US3884632A - Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments - Google Patents

Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3884632A
US3884632A US34113473A US3884632A US 3884632 A US3884632 A US 3884632A US 34113473 A US34113473 A US 34113473A US 3884632 A US3884632 A US 3884632A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
compartment
material
garments
chemical
process
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
George L Payet
Berthal D Brummet
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
American Laundry Machinery Co
McGraw-Edison Co
Original Assignee
McGraw-Edison Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M13/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M13/10Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, with non-macromolecular organic compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with compounds containing oxygen
    • D06M13/12Aldehydes; Ketones
    • D06M13/127Mono-aldehydes, e.g. formaldehyde; Monoketones
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06CFINISHING, DRESSING, TENTERING OR STRETCHING TEXTILE FABRICS
    • D06C29/00Finishing or dressing, of textile fabrics, not provided for in the preceding groups

Abstract

A vapor-phase process for imparting a durable press to cellulosic-containing material (fabric or successive garments) is an improvement on U.S. Pat. No. 3,660,013, dated May 2, 1972, in that the material being treated is moved through successive treating compartments and is processed faster and more economically. The new process includes first introducing an abundant moisture content into the material at a first compartment or station while not in contact with any chemical treating agents (formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapors) and in then conveying the material through a second compartment containing the chemical treating agents, while the material is at a cooler temperature than the temperature of the chemical compartment whereby to accelerate condensation of the chemical treating agents on the material and a faster reaction therewith. Exhausting is carried out following the chemical compartment in order to enable faster and more economical heating in the curing compartment that follows, and in order to avoid moisture buildup in the curing compartment. In an elongate passageway for treating garments, the respective compartments are divided off by air screens, flap valves and/or rollers. In addition, a slow exhausting lengthwise of the passageway is maintained to provide an effective seal at the entrance end.

Description

United States Patent [191 Payet et al.

[ 1 May 20, 1975 CONTINUOUS DURABLE-PRESS PROCESSING OF FABRIC AND GARMENTS [75] Inventors: George L. Payet, Cincinnati, Ohio;

Bertha] D. Brummet, Barrington, Ill.

[73] Assignee: McGraw-Edison Company, Elgin,

Ill.

[22] Filed: Mar. 14, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 341,134

Primary Examiner-Stephen J, Lechert, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-George H. Fritzinger [57] ABSTRACT A vapor-phase process for imparting a durable press to cellulosic-containing material (fabric or successive garments) is an improvement on US. Pat. No. 3,660,013, dated May 2, 1972, in that the material being treated is moved through successive treating compartments and is processed faster and more economically. The new process includes first introducing an abundant moisture content into the material at a first compartment or station while not in contact with any chemical treating agents (formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapors) and in then conveying the material through a second compartment containing the chemical treating agents, while the material is at a cooler temperature than the temperature of the chemical compartment whereby to accelerate condensation of the chemical treating agents on the material and a faster reaction therewith. Exhausting is carried out following the chemical compartment in order to enable faster and more economical heating in the curing compartment that follows, and in order to avoid moisture buildup in the curing compartment. In an elongate passageway for treating garments, the respective compartments are divided off by air screens, flap valves and/or rollers. In addition, a slow exhausting lengthwise of the passageway is maintained to provide an effective seal at the entrance end.

17 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures chamber to provide an interval for reaction between the garments and the vapors. Thereupon. the chamber is heated to a curing temperature of around 250F.

In the present process an abundant moisture content is introduced into the articles as an initial independent step by use of water-covered walls in a steam compart ment for garments and by the use of wet padding and controlled drying cans for fabrics. Next, the articles are fed into a chemical compartment preferably containing some steam to prevent drying and having an atmosphere of formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapors. The articles are fed into the chemical compartment while at a substantially cooler temperature so that there will be rapid condensation of the chemical vapors on the articles and a resultant faster reaction therewith. Since the chemical compartment is maintained at a uniform temperature. less formaldehyde is condensed and lost from the compartment than when the temperature has to be cycled. A pre-dryer following the chemical compartment removes moisture from the material to permit the same to be heated more readily and economically in the curing compartment to the necessary 250F, and at the same time it prevents any moisture build-up in the compartment. In a preferred embodiment. the material being treated is moved at a constant uninterrupted rate through the successive compartments.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved method of processing cellulosic-containing material to impart thereto a durable press, which comprises conveying the material continuously through successive compartments to carry out thereon respective indepen dent treating operations.

Another object is to provide such improved process which permits the material to be treated at a faster rate and at lower cost than has been heretofore possible.

Another object is to provide such improved process which enables the material to be treated with greater consistency and uniformity.

Another object is to provide such improved process which permits the use of smaller and more economical equipment.

Another object is to provide such improved continuous process wherein the material being treated is introduced into a chemical compartment containing formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide treating agents while the material is at a temperature cooler than that of the chemical compartment so as to accelerate condensation of the chemical treating agents on the material and a faster reaction therewith.

Still further objects of the invention are to provide an improved continuous process for imparting a durable press to cellulosic-containing materials wherein 1) No raising or lowering of temperature is required in a single chamber, thus conserving heat energy; 2) A more economical use of chemical treating agents is achieved as there is no exhausting of the chemical chamber; 3) As the chemical chamber is not exhausted, only low concentrations of chemicals are vented to the scrubber, reducing scrubbing requirements; and 4) An apparatus of simple and economical construction is made possible because more economical materials can be used and requirements are relaxed as to heat transfer and corrosion.

A still further object is to provide a continuous process for imparting a durable press to garments wherein the garments are conveyed through one elongate passageway subdivided into individual compartments with conservation of vapors, heat and chemicals at the respective compartments while yet permitting transfer of the garments being treated from one compartment to the next without contamination of one compartment by the other and without any substantial exposure of the material being treated to the outside atmosphere between compartments.

These and other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the appended claims.

In the description of my invention, reference is had to the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic layout of an apparatus for carrying out a vapor phase process for imparting a durable press to a fabric in a continuous run; and

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic layout of an apparatus for carrying out the same vapor phase process in a continuous run with respect to a series of garments.

In the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 a fabric 10 containing cellulosic material is fed continuously through a series of stations lll5 at which respective independent operations are performed on the fabric to impart the durable press thereto. The first station 11 includes a water pad 17 comprising an open container 18 of water having a guide roller I9 therein and a pair of wringer rollers 20 thereabove for directing the fabric through the water bath to soak it with moisture and then between the wringer rollers to press a major excess of the water therefrom. Next, the fabric is drawn around a series of drying cans 21 to reduce the moisture content of the fabric to the desired extent by controlling the temperature of the cans and the speed of travel of the fabric.

Immediately following the station 11 the fabric is drawn into a chemical compartment 22 of station 12 through a seal 23 comprising a pair of soft rollers 24 and a surrounding case 25 exhausted to the outside via a duct 26 to draw off leakage. This compartment has a series of rollers 27 therein around which the fabric is drawn from the top to the bottom of the chamber. Into the chemical compartment is injected sufficient steam via a nozzle 28 to prevent drying of the fabric during its transit through the compartment. Also. there is a second nozzle 29 for injecting sulphur-dioxide and a pipe 30 provided with a suitable auger for feeding paraformaldehyde into a heated pan 3] for producing formaldehyde vapor in the compartment. This compartment is maintained by a suitable heating box 33 at a temperature above the outside ambient, say by 20F, so that the fabric is cooler than the chemical atmosphere to cause a rapid condensation of formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapors thereon and a fast reaction therewith. Further, the formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapors are fed into the compartment at such rate as will maintain a formaldehyde concentration in the range of 220% by volume and a sulphur dioxide concentration in the range of 0. l5% by volume. The vapors will condense readily on the cooler fabric but will not readily condense on the walls of the compartment. From the chemical compartment 22 the fabric is led around guide rollers 34 and out through a seal 35 comprising rollers 36, surrounding case 37 and an exhaust duct 38 in the same manner as the seal 23 above-described. EX- haust duct 38 is preferably led back into the chemical compartment.

Following the chemical compartment 22 is a drying and heating station 13 which preferably comprises a predrying compartment 39 and a heating compartment 43. The predrying compartment has therein a series of vertically staggered drying cans 40 around which the fabric is drawn and then lead out therefrom through a seal 41 such as the seal 35. The drying cans are heated as by steam to dry substantially all excess moisture and chemical vapors from the fabric, which are exhausted via duct 42 and preferably fed back into the chemical compartment so as not to contaminate the surrounding atmosphere. The advantage of predrying is to prevent moisture build-up in the following heating (curing) compartment 43 and to enable the fabric to be heated to the curing temperature quickly and with less expenditure of heat.

In order for the fabric to reach a curing temperature of 250F in the compartment 43 in a short time and within a convenient size of heating chamber, the fabric is drawn back and forth vertically around a series of guide rollers 44 and the heating is carried out preferably by heated air via a duct 45 leading from the bottom of the compartment near the output end through a blower 45B and heater 45R into the top of the compartment near the input end. Alternative heating may be carried out with the use of suitably placed radiant panels or heating coils.

Following the curing chamber there is a cleaning station 14 which for example comprises a first bath 46 of water with about /2% sodium carbonate and O.l% wetting agent through which the fabric is reciprocated into and out of the bath by being drawn around a series of guide rollers 47. Next the fabric is drawn through a bath 48 of rinse water again into and out of the bath by a series of guide rollers 49. Thereupon, the fabric is drawn through a drying tower 50 ofa station having therein a series of drying cans 51. As the fabric comes from the drying tower it is folded into a series of plaits 52 for compact storage into a container 53 until fabricated.

In the embodiment for treating garments shown in FIG. 2 the garments 54 are conveyed through a long passageway 55 as by a conveying means 56 such as is disclosed in the pending Hendren Application Ser. No. 227,409. filed Feb. 18, 1972 using modified hangers or, alternatively, a simple chain conveyor may be used. Along this passageway are successive stations 57-62 wherein different successive treating operations are performed in the same sequence as in the first embodiment above-described. The first station comprises a steam compartment 63 provided with a saturated low pressure wet steam via nozzles 64. In order to confine the steam in the compartment and keep it in a wet condition for fast introduction of moisture into the garments the walls of the compartment are provided with running water 65 from perforated tubes 65a near the ceiling. In order that the steam will have ready access to the garments the same are conveyed therethrough in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement.

Immediately following the steam compartment 63 is an air screen or curtain 66 wherein air is blown in at the top and exhausted at the bottom as indicated by the arrows 67a and 67)). Further, there may be a seal at this point provided as by flap valves, soft rollers, etc.

Following the air screen is a chemical compartment 68 of station 58in which an amount of steam is injected as by a nozzle 69 only to prevent drying. sulphur dioxide is injected by a nozzle 70 and paraformaldehyde is injected via a pipe and auger 71 into a tray 72 heated to vaporize the same. The sulphur-dioxide and paraformaldehyde are injected at such rate as to keep the atmosphere in a range of 220% by volume of formaldehyde gas and O. l5% by volume of sulphur dioxide, and heating is applied to the compartment as by wall heater 73 to maintain the temperature in the compartment above that of the steam compartment 63 by approximately 20F. Thus, the garments are introduced into the chemical compartment at a substantially cooler temperature. Since the atmosphere is saturated with sulphur-dioxide and formaldehyde vapors, these vapors condense rapidly onto the wet garments and react therewith within a period of only 30 seconds. Also, since the chemicals are used only to the extent that they are consumed by reaction with the garments a very economical use of chemicals is achieved.

Following the chemical compartment is an exhaust and predrying compartment 74 of a drying and heating station 59, which serves also as an air screen. This exhaust draws in dry air through the garments to remove moisture therefrom but since there is also drawn in some chemicals from the chemical compartment the exhaust 75 is led back into the chemical compartment to avoid contaminating the surrounding atmosphere.

The station 59 has also a curing compartment 76 heated preferably by hot air, via a duct 77 leading from the bottom of the compartment near the output end through a blower 78 and heater 79 into the top of the chamber near the input end. Since the garments are conveyed in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement the curing compartment may be heated alternatively by radiant or coil type heater plates in the opposite walls, inasmuch as there would be only one garment between opposing heater plates at a time. As before, it is necessary that the garments be heated to at least 250F; however, in the present system the heating is carried out very economically because the heat is maintained in the compartment at an even temperature.

Following the curing compartment there is a slow exhaust compartment 80 of station 60. Air is drawn in via tube 81 and gases are exhausted via vent 82 into a scrubber 83 during the operation of the apparatus, so as to remove contaminated gases from the garments. This slow exhaust keeps a flow of gases moving from the entrance of the passageways through the steam, chemical and curing compartments to provide essentially a sea] at the entrance end of the system. Also this exhaust cools the garments to allow more ready steam moisturization thereof in the steam compartment 84 of the cleaning station 61 which follows.

The compartment 84 is provided with wet lowpressure steam which heats the compartment to a temperature of from 180 to 220F. Some of the steam may be impinged by nozzles 85 directly onto the garments to effect further penetration thereinto. A vent 86 from the compartment 62 is to allow escape of some formaldehyde laden steam. if I Following the steam compartment 84 there is an air screen 87 and then a drying compartment 88 of station 62 supplied with a dry heat at temperatures from 250F to 350F as by a circulating duct 89 including a blower 90 and heater 91. After the garments leave the drying compartment they are left to cool and are folded and packed for shipment.

In view of the rapid uptake of moisture in the steam compartment 63 made possible by the use of wet low pressure steam, the rapid condensation and reaction of the chemical vapors with the garments in the chemical compartment 68 by introducing the garments into the chemical compartment while at a substantially cooler temperature, and in view of the predrying of the garments in compartment 74 before they enter the curing compartment 76 and the economical heating of the garments in this compartment achieved by maintaining the temperature at a nearly constant value, approximately only 30 seconds treating time is required in each of these compartments. Upon allowing 2 feet per garment lengthwise of each compartment and an overall length of ft. per compartment the garments may be fed through the system at a rate as high as 600 per hour.

The embodiments of our invention herein particularly shown and described are intended to be illustrative and not necessarily limitative of my invention, since the same is subject to changes and modifications without departure from the scope of my invention which I endeavor to express according to the following claims.

We claim:

1. A vapor-phase process for continuously treating cellulosic fabric-containing material to impart a durable press thereto comprising conveying said material through a first station to introduce moisture thereinto, conveying the material then through a second station to subject it to formaldehyde and sulphur-dioxide vapor agents, and conveying said material next through a third station to effect a drying thereof and to subject the material to a curing temperature of about 250F.

2. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said third station comprises a first compartment for predrying the material to reduce substantially the moisture content thereof and a second compartment having a dry heated atmosphere to raise the temperature of the material to said 250F.

3. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is conveyed lengthwise of an elongate pathway through said successive stations, and the treating steps are substantially isolated from each other while allowing passage of said material between stations.

4. The process set forth in claim 3 wherein said second station comprises a chemical compartment containing said agents, and said material is introduced into said compartment while at a temperature lower than the temperature in said compartment so as to accelerate condensation of said agents on and into said material and to expedite a reaction of said agents therewith.

5. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said chemical compartment has an atmosphere containing 220% by volume formaldehyde gas and (Ll-5% by volume sulphur-dioxide gas and wherein said temperature in said compartment is higher by approximately 20 F. than that of the material at the time the material is introduced into the compartmentv 6. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material is a continuous fabric and the fabric is first saturated with water by feeding it through a water pad, and the moisture contentis then reduced to a predetermined percentage content by feeding the fabric around a series of drying cans controlled as to temperature and speed.

7. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material comprises a series of garments, and the moisture is introduced by feeding the garments through a wet steam atmosphere in a steam compartment.

8. The process set forth in claim 7 wherein the wet steam atmosphere is maintained by having water run ning down the walls of said steam compartment to confine the steam in said steam compartment and to cause the garments to receive an abundant moisture content.

9. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material is a continuous fabric and is drawn continuously through seals into and out of said stations and wherein leakage from said seals of said second station is exhausted and returned to said chemical compartment.

10. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein steam is fed into said chemical compartment at a controlled rate adapted only to maintain substantially the moisture content in the material during the passage thereof through said chemical compartment.

11. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is a series of garments fed continuously through said stations in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement, said first station comprises a steam compartment with a low pressure steam and with water running down the walls thereof to confine the steam in the compartment, said second station comprises a chemical compartment containing said agents, and the temperature in said chemical compartment is maintained at a higher value than that in said steam compartment by about 20F.

12. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is a series of garments conveyed on hangers in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement, and wherein the temperature is maintained at said third station.

13. A vapor-phase process for continuously treating cellulose-containing garments to impart a durable press thereto, comprising an elongate passageway through which said garments are successively conveyed, providing air screens dividing said passageway into at least four successive compartments while permitting said garments to be conveyed from one compartment to the next, introducing steam into the first of said compartments and concurrently providing running water on the side walls thereof so that said garments have a rapid absorption of moisture and steam is confined in said compartment, maintaining the temperature of said second compartment above that of said first compartment while introducing formaldehyde and sulphur dioxide vapors thereinto, continuously predrying said garments in said third compartment at the output end of said second compartment to prevent moisture buildup in said fourth compartment, and heating said fourth compartment to bring each garment to a curing temperature of the order of 250F during its passage therethrough.

14. The vapor-phase process set forth in claim 13 wherein said vapors are maintained in a range of 220% by volume of formaldehyde gas and 0. l-5% by volume sulphur dioxide gas.

15. The vapor-phase process set forth in claim 13 wherein said predrying step includes a transverse exhaust heating and venting back into said second com- 8 17. The process set forth in claim 16 including steaming and drying compartments following said exhausting after said fourth compartment for cleaning said garments of contaminants and residual odors, wherein said exhausting is vented into a scrubber and utilized also to cool said garments.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE QERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 884-, 632 Dated May 20, 1.975

Inventor($) George L. Payet and Berthal D. Brummet It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In claim 1, line 1, delete "continuously".

Evigned and Scaled this second Day Of September1975 [SEAL] A ttest.

C. MARSHALL DANN Alresn'ng Officer Notice of Adverse Decision in Interference In Interference No. 99,652, involving Patent No. 3,884,632, G. L. Payet and B. D. Brummet, CONTINUOUS DURABLE-PRESS PROCESSING OF FABRIC AND GARMENTS, final judgment adverse to the patenbees was rendered June 23, 1980, as to claim 1.

[Ofiicial Gazette February 24, 1981.]

Claims (17)

1. A VAPOR-PHASE PROCESS FOR CONTINOUSLY TREATING CELLULOSIC FABRIC-CONTANING MATERIAL TO IMPART A DURABLE PRESS THERETO COMPRISING CONVEYING SAID MATERIAL THROUGH A FIRST STATION TO INTRODUCE MOISTURE THEREINTO, CONVEYING THE MATERIAL THEN THROUGH A SECOND STATION TO SUBJECT IT TO FORMALDEHYDE AND SULPHUR-DIOXIDE VAPOR AGENTS, AND CONVEYING SAID MATERIAL NEXT THROUGH A THIRD STATION TO EFFECT A DRYING THEREOF AND TO SUBJECT THE MATERIAL TO A CURING TEMPERATURE OF ABOUT 250*F.
2. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said third station comprises a first compartment for predrying the material to reduce substantially the moisture content thereof and a second compartment having a dry heated atmosphere to raise the temperature of the material to said 250*F.
3. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is conveyed lengthwise of an elongate pathway through said successive stations, and the treating steps are substantially isolated from each other while allowing passage of said material between stations.
4. The process set forth in claim 3 wherein said second station comprises a chemical compartment containing said agents, and said material is introduced into said compartment while at a temperature lower than the temperature in said compartment so as to accelerate condensation of said agents on and into said material and to expedite a reaction of said agents therewith.
5. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said chemical compartment has an atmosphere containing 2-20% by volume formaldehyde gas and 0.1-5% by volume sulphur-dioxide gas and wherein said temperature in said compartment is higher by approximately 20* F. than that of the material at the time the material is introduced into the compartment.
6. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material is a continuous fabric and the fabric is first saturated with water by feeding it through a water pad, and the moisture content is then reduced to a predetermined percentage content by feeding the fabric around a series of drying cans controlled as to temperature and speed.
7. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material comprises a series of garments, and the moisture is introduced by feeding the garments through a wet steam atmosphere in a steam compartment.
8. The process set forth in claim 7 wherein the wet steam atmosphere is maintained by having water running down the walls of said steam compartment to confine the steam in said steam compartment and to cause the garments to receive an abuNdant moisture content.
9. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein said material is a continuous fabric and is drawn continuously through seals into and out of said stations and wherein leakage from said seals of said second station is exhausted and returned to said chemical compartment.
10. The process set forth in claim 4 wherein steam is fed into said chemical compartment at a controlled rate adapted only to maintain substantially the moisture content in the material during the passage thereof through said chemical compartment.
11. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is a series of garments fed continuously through said stations in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement, said first station comprises a steam compartment with a low pressure steam and with water running down the walls thereof to confine the steam in the compartment, said second station comprises a chemical compartment containing said agents, and the temperature in said chemical compartment is maintained at a higher value than that in said steam compartment by about 20*F.
12. The process set forth in claim 1 wherein said material is a series of garments conveyed on hangers in shoulder-to-shoulder arrangement, and wherein the temperature is maintained at said third station.
13. A vapor-phase process for continuously treating cellulose-containing garments to impart a durable press thereto, comprising an elongate passageway through which said garments are successively conveyed, providing air screens dividing said passageway into at least four successive compartments while permitting said garments to be conveyed from one compartment to the next, introducing steam into the first of said compartments and concurrently providing running water on the side walls thereof so that said garments have a rapid absorption of moisture and steam is confined in said compartment, maintaining the temperature of said second compartment above that of said first compartment while introducing formaldehyde and sulphur dioxide vapors thereinto, continuously predrying said garments in said third compartment at the output end of said second compartment to prevent moisture buildup in said fourth compartment, and heating said fourth compartment to bring each garment to a curing temperature of the order of 250*F during its passage therethrough.
14. The vapor-phase process set forth in claim 13 wherein said vapors are maintained in a range of 2-20% by volume of formaldehyde gas and 0.1-5% by volume sulphur dioxide gas.
15. The vapor-phase process set forth in claim 13 wherein said predrying step includes a transverse exhaust heating and venting back into said second compartment to capture chemicals passing from said second compartment and to insure against high concentrations of chemicals entering said third compartment.
16. The process set forth in claim 13 wherein an exhausting is applied to said passageway beyond the output end of said fourth compartment sufficient to maintain a slight negative pressure within said passageway to prevent leakage therefrom.
17. The process set forth in claim 16 including steaming and drying compartments following said exhausting after said fourth compartment for cleaning said garments of contaminants and residual odors, wherein said exhausting is vented into a scrubber and utilized also to cool said garments.
US3884632A 1973-03-14 1973-03-14 Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments Expired - Lifetime US3884632A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3884632A US3884632A (en) 1973-03-14 1973-03-14 Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments

Applications Claiming Priority (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3884632A US3884632A (en) 1973-03-14 1973-03-14 Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments
CA 194897 CA1023106A (en) 1973-03-14 1974-03-13 Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments
FR7408454A FR2221566B1 (en) 1973-03-14 1974-03-13
DE19742412034 DE2412034C3 (en) 1973-03-14 1974-03-13
JP2817174A JPS5217157B2 (en) 1973-03-14 1974-03-13
GB1146174A GB1446396A (en) 1973-03-14 1974-03-14 Durable-press processing of cellulosic fibre-containing material

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3884632A true US3884632A (en) 1975-05-20

Family

ID=23336371

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3884632A Expired - Lifetime US3884632A (en) 1973-03-14 1973-03-14 Continuous durable-press processing of fabric and garments

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (1) US3884632A (en)
JP (1) JPS5217157B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1023106A (en)
DE (1) DE2412034C3 (en)
FR (1) FR2221566B1 (en)
GB (1) GB1446396A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4032294A (en) * 1974-02-01 1977-06-28 Mcgraw-Edison Company Method for vapor phase treating garments
USRE30860E (en) * 1971-12-06 1982-02-02 Cotton, Incorporated Process for treating cellulosic material with formaldehyde in liquid phase and sulfur dioxide
US5320873A (en) * 1991-08-29 1994-06-14 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Process and apparatus for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric to improve durable press and shrinkage resistance
US5376144A (en) * 1991-01-23 1994-12-27 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Process for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric
WO2003029551A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Fabric article treating system
US20040000175A1 (en) * 2000-12-27 2004-01-01 Edwin Bolduan Washing machine with conveyor device
US20090090018A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2009-04-09 Gabriele Stein Cooling system with a cover which contains super absorber and can be activated
US8336474B2 (en) 2001-10-18 2012-12-25 Yugao Zhang Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0120537B2 (en) * 1980-01-31 1989-04-17 Nippon Electric Co
JPS5887854A (en) * 1981-11-20 1983-05-25 Nec Corp Master slice system lsi substrate
DK1889969T3 (en) * 2006-08-14 2017-03-06 Kannegiesser H Gmbh Co A method for smoothing the garments and tunnelfærdiggøringsapparat

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3653805A (en) * 1968-09-24 1972-04-04 Cotton Inc Delayed cure process using formaldehyde vapor to cause creaseproofing
US3660013A (en) * 1969-08-01 1972-05-02 Mc Graw Edison Co Method and apparatus for producing a durable press in garments containing cellulose or cellulosic derivatives
US3663974A (en) * 1961-11-28 1972-05-23 Toyo Spinning Co Ltd Treatment of a cross-linking agent-impregnated cellulosic fabric with a gaseous acid catalyst
US3706526A (en) * 1971-12-06 1972-12-19 Cotton Inc Process for treating cellulosic material with formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3663974A (en) * 1961-11-28 1972-05-23 Toyo Spinning Co Ltd Treatment of a cross-linking agent-impregnated cellulosic fabric with a gaseous acid catalyst
US3653805A (en) * 1968-09-24 1972-04-04 Cotton Inc Delayed cure process using formaldehyde vapor to cause creaseproofing
US3660013A (en) * 1969-08-01 1972-05-02 Mc Graw Edison Co Method and apparatus for producing a durable press in garments containing cellulose or cellulosic derivatives
US3706526A (en) * 1971-12-06 1972-12-19 Cotton Inc Process for treating cellulosic material with formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE30860E (en) * 1971-12-06 1982-02-02 Cotton, Incorporated Process for treating cellulosic material with formaldehyde in liquid phase and sulfur dioxide
US4070876A (en) * 1974-02-01 1978-01-31 Mcgraw-Edison Company Apparatus for vapor phase treating garments
US4032294A (en) * 1974-02-01 1977-06-28 Mcgraw-Edison Company Method for vapor phase treating garments
US5600975A (en) * 1991-01-23 1997-02-11 American Textile Processing, L.L.C. Process and apparatus for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric
US5376144A (en) * 1991-01-23 1994-12-27 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Process for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric
US5704230A (en) * 1991-01-23 1998-01-06 American Textile Processing, L.L.C. Process and apparatus for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric
US5480485A (en) * 1991-08-29 1996-01-02 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Apparatus for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric to improve durable press and shrinkage resistance
US5320873A (en) * 1991-08-29 1994-06-14 American Laundry Machinery, Inc. Process and apparatus for treating cellulosic fiber-containing fabric to improve durable press and shrinkage resistance
US20040000175A1 (en) * 2000-12-27 2004-01-01 Edwin Bolduan Washing machine with conveyor device
US7089768B2 (en) * 2000-12-27 2006-08-15 Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete Gmbh Washing machine with conveyor device
WO2003029551A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Fabric article treating system
US20030066138A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Fabric article treating system
US8336474B2 (en) 2001-10-18 2012-12-25 Yugao Zhang Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US20090090018A1 (en) * 2005-05-13 2009-04-09 Gabriele Stein Cooling system with a cover which contains super absorber and can be activated
US8381319B2 (en) * 2005-05-13 2013-02-26 Pervormance International Gmbh Cooling system with a cover which contains super absorber and can be activated

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JP889527C (en) grant
DE2412034C3 (en) 1982-05-06 grant
DE2412034B2 (en) 1981-06-11 application
FR2221566B1 (en) 1978-01-06 grant
GB1446396A (en) 1976-08-18 application
CA1023106A1 (en) grant
JPS5024597A (en) 1975-03-15 application
CA1023106A (en) 1977-12-27 grant
FR2221566A1 (en) 1974-10-11 application
JPS5217157B2 (en) 1977-05-13 grant
DE2412034A1 (en) 1974-10-03 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3574261A (en) Apparatus and method for drying permeable webs
US3231985A (en) Heating, drying and curing apparatus and methods
US4896010A (en) Microwave drying & sanitizing of fabric
US5118357A (en) Treatment fluid application and recovery apparatus and method
US4263258A (en) Steam-operated sterilization apparatus
US4761896A (en) Apparatus for processing dry-cleaned clothes
US5105558A (en) Apparatus and process for drying cellulosic and textile substances with superheated steam
US4704804A (en) Method of and apparatus for temperature conditioning of matter
US3257739A (en) Drying garments
US3899862A (en) Sterilization of containers
US4404717A (en) Environmental control of needled mat production
US5228211A (en) Method and apparatus for energy efficient drying
US5044142A (en) Packaging method and apparatus
US4340073A (en) Expanding tobacco
US2419876A (en) Dehydration apparatus having conveyors, agitators, radiant heaters, and gas circulating means
US2630958A (en) Method and apparatus for sealing containers
US2549216A (en) Apparatus and method for preserving products in sealed containers
US3644085A (en) Garment finisher and method of finishing garments
US2799947A (en) Method of drying grain
US4124942A (en) Method and apparatus for controlling the moisture content of a web of sheet material
US4425718A (en) Apparatus for development and fixation of dyes with a printed textile sheet by application of microwave emanation
US3730678A (en) Process for treating textile materials
US3807054A (en) Apparatus for enhancing the appearance of plastic articles such as telephone cases
US5203043A (en) Method for continuously intensively wetting a flat article, especially a textile strip
US2870024A (en) Preserving products in sealed containers

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINERY, INC.

Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINERY INC.;AURORA DEVELOPMENT CORP.;FLORIDA OHM, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004864/0128

Effective date: 19861219

Owner name: AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINERY, INC.,OHIO

Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINERY INC.;AURORA DEVELOPMENT CORP.;FLORIDA OHM, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004864/0128

Effective date: 19861219