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US3861029A - Method of making heater cable - Google Patents

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US3861029A
US3861029A US28744472A US3861029A US 3861029 A US3861029 A US 3861029A US 28744472 A US28744472 A US 28744472A US 3861029 A US3861029 A US 3861029A
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temperature
black
resistivity
carbon
polymeric
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Robert Smith-Johannsen
Jack Mclean Walker
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Raychem Corp
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Raychem Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01CRESISTORS
    • H01C7/00Non-adjustable resistors formed as one or more layers or coatings; Non-adjustable resistors made from powdered conducting material or powdered semi-conducting material with or without insulating material
    • H01C7/02Non-adjustable resistors formed as one or more layers or coatings; Non-adjustable resistors made from powdered conducting material or powdered semi-conducting material with or without insulating material having positive temperature coefficient
    • H01C7/027Non-adjustable resistors formed as one or more layers or coatings; Non-adjustable resistors made from powdered conducting material or powdered semi-conducting material with or without insulating material having positive temperature coefficient consisting of conducting or semi-conducting material dispersed in a non-conductive organic material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49082Resistor making
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49082Resistor making
    • Y10T29/49083Heater type

Abstract

Described herein are self-regulating conductive articles comprised of an extruded length of polymeric material containing not more than about 15 percent by weight conductive carbon black, the resistivity of the extrudate following prolonged exposure to temperatures in excess of the crystalline melting point or range of the polymeric matrix in which the black content satisfies the equation:

Description

United States Patent Smith-Johannsen et al.

[ Jan..21, 1975 METHOD OF MAKING HEATER CABLE [75] Inventors: Robert Smith-Johannsen; Jack McLean Walker, both of Portola Valley, Calif.

[73] Assignee: Raychem Corporation, Menlo Park,

Calif.

[22] Filed: Sept. 8, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 287,444

[52] US. Cl 29/611, 29/610, 264/346, 338/214 [51] Int. Cl. 1105b 3/10 [58] Field of Search 338/31, 22, 28, 211, 212, 338/214, 213', 252/511; 29/610, 611; 264/346 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,282,832 5/1942 Spooner 252/511 2,905,919 9/1959 1, 338/214 3,155,631 11/1964 260/285 3,277,419 10/1966 338/212 3,308,528 3/1967 Bullard 29/610 3,435,401 3/1969 Epstein 338/214 3,591,526 7/1971 Kawashima 3,629,154 12/1971 Johnson 252/511 Primary Examiner-E. A. Goldberg Attorney, Agent, or FirmLyon & Lyon [57] ABSTRACT 2 L +log R s 45.

Wherein L is percent by weight black and R is resistivity of the extrudate expressed in ohm-cm. The articles exhibit room temperature resistivity in the range from about 5 to 100,000 ohm-cm and may be employed, e.g., in heat tracing and thermostating applications.

2 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures METHOD OF MAKING HEATER CABLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Electrically conductive thermoplastic compositions have previously been achieved by the addition of conductive carbon black to a polymeric base. In one category of such compositions, advantage has been taken of a non-linear positive temperature resistivity coefficient displayed by the particular material to obtain selfregulating or currentdimiting semicondu ctive articles. In U.S. Pat. No. 3,243,753 to Kohler, one such composition is described as containing from 25 to 75 percent carbon black about which the polymeric matrix has been formed by in situ polymerization. As the temperature of such a composition increases, either through a rise in ambient temperature or by reason of resistive heating occasioned by the passage of current therethrough, the polymer matrix expands at a rate greater than that'of the carbon black particles which, in an interconnected array of channels, impart the property of conductivity. The resulting diminution in the number of current-carrying channels decreases the amount of power generated by PR heating. This self-limiting feature may be put to work in, eg, heat tracing pipes in chemical plants for freeze protection, maintaining flow characteristics of viscous syrups, etc. In such applications, articles formed from the conductive composition ideally attain and maintain a temperature at which energy lost through heat. transfer to the surroundings equals that gained from the current. If the ambient temperature then falls, increased heat transfer to the surroundings is met by increased power generation owing to the resistivity decrease associated with the articles lowered temperature. In short order, parity of heat transfer and power generation is again attained. Conversely, where ambient temperature increases heat transfer from the conductive article is reduced and the resistivity rise resulting from increased temperature diminishes or stops 1 R heating.

Self-regulating conductive compositions may, of course, be used in employments other than resistive heating, for example, in heat sensing and circuitbreaking applications. In every case, however, the high carbon black content characteristic of most prior art compositions is disadvantageous. High black loadings are associated with inferior elongation and stress crack resistance, as well as low temperature brittleness. In addition, high black loading appears to adversely affect the current-regulating properties of the conductive compositions. If a semi-conductive thermoplastic composition is externally heated and its resistivity plotted against temperature (on the abscissa) the resulting curve will show resistivity rising with temperature from the low room temperature value (Ri) to a point of peak resistance (Rp), following which additional increase in temperature occasions a precipitous resistivity drop associated with the melt phase of the polymer matrix. To avoid resistance runaway with the concomitant irreversible change in resistivity characteristics, the practice of cross-linking the polymer matrix has grown up, in which event resistivity levels off at the peak temperature and remains constant upon further increase in ambient temperature. Cross-linked semiconductive articles with high black loadings exhibit undesirably low resistivity when brought to peak temperature by exposure to very high or low ambient tempera tures. In such instances poor heat transfer characteristics can prevent dissipation of I Rp generation, causing burnout.

It would accordingly be desirable to prepare semiconductive self-regulating articles with substantially lower black contents, with the objects, inter alia, of improving flexural and other physical properties and substantially increasing the ratio Rp/Ri. However, attainment of these goals has in large part been precluded by the extremely high room temperature resistivities exhibited by polymers with low black loadings. In Cabot Corporations Pigment Black Technical Resport S-8, entitled Carbon Blacks for Conductive Plastics percent carbon-resistivity curves for various polymers containing Vulcan XC-72, an oil furnace black, show resistivities of 100,000 ohm-cm or more, asymptotically increasing at black loadings of about 15 percent. Others have reported similarly high resistivities with low black loads. Recently resistivities sufficiently low for freeze protection applications have been achieved with low black loadings by resort to the special deposition techniques, such as solvent coating, disclosed in commonly assigned copending U.S. Pat. application S.N. 88,841, filed Nov. 12, 1970 by Robert Smith- J ohannsen, and now abandoned. Self-limiting compositions have been extruded heretofore, eg, U.S. Pat. No. 3,435,401 to Epstein, but when low black loading has been attempted the extrudates have exhibited room temperature resistivities of 10 ohm-cm or higher, essentially those of the polymer matrices themselves. Indeed, the patentees in GB. Pat. No. 1,201,166 urge the avoidance of hot melt techniques where significant conductivities are desired with less than about 20 percent black.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION We have now for the first time obtained self-limiting extrudates advantaged by low black loading yet exhibiting room temperature (hereafter, F) resistivities in the useful range from about 5 to about 100,000 ohmcm, the relation of the carbon black loading and room temperature resistivity satisfying the equation 2L+5log R 45 wherein L is the percentage by weight of the carbon black in the extruded composition. After extrusion in conventional fashion, we have learned, resistivity can be greatly reduced by subjection of the yet uncrosslinked article to thermal structuring according to a time-temperature regime far more severe than that which heretofore has been employed for strain relief or improved electrode wetability, eg., exposure to 300F for periods on the order of 24 hours. The resulting articles are suitable for freeze protection and other selflimiting applications, exhibit high Rp/Ri, and are otherwise advantaged by low black content. In particular and unlike extrudates with high black content, their resistivity-temperature properties are stable in storage and unaffected by temperature cycling.

The manner in which these and other objects and advantages of the invention are attained will become apparent from the detailed description which follows and from the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectioned end-on view of one jacketed extrudate formed according to the practice of this invention; and

FIG. 2 is a flow chart which depicts the steps of the preferred manner of obtaining jacketed extrudates like those depicted in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In order to obtain self-limiting compositions, the polymeric matrix in which conductive black is dispersed in whatever proportion must exhibit overall an appropriately non-linear coefficient of thermal expansion, for which reason a degree of crystallinity is believed essential. Generally, polymers exhibiting at least about percent crystallinity as determined by x-ray diffraction are suited to the practice of the invention. Among the many polymers with which the invention may be practiced are polyolefins such as low, medium and high density polyethylenes and polypropylene, polybutene-l, poly(dodecamethylene pyromellitimide), ethylene-propylene copolymers and terpolymers with non-conjugated dienes, polyvinylidine fluoride, polyvinylidine fluoride-tetrafluoroethylene copolymers, etc. As will be recognized by those skilled in the art, limiting temperatures tailored to the application intended (eg., freeze protection, thermostatting,

etc.) may be obtained by appropriate selection of polymeric matrix material. For example, elements which self-limit at temperatures on the order of 100F, 130F, 150F, 180F and 250F may be produced with, respectively, wax-poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) blends, low density polyethylene, high density polyethylene, polypropylene and polyvinylidene fluoride. Other criteria of polymer selection will, in particular instances, include desired elongation, environmental resistance, ease of extrusibility, etc., as is well known.

Particularly preferred matrix materials are multicomponent blends in which black is mixed with a first blend component to form a master batch which is in turn mixed with the principal polymeric component. The first and second polymer blend components are chosen such that they exhibit a positive free energy of mixing, one with the other. Their attendant incompatibility apparently has the effect of segregating contained black into generally delimited regions of the polymer matrix, and such blends have proven extremely stable in the face of temperature cycling in use. In the case of single component matrices, cycling has occasionally had the effect of requiring that successively higher temperatures be attained to provide identical wattage values. Of course, even in the case of single component matrices, the low black loadings achieved according to this invention can result in satisfactory stability to cycling. Typically, the minor polymeric blend component is chosen for superior compatibility with carbon black relative to the blend component present in major proportion, while the latter component is selected for the particular physical properties desired in the overall extrudate. The principal blend component is preferably present in at least'about 3:1 weight ratio relative to the minor component with which the black is first mixed. Presently, the blends most preferred have a polyethylene as the principal component, the other being an ethylene-vinyl ester copolymer, such as ethylene-vinyl acetate or ethylene-ethylacrylate copolymers. An especially preferred extrudate contains about 70:20 polyethylene: ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymer by weight.

The carbon blacks employed are those conventionally used in conductive plastics, eg., high structure varieties such as furnace and channels blacks. Other conventional addends such as antioxidants. etc., may be employed provided only that their quantities and characteristics do not subvert the objects of the invention. An especially interesting class of beneficial addends, it has been found, are materials such as waxes which, while compatible with the predominant blend component, melt at lower temperature. The result is to permit obtainment of a given wattage at lower temperature, owing to a first peaking effect of the wax on the resistivity-temperature curve. Compounding is conventional and generally involves banburying, milling and pelletizing prior to pressure extrusion of the selflimiting element from the melt.

In the preferred embodiment, as will appear from FIG. 1, the black-containing matrix 1 is extruded onto a spaced-apart pair of elongate electrodes 2 to form an element rod-shaped or, most preferably, dumbellshaped in cross-section, the extruded thermoplastic both encapsulating and interconnecting the electrodes. Thereafter, polymeric jackets 3 and 4 may be extruded thereover, as in the fourth and sixth steps of the flow chart which is FIG. 2.

Now, in the freeze protection applications in which self-limiting elements are most commonly employed it is desirable that at least about 4-8 watts per foot be available for transfer to ambient. With commonly available voltages ranging from to 480 volts, resistivity values must be in the range from about 6,000 to 100,000 ohm-cm in order to generate 4-watts per foot and, of course, lower at a particular voltage to obtain as much as 8 watts/foot. However, we have found that following extrusion of compound containing not more than about 15 percent by weight carbon, room temperature resistivity is greater than about 10 ohm-cm, and most commonly on the order of the resistivity of the dielectric polymer matrix itself. At such resistivities available wattage under power is essentially zero. We have learned that enormous increases in conductivity of such extrudates may be obtained by subjecting-the extrudate to temperatures above the melt for periods substantially longer than those which heretofore have been employed to improve electrode wetting, etc., when selflimiting articles were achieved by other methods. By so doing, we having attained resistivities ranging from 5 to about 100,000 ohm-cm with carbon contents not greater than about 15 percent, and indeed have commonly achieved room temperature resistivities well below 10,000 ohm-cm even at black loadings less than about 10 percent. The thermal structuring process apparently involves microscopic movement of carbon particles of a sort not commonly associating with annealing, although that term is employed herein for the sake of convenience.

Annealing is performed at a temperature greater than about 250F, preferably at at least about 300F, and in any case at or above the melting point or range of the polymeric matrix in which the carbon black is dispersed. The period over which annealing is effected will, it will be appreciated, vary with the nature of the particular matrix and the amount of carbon black contained therein. In any case, annealing occurs over a time sufficient to reduce resistivity of the annealed element to satisfaction of the equation 2 L 5 log R s 45, preferably 40, and the time necessary in a particular case may be readily determined empirically. Typically, annealing is conducted over a period in excess of 15 hours, and commonly at least about a 24 hour anneal is had. Where the element is held at anneal temperature continuously throughout the requisite period, it is advisable to control cooling upon completion of the anneal so that at least about 1 /2 hours are required to regain room temperature. However, it has been learned that control of cooling is substantially less important where the requisite overall annealing residence time is divided into at least about three roughly equal stages, and the element returned to room temperature between each annealing stage.

Because the polymeric matrix of the blackcontaining extrudate is in the melt during annealing, that extrudate is preferably supplied prior to annealing, with an insulative extruded jacket of a thermoplastic material which is shape-retaining when brought to the annealing temperature. J acketing materials suitable for the preferred embodiments of this invention are set out in the Examples which follow, and are discussed at length in the commonly assigned application entitled SELF-LIMITING CONDUCTIVE EXTRUDATES AND METHODS THEREFOR, Ser. No. 287,442 filed concurrently herewith, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.

Upon completion of annealing and optional addition of a further insulative jacket of, e.g., polyethylene, the self-limiting element is desirably subjected to ionizing radiation sufficient in strength to cross-link the blackcontaining core. Radiation dosage is selected with an eye to achieving cross-linking sufficient to impart a degree of thermal stability requisite to the particularly intended application without unduly diminishing crystallinity of the polymer matrix, i.e., overall crystallinity of the cross-linked black-containing matrix less than about 20 percent is to be avoided. Within those guidelines, radiation dosage may in particular cases range from about 2 to megarads or more, and preferably is about 12 megarads.

The invention is further described in the following Examples of preferred embodiments thereof, in which all parts and percentages are by weight, and all resistivities measured at room temperature and with a Wheatsone bridge unless otherwise indicated.

EXAMPLE 1 Seventy-six lbs. of polyethylene (density 0.929 gm/cc, 32 lbs. ofa mixture of 34 percent Vulcan XC-72 and ethylene ethyl acrylate copolymer (density 0.930 gm/cc, 18 percent ethyl acrylate) were loaded with 1 lb. of antioxidant into a Banbury mixer. The ram was closed and mixing commenced. When temperature reached about 24050F the batch was dumped, placed in a 2-roll mill, and cut off in strips which were fed to a pelletizing extruder. The pelletized compound was next extruded onto two parallel tinned copper electrodes AWG 19/32) to form an extrudate generally dumbbell-shaped in cross-section. The electrodes were 0.275 inch apart (center-to-center), the interconnecting web being about 15 mils in thickness, at least 8 mils thickness of the semiconductive composition surrounding the electrodes. Extrusion was performed in a plasticating extruder with crosshead attachment (Davis- Standard 2 inches extruder, 24/1 L/D, with PE screw. Thereafter, the same extruder was arranged to extrude an 8 mil thick insulation jacket of polyurethane (Texin 59l-A, available from the Mobay Corporation). For optional geometric conformation, a conventional tube extrusion method was employed in which a vacuum (eg., 5-20 in. H O) is drawn in the molten tube to collapse it about the semiconductive core within about 3 inches of the extrusion head. The jacketed product was next spooled onto aluminum disks (26 inches dia) and exposed to 300F for 24 hours in a circulating air oven. Following this thermal structuring procedure and cooling to room temperature oven about 1 /2 hours the resistivity of the sample was determined at various tem- Additional extrudates were prepared with various polymers and black loadings following the procedure of Example 1 save where otherwise indicated below. The polymeric matrices for the various examples were as follows: (2) a 3:1 blend of low density polyethylene: ethylene ethyl acrylate copolymer; (3) a 5:1 blend of low density polyethylene: ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; (4) polyvinylidene fluoride; (5) a 3:1 blend of medium density polyethylene: ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymer; (6) a 3:1 blend of high density polyethylene: ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymer; (7) ethylene/- propylene copolymer (Eastman Chemical Companys Polyallomer"); (8) polybutene-l; and (9) polyvinylidene fluoride/tetrafluoroethylene copolymer (Pennwalt Chemical Companys Kynar 5200). In the case of each blend, carbon black was first mixed with the minor component of the polymeric blend, and the resulting masterbatch mixed with the other polymeric component. The jacketed extrudate of each composition exhibited a non-linear positive resistivity temperature coefficient. The data reported in Table 11 was taken.

Table 11 Example Carbon R(as extruded) R(annealed) Rp Annealing 2 L 5 log R ohm-cm ohmcm ohm-cm Regimen 2 10 10 5 X 10" 10 at 210F 24 hrs. 300F 38.5 3 10 10 6050 2 X 10 at 212F 13 hrs. 350F 38.9 4 13 10 116 6 X10 at 325F 2 hrs. 450F 36.5 5 13 10 393 2.82 X 10 at 240F 15 hrs. 300F 39.0 6 5 10" 570 2.66 X 10 at 280F 20 hrs. 300F 23.0 7 9 10 5980 5.78 X 10 at 220F 20 hrs. 400F 36.9 8 13 10' 434 1.59 X 10 at 210F 5 hrs. 300F 39.2 9 l3 10 39.9 800 at 250F 4 hrs. 450F 34.0

[EXAMPLE 10 Table Ill ohm-cm ohm-cm 60 4800 l40 69,900 80 5910 l60 481,500 l 9600 l80 6,150,000 l20 20,950 200 2 X We claim:

1. method of forming an electrically conductive self-regulating article which comprises the steps of l extruding onto a pair of elongate parallel electrodes held in spaced-apart relation an electrodeinterconnecting web of a composition consisting essentially of a thermoplastic crystalline polymeric material exhibiting overall at least about 20 percent crystallinity as determined by x-ray diffraction and (b) conductive carbon black, the percentage by weight (L) of carbon black based on the total weight of said composition being not greater than about 15, the resulting extrudate exhibiting room temperature resistivity (R, ohm-cm) greater than about 10, and (2) annealing the extrudate at or above the melting temperature of said crystalline polymeric material for a period of time sufficient to reduce R to satisfaction of the equation 2L-l-Slog R s 45,

the value L being not more thanabout ten, annealing being performed at a temperature of at least about 300F over a period of not less than about 15 hours.

2. A method according to claim 1 wherein said polymeric material is a blend of polyethylene and, in minor proportion relative thereto, a copolymer of ethylene and a vinyl ester.

Claims (2)

1. A METHOD OF FORMING AN ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE SELFREGULATING ARTICLE WHICH COMPRISES THE STEPS OF (1) EXTRUDING ONTO A PAIR OF ELONGATE PARALLEL ELECTRODES HELD IN SPACED-APART RELATION AN ELECTRODE-INTERCONNECTING WEB OF A COMPOSITION CONSISITING ESSENTIALLY OF A THERMAOPLASTIC CRYSTALLINE POLYMERIC MATERIAL EXHIBITING OVERALL AT LEAST ABOUT 20 PERCENT CRYSTALLINITY AS DETERMINED BY X-RAY DIFFRACTION AND (B) CONDUCTIVE CARBON BLACK, THE PERCENTAGE BY WEIGHT (L) OF CARBON BLACK BASED ON THE TOTAL WEIGHT OF SAID COMPOSITION BEING NOT GREATER THAN ABOUT 1,5 THE RESULTING EXTRUDATE EXHIBITING ROOM TEMPERATURE RESISTIVITY (R, OHM-CM) GREATER THAN ABOUT 10**7, AND (2) ANNEALING THE EXTRUDATE AT OR ABOVE THE MELTING TEMPERATURE OF SAID CRYSTALLINE POLYMERIC MATERIAL FOR A PERIOD OF TIME SUFFICIENT TO REDUCE R TO SATISFACTION OF THE EQUATION 2 L + S LOG10 R 45, THE VALUE L BEING NOT MORE THAN ABOUT TEN, ANNEALING BEING PERFORMED AT A TEMPERATURE OF AT LEAST ABOUT 300*F OVER A PERIOD OF NOT LESS THAN ABOUT 15 HOURS.
2. A method according to claim 1 wherein said polymeric material is a blend of polyethylene and, in minor proportion relative thereto, a copolymer of ethylene and a vinyl ester.
US3861029A 1972-09-08 1972-09-08 Method of making heater cable Expired - Lifetime US3861029A (en)

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US3861029A US3861029A (en) 1972-09-08 1972-09-08 Method of making heater cable
DE19732345303 DE2345303C2 (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07
CA 180537 CA996171A (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07 Self limiting conductive extrudates
JP10100173A JPS5818722B2 (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07
GB4214073A GB1449262A (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07 Sel-limiting conductive extrudates and methods for their manufacture
NL7312393A NL7312393A (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07
BE135466A BE804628A (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07 manufactures extruded self-limiting drivers
FR7332300A FR2199175B1 (en) 1972-09-08 1973-09-07
US07195558 US4954695A (en) 1972-09-08 1988-05-12 Self-limiting conductive extrudates and methods therefor

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US54259275 Continuation 1975-01-20 1975-01-20

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BE (1) BE804628A (en)
CA (1) CA996171A (en)
DE (1) DE2345303C2 (en)
FR (1) FR2199175B1 (en)
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US7568526B2 (en) 2004-07-29 2009-08-04 Tyco Thermal Controls Llc Subterranean electro-thermal heating system and method
US9603196B2 (en) * 2012-12-14 2017-03-21 Tech Design Llc Self-regulating semi-conductive flexible heating element
US20140166638A1 (en) * 2012-12-14 2014-06-19 Tech Design Llc Self-regulating semi-conductive flexible heating element

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JPS4968296A (en) 1974-07-02 application
JP1453293C (en) grant
GB1449262A (en) 1976-09-15 application
CA996171A1 (en) grant
FR2199175A1 (en) 1974-04-05 application
DE2345303C2 (en) 1984-09-20 grant
BE804628A1 (en) grant
NL7312393A (en) 1974-03-12 application
BE804628A (en) 1974-03-07 grant
CA996171A (en) 1976-08-31 grant
DE2345303A1 (en) 1974-04-18 application
FR2199175B1 (en) 1977-09-23 grant
JPS5818722B2 (en) 1983-04-14 grant

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