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Tooth cleaning device

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US3861406A
US3861406A US31176872A US3861406A US 3861406 A US3861406 A US 3861406A US 31176872 A US31176872 A US 31176872A US 3861406 A US3861406 A US 3861406A
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Prior art keywords
spool
floss
device
supply
housing
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Ralph E Stitt
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Ralph E Stitt
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0055Brushes combined with other articles normally separate from the brushing process, e.g. combs, razors, mirrors
    • A46B15/0069Brushes fitted with a interdental devices, e.g. toothpick
    • A46B15/0071Toothbrushes with flossing arrangements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C15/00Devices for cleaning between the teeth
    • A61C15/04Dental floss; Floss holders not used, see subgroups
    • A61C15/046Flossing tools

Abstract

A tooth cleaning device utilizing stretched floss from an arrestable supply spool in a handle converted to the base of a two tined fork is described. The floss is guided over the fork tines and returned to the housing and take-up spool. The spool is turnably mounted on the housing for rotation in one direction only so that simple finger movement provides a fresh supply of floss.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Stitt Jan. 21, 1975 TOOTH CLEANING DEVICE [76] Inventor: Ralph E. Stitt, Frankfurt American High School, APO, New York, NY. 09039 [22] Filed: Dec. 4, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 311,768

2,443,415 6/1948 Buscarino 132/91 3,340,881 9/1967 Cowan 132/92 R 3,734,107 5/1973 Thierman 132/92 A Primary ExaminerG. E. McNeill Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Miller, Morriss, Pappas & McLeod [57] ABSTRACT A tooth cleaning device utilizing stretched floss from an arrestable supply spool in a handle converted to the base of a two tined fork is described. The floss is [56] References Cited guided over the fork tines and returned to the housing UNITED STATES PATENTS and take-up spool. The spool is turnably mounted on 1 488 214 3/1924 Mason n 132/92 R the housing for rotation in one direction only so that 1Z815Z408 7/1931 Jordan 1 132/91 Simple finger movement PYOIides a fresh pp y of 2,029,031 1/1936 Novick 132/91 floss- 2,162,240 6/1939 Boldusoff 132/91 2,381,530 8/1945 Dembenski 132 92 A 11 Clam, 32 D'awmg Flgures I \\\\\-.I|E

5- 5.22:.- 3 A. 74, .AJ'

v PATENTED JAN 21 I975 SHEET 4 [1F 4 TOOTH CLEANING DEVICE The invention regards a device to clean the teeth in the area between the teeth by the means of a length of stretched floss between the ends of the tines of a twotined fork, which is supplied with floss from an arrestable floss supply spool situated in a housing in the handle to the fork, the handle serving as a guide for the floss to the fork tines.

It is known to clean the teeth in the area between the teeth by using a string, called floss, preferably synthetically produced, and by pulling the floss back and forth and up and down. This method of cleaning the teeth is called flossing. This is done by wrapping the ends of a large length of floss around the middle fingers of both hands and stretching the floss between the pointing finger of one hand and the thumb of the other hand and placing the stretched portion of the floss between neighboring teeth in ones mouth and moving the floss about in a back and forth and up and down motion. This needs a special dexterity, so that the use of floss, especially by children, tends to be difficult and is discontinued.

It is also already known to floss with a commerically produced device, by which the floss is under tension across the ends of a U-shaped form which serves as a fork to place the floss between the teeth. This U form is attached to a longitudinally split metal housing, which one grips to use, and which contains a spool of floss to supply to the tips of the U form. The floss is pulled from the supply spool by hand and is placed into a slit in the end ofa lever mechanism which fits into the housing as the lever closes into the housing. As the lever closes, it locks the supply spool in non-turnable position and puts the floss under tension across the tips of the U form and continues on into the closed position into the handle. The extra used floss is then guided by hand into a cutting slot to remove the used portion of floss.

The supply spool of this device can be removed from the housing so that a new supply spool can be inserted or refilled.

This known tooth cleaning device is complicated with many parts and therefore very expensive to produce. This device lends itself to be made only from strong material, such as metal, because of the high strength with which the floss is clamped.

It is further necessary to use special dexterity and strength, which children have not yet developed, and one needs both hands.

Also the handling of the known device is difficult because the fork tines line in the same plane as the housing. The area between the back teeth is therefore difficult to reach.

lt is therefore basically the task of the invention to simplify the construction and handling ofa tooth cleaning device with fork, especially the floss renewal.

This task is solved by the invention through the supply and take-up spools housing being built into the fork handle and that the take-up spool is turnable in only one direction and in this direction pulls floss from the supply spool which turns only a predetermined amount which allows the floss to be renewed at least the length of the distance between the tines of the fork and is automatically arrested, and floss tension is again created across the tines of the fork.

The floss in the supply spool has a length sufficient for one half years usage. From the supply spool the floss is guided over guide channels, grooves or eyes, rings or fingers to the fork ends and back to the take-up spool. After that portion of the floss between the tines of the fork becomes used, the take-up spool is turned with the thumb or finger of the hand holding the tooth cleaning device, turning at the same time the supply spool which is released with a finger of the same hand. The take-up spool turning movement becomes transfered through the floss to the supply spool. The supply spool turns around the predetermined number of degrees until it is again automatically arrested by the means ofa snap-in (preferably) button or pin. Through this turning movement a new unused portion of floss becomes moved into a position between the tines of the fork ready for use and the used portion becomes taken up into the take-up spool.

This device can therefore not only serve to clean the teeth but also to renew the used portion of floss with only one hand, so that the device is also appropriate for children and from this, used with preference.

In order to attain that the take-up spool is turnable in only one direction and that it not allow itself to be turned backward by the tension of the floss, projecting out around the circumference of the flange of the takeup spool against the take-up direction are appropriate elastic projections which grip in appropriate opposition to projections of the housing wall. The take-up spool stays therefore in every chosen position corresponding to the distance between the projections. The arresting of the supply spool is effected preferably by means of at least one projection on the flange of the supply spool which is operable manually from the outside located in a predetermined radial position from the turning axis of the supply spool and in the turning path of this projection, a block or boss service projection bound to the housing stands and that the supply spool is elastic.

In order to release the arrested supply spool, the thumb or finger of the hand holding the tooth cleaning device, pushes in an axial direction on the outer rim of the supply spool so that the projection on the supply spool can turn further, until its projection or one of its other projections becomes blocked by the same projection on the housing (or after a complete revolution of the supply spool). Depending on the size of the diameter of the winding floss one can choose one or more projections on the housing and/or on the flange of the supply spool.

Another preferred possibility of arresting the supply spool is contained herein; that the projection connected to the housing, which is in the turning path of the projection of the supply spool, is slideable.

The slideable projection works like a slide bar or bolt, so that as the slideable projection is shoved into the turning path of one or the other of the projections of the supply spool it is struck by the turning projection of the supply spool and stops turning.

A further structural possibility is that of a bump on a ridge or rim that is formed on the outer flange of the supply spool which travels in a groove in the housing wall and becomes lodged by a projection or gripped by a narrowing of the groove and that the bump be elastic.

In this way not only is the spool secured against an axial displacement but it is also a seal between the housing and the spool so that water does not penetrate. In a watertight arrangement of this type a disinfectant can be placed in the take-up spool compartment of the housing which would kill bacteria. The elasticity of the spools would also allow assembly.

The advantages of the structure lie in the fact that the groove is formed into the outside of the housing wall and at one side, in the area of the striking projection on the housing wall is a position in the groove which is widened in an axial direction outward.

This facilitates a simple axial bending of the outer flange of the supply spool in the widened area of the groove, so that when the projection of the supply spool lies against the projection of the housing, the flange of the supply spool is moveable by a simple thumb movement out and away allowing the supply spool projection to pass, so that a new section of floss can be drawn through.

Preferably the spools are coaxially positioned, thereby facilitating an especially space saving organization and also a simple servicing of the spools.

The fork is also intentionally constructed on the opposite side of the handle of the tooth brush on the same end of the brush.

In this way the whole device becomes shortened and also easily handled, as opposed to the case, that the fork is on the opposite end of the handle of the brush end. At the same time it gives a stronger impulse not only to brush but to floss.

Especially by the bringing of the fork to the same end of the tooth brush is it advantageous if the tines of the fork lie in the direction of the long axis of the handle and are collapsable, because in this way a greater freedom of movement is allowed in the mouth.

A further example of the tooth cleaning device is contained herein, that on the fork handle in the vicinity of the fork, two opposing structures built out from the sides of the handle and curving back toward one another like an unclosed ring, so that a finger of the users hand holding the device could be inserted between and the two structures would clamp around.

This enables a better handling of the tooth cleaning device, because the insertion of a finger (the pointing finger) controls the device closer to the point of use.

Preferably the handle of the fork is at the same time the handle of a tooth brush.

Thereby constructed, this flossing device or tooth cleaning device is united with a presently known tooth brush. Therefore, using the tooth brush encourages the use of the floss-tooth cleaning device.

Another, a fork-displaying flossing device, which is especially simply arranged, and especially regarding the renewing of the length of floss between the fork tines, is easy to handle: The invention is in this manner constructed, that the fork tines are elastic and the length of floss the same as the distance between the fork tines as they are pressed together and the ends of the length of floss are hung on the ends of the fork tines.

In the following the invention and its developments will be more closely described through drawings of preferred explanatory examples.

FIG. 1 represents perspectively an explanatory example of the flossing-tooth cleaning device in combination with a toothbrush.

FIG. 2 represents a partial longitudinal section through a further explanatory example of a flossingtooth cleaning device in combination with a toothbrush.

FIG. 3 represents a front view of the fork of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 2 without the remaining parts of the tooth cleaning device.

FIG. 4 represents the top view of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 2 without the single part contents of the housing part.

FIG. 5 represents the section view BB of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 2 without the background of the tooth cleaning device normally seen in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 6 represents the section view AA of FIG. 4 without that background normally seen in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 7 represents the view of the take-up spool of FIG. 2 from the bottom.

FIGS. 8 and 9 represent a bearing and seal of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 2 in side and bottom view.

FIGS. 10 and 11 represent the supply spool of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 2 in side and bottom view.

FIG. 12 represents a partial longitudinal section through a further design of the floss-tooth cleaning device in combination with a tooth brush.

FIG. 13 represents another partial sectional view of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12 without the function parts in the housing part of the handle.

FIG. 14 represents a top view of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 13 without the internal parts.

FIG. 15 represents a front view of the fork of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 14 without the parts normally seen in the background.

FIGS. 16 and 17 represent an axial sectional and bottom view of the take-up spool of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12.

FIGS. 18 and 19 represent an axial sectional and bottom view of the supply spool of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12.

FIGS. 20 and 21 represent an axial sectional view and top view of the bearing and seal part of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12.

FIGS. 22 and 23 represent a longitudinal sectional and top view of a slider-bar of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12.

FIGS. 24 and 25 represent a longitudinal sectional and top view of the bottom plate and slider-bar guide part of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 12.

FIG. 26 represents another design of the tooth cleaning device in side view.

FIG. 27 represents the sectional view EE of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 26 and the fork seen in the background in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 28 represents the sectional view I-l-H of the spool and housing parts of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 26 without displaying the parts normally seen in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 29 represents the sectional view K-K of the spool and housing parts of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 26.

FIG. 30 represents a perspective view of the housing of the tooth cleaning device of FIG. 26.

FIG. 31 represents a perspective view of another design of a tooth cleaning device with collapsable fork tines.

FIG. 32 represents another design of the tooth cleaning device.

In the design example of FIG. 1 the supply and takeup spools are together but in separate parts of the housing 1 structured part of the handle 2, on which the fork 3 is found, so situated and the housing 1 so constructed, that only a part of the outer flange 4 of the take-up spool is reachable from the outside. The edge 4a of the flange 4 is ridged.

Also the arresting device for the supply spool is opperable from the outside on the underside of the housing 1 of FIG. 1.

The floss is unwound from the supply spool by turning the take-up spool with the thumb or finger of the hand which holds the tooth cleaning device and at the same time the arresting device of the supply spool is released by another finger of the same hand on the under side of the housing 1 and the floss is at the same time collected on taken-up onto the take-up spool, so that the floss moves in the direction of the arrow 6 and an unused portion of floss moves into position between the fork tines.

The handle 2 is at the same time the handle of a tooth-brush.

In the design example of FIG. 2 11 the single performing parts are represented. The outer flange 4 of the take-up spool 7 lies here fully free and serves as the closure or cap of the housing 1 at the same time. This flange 4 has also a ridged rim 4a and is at the same time provided with a surrounding rim 8, which grips closely into the especially designed groove 8a of the housing 1', so that the take-up spool 7 part of the housing 1 becomes watentight, but that the take-up spool 7 is yet turnable. The flange 7 and together with it the rim 8 are elastic so that the take-up spool 7 is removable from the housing 1, for example, so that the rim 8 snaps into the groove 8a. By this means is the take-up spool 7 more guaranteed a sure hold in the housing 1'.

Under the rim 8 the take-up spool flange 4 is provided with saw-tooth formed projections S which are inclined in opposition to the direction of arrow 10 of the take-up direction. On the inside of the housing 1' at the level of projections 9 are also saw-tooth-form projections 11 provided which are inclined in the takeup turning direction. The diameter of the ring formed by the tips of the diametrically opposed projections 11 is slightly smaller than the diameter of the ring formed by the diametrically opposed tips of the projections 9, so that the projections 9 and 11 grip together like the teeth of two gears. The projections 9 are elastic, at least. In this way, when the take-up spool 7 is turned in the direction of the arrow 10, the tips of the projections 9 slide over the tips of the projections 11, and again grip behind the projections 11. In this manner the takeup spool 7 is turnable in only one direction.

In the housing 1', further, the supply spool 12 is situated rotatably, wherein the unused supply of heretofore unrepresented floss if wound, coaxially with the takeup spool 7 on a peg or pivot 13. The peg 13 with a circle forming flange 14 is glued to a circle-formed seating ledge in the housing I. Further the supply spool 12 rests on a ring-forming seat or ledge 15, which is pro vided with at least one projection 16 on its inner radius. In the same position on the turning axis as the projection 16 on the under side of the outer flange 17 of the supply spool 12, at least one downward projection 18 is provided, so that the projection 16 projects into the turning path of projection 18. The motive power of the supply spool 12 results from pulling the wound-up floss on the supply spool 12, when the turning of the take-up spool 7 pulls the floss from the supply spool 12 and over the guide channel 19 and 19', through the hairline groove in the fork 3 and over the earlike guide projections 20 on the fork 3. By utilizing only one projection 16 and only one projection 18, as shown, projection 18 strikes projection 16 after a full revolution at most, so that the supply spool 12 becomes arrested. When the elastic flange l7 pictured in FIG. 2 is bent upward easily, by means of a thumb or finger of the hand holding the tooth cleaning device, the projection 18 becomes freed and turns past the projection 16 until it completes a revolution and again stops by striking projection 16. In this way the floss, step by step, is turned further by only such a length corresponding to a turn of the supply spool 12. The diameter of the floss winding on the supply spool 12 is so chosen that its length by one revolution on the supply spool 12 is at least as long as the distance between the tines of the fork, thereby resulting in a renewal of the complete length of floss between the fork tines. This means, the minimum winding circumference is then approximately the same as the distance between the tines. Then the diameter of the floss winding on the supply spool 12 is larger in the beginning, there are advisably more projection 16 in the path of the projection 18, so that the end of the windings diameter can be compensated for. The same function can be accomplished with only one projection 16 and more projections 18.

The guide channels 19 are so constructed that they open transversely to the long direction of the handle making it easier to position the floss.

The further design example in the FIG. 12 25 differs significantly from the previous example only in the arrangement of the saw-tooth formed projections 9' as related to 11' and the manner of arresting and locking of the supply spool 12, so that the drawing referents of the previous example parts are herein maintained but with a sub" mark The saw-tooth-formed projections 9' are here constructed on the lower side of the inner flange of the take-up spool 7', and the projections 9' continually grip the saw-tooth-formed projections 11 on the upper side of the flange 14' of the peg 13.

The rim 8' reaches under a closely fitting circle forming ridge 21 and is better strengthened and sealed from above and out.

In order to arrest the turning of the supply spool 12 a slide-bar 22 is arranged into the capping disk 23 which is welded or glued into place covering the lower opening of the housing 1''. This capping disk 23 exhib its two separated guide projections 24, between which the slide bar 22 is slideable back and forth. Through the movement of the slide-bar 22 the projection 16' of the slide-bar 22 is moveable into the turning path of the projection 18 of the supply spool 12. From under the capping disk 23 the shaft of a control button 27 protrudes through an elongated hole 25 of the capping disk 23 and is glued to the slide-bar 22, thereby enabling operation of the slide-bar 22 from outside the housing I". The control button 27 is constructed in an elastic inverted umbrella shape over the elongated hole 25 thereby sealing the hole 25 from water or dirt Another design example of FIG. 26 30 differs from the previous examples only with respect to the structure parts which have not yet been utilized or are represented with a second or third sub mark On this example an attachment 28 pointing upward from both sides of the handle 2 and bend outward and then back inward. The curvature of the attachments 28 is of the shape that a finger or thumb passes through, so that the thumb or finger, preferrably the pointing finger, front member can be inserted into the attachments 28. This makes the handling of the tooth cleaning device easier.

On the end of the handle 2 a housing 1 is furnished with two grooves 8a and 8b (FIGS. 28, in which the encircling rim 8" of the outer flange 24' of the take-up spool 7' and encircling rim 8" of the outer flange 17' of the supply spool 12' grips closely. The flange 17' contains, in an encircling inner groove 30, at least one projection 18', which, in the turning of the supply spool 12' on a axis around the rim of the housing 1", strikes the projection 16" so that the supply spool 12 is arrested.

To release the supply spool 12, in order to unwind a new fresh length of floss, the groove 8b is provided with a widened section 31 at a predetermined position at the area of projection 16', which means on the outside and in an axial direction more broadly grooved, as an extra part of the groove 8b, so that the elastic flange I7, which is preferably made with transparent, pliable plastic, in the area of this broadening 31 can be bent and pushed outwards in an axial direction by the means of the thumb or fingertip, so that the projections 16" and 18' can pass one another. The transparency of the flange 17' makes finding of the position 31 and at the same time enables a check of the supply of floss on the supply spool. Only one projection 16" and only one broadening 31 of the groove 8b is shown, but it is also possible to arrange more of the same types of projections and broadenings of the groove. That would make it necessary for only one projection 18' in the groove 30 for the supply spool 12' to turn by steps. The distances between the projections 16" and broadenings 31 or the projections 18' are necessarily the distance between the tines because of a predetermined winding diameter of floss supply, so that with one turning step or more of the supply spool 12', a fresh length of floss is supplied to the tines of the tooth cleaning device from the supply spool.

Another design example in FIG. 31 represents a fork 3' with collapsable tines built into the opposite side of the bristles side of a tooth brush head, as is shown by the arrows, so that the fork tines collapse in order to save space while using the brush and then return to upright position for flossing. In the upright position the fork tines are through a special structure of the joints or by utilizing a tie-bar, made fixed. In the collapsed position the tines lie in a position below the surface of the handle. Also, through another design, which means by constructing the fork on the other end of the handle opposite the brush, or by utilizing another handle without a brush the tines of this or a similar design made non-collapsable.

In the design example of FIG. 31, the tines lie in a parallel line with the longitudinal axis of the bristles, or can also lie in a line perpendicular to the long axis of the bristles, so that to floss the length of floss could lie parallel or perpendicular.

The fork tines can also be constructed on the opposite end of the handle from the bristle end of the handle so that the tines lie along the parallel axis.

Preferably, the fork tines should be perpendicular or diagonal to the long axis of the handle 2 and 2' at least while being used for flossing.

FIG. 32 represents another design example of the tooth cleaning device. Here, the fork 3" is provided with a groove 33 in length-wise direction of the handle 2'. In these grooves, two pegs 34, preferably produced from plastic, flt, which are bound together with a length of floss 5. The length of floss is slightly shorter than the distance between the tines, so that the floss 5' is stretched between the forks, when the pegs 34 are set into the grooves 33.

At least to the height of the grooves 33, the ends of the tines are provided with a slit 35 lying in the same plane as the floss 5' stretched between the tine ends. The floss 5 runs through these slits 35 when the floss 5 is stretched between these fork tines ends.

Instead of the pegs 34, other connections could also be arranged, for example, knots, on the ends of the length of floss. When the floss itself is thickened on the end, then the grooves could be removed. Preferably then a deepening of the outer lip of the slit is arranged so that the thickened end of the floss could drop below the surface of the fork tine ends.

Finally one comes out without pegs 34, if one constructs a loop on the ends of the floss which could be hung on the tine ends.

In all cases the floss 5' is of the length corresponding to the distance between the tines of the fork, even somewhat shorter than this distance, machine prefabricated, so that it can be placed on the ends of the tines whether with the provided knots, loops thickened ends or pegs. The renewal of the length of floss between the tines takes place then through a simple exchange of the floss 5' by pressing together the tines of the fork.

In all design examples all parts are produced of plastic, preferably, so that the burning of the parts does not create a pollution.

I claim:

1. In a device for cleaning of the teeth in the area between the teeth having stretched floss supplied from a floss supply spool turnably mounted on an axis in a first housing in a handle connected to the base of a two ended tined fork and over the fork tine ends the floss is guided and returned to the housing to a take-up spool, turnably mounted on an axis in a second housing and turnable by hand from outside the handle in only one direction, thereby retrieving the used floss by simple finger movements the combination comprising:

a. an arrestable supply spool having a flange projecting toward the housing provided with at least one projection positioned at a predetermined radial distance from the turning axis of the supply spool; and

b. in the movement path of this projection on the supply spool at least one other projection which extends from and is bound to the housing so as to serve as a stop or block to the supply spool projection movement upon manual turning of the take-up spool to renew the floss between the tines.

2. The device as in claim 1, in which the take-up spool has a flange projecting towards a groove within the housing and at the circumference of the flange of the take-up spool are provided elastic projections inclined in opposition to the take-up direction which engage opposingly inclined projections on the housing groove, thereby allowing turning of the take-up spool in one direction only.

3. The device as in claim 1, in which the projection which is bound to the housing is slideable into the turning path of the supply spool projection.

4. The device as in claim 1, in which an outer flange with a rim which runs completely around its circumference is provided on at least one spool and wherein the rim grips elastically into a groove which is formed on the outside of the housing.

5. The device as in claim 4, in which the groove widens in the area of a projection on the spool which forms a lock with a second projection on the housing and wherein the flange is manually bendable in the spool axis direction at the point where the groove on the housing widens so that the projections can pass each other.

6. The device, as in claim 1, in which the spools are located co-axially.

7. The device as in claim 1, in which on the fork handle in the area of the fork has two opposing finger conforming attachments on either side of the fork handle so that a finger of the hand using the device can be inserted between the two attachments which then clamp around the finger.

8. The device as in claim 1 in which the handle is also the handle of a toothbrush with bristles.

9. The device as in claim 8, in which the fork is on the same end of the toothbrush as the bristles but on the opposite side from the bristles.

10. The device as in claim 1 in which the tines of the fork are collapsable in the direction of the longitudinal axis of the handle and away from it.

11. The device as in claim 1 in which the tines are formed diagonally to the longitudinal direction of the handle.

Claims (11)

1. In a device for cleaning of the teeth in the area between the teeth having stretched floss supplied from a floss supply spool turnably mounted on an axis in a first housing in a handle connected to the base of a two ended tined fork and over the fork tine ends the floss is guided and returned to the housing to a take-up spool, turnably mounted on an axis in a second housing and turnable by hand from outside the handle in only one direction, thereby retrieving the used floss by simple finger movements the combination comprising: a. an arrestable supply spool having a flange projecting toward the housing provided with at least one projection positioned at a predetermined radial distance from the turning axis of the supply spool; and b. in the movement path of this projection on the supply spool at least one other projection which extends from and is bound to the housing so as to serve as a stop or block to the supply spool projection movement upon manual turning of the take-up spool to renew the floss between the tines.
2. The device as in claim 1, in which the take-up spool has a flange projecting towards a groove within the housing and at the circumference of the flange of the take-up spool are provided elastic projections inclined in opposition to the take-up direction which engage opposingly inclined projections on the housing groove, thereby allowing turning of the take-up spool in one direction only.
3. The device as in claim 1, in which the projection which is bound to the housing is slideable into the turning path of the supply spool projection.
4. The device as in claim 1, in which an outer flange with a rim which runs completely around its circumference is provided on at least one spool and wherein the rim grips elastically into a groove which is formed on the outside of the housing.
5. The device as in claim 4, in which the groove widens in the area of a projection on the spool which forms a lock with a second projection on the housing and wherein the flange is manually bendable in the spool axis direction at the point where the groove on the housing widens so that the projections can pass each other.
6. The device, as in claim 1, in which the spools are located co-axially.
7. The device as in claim 1, in which on the fork handle in the area of the fork has two opposing finger conforming attachments on either side of the fork handle so that a finger of the hand using the device can be inserted between the two attachments which then clamp around the finger.
8. The device as in claim 1 in which the handle is also the handle of a toothbrush with bristles.
9. The device as in claim 8, in which the fork is on the same end of the toothbrush as the bristles but on the opposite side from the bristles.
10. The device as in claim 1 in which the tines of the fork are collapsable in the direction of the longitudinal axis of the handle and away from it.
11. The device as in claim 1 in which the tines are formed diagonally to the longitudinal direction of the handle.
US3861406A 1972-12-04 1972-12-04 Tooth cleaning device Expired - Lifetime US3861406A (en)

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US3861406A Expired - Lifetime US3861406A (en) 1972-12-04 1972-12-04 Tooth cleaning device

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4214598A (en) * 1978-10-13 1980-07-29 Lee Lawrence L Dental floss applicator
FR2596964A1 (en) * 1986-04-15 1987-10-16 Hababou Jacques Toothbrush device with integral dental-floss holder with variable lateral spacing
GB2208799A (en) * 1987-08-22 1989-04-19 Nigel Geoffrey Ley Dental flossing tool
US4920993A (en) * 1988-10-03 1990-05-01 Mackie Kenneth H Dental floss applicator for flossing teeth
US4966176A (en) * 1988-12-22 1990-10-30 Lachenberg James A Dental flosser
US5020554A (en) * 1989-11-08 1991-06-04 Feinberg Andrew S Dental floss dispenser and applicator
US5060681A (en) * 1990-12-24 1991-10-29 Robert S. Westbrook Dental flossing device
US5141008A (en) * 1991-05-15 1992-08-25 Lee Lawrence L Dental floss applicator
GB2259016A (en) * 1991-08-22 1993-03-03 James Augustus Beddie Dental floss holder
US5301698A (en) * 1992-09-25 1994-04-12 Ballard Larry N Multiple lock dental floss holder and spool enclosure assembly therefor
US5417232A (en) * 1992-09-25 1995-05-23 Ballard; Larry N. Multiple lock dental floss holder and spool enclosure assembly therefor
US5450866A (en) * 1994-04-19 1995-09-19 Nupro, Inc. Dental floss device
US5629527A (en) * 1995-05-01 1997-05-13 Levitt; Gary H. Dental hygiene system
US20040134510A1 (en) * 2003-01-13 2004-07-15 Van Vilsteren Arnold G. Gloss and floss
US6772770B1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2004-08-10 Alexander Williams, Sr. Floss toothbrush for adults and children
US20040187887A1 (en) * 2003-03-24 2004-09-30 Beckman Nancy Ruth Disposable angled toothbrush, periodontal aid and floosing device
US20060086369A1 (en) * 2004-10-26 2006-04-27 Wilkinson William T Toothbrush and flossing system
WO2006104470A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Peter Strelec Device for cleaning teeth containing a dental floss
US20090314307A1 (en) * 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Colgate-Palmolive Oral Hygiene Device With Floss Storage Capability
US20100186182A1 (en) * 2009-01-26 2010-07-29 Avila Angela A Oral hygiene device & methods of use thereof
US20110041870A1 (en) * 2009-08-19 2011-02-24 Russell Kalbfeld Dental flosser
US20110290274A1 (en) * 2010-05-27 2011-12-01 Will Miles Flossing Toys and Methods of Making and Using the Same
GB2494928A (en) * 2011-09-26 2013-03-27 Rashid Zlaoui Toothbrush with floss dispenser
US8544481B1 (en) * 2011-07-14 2013-10-01 Gloria Smith Brush and toss
US20140311521A1 (en) * 2013-04-20 2014-10-23 Ricardo Manuel Souza Mourra Multifunctional oral hygiene system
US20150027488A1 (en) * 2013-07-25 2015-01-29 Ray Charles Two (2) in one (1) toothbrush floss
USD738044S1 (en) 2013-04-30 2015-09-01 Larry Willis Miles, Jr. Flossing device
US20160192770A1 (en) * 2015-04-27 2016-07-07 Charles Ray Trent 3 In one toothbrush flosser
USD772578S1 (en) * 2015-09-04 2016-11-29 Zack Isaacs Dental brush-flosser
USD778060S1 (en) * 2014-08-26 2017-02-07 Finkelfloss Ltd. Toothbrush with dental floss dispenser
US20170079758A1 (en) * 2015-09-17 2017-03-23 Christine Cooper Carbon Coated Filament Cord

Citations (8)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1488214A (en) * 1923-01-06 1924-03-25 Mason Saul Toothbrush
US1815408A (en) * 1929-03-29 1931-07-21 James K Jordan Dental floss holder
US2029031A (en) * 1934-04-25 1936-01-28 Novick Jacob Dental floss holder for toothbrushes
US2162240A (en) * 1937-12-14 1939-06-13 Fred J Boldusoff Dental floss holder
US2381530A (en) * 1944-05-25 1945-08-07 Joseph E Dembenski Sanitary dental floss holder
US2443415A (en) * 1946-09-18 1948-06-15 Buscarino James Dental floss holder
US3340881A (en) * 1964-09-02 1967-09-12 Laverne M Cowan Dental floss holder
US3734107A (en) * 1971-11-12 1973-05-22 I Thierman Dental floss tooth cleaning tool

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1488214A (en) * 1923-01-06 1924-03-25 Mason Saul Toothbrush
US1815408A (en) * 1929-03-29 1931-07-21 James K Jordan Dental floss holder
US2029031A (en) * 1934-04-25 1936-01-28 Novick Jacob Dental floss holder for toothbrushes
US2162240A (en) * 1937-12-14 1939-06-13 Fred J Boldusoff Dental floss holder
US2381530A (en) * 1944-05-25 1945-08-07 Joseph E Dembenski Sanitary dental floss holder
US2443415A (en) * 1946-09-18 1948-06-15 Buscarino James Dental floss holder
US3340881A (en) * 1964-09-02 1967-09-12 Laverne M Cowan Dental floss holder
US3734107A (en) * 1971-11-12 1973-05-22 I Thierman Dental floss tooth cleaning tool

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4214598A (en) * 1978-10-13 1980-07-29 Lee Lawrence L Dental floss applicator
FR2596964A1 (en) * 1986-04-15 1987-10-16 Hababou Jacques Toothbrush device with integral dental-floss holder with variable lateral spacing
GB2208799A (en) * 1987-08-22 1989-04-19 Nigel Geoffrey Ley Dental flossing tool
US4920993A (en) * 1988-10-03 1990-05-01 Mackie Kenneth H Dental floss applicator for flossing teeth
US4966176A (en) * 1988-12-22 1990-10-30 Lachenberg James A Dental flosser
US5020554A (en) * 1989-11-08 1991-06-04 Feinberg Andrew S Dental floss dispenser and applicator
US5060681A (en) * 1990-12-24 1991-10-29 Robert S. Westbrook Dental flossing device
US5141008A (en) * 1991-05-15 1992-08-25 Lee Lawrence L Dental floss applicator
GB2259016A (en) * 1991-08-22 1993-03-03 James Augustus Beddie Dental floss holder
US5417232A (en) * 1992-09-25 1995-05-23 Ballard; Larry N. Multiple lock dental floss holder and spool enclosure assembly therefor
US5301698A (en) * 1992-09-25 1994-04-12 Ballard Larry N Multiple lock dental floss holder and spool enclosure assembly therefor
US5450866A (en) * 1994-04-19 1995-09-19 Nupro, Inc. Dental floss device
US5629527A (en) * 1995-05-01 1997-05-13 Levitt; Gary H. Dental hygiene system
US6772770B1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2004-08-10 Alexander Williams, Sr. Floss toothbrush for adults and children
US20040134510A1 (en) * 2003-01-13 2004-07-15 Van Vilsteren Arnold G. Gloss and floss
US20040187887A1 (en) * 2003-03-24 2004-09-30 Beckman Nancy Ruth Disposable angled toothbrush, periodontal aid and floosing device
US20060086369A1 (en) * 2004-10-26 2006-04-27 Wilkinson William T Toothbrush and flossing system
US8015982B2 (en) 2004-10-26 2011-09-13 Wilkinson William T Toothbrush and flossing system
WO2006104470A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Peter Strelec Device for cleaning teeth containing a dental floss
US8776806B2 (en) 2008-06-19 2014-07-15 Colgate-Palmolive Company Oral hygiene device with floss storage capability
US20090314307A1 (en) * 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Colgate-Palmolive Oral Hygiene Device With Floss Storage Capability
US20100186182A1 (en) * 2009-01-26 2010-07-29 Avila Angela A Oral hygiene device & methods of use thereof
US20110041870A1 (en) * 2009-08-19 2011-02-24 Russell Kalbfeld Dental flosser
US20110290274A1 (en) * 2010-05-27 2011-12-01 Will Miles Flossing Toys and Methods of Making and Using the Same
US9848967B2 (en) * 2010-05-27 2017-12-26 Will Miles Flossing toys and methods of making and using the same
US8544481B1 (en) * 2011-07-14 2013-10-01 Gloria Smith Brush and toss
GB2494928B (en) * 2011-09-26 2013-10-09 Rashid Zlaoui Oral hygiene apparatus
GB2494928A (en) * 2011-09-26 2013-03-27 Rashid Zlaoui Toothbrush with floss dispenser
US20140311521A1 (en) * 2013-04-20 2014-10-23 Ricardo Manuel Souza Mourra Multifunctional oral hygiene system
USD738044S1 (en) 2013-04-30 2015-09-01 Larry Willis Miles, Jr. Flossing device
US20150027488A1 (en) * 2013-07-25 2015-01-29 Ray Charles Two (2) in one (1) toothbrush floss
USD778060S1 (en) * 2014-08-26 2017-02-07 Finkelfloss Ltd. Toothbrush with dental floss dispenser
US20160192770A1 (en) * 2015-04-27 2016-07-07 Charles Ray Trent 3 In one toothbrush flosser
USD772578S1 (en) * 2015-09-04 2016-11-29 Zack Isaacs Dental brush-flosser
US20170079758A1 (en) * 2015-09-17 2017-03-23 Christine Cooper Carbon Coated Filament Cord

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