fulfills to a marked degree the requirements and objects hereinbefore set forth. As described previously, the upper ends of the shoulder straps of the pack frame are adjustable laterally through the holes 11 in the shoulder strap bar D, while each hip tube T is adjustable vertically through adjustment of the corresponding joint J along the corresponding side bar B, through holes 36 at the lower end of each side bar. In addition, the angularity of the arm 42 of each hip tube T may be adjusted inwardly and outwardly, to accommodate the measurement around the hips of an individual using the pack, through the obliquely staggered holes 43, 44 and 45 in the hip tubes. Furthermore, the hip tubes T may be placed with the arms 42 below the joints J, i.e., with a post 40 of each hip tube extending upwardly to accommodate a longer torso of a user, as well as with the arms 42 above the joints .l, i.e., the posts 40 extending downwardly into the joint, to accommodate a shorter torso of a user. Of course, the user may find that either position of the hip tubes T is more comfortable and thus may utilize the considerable adjustment of the vertical position of the hip tubes, irrespective of the position of the hip tubes relative to the joints 1. Since the hip strap H may be adjusted to comfortably encircle the hips of the user and the load of the pack is concentrated on the hip strap, but at a position at each side of the hip strap rather than at the rear, the weight of the pack and the load carried thereby is imposed primarily upon the legs of the user which must carry this weight in any event rather than on the shoulders of the user, as in the usual prior type of pack frame. While the hip strap H is preferably tightened so as to be quite snug around the hips of the user, such position is low on the torso, producing little or no pressure on the stomach area and further does not tend to produce pressure which restricts the breathing of the user.

Since the weight carried by the shoulder straps is reduced to what may be considered a minimum, there is little opportunity for the shoulder straps to constrict breathing or to bind the area near the shoulders, particularly at the position of the pectoral muscles. In addition, since the lower ends of the shoulder straps are attached at the sides of the user, rather than behind him, there is again less tendency for the shoulder straps to bind the area just below the shoulders.

The sack S, as described and shown, is particularly adapted for use with the pack frame of this invention and has many features of convenience, including the pack spreader bar C which maintains the sack in a spread condition at the top and thus holds the sack in an open condition, when articles are being placed inside. The pack spreader bar C, of course, has a dual function, the additional function being that of providing a fixed support for articles placed on top ofthe sack and lashed to the upper bar U. The rigid support provided by the pack spreader bar C thus permits articles of considerable weight to be placed at the top of the pack without tending to slide down or to compress articles placed inside the sack S. The upper bar U and lower bar L are, of course, removable when desired, but add relatively little weight to the pack frame, when retained thereon. Also, the lower bar L may be adjusted to the upper position of FIG. 3 and adds a minimum of additional weight. The rearwardly bowed cross bar of the lower bar L further prevents the lower end of the pack frame from banging the buttocks of the user each time a step is taken.

it will be understood that, although a preferred embodiment of both the pack frame and the sack of this invention have been illustrated and described, other embodiments may exist and various changes made therein, without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A pack frame comprising:

a pair of side bars and transverse bars connecting said side bars, including an upper transverse bar adapted for the attachment of the upper ends of a pair of shoulder strap means;

a forwardly extending hip member attached to each side bar at a lower position and adapted to extend forwardly to a position alongside a hip of a user, each hip member being provided with a rear post and a forwardly extending arm;

means for attaching said hip member to the corre sponding side bar with said post extending either upwardly or downwardly;

a pair of shoulder strap means attached at the upper ends thereof to said upper transverse bar;

a hip strap means constructed and arranged to encir cle the hips of said user;

means for connecting the lower end of a shoulder strap means and one side of said hip strap means to the corresponding hip member alongside each said hip of said user;

joints for attaching each hip member to the corresponding side bar, each joint having spaced upright apertures for engaging said side bar and said post, respectively, said post having a series of vertically spaced holes at different angles to the direction of said arm and said side bar having a series of vertically spaced holes;

removable pin means for extending alternatively through said holes of said post for attaching said post to said joint at different angular positions; and

removable pin means for extending alternatively through said holes in said side bar for attaching said joint to said side bar at different vertical positions.

2. A pack frame as defined in claim 1, wherein:

said hip member is tubular with open ends; and

a plug closes each end of said hip member, said plug being resilient to engage the inside of each end of said hip member and having a flange abutting the end of the tubular wall of said hip member.

3. A pack frame as defined in claim 1, wherein:

said side bars are tubular and provided with an angular forward offset spaced below said upper trans verse bar and a rearward angular offset spaced above said hip member, each said side bar having a transverse hole adjacent the upper end for attachment by pin means ofa joint for connecting a pack spreader bar to said side bars, a series of vertically spaced, transverse holes for attachment by pin means of a sack to said side bars, said upper transverse bar being tubular and having a spaced series of vertical holes at each side thereof for pin means for attaching the upper ends of said shoulder strap means, and a pair of centrally located, spaced holes in the underside only for reception of reinforcing rods;

a tubular waist bar is attached to said side bars immediately below said rearward angular offset, said waist bar being bowed rearwardly and having a pair of laterally spaced holes in the upper side only, for reception of the lower ends of said reinforcing rods;

a rearwardly extending tubular pack spreader bar of generally rectangular configuration with rounded corners and forwardly extending posts attached to the upper ends of said side bars;

a tubular upper extension bar having an outer diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of said side bars and insertable within the upper ends of said side bars, said upper extension bar having a pair of spaced, depending posts and an upper cross member connected to said posts by rounded corners;

a tubular lower extension bar having an outer diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of said side bars and having a pair of upwardly extending posts insertable within the lower ends of said side bars,

said posts being connected by rounded corners with a rearwardly bowed lower cross member; second joints having a vertical aperture therethrough for engaging said side bar and a horizontal aperture extending into said joint from the inside for engaging the ends of the respective upper transverse bar and waist bar, said second joints being attached by rivet means to said side bars and to the respective ends of said upper transverse bar and waist bar; third joints attachable to the upper end of each side bar, having a vertical aperture for receiving said side bar and a horizontal aperture extending from 12 the rear into said joint for receiving the ends of the posts of said pack spreader bar; removable pin means for attaching the ends of said posts to said third joints and for attaching said third joints to the upper ends of said side bars and concurrently attaching the lower ends of the posts of said upper extension bar to said side bars; and removable pin means for attaching said posts of said lower extension bar inside the lower ends of said side bars.

Claims (3)

1. A pack frame comprising: a pair of side bars and transverse bars connecting said side bars, including an upper transverse bar adapted for the attachment of the upper ends of a pair of shoulder strap means; a forwardly extending hip member attached to each side bar at a lower position and adapted to extend forwardly to a position alongside a hip of a user, each hip member being provided with a rear post and a forwardly extending arm; means for attaching said hip member to the corresponding side bar with said post extending either upwardly or downwardly; a pair of shoulder strap means attached at the upper ends thereof to said upper transverse bar; a hip strap means constructed and arranged to encircle the hips of said user; means for connecting the lower end of a shoulder strap means and one side of said hip strap means to the corresponding hip member alongside each said hip of said user; joints for attaching each hip member to the corresponding side bar, each joint having spaced upright apertures for engaging said side bar and said post, respectively, said post having a series of vertically spaced holes at different angles to the direction of said arm and said side bar having a series of vertically spaced holes; removable pin means for extending alternatively through said holes of said post for attaching said post to said joint at different angular positions; and removable pin means for extending alternatively through said holes in said side bar for attaching said joint to said side bar at different vertical positions.
2. A pack frame as defined in claim 1, wherein: said hip member is tubular with open ends; and a plug closes each end of said hip member, said plug being resilient to engage the inside of each end of said hip member and having a flange abutting the end of the tubular wall of said hip member.
3. A pack frame as defined in claim 1, wherein: said side bars are tubular and provided with an angular forward offset spaced below said upper transverse bar and a rearward angular offset spaced above said hip member, each said side bar having a transverse hole adjacent the upper end for attachment by pin means of a joint for connecting a pack spreader bar to said side bars, a series of vertically spaced, transverse holes for attachment by pin means of a sack to said side bars, said upper transverse bar being tubular and having a spaced series of vertical holes at each side thereof for pin means for attaching the upper ends of said shoulder strap means, and a pair of centrally located, spaced holes in the underside only for reception of reinforcing rods; a tubular waist bar is attached to said side bars immediately below said rearward angular offset, said waist bar being bowed rearwardly and having a pair of laterally spaced holes in the upper side only, for reception of the lower ends of said reinforcing rods; a rearwardly extending tubular pack spreader bar of generally rectangular configuration with rounded corners and forwardly extending posts attached to the upper ends of said side bars; a tubular upper extension bar having an outer diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of said side bars and insertable within the upper ends of said side bars, said upper extension bar having a pair of spaced, depending posts and an upper cross member connected to said posts by rounded corners; a tubular lower extension bar having an outer diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of said side bars and having a pair of upwardly extending posts insertable within the lower ends of said side bars, said posts being connected by rounded corners with a rearwardly bowed lower cross member; second joints having a vertical aperture therethrough for engaging said side bar and a horizontal aperture extending into said joint from the inside for engaging the ends of the respective upper transverse bar and waist bar, said second joints being attached by rivet means to said side bars and to the respective ends of said upper transverse bar and waist bar; third joints attachable to the upper end of each side bar, having a vertical aperture for receiving said side bar and a horizontal aperture extending from the rear into said joint for receiving the ends of the posts of said pack spreader bar; removable pin means for attaching the ends of said posts to said third joints and for attaching said third joints to the upper ends of said side bars and concurrently attaching the lower ends of the posts of said upper extension bar to said side bars; and removable pin means for attaching said posts of said lower extension bar inside the lower ends of said side bars.
US36996173 1973-06-14 1973-06-14 Pack frame and sack therefor Expired - Lifetime US3889859A (en)

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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4015759A (en) * 1975-05-27 1977-04-05 Dreissigacker Peter D Backpack frame having shoulder and hip supports with flexible connection to hip support
US4189076A (en) * 1976-05-26 1980-02-19 Zufich Anthony C Backpack and frame apparatus
US4194656A (en) * 1976-05-26 1980-03-25 Zufich Anthony C Backpack and frame apparatus
US4217998A (en) * 1976-05-10 1980-08-19 Alexander James E Adjustable weight balancing device for a backpack frame
US4303186A (en) * 1980-08-11 1981-12-01 Ollinger Iv Charles G Triaxially pivotable backpack carrier
US4605143A (en) * 1985-02-04 1986-08-12 Parker Steven E Method and apparatus for retaining articles on packframes
EP0257142A1 (en) * 1986-08-11 1988-03-02 Karrimor International Limited Rucksack with intermediate opening
US5381936A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-01-17 Beery; Nicholas N. Backpack support apparatus
US5465884A (en) * 1994-05-25 1995-11-14 Bohl; Eric E. Crutch pack
US5588570A (en) * 1994-12-28 1996-12-31 Zirbel; Kurt D. Combination backpack and seat device
US5642846A (en) * 1995-10-16 1997-07-01 Morrow; John T. Backpack support apparatus
US5762251A (en) * 1996-08-14 1998-06-09 Dana Design Ltd. External frame backpack with flexible harness
US5904282A (en) * 1996-08-14 1999-05-18 K-2 Corporation External frame backpack harness
US5954253A (en) * 1996-06-26 1999-09-21 Johnson Worldwide Associates, Inc. Flexible frame load carrying system
US6161739A (en) * 1999-07-15 2000-12-19 Bentzen; Michael Versatile backpack
US6199732B1 (en) 1999-05-07 2001-03-13 Johnson Outdoors Inc. Load support system
US6536641B1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2003-03-25 Original Design Group Back-mounted load-carrying apparatus
US20030150895A1 (en) * 2002-02-14 2003-08-14 Beachpacker, Llc Beach equipment carrying apparatus
US20040108350A1 (en) * 2002-11-22 2004-06-10 Bruce Warren External Frame Backpack
US20080121672A1 (en) * 2006-11-06 2008-05-29 Rv Raxx Llc Adjustable vehicle rack system
US20090057359A1 (en) * 2007-08-30 2009-03-05 Wen Jye Chen Backpack
US20090145787A1 (en) * 2007-12-06 2009-06-11 White Angel Lab Golf bag
US20120012629A1 (en) * 2010-07-15 2012-01-19 Deuter Sport Gmbh & Co. Kg Backpack Having Removable Frame
EP2420155A1 (en) * 2010-08-22 2012-02-22 Marom Dolphin Ltd. Device for distributing weight
WO2012081013A1 (en) * 2010-12-16 2012-06-21 Source Vagabond Systems Ltd. Load carrier device
US20140367439A1 (en) * 2013-06-14 2014-12-18 Joseph Ethan Valesko Backpack Frame
US20160058160A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Bill Ridley Backpack with flexible frame
US10383427B1 (en) * 2018-04-10 2019-08-20 Ralph Walker Backpack support device
WO2019200209A1 (en) * 2018-04-13 2019-10-17 Ripepi Philip M Multifunctional pack frame

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US3733017A (en) * 1971-03-22 1973-05-15 K2 Corp Adjustable pack frame

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US3206087A (en) * 1961-10-02 1965-09-14 Vincent C Tyrreli Back pack frame
US3355075A (en) * 1966-07-25 1967-11-28 William H Dean Pack frame
US3653566A (en) * 1970-06-15 1972-04-04 Jimmie L Owens Pack frame assembly
US3733017A (en) * 1971-03-22 1973-05-15 K2 Corp Adjustable pack frame

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4015759A (en) * 1975-05-27 1977-04-05 Dreissigacker Peter D Backpack frame having shoulder and hip supports with flexible connection to hip support
US4217998A (en) * 1976-05-10 1980-08-19 Alexander James E Adjustable weight balancing device for a backpack frame
US4189076A (en) * 1976-05-26 1980-02-19 Zufich Anthony C Backpack and frame apparatus
US4194656A (en) * 1976-05-26 1980-03-25 Zufich Anthony C Backpack and frame apparatus
US4303186A (en) * 1980-08-11 1981-12-01 Ollinger Iv Charles G Triaxially pivotable backpack carrier
US4605143A (en) * 1985-02-04 1986-08-12 Parker Steven E Method and apparatus for retaining articles on packframes
EP0257142A1 (en) * 1986-08-11 1988-03-02 Karrimor International Limited Rucksack with intermediate opening
US4809893A (en) * 1986-08-11 1989-03-07 Karrimor International Limited Rucksack with intermediate opening
US5381936A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-01-17 Beery; Nicholas N. Backpack support apparatus
US5465884A (en) * 1994-05-25 1995-11-14 Bohl; Eric E. Crutch pack
US5588570A (en) * 1994-12-28 1996-12-31 Zirbel; Kurt D. Combination backpack and seat device
US5642846A (en) * 1995-10-16 1997-07-01 Morrow; John T. Backpack support apparatus
US5954253A (en) * 1996-06-26 1999-09-21 Johnson Worldwide Associates, Inc. Flexible frame load carrying system
US5762251A (en) * 1996-08-14 1998-06-09 Dana Design Ltd. External frame backpack with flexible harness
US5904282A (en) * 1996-08-14 1999-05-18 K-2 Corporation External frame backpack harness
US6199732B1 (en) 1999-05-07 2001-03-13 Johnson Outdoors Inc. Load support system
US6161739A (en) * 1999-07-15 2000-12-19 Bentzen; Michael Versatile backpack
US6536641B1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2003-03-25 Original Design Group Back-mounted load-carrying apparatus
US7988024B2 (en) * 2002-02-14 2011-08-02 Beachpacker, Llc Beach equipment carrying apparatus
US20030150895A1 (en) * 2002-02-14 2003-08-14 Beachpacker, Llc Beach equipment carrying apparatus
US20040108350A1 (en) * 2002-11-22 2004-06-10 Bruce Warren External Frame Backpack
US20080121672A1 (en) * 2006-11-06 2008-05-29 Rv Raxx Llc Adjustable vehicle rack system
US20090057359A1 (en) * 2007-08-30 2009-03-05 Wen Jye Chen Backpack
US7828145B2 (en) * 2007-12-06 2010-11-09 White Angel Ab Golf bag
US20090145787A1 (en) * 2007-12-06 2009-06-11 White Angel Lab Golf bag
US9131762B2 (en) * 2010-07-15 2015-09-15 Deuter Sport Gmbh Backpack having removable frame
US20120012629A1 (en) * 2010-07-15 2012-01-19 Deuter Sport Gmbh & Co. Kg Backpack Having Removable Frame
EP2420155A1 (en) * 2010-08-22 2012-02-22 Marom Dolphin Ltd. Device for distributing weight
US9402456B2 (en) 2010-08-22 2016-08-02 Marom Dolphin Ltd. Device for distributing weight
WO2012081013A1 (en) * 2010-12-16 2012-06-21 Source Vagabond Systems Ltd. Load carrier device
US8991671B2 (en) 2010-12-16 2015-03-31 Source Vagabond Systems Ltd. Load carrier device
US20140367439A1 (en) * 2013-06-14 2014-12-18 Joseph Ethan Valesko Backpack Frame
US9060590B2 (en) * 2013-06-14 2015-06-23 Joseph Ethan Valesko Backpack frame
US20160058160A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Bill Ridley Backpack with flexible frame
US10383427B1 (en) * 2018-04-10 2019-08-20 Ralph Walker Backpack support device
WO2019200209A1 (en) * 2018-04-13 2019-10-17 Ripepi Philip M Multifunctional pack frame
US10470552B2 (en) 2018-04-13 2019-11-12 Philip M. Ripepi Multifunctional pack frame

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