US3871419A - Deflecting beam for warp threads in a weaving machine - Google Patents

Deflecting beam for warp threads in a weaving machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3871419A
US3871419A US31410272A US3871419A US 3871419 A US3871419 A US 3871419A US 31410272 A US31410272 A US 31410272A US 3871419 A US3871419 A US 3871419A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
support
guide member
warp threads
beam
threads
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Erwin Pfarrwaller
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sulzer AG
Original Assignee
Sulzer AG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D49/00Details or constructional features not peculiar to looms of a particular type
    • D03D49/04Control of the tension in warp or cloth
    • D03D49/06Warp let-off mechanisms
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D27/00Woven pile fabrics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms
    • D03D39/22Terry looms
    • D03D39/223Cloth control
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/50Pile-fabric looms; Pile fabrics
    • D03D2700/60Pile fabric weaving in general

Abstract

The deflecting beam is constructed so as to be deformed under the tension force imparted to the ground warp threads during the beating up of the reed of the loom. The amount of deformation is designed to facilitate forward movement of the pile warps during a full beat of the reed. The guide beam can be constructed in any number of ways and in any number of shapes to effect the required deformation.

Description

States V atem 1 1 Piarrwaller Mar."18, 1975 [54] DEFLECTING BEAM FOR WARP THREABS 1,707,334 4/1929 Turner 139/114 I MA E 2,442,7 6 6 1948 oung IN A WEAV NG CHIN 2,589,498 3/1952. Kulczycki et al. Inventor: lsirwin Pfarrwaller, Wmterthur, 2,932,325 4/1960 Patrick 139/102 x witzerland FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [73] Asslgnee: Bmhm wmterthur, 4,333 0/1890 United Kingdom 139/114 Swltlerland 777 0/1852 United Kingdom 139/114 [22] Filed: Dec. 11, 1972 Primary Examiner-James Kee Chi [21] Appl' 314102 Attorney, Agent, or FirmKenyon & Kenyon Reilly Carr & Chapin [30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 10, 1971 Switzerland l8030/7l [57] ABSTRACT The deflecting beam is constructed'so as to be de- [52] US. Cl 139/114, l39/25,ll3399//1907 formed under the tension force imparted to the ground warp threads during the beating up of the reed 2g fa g 2 vof the loom. The amount of deformation is designed to 1 1e 0 139/97 1 6 A 1 facilitate forward movement of the pile warps during a full beat of the reed. The guide beam can be construc ted in any number of ways and in any number of [56] uNlTE g gg xfigs giiENTs shapes to effect the required deformation. 1,705,637 3/1929 Deleu 139/114 12 Claims 12 Drawing Figures PATENTED 1 819??) SHEET 2 [1F 5 PATENTEB MAR l 8 I975 sum 5 or 5 DEFLECTING BEAM FOR WARP THREADS IN A WEAVING MACHINE This invention relates to a guide means for warps in a loom and more particularly to a pile warp tension beam in a terry cloth loom.

Terry cloth looms have been known to have at least two warp beams, namely one beam for forming the group fabric having relatively tightly tensioned ground warp threads which are to be bound or woven with weft threads, and a second beam for the pile warp threads that are under much less tension or that are, even during the weaving process, in a known way relaxed briefly at suitable intervals of time. As is known, the pile warp threads are distributed across the entire width of the warp threads in correspondence to the desired pattern to be woven and are drawn through a shed, and woven into the fabric by means of a reed. During the weaving operation, pile loops are formed by the pile warp threads in the weaving plane through a periodically effected forward and backward movement of the shed apex relative to the front reversal point of the reed. By means of this relative movement between the shed apex and the front reversal point of the reed, the individual weft threads are assured of being beaten into the shed apex by the reed, either directly adjoining the finished fabric (full beat), or else at a certain distance from the fabric (partial beat), depending on the desired pileloop length of some 1 to 2 centimeters (cm),in the finished fabric. In the case of the so-called three-shot weaves, one full beat is followed by two partial beats; and in the case ofa four-shot weave, one full beat is followed by three consecutive partial beats. The groups of partial and full beats are repeated so long as terry cloth is to be produced.

lfsmooth cloth (without pile loops) is to be produced from time to time during the weaving operation, this can be done by having the reed make only full beats until pile loops are to be made again. The changeover can be by any suitable known process, e.g., by means of a Jacquard mechanism, or an eccentric mechanism, or a cardan-shaft mechanism.

During partial beats, the inserted weft threads are at first in fairly loose contact, at the aforesaid spacing from the last threads, while the weft threads beaten in by full beats are in contact with the ground warp threads as well as with the pile warp threads. As the last beat for each Weft-thread group is usually a full beat, all the weft threads of the group which had been partially beaten since the last full beat, become pushed forward together along the tightly tensioned ground warp threads, until they become set against the previously formed fabric. The pile-loop threads which are sub jected to but little or no tension, are first, spaced from the fabric between the first partially beaten weft threads, and at the next full beat are pushed forward, together with the partially-beaten Weft threads, and are compacted such that the desired pile loops become formed. In this way, the ground warp threads and the weft threads hold the finished ground fabric completely together, and the pile loops stand out, depending on the texture employed, either on one side of else on both sides of the ground weave. 7

In order to allow the pile warp threads to offer as little resistance as possible to the pulling back and pushing forward done by the reed at least during the full beats for forming the pile loops, while the ground warp threads remain tensioned tautly during all beats of th reed, various contrivances have been used.

For example, in some known warp-threads relaxing contrivances, the warp-thread groups, both of the ground warp and also of the pile warp, are relaxed either while overcoming a braking force acting on the warp beam (which may be periodically variable) or else are relaxed intermittently from the warp beam by means of a control warp-beam drive. In this way, as already mentioned, different thread tensions are maintained for the ground warp and for the pile warp. ln these cases, the warp-threads group is usually run over a tensioning beam and diverted into the weaving plane. The warp-threads group is then run through a warpthreads control system and forms a shed which is controlled by the weaving shafts. The weft threads are then inserted into the shed and beaten up into the apex of the shed by a reed.

As can be appreciated that various contrivances which have been used to relax the pile warp threads have certain disadvantages. For example, there is a considerable amount of friction generated between the pile warp threads and the contrivances during the loop forming operations. Also, large inertia forces must be overcome in creating a braking force on the warp beam.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to avoid damage to the pile warps being delivered from a warp beam to a shed in a terry cloth loom.

It is another object of the invention to permit relaxing of the tension in pile warps without braking ofa tensioning beam.

It is another object of the invention to reduce the frictional forces on pile warps during terry cloth weaving.

Briefly, the concept of the invention is to make the tensioning beam of a terry cloth loom which is used for the groundwarp threads as a normal relatively massive oscillating beam, which because of the inertia from its mass, at the instant of the-peak tension occurring at the beat of a reed into the threads, opposes a resistance, and thus holds the ground warp threads tautly stretched, while the pile warp threadsare deflected out of a normal thread path by a guide means having a resiliently yieldable guide member. This guide member is used to determine the pile warp thread tension and has as little mass as possible, and thus has only small massinertia. in this way, the'guide member under the influence of the peak tension produced in the pile warp threads by the impact of the reed, yields, and facilitates the described slip-forward movement of the pile warp threads during the full beat of the reed.

In accordance with the invention, the guide means for the pile warp threads is made as a non-rotatable deflecting beam having a rigid support extending across the width of a thread-group, and an elastic yielding guide member secured to the support that yields under the influence of varying thread tension. This guide member which can be made of laminated material, has an elongated surface, which is curved and extends continuously in its lengthwise or longitudinal direction across the width of the thread-group, for guiding the pile warp threads.

The rigid support may be disposed in a fixed location in the loom housing, and may have any desired cross section, for example, tubular. However, the support may also be mounted so as to pivot about an axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the support. This construction can in a way known per se be used for controlling the drive of the pile-warp beam in such a way that themean pile warp threadtension can be kept at a constant desired small value. A means may also be provided, in a way known per se that acts on the support, for example, by means of a spring or by utilizing the force of gravity, for the purpose of producing a prestress counter to the pivoting caused by the tension of the warp threads.

In one embodiment of the invention, the yielding guide member is in the form of a band curved similarly to the surface of a cylinder, and enclosing the rigid support part, at least partly.

In order to obtain particularly great flexibility of the striplike guide member, the member can be fastened to the rigid support only at one side; that is, along one longitudinal edge. As a suitable guide surface, the other free longitudinal edge is made as a cylindrical surface of a small radius of curvature, so as to avoid any damage to the threads lying thereon.

In another embodiment ofthe invention, in order to keep the curvature of the guide surface within limits, the striplike guide membermay, however, be fastened to the rigid support along both longitudinal edges. With such a form of construction, the danger of dirtying by dust or fluff is substantially reduced.

In still another embodiment, an elastic damping element is disposed between the support andthe inner side of the elastic guide member so that any vibrations produced through the impacts of the reed become effectively countered. Moreover, in this way there is obtained the additional possibility, while using the same strip-material and imparting the same external shape, of making guide surfaces of different flexibility. The support can be made of any desired known material, e.g., an elastic foam-material, or of an inflatable hose.

The support can have at least one support surface which is turned toward the inside of the flexible guide member and extends parallel to the longitudinal direction of the deflecting beam, whereby the damping element is held between this support surface and the inside of the guide member. With such a construction, there is no need to provide special attachment, e.g., adhesion or vulcanizing of the damping element to one of the other parts. The damping element is compressed between the support surface and the inside of the guide member, and it is possible, through a suitable configuration of the support surface and a suitable curvature of the guiding-member to obtain a certain behavior of the restoring force as a function of the bending of the guide member.

The elastically yielding guide member may however also consist of a sheet formed into a closed tube, fastened, through the intermediary of the damping support element, to the rigid support. In this case, the tube may, in a position of rest, be disposed concentric of the longitudinal axis of the rigid support. This is particularly advantageous when the support is disposed to be able to turn about its longitudinal axis, so that the warp threads, during weaving, are able to roll over the deflecting beam, instead of sliding. The warp threads can thus receive particularly careful treatment, and undesirable rubbing and friction is avoided. I

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

' FIG. 1 illustrates a cross sectional view'of a deflecting beam in accordance with the invention which has a tubular rigid support of round cross section and a flexible strip-steel guide member fastened to the support by both longitudinal edges;

FIG. 2 illustrates a view similar to FIG. 1 of a modified deflecting beam according to the invention utilizing a support of hexagonal cross-section;

FIG. 3 illustrates a cross sectional view of a deflecting beam having a flexible striplike guide member fastened to the support only along one longitudinal edge; FIG. 4 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a deflecting beam formed from a strip closed into a tube, fastened with an intermediate support element, to a rigid support in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 5 is a greatly simplified perspective view ofa deflecting beam according to the invention, with a cross section similar to FIG. 1 with a rigid support mounted to be able to pivot about an axis parallel to a longitudinal axis, and with a means to produce a prestress counter to the pivoting resulting from the tension of the threads;

FIGS. 6 to 11 each illustrates cross-sectional views of other embodiments of a deflecting beam according to the invention.

FIG. 12 diagrammatically illustrates a weaving machine for weaving terry cloth including a pivotal deflecting beam as shown in FIG. 5 in accordance with the invention.

In the various Figures, like reference characters indicate like components. Also, for simplicity, the details of a terry cloth loom for which the deflecting beam of the invention are not shown or particularly discussed as such are notoriously well known to those skilled in the art.

Referring to FIG. 1, the deflecting beam which is incorporated in a terry cloth loom FIG. 12 between a pile warp thread beam 117 and a warp stop motion 113, 114 in which a reed 115 operates includes a rigid support 1 in the form of a round tube and an elastically yieldable guide member 2 formed from a wide strip of spring steel, which surrounds the support 1, and is likewise tubular. The two longitudinal edges of the member 2 are fastened tightly, by means of an underlay bar 3 and a row of screws 4, to the support 1. The plane of symmetry of this deflecting beam is set at a slant, and coincides approximately with the angle-bisector between the planes of the incoming group of warp threads 5 (coming from the warp beam 117 for example) and the outgoing group of threads 6 (going toward the shed). The position of the guide member 2 and of the threads 5, 6 rest without tension against the curved guide surface of the member 2 which extends between the two edges of the member 2. When the group of threads 5, 6 becomes tensioned (for example, through the impact of the reed 115, then the cross-section of the member 2 becomes distorted into an approximately symmetrical ellipse 2', whose minor axis is still situated approximately in the angle-bisector between the incoming threads 5 and the outgoing threads 6". If the tension of the threads relaxes, then the member 2 reassumes its original approximately cylindrical shape.

Referring to FIG. 2, the rigid support 11 can alternatively be made as a hexagonal tube. The two lengthwise edges of the striplike guide member 12 are then clamped tightly to two different adjacent side surfaces of the hexagonal tube, in each case by means of an underlying bar 13 and a row of screws 14. The planeof symmetry of the deflecting beam in this case is set vertically, so that the resultant of the thread-tension force no longer coincides with the plane of symmetry. When the group of threads 5, 6 becomes tensioned, the cross section of the guide member 12 becomes deformed, no longer symmetrically but toward the right-hand side, as viewed, into an egg-shaped pear 12'. For the rest, the way in which the individual elements work is in the same as with FIG. 1, except for a slight torsional stressing of the deflecting beam.

Referring to FIG. 3, while the rigid support 21 is made similarly to that of FIG. 1, its plane of symmetry is turned about 90 clockwise. Also, the striplike guide member 22 is no longer made symmetrical as in FIG. 1, but is fastened in cantilever fashion to the support 21 at only one longitudinal edge, namely, the left-hand one as viewed. Under the influence of increased thread tension this guide member 22 becomes deformed from 22 to 22'. As shown, the guide surface of the guide member 22 is formed on a smaller radius of curvature at the free edge to pass under the threads 5, 6 so as to avoid sharp or rough edges coming in contact with the threads 5, 6.

Referring to FIG. 4, the elastically yieldable guide member 32 is formed from a steel sheet bent into a closed tube, welded, for example, together by a lengthwise seam. The rigid support 3l\is likewise made as a round tube, free to turn about a longitudinal axis as shown by the double arrow 38. The guide member 32 is in the position of rest concentric of the support 31, and the cylindrical gap between the support '31 and member 32 is filled with a soft damping foam-material supporting element 37, by which the member 32 is fastened to the support 31. At the occurrence of tension peaks, the deflecting beam becomes deformed, in that the guide member deflects into the approximate position 32' shown by dot-dash lines. Thisform of construction is normally stiffer that that of FIG. 3, and is particularly suitable for stronger pile threads. Through the ability of the support 31 to turn, friction of the threads against the guide surface is largely avoided. Dust and fluff can, in this case, not become deposited in the interior of the guide member 32.

Referring to FIG. 5, the deflecting beam has a crosssection which corresponds approximately to that of FIG. 9, and consists of a rigid support 51 made from a hexagonal tube, which is mounted pivotably, by means of levers 53 at both ends, about an axis 54 paralleland spaced to its longitudinal axis. The guide member 52 is made from a strip of spring-steel, fastened by both its lengthwise or longitudinal edges to the support 51, and under the influence of the tension acting on the threadgroups 5, 6', becomes deformed similarly to FIG. 2. As is shown in FIGS. 5 and 9, the guide member 52, 52, respectively is not closed up on itself and does not completely surround the support 51, but is fastened to two non-adjacent side faces of the hexagonal support 51. In addition, as shown in FIG. 5, a means such as a'spring 55, for producing a prestress counter to the pivoting caused by the thread tension (that is, counter to the pivoting effected by the resultant of the tension of the threads-group 5', 6) is provided which tends to turn the levers 53 in the direction indicated by the arrow 56. Instead of using a spring 55, it is also possible to make use of the force of gravity, or of some other constant or intermittent force from some power source which acts in a similar manner. Such an arrangement may be particularly important when, for some reason, the friction of the threads 5', 6' against the guide surface of the guide member 52' is too great, or when the operation of the pivotable mounting is required as a control device for the drive of the warp beam (active relaxation of the warp threads). As shown, the spring 55 is fixedly secured at one end to the housing of the loom and at the opposite end to a lever 53 in any suitable manner.

In operation, the pile warp threads travel over the curved guide surface of the guide member 52' while travelling in a predetermined path to the shed (not shown). At the occurrence of a full beat of the reed (not shown), the pile warp threads are pulled forward from their untensioned position so as to be tensioned. At this time, the tension in the pile warp threads causes the guide member 52 to deform and deflect in a direction towards the shed, i.e., to the right as viewed, in a manner similar to the guide members 2, 12 described above.

Other forms of deflecting beams can also be used in the manner described above. For example, referring to FIG. 6 which to a great extent corresponds to FIG. 1, the support 41 consists of a rigid hexagonal tube with a plane of symmetry relative to the mounting screw 3 set vertical. In FIG. 7, the deflecting beam has a support 41 with a plane of symmetry set at a slant, an outer form similar to FIG. 6, and a support surface 42 running parallel to the longitudinal axis of the support 41. In addition, a damping elastic support element 43, e.g., a soft foam-material, or even an inflatable hose, is held between this support surface 42 and the inner side of the guide member 2. During the deformation of the guide member 2 under the tension of the threads, the support element 43 likewise becomes deformed and compressed and rolls to and fro on the support surface 42. The support surface 42 does not need to be a plane surface, as shown in FIG. 7, but may be any desired cylindrical surface, approximately parabolicor cylindrical, curved convexly or concavely. By means of the shape imparted to the support surface 42, it becomes possible to fix a desired pattern of restoring force as a function of the deviation caused by the thread tension.

Referring to FIG. 8, the gap between the tubular support 1 and the inner side of the guide member 2 can be partly filled by a damping and stiffening support element 44, made, for example, of an elastic foam material as shown. Finally, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 constructions that work similarly to the forms of FIGS. 9 or 2, use a tube of square cross section, 61 and 71 respectively, which may be particularly suitable for certain cases, instead of hexagonal tube for reasons of available space or other constructional or economic reasons.

The corresponding guide members are numbered 62 and 72, respectively.

Referring to FIG. 12, the terry cloth weaving machine utilizes a ground warp 111 which runs off a ground warp beam 112 and passes .througha row of warp stop motion droppers 113, heald shafts 114 used for shedding and a reed 115. As viewed, the shed is open. A weft is picked by a shuttle 116. In known manner, pile loops 121 are formed from a pile warp 5'. which runs off a pile warp beam 117 and is deflected when passing the guide member 52 affixed to the rigid support 51 of the deflecting beam according to the invention (see FIG. After deflection, the pile warp 6' passes through another row of stop motion droppers 119, heald shafts 120 and the reed 115. In a manner known per se, the deflecting beam is mounted pivotably (arrow 56), by means of levers 53 at both ends,

about an axis 54, and biased by the spring 55 to produce a substantially constant pile warp tension.

In the embodiment illustrated, the pile loops 121 are formed by means of a reciprocating motion superimposed on the normal take-up motion of the cloth 122 and produced by means of a periodically reciprocating breast beam 123. To this end, the breast beam has a drive 130 connected to the main shaft (not shown) of the loom,- which can transfer the beam 123 over a distance h from a limit position as illustrated into a position 123' as shown by chain lines, thereby moving the fell of the cloth over a distance 11' with respect to the beat up point 115' oftlze reed 115.

On leaving the breast beam, the cloth 122 runs onto a cloth draw-off roller 124, which is driven in a known manner at a speed corresponding to the formation of the cloth. From the cloth draw-off roller 124, the cloth 122 runs over a pinch roller 125 and is wound onto a cloth beam 126.

The essence of the invention is not tied to the examples of construction which have been described. In particular, the method of attaching the rigid support to the machine frame, or its position in its operative state, may be altered as desired. Instead of a tube, which is of itself economically advantageous, any other bending-resistant form of construction, e.g., a double-T or an angle-profile, may be provided. When economic reasons do not prohibit such, it is also possible to make use of a massive bar or roll. Further, the damping element may be fastened to the rigid support and, in the position of rest, not contact the inner side of the yieldable guide member but do this only after a certain bending (deformation) of the guide member has occurred. That is, the damping element may, as shown in FIG. 3, be made with a kind of buffer 23. The essential thing is only that the guide member shall be elastic and easily deformable, and have a small movable mass.

Deflectin'g beams of the described kind may be installed in a loom for special purposes, and also for purposes other than that of a pile-warp beam. Also, these deflecting beams do not need to extend across the entire weaving width of the machine. It suffices for their length to be suitable for the width of the group of threads to be deflected thereby. Thus, for example, it is possible to imagine that over a part of the width of the weave of a special pattern, or in the case of special designs, a part of the warp threads consists of fancy yarns, particularly delicate or elastic yarns, that have to be woven with less thread tension than ordinarily. In this case, use may also be made of a deflecting beam according to the invention, without the threads-group concerned, and thus the deflecting beam, having to extend across the entire width of the weave. It is also obvious that the deflecting beam of the invention may also be used to deflect normal ground warp threads.

1. A deflecting beam for warp threads in a terry cloth loom comprising an elongated rigid non-rotatable support for disposition across the path of the warp threads and an elastically yieldable guide member secured to said support, said guide member having two longitudinal edges secured to said support and an elongated curved surface extending between said edges and across the path of the warp threads for sliding of the 2. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 wherein I said support is tubular in cross-section.

3. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 wherein said guide member is a metal strip at least partially surrounding said support and said surface is a cylindrical surface,

4. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 further comprising an elastic damping element between said support and said guide member.

5. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 4 wherein said support has at least one support surface facing said guide member and extending parallel thereto with said damping element therebetween.

6. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 5Wherein said damping element is made of foam material.

7. A deflecting beam'as set forth in claim 5 wherein said damping element is an inflatablehose.

8.- A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 5 wherein said guide member is a closed tube of metal sheet material and said damping element is sandwiched between said support and said guide member.

9. In combination with a deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1, means for pivoting said support about an axis spaced to and parallel to the longitudinal axis of said support.

10. The combination as set forth in claim 9 which further includes means for prestressing said support in a second direction opposite said first direction.

11. In a loom for weaving terry cloth, said loom having means for directing pile warp threads through a predetermined path into a shed and means for beating up weft threads in said shed wile imparting tension to ground warps; a non-rotatable deflecting beam mounted in said loom and having a support for disposition across the path of the pile warp threads and an elastically yieldable guide member secured to said support, said guide member having two longitudinal edges secured to said'support and an elongated curved surface made of leaf-spring like material extending between said edges and across said path of said pile warp threads for sliding of said pile warp threads thereon, said beam surface being resiliently mounted in said loom to deform in a direction away from said path under the tension of said pile warp threads, said direction coinciding with the angle bisector between the planes of an incoming group of the pile warp threads and an outgoing group of the pile warp threads.

12. In a loom for weaving terry cloth as set forth in claim 11 wherein said beam includes a deformable element between said support and said guide member.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent 3.871l4l9 Dated March 18. 1975 Inventor (s) ERWIN It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:'

Column 1, line 8, "group" should be -ground-.

Column 5, line 47-48, "cros-ssection" should be --cross-section-.

Claim 11 line 45, "wile" should be -while--.

Signed and Scaled this twenty-second Day of July 1975 [SEAL] Arrest:

RUTH c. MASON I c. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Offitfl Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks

Claims (12)

1. A deflecting beam for warp threads in a terry cloth loom comprising an elongated rigid non-rotatable support for disposition across the path of the warp threads and an elastically yieldable guide member secured to said support, said guide member having two longitudinal edges secured to said support and an elongated curved surface extending between said edges and across the path of the warp threads for sliding of the threads thereon, said surface being curved similarly to a cylindrical surface to at least partly surround said support, said guide member being made of leaf-spring like material for resiliently deforming under the influence of a variable tension in the threads in a direction away from said path coinciding with the angle bisector between the planes of an incoming group of the warp threads and an outgoing of the warp threads.
2. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 wherein said support is tubular in cross-section.
3. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 wherein said guide member is a metal strip at least partially surrounding said support and said surface is a cylindrical surface.
4. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1 further comprising an elastic damping element between said support and said guide member.
5. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 4 wherein said support has at least one support surface facing said guide member and extending parallel thereto with said damping element therebetween.
6. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 5 wherein said damping element is made of foam material.
7. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 5 wherein said damping element is an inflatable hose.
8. A deflecting beam as set forth in claim 5 wherein said guide member is a closed tube of metal sheet material and said damping element is sandwiched between said support and said guide member.
9. In combination with a deflecting beam as set forth in claim 1, means for pivoting said support about an axis spaced to and parallel to the longitudinal axis of said support.
10. The combination as set forth in claim 9 which further includes means for prestressing said support in a second direction opposite said first direction.
11. In a loom for weaving terry cloth, said loom having means for directing pile warp threads through a predetermined path into a shed and means for beating up weft threads in said shed wile imparting tension to ground warps; a non-rotatable deflecting beam mounted in said loom and having a support for disposition across the path of the pile warp threads and an elastically yieldable guide member secured to said support, said guide member having two longitudinal edges secured to said support and an elongated curved surface made of leaf-spring like material extending between said edges and across said path of said pile warp threads for sliding of said pile wArp threads thereon, said beam surface being resiliently mounted in said loom to deform in a direction away from said path under the tension of said pile warp threads, said direction coinciding with the angle bisector between the planes of an incoming group of the pile warp threads and an outgoing group of the pile warp threads.
12. In a loom for weaving terry cloth as set forth in claim 11 wherein said beam includes a deformable element between said support and said guide member.
US3871419A 1971-12-10 1972-12-11 Deflecting beam for warp threads in a weaving machine Expired - Lifetime US3871419A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CH1803071 1971-12-10

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3871419A true US3871419A (en) 1975-03-18

Family

ID=4429890

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3871419A Expired - Lifetime US3871419A (en) 1971-12-10 1972-12-11 Deflecting beam for warp threads in a weaving machine

Country Status (9)

Country Link
US (1) US3871419A (en)
JP (1) JPS5039177B2 (en)
BE (1) BE792485A (en)
CA (1) CA989278A (en)
DE (1) DE2162396C3 (en)
ES (1) ES409468A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2162635B1 (en)
GB (1) GB1417866A (en)
NL (1) NL7216643A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4121625A (en) * 1976-08-13 1978-10-24 Adolph Saurer Device for equalizing the warp yarn tension in a loom
US4403630A (en) * 1980-08-26 1983-09-13 Aktiengesellschaft Adolf Saurer Apparatus for tensioning the warp thread sheet of a loom
US4534386A (en) * 1982-10-26 1985-08-13 Sulzer Brothers Limited Tensioning beam assembly for a weaving machine
US4721134A (en) * 1986-08-04 1988-01-26 West Point Pepperell, Inc. Terry loop ratio control device
US5002095A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-03-26 Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Electronic control of terry pile warp yarn dispensing rate
US6135163A (en) * 1998-12-07 2000-10-24 Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft Mbh Method and apparatus for compensating warp thread tension or elongation variations during loom shedding
EP1369514A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-10 Tsudakoma Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Pile loom
US20040221908A1 (en) * 2002-08-02 2004-11-11 Mario Servalli Weaving machine with correction of the distortion of the weft
US20050056334A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft drive system for power loom shafts
US20070137719A1 (en) * 2005-12-15 2007-06-21 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft drive for a power loom
EP1923493A2 (en) * 2006-11-17 2008-05-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Jidoshokki Warp tension controlling apparatus in a weaving machine for weaving a pile fabric
US20110023992A1 (en) * 2008-04-16 2011-02-03 Sho Jinsoo Thread feeding method, warp thread feeding method, thread feeder and weaving method
CN102797102A (en) * 2011-05-27 2012-11-28 株式会社丰田自动织机 Pile warp tension adjusting device of pile fabric loom
CN103189556A (en) * 2010-09-06 2013-07-03 必佳乐公司 Back rest for a weaving machine
CN104047097A (en) * 2014-06-30 2014-09-17 山东日发纺织机械有限公司 Terry warp tension control device of terry cloth loom
US20160230317A1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2016-08-11 Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft Mit Beschränkter Haftung Method and Device for Applying Forces and Motions to Warp Threads of Weaving Machine
CN106065511A (en) * 2016-07-06 2016-11-02 江苏友诚数控科技有限公司 Yarn buffering mechanism

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3346030A1 (en) * 1983-12-20 1985-06-20 Inst Textil & Faserforschung Weaving machine
DE3839943A1 (en) * 1988-11-26 1990-05-31 Stromag Maschf Back rest for a weaving machine
EP1172471B1 (en) * 2000-07-10 2005-01-05 Sultex AG Pile warp tensioning bar

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1705637A (en) * 1928-07-02 1929-03-19 Deleu Robert Means for controlling the warp in looms
US1707374A (en) * 1927-08-04 1929-04-02 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Whip roll for looms
US2442796A (en) * 1946-10-10 1948-06-08 Vanity Fair Mills Inc Thread tensioning means
US2589498A (en) * 1949-11-01 1952-03-18 Steel And Alloy Tank Company Warp tension compensator
US2932325A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-04-12 Beattie Mfg Company Yarn tensioning mechanism

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE251905C (en) *

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1707374A (en) * 1927-08-04 1929-04-02 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Whip roll for looms
US1705637A (en) * 1928-07-02 1929-03-19 Deleu Robert Means for controlling the warp in looms
US2442796A (en) * 1946-10-10 1948-06-08 Vanity Fair Mills Inc Thread tensioning means
US2589498A (en) * 1949-11-01 1952-03-18 Steel And Alloy Tank Company Warp tension compensator
US2932325A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-04-12 Beattie Mfg Company Yarn tensioning mechanism

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4121625A (en) * 1976-08-13 1978-10-24 Adolph Saurer Device for equalizing the warp yarn tension in a loom
US4403630A (en) * 1980-08-26 1983-09-13 Aktiengesellschaft Adolf Saurer Apparatus for tensioning the warp thread sheet of a loom
US4534386A (en) * 1982-10-26 1985-08-13 Sulzer Brothers Limited Tensioning beam assembly for a weaving machine
US4721134A (en) * 1986-08-04 1988-01-26 West Point Pepperell, Inc. Terry loop ratio control device
US5002095A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-03-26 Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Electronic control of terry pile warp yarn dispensing rate
US6135163A (en) * 1998-12-07 2000-10-24 Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft Mbh Method and apparatus for compensating warp thread tension or elongation variations during loom shedding
EP1369514A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-10 Tsudakoma Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Pile loom
US20030226610A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-11 Akihiko Nakada Pile loom
US20040221908A1 (en) * 2002-08-02 2004-11-11 Mario Servalli Weaving machine with correction of the distortion of the weft
US7104286B2 (en) * 2002-08-02 2006-09-12 Sam Engineering S.A. Weaving machine with correction of the distortion of the weft
US20050056334A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft drive system for power loom shafts
US7140399B2 (en) * 2003-09-17 2006-11-28 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft drive system for power loom shafts
US20070137719A1 (en) * 2005-12-15 2007-06-21 Groz-Beckert Kg Shaft drive for a power loom
EP1923493A2 (en) * 2006-11-17 2008-05-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Jidoshokki Warp tension controlling apparatus in a weaving machine for weaving a pile fabric
EP1923493A3 (en) * 2006-11-17 2009-07-22 Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota Jidoshokki Warp tension controlling apparatus in a weaving machine for weaving a pile fabric
US20110023992A1 (en) * 2008-04-16 2011-02-03 Sho Jinsoo Thread feeding method, warp thread feeding method, thread feeder and weaving method
US8381773B2 (en) * 2008-04-16 2013-02-26 JinSoo Sho Thread feeding method, warp thread feeding method, thread feeder and weaving method
CN103189556A (en) * 2010-09-06 2013-07-03 必佳乐公司 Back rest for a weaving machine
CN103189556B (en) * 2010-09-06 2015-11-25 必佳乐公司 Back rest for a weaving machine
CN102797102A (en) * 2011-05-27 2012-11-28 株式会社丰田自动织机 Pile warp tension adjusting device of pile fabric loom
CN102797102B (en) 2011-05-27 2014-03-05 株式会社丰田自动织机 Pile warp tension adjusting device of pile fabric loom
US20160230317A1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2016-08-11 Lindauer Dornier Gesellschaft Mit Beschränkter Haftung Method and Device for Applying Forces and Motions to Warp Threads of Weaving Machine
CN104047097A (en) * 2014-06-30 2014-09-17 山东日发纺织机械有限公司 Terry warp tension control device of terry cloth loom
CN106065511A (en) * 2016-07-06 2016-11-02 江苏友诚数控科技有限公司 Yarn buffering mechanism

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
BE792485A1 (en) grant
GB1417866A (en) 1975-12-17 application
JPS5039177B2 (en) 1975-12-15 grant
FR2162635B1 (en) 1976-06-04 grant
DE2162396A1 (en) 1973-06-28 application
DE2162396C3 (en) 1975-01-09 grant
DE2162396B2 (en) 1974-05-22 application
ES409468A1 (en) 1976-01-01 application
CA989278A (en) 1976-05-18 grant
CA989278A1 (en) grant
FR2162635A1 (en) 1973-07-20 application
NL7216643A (en) 1973-06-13 application
JPS4875860A (en) 1973-10-12 application
BE792485A (en) 1973-06-08 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4429722A (en) Method and apparatus for weaving fabrics of novel construction
US6575201B2 (en) Fabric with a variable width
US3692068A (en) A method of and a loom for producing a tape having a list with laterally protruding loops
US2424928A (en) Weaving and woven fabrics
US3394739A (en) Apparatus for making plush fabrics
US3461920A (en) Apparatus for cutting weft yarn ends under tension on a shuttleless loom
US4577665A (en) Narrow-fabric needle loom weaving system
US3885600A (en) Method and temple apparatus for guiding fabric lengths through textile weaving machines
US2625959A (en) Needle loom
US3302665A (en) Method of weaving terry fabric
US3446250A (en) Temple for looms
US6092559A (en) Device for controlling warp threads for the production of leno fabrics on a textile machine
US3717182A (en) Rapier loom
US3460583A (en) Edge forming device for looms
US2318080A (en) Loop pile fabric and method and apparatus for weaving same
US4421141A (en) Fabric selvage forming
US5007463A (en) Weft clamping system for inserter rapier
US2710631A (en) Selvage thread feeding means for looms
US3796234A (en) Method and apparatus for anchoring a floating yarn portion in a woven fabric
US2130636A (en) Looms with stationary weft supplies
US3297057A (en) Device for grasping and guiding travelling ends of wefts
US3752195A (en) Loom
US3240235A (en) Electrically operated terry motion for looms
US3695304A (en) Dobby mechanism for looms
US3590880A (en) Apparatus and method for operating a loom