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Gap jumping toy vehicle game

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Publication number
US3858875A
US3858875A US43118474A US3858875A US 3858875 A US3858875 A US 3858875A US 43118474 A US43118474 A US 43118474A US 3858875 A US3858875 A US 3858875A
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Prior art keywords
vehicle
ramp
track
game
means
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Expired - Lifetime
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Henry Nemeth
Iii Edward Snyder
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TYCO INDUSTRIES II Inc
E I du Pont de Nemours and Co
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Ideal Toy Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H18/00Highways or trackways for toys; Propulsion by special interaction between vehicle and track
    • A63H18/02Construction or arrangement of the trackway

Abstract

The toy vehicle game includes a vehicle track and a toy vehicle adapted to move along the track and across a vehicle jump defined by a pair of ramps associated with the track. The ramps are independent of one another and longitudinally aligned in spaced relation to each other to define a gap therebetween. At least one of the ramps is movable with respect to the track and the other of the ramps in order to permit adjustment of the size of the gap or jump, thereby to vary the degree of difficulty of the jump. In addition, an uncontrolled obstacle is associated with the track for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle on the track to further affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse the vehicle jump.

Description

United States Patent Nemeth et al.

1 1 GAP .IUMPING TOY VEHICLE GAME [75] Inventors: Henry Nemeth, Massapequa, Long Island; Edward Snyder, III, Dix Hills, both of NY.

[73] Assignee: Ideal Toy Corporation, Hollis, NY. [22] Filed: Jan. 7, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 431,184

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 828,516 l/l952 Germany 4. 46/202 [Ill 3,858,875

[ 1 Jan. 7, 1975 OTHER PUBLICATIONS German Printed Application, Hl9208Xl/77f, Hausser, [2/56.

Primary Examiner-Ant0n O. Oechsle Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Richard M. Rabkin 7 1 ABSTRACT The toy vehicle game includes a vehicle track and a toy vehicle adapted to move along the track and across a vehicle jump defined by a pair of ramps associated with the track. The ramps are independent of one another and longitudinally aligned in spaced relation to each other to define a gap therebetween. At least one of the ramps is movable with respect to the track and the other of the ramps in order to permit adjustment of the size of the gap or jump, thereby to vary the degree of difficulty of the jump. In addition, an uncontrolled obstacle is associated with the track for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle on the track to further affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse the vehicle jump.

23 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTED JAN (I975 3. 858 875 SHEET 1 [IF 3 PATENTEU 3, 8 58 8 7 5 SHEET 2 OF 3 PATENIEDJA" 11911 sum 30F 3 1 GAP JUMPING TOY VEHICLE GAME The present invention relates to a toy vehicle game, and more particularly, to a vehicle jump game wherein a toy vehicle is made to jump a gap between a pair of ramps.

The present invention provides a novel and challenging toy vehicle game in which a vehicle is directed along a continuous loop track through a pair of ramp assemblies in order to jump a gap formed therebetween. The ramp assemblies respectively provide launching and landing ramps which are normally maintained in a horizontal position above the track to permit a vehicle on the track to pass below the ramps withoutjumping the gap therebetween. The launching ramp is selectively movable from its horizontal position to an inclined position to direct a vehicle from the track up the ramp and across the gap between it and the landing ramp, so that the competitor or player of the game can selectively cause the vehicle on the track to jump the gap between the ramps or to bypass the ramps. The determination is made in accordance with the speed of the vehicle as determined by the player observing the game. Thus, if the player feels the vehicle is traveling at sufficient speed to jump the gap, he selectively operates the launching ramp to lower the same into position to permit the vehicle to be directed to jump the gap. If the vehicle does have sufficient speed and makes the jump properly, it lands on the landing ramp, and as it moves along the ramp, its weight causes the ramp to pivot downwardly so as to permit the vehicle to return to the race track.

In order to vary the game and to increase the degree of difficulty involved in having the toy vehicle properly make the jump, the game is provided with an obstacle that can randomly slow down a vehicle traveling along the race track. 'Thus, if the vehicle is engaged by the randomly moving obstacle it is slowed down and, depending upon its initial speed, may not have enough speed after passing the obstacle to make the jump. Thus, the competitor must make a decision before the vehicle reaches the launching ramp whether the vehicle has sufficient speed to make the jump or whether he should permit the vehicle to pass below the launching ramp. Since the vehicle is of the type which will accelerate after it has been slowed down, the player must carefully watch the speed of the vehicle as it approaches the ramp to determine if its speed has increased sufficiently to make the jump.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a toy vehicle race game which is relatively simple in construction and which will permit a player to selectively cause a vehicle to jump a gap between a pair of ramps therein.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a toy vehicle race game which is relatively simple in construction and durable in use.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a vehicle jump game which is relatively economical to manufacture and yet which provides an interesting and challenging game.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of this invention, will be apparent in the following detailed description thereof when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a toy vehicle game constructed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged exploded perspective view of the obstacle used in the toy game of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 and showing the configuration of the ramps of the invention as a vehicle makes a jump; and

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 3 sho winjthe configuration of the ramps when a vehicle passes therebelow.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, and initially to FIG. 1 thereof, it will be seen that the toy vehicle game 10 of the present invention includes a continuous track 12 which provides an unobstructed path of travel for a self-propelled vehicle 14. In its movement along track 12, vehicle 14 passes through a pair of ramp assemblies 16, 18 and is selectively permitted to pass on track 12 directly through the assemblies or to pass onto assembly 16 to jump a gap 20 between the ramp assemblies l6, 18 as described hereinafter. After passing the ramp assemblies vehicle 14 continues along track I2 and passes through a random slow down or obstacle de vice 22, which will slow down vehicle 14 or permit it to pass freely therethrough depending upon the position of the slow down device as described hereinafter.

In addition, the game is provided with a start and tinish station 24 from which the movement of the vehicle 14 is initiated and at which the vehicle will stop at the end of the game if the player has properly directed the vehicle during the course of the game.

Vehicle 14 preferably is a vehicle of the type described in US. Pat. application Ser. No. 126,8l8, filed Mar. 22, l97l by Julius Cooper, et al., the disclosure of which application is incorporated herein by reference. Thus, vehicle 14 is provided with a spring drive that produces a substantially constant output torque. The gear train in the vehicle is selected to couple the spring drive to the wheels of the vehicle and to provide a low starting torque for constant acceleration over a long period of time. Accordingly, when the vehicle is slowed down in the obstacle or slow down device 22, it thereafter will accelerate as it continues to move along the track 12.

Vehicle 14 is energized through a wind up mechanism 26 which is of the type described in the aboveidentified application of Cooper, et al. As described therein, the vehicle is placed on the wind up mechanism 26, with the rear wheels thereof in the wells 28 and lever 30 is reciprocated manually to rotate the clutch element 32 which in turn transfers the winding power to the spring of the vehicle in order to wind up the vehicles spring motor. After the vehicles spring motor is fully wound, the player holds the vehicle by the rear wheels and places the same on track 12 at starting station 24.

Starting station 24 comprises a. track section 34 on which a starting gate 36 is mounted in any convenient manner. The starting gate includes a starting flag 38 pivotally mounted therein for movement between a vertical position (shown in dotted! lines in FIG. 1) and a closed or horizontal position (shown in solid lines). Initially, flag 38 is in its vertical position, with its lower end portion or staff 40 extending into the path of travel of the vehicle. The flag is biased by a spring element 42 or the like which simply can comprise a rubberband operatively engaged between the starting gate 36 and flag 38 to hold the latter in its upright position. In this position, at the start of the game, the vehicle is placed with its nose against the end of the staff 40 and its rear wheels are held to prevent their rotation. The player then depresses the starting flag 30 into its horizontal position and releases the vehicle. As a result, the vehicle commences along its path of travel through track 12. It is noted that flag 38 will remain in its depressed position by a simple releasable latching arrangement until the latch is manually disengaged or disengaged by an impact from the vehicle 14.

Preferably, track 12 consists of a plurality of flat straight sections of track 44 and a pair of banked sections of track 46, similar to the type of track sections described in said above-identified application to Cooper et al. The various track sections are operatively interconnected to form a continuous oval track defining the path of travel for vehicle 14.

In accordance with the present invention vehicle ramp assemblies l6, 18 are positioned along a straight section of the track to define the gap across which the vehicle 14 can be selectively directed by the player. Launching ramp assembly 16, as seen most clearly in FIGS. 1 and 3, consists ofa base 48 which includestwo pairs of towers 50, 52 integrally formed therein. That is, the towers are integrally formed with a bottom plate 54 that extends below the adjacent track section 44. In this connection it is noted that each of the track sections 44 have short leg elements 56 which hold the track sections spaced slightly above the surface on which the game is placed. Thus, the base 48 of the launching ramp assembly can be moved longitudinally along the length of track section 44 with which it is associated.

The pair of towers or posts 50in base 48 of launching ramp assembly 16 provide pivotal mounting support for the launching ramp 58. This ramp preparably is formed of a molded plastic construction, as is base 48 and track 12. The pivotal mounting can be provided in any convenient manner, as for example by the formation of ears or pins 60 in the sides of the ramp which are engaged within apertures 62 formed in the upper end portions of posts 50.

Launching ramp 58 is normally biased into its horizontal position by a resilient element such as an endless rubberband 64, seen most clearly in FIG. 3. As shown therein, rubberband 64 is captured between a tab 66 formed in base 48 and a tab 68 formed on the inner edge of launching ramp 58. Thus, ramp 58 will normally remain in its horizontal position, shown in solid lines in FIG. 4 and FIG. 1, until the ramp is manually depressed by a player. To facilitate this action, a large finger tab 70 is provided on the outer edge of ramp 58 to enable the player to manually depress the ramp 58 against the bias of rubberband 64. In this manner the player can selectively cause a vehicle 14 approaching launching ramp assembly 16 to pass under ramp 58, as for example as shown in the left at FIG. 4, or to pass onto the ramp 58, when it is depressed, so as to jump along the path of travel of vehicle 14, to adjust the size of the gap or jump space 20.

Base 48 of landing ramp assembly 18 provides mounting support for the landing ramp 72. The latter is of somewhat similar construction to the launching ramp 58, and includes a pair of tabs or pins 60 integrally formed therewith which are received in apertures 62 in posts 50 to pivotally mount the ramp on base 48. However, landing ramp 72 is dimensioned so as to be weighted to normally bias the ramp into its horizontal position, shown in solid lines in FIG. 3. In this connection, the towers 52, in both the landing and launching ramp assemblies, are constructed so as to provide support for their associated ramps in the horizontal position. That is, the towers 52 are shorter than the towers 50 and have a generally T-shaped configuration in plan with stem elements 74 which extend inwardly above the track and provide abutting support for their associated ramps to prevent downward movement of the ramps towards the gap 20. However, in both cases the ramps are free to pivot in the opposite direction, i.e., clockwise for the ramp 58 and counterclockwise for the ramp 72, as seen in FIG. 1, to permit the play of the game..As mentioned, when a vehicle is directed by a player onto launching ramp 58, by depression of the ramp against the bias of spring 64, the vehicle will move up the ramp and, as a result of its momentum, will be propelled across the gap 20. If the vehicle is moving with sufficient speed the vehicle will land on the inner end 76 of landing ramp 72. The drive on the vehicle wheels will then cause the vehicle to continue to move along landing ramp 72, i.e., to the right in FIG. 3, until it passes the pivot 60 of the landing ramp 72, at which point the weight of the vehicle overcomes the weighted bias of ramp 72 and causes the ramp to pivot downwardly, as shown in FIG. 3, so as to deposit the vehicle on track 12. At that point, the vehicle is free to continue about track 12 till it returns to the launching and landing ramp assemblies for another jump.

It is noted that, preferably, track sections 44 adjacent which the launching and landing ramp assemblies are positioned are inscribed with, or have applied thereto, indicia representing gap spaces of predetermined dimensions. Thus, at the beginning of the game the player can select a predetermined gap space, (for example, the gap space represented by the indicia 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60) and position the base of the respective ramp assemblies such that the forward edge 78 of launching ramp 58 is directly above the leading line 80 of the low ermost score or minimum gap, and the leading edge 82 of landing ramp 72 is above the rear edge 84 of the selected score zone, for example, the score zone 60, as shown in FIG. 1. Thus, in the play of the game the player will be attempting to have the vehicle 14 make the jumps which are represented by the indicia 60. Of course, either during the game, and preferably between winding periods for vehicle 14, the landing ramp assembly 18 can be moved along its associated track section 44 to another position to vary the size of the gap 20.

In order to increase the degree of difficulty involved in having a players vehicle make the jump between the ramp assemblies, the vehicle slow down or obstacle means 22 is provided along the track 12. This slow down means is adapted to randomly engage vehicle 14 as it passes therethrough and slow the vehicle down to a greater or lesser extent, thereby effecting the ability of the vehicle to make the jump when it reaches the ramp assemblies.

The vehicle slow down or obstacle member 22 is illustrated in greater detail in FIG. 2 wherein it is seen that a pair of towers or posts 86 are operatively connected by clips 88 or the like to the side rails 90 of a straight tracksection 44. Towers 86 provide a fixed shaft and bearing assembly 90, which may simply be a male-female related pin and socket assembly which provides rotatable mounting support for an inertial element 92. This element has a sleeve 94 which receives the center portion of shaft 90 and is freely rotatable thereon in a vertical plane which extends along the path of travel of vehicle 14. While the inertial member 92 can take any desired configuration, in the illustrative embodiment of the invention it is provided in the shape of buzz saw element in order to add interest and excitement in the game.

A paddle element or blade 96 is mounted on the inertial element 92 in any convenient manner, so as to extend into the path of travel of vehicle 14 and provide an obstruction to the passage of the vehicle. As seen most clearly in FIG. 2, blade 96 can be provided with a pair of elongated prongs 98 which are adapted to snap into a slide or track 100 formed in inertial element 92.

In the play of the game inertial element 92 may initially be at rest, with blade 96 in the position shown in dotted lines in FIG. 2, Le, extending into the path of travel of vehicle 14 along track 12. It is noted that obstacle means 22 will achieve this configuration due to the effects of gravity and the added weight of the blade 96 on the inertial element 92. In this position, after the vehicle 14 makes its first pass through the ramp assemblies, it approaches obstacle 22 and hits blade 96. Since the vehicle is moving at this point with relatively high speed, the impact of the vehicle against blade 96 will overcome the inertia of element 02 and cause it to rotate, permitting the vehicle to continue its movement along track 12. However, due to the impact between the vehicle and blade 96, the vehicles speed of movement is substantially reduced so that its ability to make the jump on its next approach to the ramp assemblies is effected.

In this connection, it is noted that as an additional feature of the present invention, since the drive element in vehicle 14 is of the type which will provide substantially continuous acceleration of the vehicle, the vehicle will accelerate after engaging the obstacle means. Thus, as the vehicle reapproaches the ramp assemblies, the player will have to determine whether the vehicle has accelerated to a sufficient speed to enable it to make the jump. If it cannot make the jump, the player simply lets the vehicle pass below the ramp assemblies which are normally biased into their configuration shown in FIG. 4, as explained above, so that the vehicle will have additional time to increase its speed due to its constant acceleration from its motor, by the time it again returns to the ramp assemblies. However, before doing so, the vehicle must again pass through obstacle 22 which is now rotating so that the vehicle may or may not be engaged by blade 96. If it is not engaged by the blade 96, because the blade is in a raised position (for example, the position B shown in FIG. 2), the vehicle will continue through the obstacle and further accelerate as it returns to the ramp assemblies. On the other hand, if the vehicle engages the blade 96 it again will be slowed down. Of course, the degree to which the vehicle is slowed down depends upon the position of blade 96 when it engages the vehicle. Thus, for example, if the vehicle strikes the blade with only a glancing blow, it will be slowed down only slightly, whereas if it strikes the blade with a direct blow, as for example, as shown in FIG. 2, the vehicle will be slowed down to a greater extent. Accordingly, it is seen that as vehicle 14 continues around the track, either passing beneath the ramp assemblies or on the ramp assemblies, it will be randomly engaged in the obstacle means so that its speed will be randomly effected thereby.

As the motor in vehicle 14 unwinds, and the energy stored therein is dissipated, the vehicle will slow down and the player must determine when to stop the vehicle from making further attempts at jumping the ramp assemblies. When the player determines that the vehicle can no longer make further jumps of the ramp assemblies he can stop the play of the game by directing the vehicle 14 into the stop pit in starting station 24. This stop pit is defined by a pair of parallely extending side walls 112, 114 in starting station 24 which define a slot or pit outside of the normal path of travel of the vehicle.

Starting station 24 is constructed to permit the player to divert the vehicle into stop pit 110 when desired. This is achieved by the provision of a movable side wall 116 pivotally mounted on track section 34 at a pivot post 118. Wall 116 is normally biased by a spring into its dotted line position shown in FIG. 1, but is held in its solid line position by a lever mechanism 120. The latter includes a pivot bar 122 having a lever 123 formed on the inner end thereof and a second lever or flange 121 at its opposite end which extends upwardly into the wall 116 when lever 123 is in its upper position, shown in dotted lines in FIG. 1. In this position, flange 121 is engaged within wall 116 and blocks the pivotal movement of the wall into its dotted line position. At the end of the game when the player desires to deflect the vehicle into the stop pit 110, lever 123 is depressed downwardly into its dotted line position, causing the integral flange 121 to also be moved downwardly whereby wall 116 is pulled into its dotted line position under the action of the rubberband 130. Thus. as the vehicle approaches the starting section, it is deflected by wall 116 into the pit 110 and engages against the flag 38. The impact of the vehicle against the flag 38 disengages the latching arrangement used on the flag and causes the flag to move into its dotted line position signalling the end of the game.

To summarize therefore, in the play of the game vehicle 14 is wound in the wind up mechanism 26 and placed in the starting station 24. Flag 38 is then depressed from its dotted line position to its solid line position and the vehicle begins to accelerate under the influence of the spring wound motor therein. As the vehicle first approaches the launching ramp assemblies the player determines whether the vehicle is moving at a sufficient speed to make the jump over the gap 20, when the player had previously selected by properly adjusting the landing ramp assembly 18 with respect to the launching ramp assembly. If the player elects to let the vehicle pass through the ramp assemblies, he does nothing and the vehicle passes below the ramps 58, 72, which are normally maintained in. their configuration shown in FIG. 4. On the other hand, if the player determines that the vehicle has accelerated to a sufficient speed to permit it to make the previously selected jump, he depresses the landing ramp 58 to direct the vehicle up the ramp and over the gap 20. If the vehicle makes the jump properly, it lands on ramp 72 and moves towards the opposite end thereof, causing the ramp to pivot downwardly, thereby allowing the vehicle to return to track 12. After the vehicle leaves ramp 72, the ramp automatically returns to its horizontal position under the influence of the weighted configuration thereof. Similarly, ramp 58 returns to its horizontal position under the influence of the spring 64 when it is released by the player.

Thereafter, the vehicle continues to move from the ramp assemblies to the obstacle 22 where it engages the blade 96 and is slowed down. Although it is contemplated that the play of the game will start with the obstacle means in the position shown in FIG. 1 with blade 96 in a blocking position, it also is contemplated that the player can start the game by manually initiating rotation of obstacle 22 in order to insure complete random slow down of the vehicle from the very start of the game.

In any case, if vehicle 14 strikes blade 96, it will be slowed down due to the force expelled in overcoming the inertia of element 92 and blade 96. After passing obstacle 22 the vehicle will begin to accelerate, due to the type of spring wound motor therein, and it will pass through starting station 24 and return to the ramp assemblies. The player at that point makes the determination as to whether or not the vehicle has attained sufficient speed to make the jump. If it has, he depresses ramp 58 and permits the vehicle to make the jump; if it has not, he permits the vehicle to continue beneath the ramp assemblies as previously described and return to the obstacle means. As the vehicle re-approaches the rotating obstacle means, it may or may not engage blade 96 for a further slow down. If it does not engage the blade 96, it continues to accelerate and returns to the ramp assemblies where another jump is made. If it does engage blade 96 it will be slowed down to a degree depending upon the type of impact it has made. Thereafter, the player will again have to determine whether or not the vehicle has accelerated sufficiently to enable the jump to be made as the vehicle again approaches the ramp assemblies.

The game continues in this manner until the energy stored in the vehicle is dissipated. In this connection it is noted that the spring motor of the vehicle will store only a predetermined amount of energy which will enable it to make a maximum number of jumps if unobstructed during its travel over track 12. Thus, the number of jumps the vehicle can make will be effected by the amount of energy dissipated in impacts with the obstacle 22.

After the player has determined that the final jump which the vehicle can possibly make has been made, he then directs the vehicle into the stop pit 110 by depressing lever 123 to release wall 116 so that it can move into its dotted line position. The wall then deflects the vehicle moving along track 12 into the stop pit. Of course, if the power in the motor has run out before the stop pit 110 is reached, the vehicle will stop as a result of friction along the track 12.

It is contemplated that in the play of the game the object of the game would be to achieve the greatest number ofjumps for a selected gap as a result of one winding of the vehicle. However, if the vehicle does not return to the stop pit under its own power, but rather stops on the track because ofa loss of power, the scores or number ofjumps previously attained by the vehicle would not be counted. Thus, a single player can use the game to test his skill against himself by repetitively trying to attain greater numbers of jumps with the game or a plurality of players can compete against one another in attempting to achieve the greatest number of jumps at a particular spacing for a single winding of the vehicle.

Accordingly, it is seen that a relatively simple and inexpensively constructed assembly is provided by the present invention which forms a competitive and challenging game. The game is relatively simple to operate, even for young children, and requires no electrical connections or the like for operation.

Although an illustrative embodiment of the present invention has been described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to that precise embodiment, and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A toy vehicle game comprising a vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track and a pair of ramp assemblies associated with said track and having independent longitudinally aligned ramps respectively mounted therein and located in spaced relation to each other, thereby to define a gap between said ramp assemblies; at least one of said ramp assemblies being movable with respect to said track and the other of said ramp assemblies to permit adjustment ofthe size of said gap, and at least one of said ramps being movably mounted on its associated ramp assembly for selective movement between a horizontal position above said track and an inclined position wherein one end of said ramp is adjacent said track thereby to direct a vehicle on the track onto said one ramp across said gap towards the other of said ramp assemblies.

2. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein said ramp assemblies respectively comprise a launching ramp assembly and a landing ramp assembly, each including a base, with the ramp of each ramp assembly being pivotally mounted on its associated base for movement between a horizontal position above the track and an inclined position wherein one end of the ramp is adjacent the track.

3. The game as defined in claim 2 wherein said ramps are normally biased into their horizontal positions to permit a vehicle on said track to pass along the track below the ramps.

4. The game as defined in claim 3 wherein the base of each of said ramp assemblies includes support means for supporting said ramps in their horizontal positions, said support means being located to one side of the pivotal mounting of their associated ramps whereby said ramps can pivot to their inclined positions in only one direction and said ramp assemblies being positioned with respect to said track with their associated support means opposite one another, whereby during the play of the game said ramps pivot to their inclined positions in opposite directions with said launching ramp directing the vehicle upwardly from the track towards said gap and said landing ramp directing the vehicle from the gap downwardly toward the track.

5. The game as defined in claim 4 including resilient means for normally biasing the ramp of said launching ramp assembly into its horizontal position whereby the ramp of said launching ramp assembly is selectively operable by manual depression against the bias of said resilient means to direct a vehicle from said track upwardly and across said gap.

6. The game as defined in claim 5 wherein the ramp of said landing ramp assembly has a predetermined configuration selected to normally maintain the ramp in its horizontal position supported on its associated support means until a vehicle jumping said gap and landing on the ramp of said landing ramp assembly moves to the side of the pivot of the ramp which is opposite the support means therefore whereby the weight of the vehicle on the ramp causes the ramp to pivot to its inclined position to direct the vehicle back onto said track.

7. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein said track defines a closed continuous loop whereby a vehicle on said track makes a plurality of successive passes through said ramp means.

8. The game as defined in claim 7 including uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track in the path of travel of a vehicle thereon for randomly slowing down a vehicle on said track.

9. The game as defined in claim 8 wherein said obstacle means includes a blade rotatably mounted for movement in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and dimensioned to extend into said path of travel during a portion of its rotation whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means engages said blade and is slowed down while the blade is caused to rotate by such engagement and is thereby randomly returned to said path of travel for random engagement with a vehicle passing along said track.

10. The game as defined in claim 8 wherein said vehicle is sef-propelled and includes means for storing a predetermined quantity of energy and delivering said energy to the vehicle to cause said vehicle to traverse said track for a maximum number of unobstructed laps whereby the vehicle will make a plurality of jumps of said gap and the number of such jumps will be affected by the energy in said storing means which is dissipated by said obstacle means in randomly slowing down the vehicle.

11. A toy vehicle game comprising a closed continuous vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track, means associated with said track for defining a selectively operable vehicle jump and uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track in the path of travel of a vehicle thereon for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle moving along said track whereby the speed of said vehicle is randomly varied by said obstacle menas to affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse said vehicle jump.

12. The game as defined in claim 111 wherein said obstacle means includes a blade rotatably mounted for movement in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and dimensioned to extend into said path of travel during a portion of its rotation whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means engages said blade and is slowed down while the blade is caused to rotate by such engagement and is thereby randomly returned to said path of travel for 10 random engagement with a vehicle passing along said track.

13. The game as defined in cliam 12 wherein said obstacle means comprises a vertically extending support associated with said track and a wheel rotatably mounted on said support for rotation in said vertical plane, said blade being mounted on said wheel whereby engagement of said blade with a vehicle moving at sufficient speed to overcome the inertia of the blade and wheel will cause said wheel to rotate.

14. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 12 wherein said selectively operable jump means includes a pair of longitudinally aligned movably mounted ramps posi-v tioned in spaced relation to each other and being selectively movable from horizontal positions above said track to oppositely inclined positions wherein adjacent ends of the ramps are above the track and the other ends of the ramps are on the track for guiding a vehicle on the track up one of the ramps, across the space therebetween and towards the other of the ramps.

15. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 14 wherein at least one of said ramps is selectively movable along said track in the direction of travel of a vehicle thereon whereby the space between said ramps is adjustable.

16. A toy vehicle game comprising a closed continuous vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track, and means associated with said track for defining a selectively operable vehicle jump including a pair of independent longitudinally aligned ramps located in spaced relation to each other to define a jump gap therebetween, with at least one of said ramps being movable with respect to said track and the other of said ramps to permit selective adjustment of the size of said jump gap; and uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle moving along said track whereby the speed of said vehicle is randomly varied by said obstacle means to affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse said jump gap.

17. The game as defined in claim 16 wherein said vehicle jump means comprises a pair of independent ramp bases, said ramps being respectively pivotally mounted on said bases and defining respectively a vehicle launching ramp and a vehicle landing ramp, said ramps being normally biased into horizontal positions above said track to permit a vehicle on the track to pass therebelow.

18. The game as defined in claim 17 wherein the base of each of said ramp bases includes support means for supporting said ramps in their horizontal positions, said support means being located to one side of the pivotal mounting of their associated ramps whereby said ramps can pivot to their inclined positions in only one direction and said ramp bases being positioned with respect to said track with their associated support means opposite one another whereby during the play of the game said ramps pivot to their inclined positions in opposite directions with said launching ramp directing the vehicle upwardly from the track towards said gap and said landing ramp directing the vehicle from the gap downwardly toward the track.

19. The game as defined in claim 18 including resilient means for normally biasing said launching ramp into its horizontal position whereby said launching ramp is selectively operable by manual depression against the bias of said resilient means to direct a vehicle from said track upwardly and across said gap.

20. The game as defined in claim 19 wherein said landing ramp has a predetermined configuration selected to normally maintain the ramp in its horizontal position supported on its associated support means until a vehicle jumping said gap and landing on said landing ramp moves to the side of the pivot of the ramp which is opposite the support means therefore, whereby the weight of the vehicle on the ramp causes the ramp to pivot to its inclined position to direct the vehicle back onto said track.

21. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 20 wherein at least one of said ramps is selectively movable along said track in the direction of travel of a vehicle thereon where the space between said ramps is adjustable.

22. The game as defined in claim 17 wherein said obstacle means comprises a vertically extending support associated with said track, an inertial element rotatably mounted on said support for rotation in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and a vehicle engaging blade mounted on said inertia element for rotation therewith and extending into the path of travel of a vehicle on the track during at least a portion of its rotation, whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means and engaging said blade with sufficient speed to overcome the inertia of said blade and inertia element will be slowed down and will simultaneously cause the blade and inertia element to rotate and thereby randomly position the blade in the path of travel of the vehicle for further random engagements therewith.

23. The game as defined in claim 22 wherein said vehicle is self-propelled and includes means for storing a predetermined quantity of energy and delivering said energy to the vehicle to cause said vehicle to traverse said track for a maximum number of unobstructed laps whereby the vehicle can make a plurality ofjumps of said gap and the number of such jumps will be affected by the energy in said storing means which is dissipated by said obstacle means in randomly slowing down the vehicle.

Claims (23)

1. A toy vehicle game comprising a vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track and a pair of ramp assemblies associated with said track and having independent longitudinally aligned ramps respectively mounted therein and located in spaced relation to each other, thereby to define a gap between said ramp assemblies; at least one of said ramp assemblies being movable with respect to said track and the other of said ramp assemblies to permit adjustment of the size of said gap, and at least one of said ramps being movably mounted on its associated ramp assembly for selective movement between a horizontal position above said track and an inclined position wherein one end of said ramp is adjacent said track thereby to direct a vehicle on the track onto said one ramp across said gap towards the other of said ramp assemblies.
2. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein said ramp assemblies respectively comprise a launching ramp assemblY and a landing ramp assembly, each including a base, with the ramp of each ramp assembly being pivotally mounted on its associated base for movement between a horizontal position above the track and an inclined position wherein one end of the ramp is adjacent the track.
3. The game as defined in claim 2 wherein said ramps are normally biased into their horizontal positions to permit a vehicle on said track to pass along the track below the ramps.
4. The game as defined in claim 3 wherein the base of each of said ramp assemblies includes support means for supporting said ramps in their horizontal positions, said support means being located to one side of the pivotal mounting of their associated ramps whereby said ramps can pivot to their inclined positions in only one direction and said ramp assemblies being positioned with respect to said track with their associated support means opposite one another, whereby during the play of the game said ramps pivot to their inclined positions in opposite directions with said launching ramp directing the vehicle upwardly from the track towards said gap and said landing ramp directing the vehicle from the gap downwardly toward the track.
5. The game as defined in claim 4 including resilient means for normally biasing the ramp of said launching ramp assembly into its horizontal position whereby the ramp of said launching ramp assembly is selectively operable by manual depression against the bias of said resilient means to direct a vehicle from said track upwardly and across said gap.
6. The game as defined in claim 5 wherein the ramp of said landing ramp assembly has a predetermined configuration selected to normally maintain the ramp in its horizontal position supported on its associated support means until a vehicle jumping said gap and landing on the ramp of said landing ramp assembly moves to the side of the pivot of the ramp which is opposite the support means therefore whereby the weight of the vehicle on the ramp causes the ramp to pivot to its inclined position to direct the vehicle back onto said track.
7. The game as defined in claim 1 wherein said track defines a closed continuous loop whereby a vehicle on said track makes a plurality of successive passes through said ramp means.
8. The game as defined in claim 7 including uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track in the path of travel of a vehicle thereon for randomly slowing down a vehicle on said track.
9. The game as defined in claim 8 wherein said obstacle means includes a blade rotatably mounted for movement in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and dimensioned to extend into said path of travel during a portion of its rotation whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means engages said blade and is slowed down while the blade is caused to rotate by such engagement and is thereby randomly returned to said path of travel for random engagement with a vehicle passing along said track.
10. The game as defined in claim 8 wherein said vehicle is sef-propelled and includes means for storing a predetermined quantity of energy and delivering said energy to the vehicle to cause said vehicle to traverse said track for a maximum number of unobstructed laps whereby the vehicle will make a plurality of jumps of said gap and the number of such jumps will be affected by the energy in said storing means which is dissipated by said obstacle means in randomly slowing down the vehicle.
11. A toy vehicle game comprising a closed continuous vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track, means associated with said track for defining a selectively operable vehicle jump and uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track in the path of travel of a vehicle thereon for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle moving along said track whereby the speed of said vehicle is randomly varied by said obstacle menas to affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse said vehicle jump.
12. The game as defined in claim 11 wherein said obstacle means includes a blade rotatably mounted for movement in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and dimensioned to extend into said path of travel during a portion of its rotation whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means engages said blade and is slowed down while the blade is caused to rotate by such engagement and is thereby randomly returned to said path of travel for random engagement with a vehicle passing along said track.
13. The game as defined in cliam 12 wherein said obstacle means comprises a vertically extending support associated with said track and a wheel rotatably mounted on said support for rotation in said vertical plane, said blade being mounted on said wheel whereby engagement of said blade with a vehicle moving at sufficient speed to overcome the inertia of the blade and wheel will cause said wheel to rotate.
14. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 12 wherein said selectively operable jump means includes a pair of longitudinally aligned movably mounted ramps positioned in spaced relation to each other and being selectively movable from horizontal positions above said track to oppositely inclined positions wherein adjacent ends of the ramps are above the track and the other ends of the ramps are on the track for guiding a vehicle on the track up one of the ramps, across the space therebetween and towards the other of the ramps.
15. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 14 wherein at least one of said ramps is selectively movable along said track in the direction of travel of a vehicle thereon whereby the space between said ramps is adjustable.
16. A toy vehicle game comprising a closed continuous vehicle track, a toy vehicle adapted to move along said track, and means associated with said track for defining a selectively operable vehicle jump including a pair of independent longitudinally aligned ramps located in spaced relation to each other to define a jump gap therebetween, with at least one of said ramps being movable with respect to said track and the other of said ramps to permit selective adjustment of the size of said jump gap; and uncontrolled obstacle means associated with said track for randomly engaging and slowing down a vehicle moving along said track whereby the speed of said vehicle is randomly varied by said obstacle means to affect the ability of the vehicle to traverse said jump gap.
17. The game as defined in claim 16 wherein said vehicle jump means comprises a pair of independent ramp bases, said ramps being respectively pivotally mounted on said bases and defining respectively a vehicle launching ramp and a vehicle landing ramp, said ramps being normally biased into horizontal positions above said track to permit a vehicle on the track to pass therebelow.
18. The game as defined in claim 17 wherein the base of each of said ramp bases includes support means for supporting said ramps in their horizontal positions, said support means being located to one side of the pivotal mounting of their associated ramps whereby said ramps can pivot to their inclined positions in only one direction and said ramp bases being positioned with respect to said track with their associated support means opposite one another whereby during the play of the game said ramps pivot to their inclined positions in opposite directions with said launching ramp directing the vehicle upwardly from the track towards said gap and said landing ramp directing the vehicle from the gap downwardly toward the track.
19. The game as defined in claim 18 including resilient means for normally biasing said launching ramp into its horizontal position whereby said launching ramp is selectively operable by manual depression against the bias of said resilient means to direct a vehicle from said track upwardly and across said gap.
20. The game as defined in claim 19 wherein said landing ramp has a predetermined configuration selected to normally maintain thE ramp in its horizontal position supported on its associated support means until a vehicle jumping said gap and landing on said landing ramp moves to the side of the pivot of the ramp which is opposite the support means therefore, whereby the weight of the vehicle on the ramp causes the ramp to pivot to its inclined position to direct the vehicle back onto said track.
21. The toy vehicle as defined in claim 20 wherein at least one of said ramps is selectively movable along said track in the direction of travel of a vehicle thereon where the space between said ramps is adjustable.
22. The game as defined in claim 17 wherein said obstacle means comprises a vertically extending support associated with said track, an inertial element rotatably mounted on said support for rotation in a vertical plane extending in the direction of travel of a vehicle on said track and a vehicle engaging blade mounted on said inertia element for rotation therewith and extending into the path of travel of a vehicle on the track during at least a portion of its rotation, whereby a vehicle moving through said obstacle means and engaging said blade with sufficient speed to overcome the inertia of said blade and inertia element will be slowed down and will simultaneously cause the blade and inertia element to rotate and thereby randomly position the blade in the path of travel of the vehicle for further random engagements therewith.
23. The game as defined in claim 22 wherein said vehicle is self-propelled and includes means for storing a predetermined quantity of energy and delivering said energy to the vehicle to cause said vehicle to traverse said track for a maximum number of unobstructed laps whereby the vehicle can make a plurality of jumps of said gap and the number of such jumps will be affected by the energy in said storing means which is dissipated by said obstacle means in randomly slowing down the vehicle.
US3858875A 1974-01-07 1974-01-07 Gap jumping toy vehicle game Expired - Lifetime US3858875A (en)

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Cited By (43)

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US4094089A (en) * 1976-04-22 1978-06-13 Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc. Jumping rail
US4140276A (en) * 1977-12-22 1979-02-20 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track intersection
US4161279A (en) * 1977-12-22 1979-07-17 Mattel, Inc. Curved track section for toy vehicle
US4266769A (en) * 1978-02-15 1981-05-12 Masudaya Toy Company Limited Toy racing car and circuit
DE3106123A1 (en) * 1981-02-19 1982-08-26 Neuhierl Hermann Vehicle with ascending ramp for car race tracks
US4355807A (en) * 1981-01-23 1982-10-26 Aurora Products Canada Limited Pivotable ramp device for track games
US4472905A (en) * 1983-03-30 1984-09-25 Custom Concepts, Incorporated Toy vehicle with timing device
US4715843A (en) * 1985-09-20 1987-12-29 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle playset
WO1988001893A1 (en) * 1986-09-11 1988-03-24 Kurt Hesse Track composed of connectable track sections for self-propelled toy cars
EP0261313A1 (en) * 1986-09-11 1988-03-30 Kurt Hesse Track line consisting of interconnectable track sections for freely movable toy vehicles
US6074269A (en) * 1996-09-24 2000-06-13 Choas, L.L.C. Kinetic toy
US6173654B1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2001-01-16 Artin Industrial Co., Ltd. Toy racing car track system
US6216600B1 (en) 1999-06-28 2001-04-17 James Verret Jumping ramp for motorized toy vehicles
WO2003097199A1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2003-11-27 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle ramp
US20050191940A1 (en) * 2004-01-23 2005-09-01 Sheltman David A. Bellows actuated stunt device for toy vehicle trackset
US20060211331A1 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Mattel, Inc. Toy wheel launcher
US20070123360A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-05-31 Carroll Michael M Proposed running track design for fairer 200 m and 400 m races
US20080009224A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-01-10 Michael Nuttall Folding track assemblies
US20080009219A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-01-10 Michael Nuttall Toy ramp devices
US20080032596A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-02-07 David Sheltman Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20080113585A1 (en) * 2006-06-09 2008-05-15 Julian Payne Toy track devices
US20100159800A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-06-24 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US20100273392A1 (en) * 2009-04-27 2010-10-28 Michael Nuttall Floating toy
US20100273394A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-10-28 O'connor Stacy L Toy track set and relay segments
US20100291833A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-11-18 O'connor Stacy L Toy track set and relay segments
US20110021110A1 (en) * 2009-07-23 2011-01-27 Keith Hippely Ramp for a toy vehicle
US20110092132A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2011-04-21 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US20110101120A1 (en) * 2009-04-24 2011-05-05 O'connor Stacy Adjustable toy vehicle track intersection assemblies
US20110124265A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2011-05-26 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US20110269371A1 (en) * 2010-04-30 2011-11-03 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle racetrack with paired obstacles
WO2012048019A2 (en) * 2010-10-05 2012-04-12 Innovation First, Inc. Modular track for autonomous vehicles
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US8256721B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2012-09-04 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US8322660B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2012-12-04 Mattel, Inc. Relay for toy track set
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US20130324003A1 (en) * 2012-06-01 2013-12-05 Mattel, Inc. Race course play set for floating toy vehicles
US20140221111A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 Objex Design Stunt arenas for remote control vehicles
US8814628B2 (en) 2010-05-28 2014-08-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track set
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US8944881B2 (en) 2010-08-27 2015-02-03 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set
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Cited By (67)

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US4094089A (en) * 1976-04-22 1978-06-13 Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc. Jumping rail
US4140276A (en) * 1977-12-22 1979-02-20 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track intersection
US4161279A (en) * 1977-12-22 1979-07-17 Mattel, Inc. Curved track section for toy vehicle
US4266769A (en) * 1978-02-15 1981-05-12 Masudaya Toy Company Limited Toy racing car and circuit
US4355807A (en) * 1981-01-23 1982-10-26 Aurora Products Canada Limited Pivotable ramp device for track games
DE3106123A1 (en) * 1981-02-19 1982-08-26 Neuhierl Hermann Vehicle with ascending ramp for car race tracks
US4472905A (en) * 1983-03-30 1984-09-25 Custom Concepts, Incorporated Toy vehicle with timing device
US4715843A (en) * 1985-09-20 1987-12-29 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle playset
WO1988001893A1 (en) * 1986-09-11 1988-03-24 Kurt Hesse Track composed of connectable track sections for self-propelled toy cars
EP0261313A1 (en) * 1986-09-11 1988-03-30 Kurt Hesse Track line consisting of interconnectable track sections for freely movable toy vehicles
US6074269A (en) * 1996-09-24 2000-06-13 Choas, L.L.C. Kinetic toy
US6173654B1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2001-01-16 Artin Industrial Co., Ltd. Toy racing car track system
US6216600B1 (en) 1999-06-28 2001-04-17 James Verret Jumping ramp for motorized toy vehicles
WO2003097199A1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2003-11-27 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle ramp
US6776685B2 (en) * 2002-05-14 2004-08-17 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle ramp
US20050191940A1 (en) * 2004-01-23 2005-09-01 Sheltman David A. Bellows actuated stunt device for toy vehicle trackset
US20060211331A1 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-21 Mattel, Inc. Toy wheel launcher
WO2006101980A2 (en) * 2005-03-16 2006-09-28 Mattel, Inc. Toy wheel launcher
WO2006101980A3 (en) * 2005-03-16 2007-12-13 Mattel Inc Toy wheel launcher
US20070123360A1 (en) * 2005-11-29 2007-05-31 Carroll Michael M Proposed running track design for fairer 200 m and 400 m races
US8465339B2 (en) 2006-05-04 2013-06-18 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20080009224A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-01-10 Michael Nuttall Folding track assemblies
US20080032596A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-02-07 David Sheltman Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20110223829A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2011-09-15 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US20080171491A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-07-17 David Sheltman Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US7946903B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2011-05-24 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US7628674B2 (en) * 2006-05-04 2009-12-08 Mattel, Inc. Folding track assemblies
US7690964B2 (en) 2006-05-04 2010-04-06 Mattel, Inc. Toy ramp devices
US20080009219A1 (en) * 2006-05-04 2008-01-10 Michael Nuttall Toy ramp devices
US9492759B2 (en) 2006-05-04 2016-11-15 Mattel, Inc. Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US7537509B2 (en) 2006-06-09 2009-05-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy track devices
US20080113585A1 (en) * 2006-06-09 2008-05-15 Julian Payne Toy track devices
US20110124265A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2011-05-26 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US20100159800A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-06-24 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US8801492B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2014-08-12 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US8256721B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2012-09-04 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US20100291833A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-11-18 O'connor Stacy L Toy track set and relay segments
US20100273394A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-10-28 O'connor Stacy L Toy track set and relay segments
US8747180B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2014-06-10 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US8690632B2 (en) * 2007-04-27 2014-04-08 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US8322660B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2012-12-04 Mattel, Inc. Relay for toy track set
US8382553B2 (en) * 2007-04-27 2013-02-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US9504926B2 (en) 2007-04-27 2016-11-29 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set and relay segments
US20110092132A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2011-04-21 O'connor Stacy Lynn Toy track set and relay segments
US20110101120A1 (en) * 2009-04-24 2011-05-05 O'connor Stacy Adjustable toy vehicle track intersection assemblies
US8342903B2 (en) * 2009-04-24 2013-01-01 Mattel, Inc. Adjustable toy vehicle track intersection assemblies
US20100273392A1 (en) * 2009-04-27 2010-10-28 Michael Nuttall Floating toy
US8221184B2 (en) 2009-04-27 2012-07-17 Mattel, Inc. Floating toy
US8500510B2 (en) 2009-04-27 2013-08-06 Mattel, Inc. Floating toy
US8251768B2 (en) 2009-04-27 2012-08-28 Mattel, Inc. Floating toy
US20110021110A1 (en) * 2009-07-23 2011-01-27 Keith Hippely Ramp for a toy vehicle
US8734201B2 (en) * 2010-04-30 2014-05-27 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle racetrack with paired obstacles
US20110269371A1 (en) * 2010-04-30 2011-11-03 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle racetrack with paired obstacles
US8814628B2 (en) 2010-05-28 2014-08-26 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track set
US9314705B2 (en) 2010-08-27 2016-04-19 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set
US8944881B2 (en) 2010-08-27 2015-02-03 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set
WO2012048019A3 (en) * 2010-10-05 2014-04-17 Innovation First, Inc. Modular track for autonomous vehicles
WO2012048019A2 (en) * 2010-10-05 2012-04-12 Innovation First, Inc. Modular track for autonomous vehicles
US8616463B2 (en) 2010-10-05 2013-12-31 Innovation First, Inc. Modular track for autonomous vehicles
US8870623B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2014-10-28 Mattel, Inc. Toy track set
US8944339B2 (en) 2011-08-29 2015-02-03 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track set
US8574023B2 (en) * 2011-08-29 2013-11-05 Mattel, Inc. Toy vehicle track set
US20130052913A1 (en) * 2011-08-29 2013-02-28 Paul Schmid Toy vehicle track set
US20130324003A1 (en) * 2012-06-01 2013-12-05 Mattel, Inc. Race course play set for floating toy vehicles
US9427672B2 (en) * 2013-02-07 2016-08-30 Objex Design Stunt arenas for remote control vehicles
US20140221111A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 Objex Design Stunt arenas for remote control vehicles
US9586154B2 (en) 2013-10-03 2017-03-07 Mattel, Inc. Toy racetrack with moveable obstacle

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