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US3855745A - Earth anchor - Google Patents

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US3855745A
US3855745A US41282673A US3855745A US 3855745 A US3855745 A US 3855745A US 41282673 A US41282673 A US 41282673A US 3855745 A US3855745 A US 3855745A
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anchor
rod
cylinder
sleeve
fig
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M Patterson
L Caves
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MERIT SYST Inc
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MERIT SYST Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02DFOUNDATIONS; EXCAVATIONS; EMBANKMENTS; UNDERGROUND OR UNDERWATER STRUCTURES
    • E02D5/00Bulkheads, piles, or other structural elements specially adapted to foundation engineering
    • E02D5/74Means for anchoring structural elements or bulkheads
    • E02D5/80Ground anchors
    • E02D5/805Ground anchors with deformable anchoring members

Abstract

Apparatus for forming an earth anchor includes a rod having a pointed tip with a tapered shoulder connected at an end of the rod, the tip facilitating the driving of the rod into the earth. Overfitting the rod to bear against the tapered shoulder is a sleeve having pre-defined division lines longitudinally from an end thereof. A driving tube is fitted over the rod within the earth to drive the sleeve into engagement with the shoulder, thereby flaring the ends of the sleeve along the division lines into the earth. Means are provided for securing the shaft during the driving operations to prevent the shaft from being further driven into the earth. Also presented are means for flaring a top portion of the cylinder to further enhance the nonremoval properties of the anchor. Additionally presented are apparatus for forming plural anchor members upon the rod, having either single or top flared portions for effecting its nonremoval properties. Additionally presented is an earth anchor which is capable of resisting tension or compressional forces by virtue of an upwardly extending elongated cylinder attached to the outwardly flared members of the flared sleeve.

Description

llnited States Patent Patterson et al.

[ Dec. 24, 1974 EARTH ANCHOR [75] Inventors: Merle W. Patterson; Lawrence C.

Caves, Jr., both of Tulsa, Okla.

[73] Assignee: Merit Systems, Ine., Tulsa, Okla.

[22] Filed: Nov. 5, 1973 [21] Appl. N0.: 412,826

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 400,015, Sept. 24,

Primary Examiner-J. Karl Bell Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William S. Dorman [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for forming an earth anchor includes a rod having a pointed tip with a tapered shoulder connected at an end of the rod, the tip facilitating the driving of the rod into the earth. Overfitting the rod to bear against the tapered shoulder is a sleeve having pre-defined division lines longitudinally from an end thereof. A driving tube is fitted over the rod within the earth to drive the sleeve into engagement with the shoulder, thereby flaring the ends of the sleeve along the division lines into the earth. Means are provided for securing the shaft during the driving operations to prevent the shaft from being further driven into the earth.

Also presented are means for flaring a top portion of the cylinder to further enhance the nonremoval properties of the anchor. Additionally presented are apparatus for forming plural anchor members upon the rod, having either single or top flared portions for effecting its nonremoval properties.

Additionally presented is an earth anchor which is capable of resisting tension or compressional forces by virtue of an upwardly extending elongated cylinder attached to the outwardly flared members of the flared sleeve.

12 Claims, 30 Drawing Figures PATENTED UECZ 4 I974 SHEET 2 BF 9 PATENTEU 05924 I974 PATENTEB M82419 SHEET 9 BF 9 Fig. 28

EARTH ANCHOR CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending Patent Application Ser. No. 400,015, filed Sept. 24, 1973, entitled EARTH ANCHOR.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to improvements in apparatus for fabricating anchors to the earth or ground and to improvements in earth or ground anchors.

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Various types and kinds of earth anchors or ground anchors have been purposed, for use, for example, in anchoring mobile homes, or other objects to the earth to withstand, for instance, winds, storms, or other external influences. One of the problems encountered in earth anchors heretofore purposes is that the anchors ordinarily useable in one type of earth formation, for instance, sand, rock, shale, or the like, may not be useable in different earth formations or structures.

One factor which most earth anchors have in common is that the anchor is generally fabricated upon or about a single rod member which is driven or inserted in the ground. Commonly, an enlargement or protruding section is formed in situ beneath the surface to prevent the rod from being removed from the ground. For example, US. Pat. No. 1,119,943, shows an anchor post in which in a rod having an expanded tip portion is inserted into the ground. A sleeve having slotted sides over a portion of its length is then driven over the rod and tip and the sleeve portions expand upon contacting the expanded tip portion to present an enlarged structure to increase the resistance to the removal of the enlarged tipped rod.

US. Pat. No. 1,224,925 has advanced an anchor in which a post having a flared or expanded tip is driven into the ground, followed by a cylinder having an end which is slotted to be flared upon being driven against the expanded tip of the rod. Thus, the combination of the cylinder and the clared and the expanded tipped rod produces a flared assembly which cannot be removed.

In both aforementioned patents, however, the initially driven shaft or rod is not maintained in its initially driven location upon driving the subsequently installed cylinder thereover or thereagainst. Thus, for example, in the anchor of the US. Pat. No. 1,224,925 patent upon driving the cylinder to be flared upon the expanded tip of the anchor rod, the anchor rod and tip will be further driven into the ground, this ineffectively flaring the ends of the overfitting cylinder to produce an anchor which is not as effective as possibly achieveable.

Finally, US. Pat. No. 3,526,069, presents an apparatus in which a cylinder having a tapered bit mounted within a cylinder is driven into the ground. A rod having a plurality of prongs is then driven inside of the cylinder and into and against the bit, thereby outwardly flaring the rods through holes in the cylinder to anchor the device into the ground. Again, no provision is made for securing the outer cylinder from being further driven into the ground with the subsequent impact upon the interior rod and flaring members thereof.

BRIEF SUMIVIARY OF INVENTION In light of the above, it is, therefore, an object of the invention to present an anchor for attachment to the earth, ground, or the like.

It is another object of the invention to present an anchor which can be attached to different earth materials, including sand, dirt, clay, and rock.

It is another object of the invention to present an anchor in which a plurality of earth engaging members can be employed on a single anchor rod.

It is still another object of the invention to present an earth anchor in which outwardly extending flared members carried by an anchor rod engage the earth.

It is yet another object of the invention to present an earth anchor in which both downwardly and upwardly extending earth engaging flared members can be achieved.

It is yet another object of the invention to present an earth anchor which can be installed manually with a sledge hammer or with pneumatic or power driven hammer or force applying means.

It is yet another object of the invention to present an anchor which can resist both tension and compression forces applied thereto.

It is a further object of the invention to present an anchor which can be fabricated in situ.

It is still a further object of the invention to present an anchor which includes an anchor post carrying flared cylindrical members which can be installed without driving the anchor rod an undesireable distance into the earth.

These and other objects, features, and advantages will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings and appended claims.

In its broad aspect, the invention presents a ground anchor which includes a rod with an attached pointed tip at one end to facilitate driving the rod into the ground. The tip has a tapered shoulder above the pointed end to receive a flareable sleeve, locateable on the rod, and of length substantially less than the rod. The sleeve is longitudinally scored along at least two paths from the shoulder engaging end to enable the sleeve to split and flare into the earth upon being driven into the shoulder. To drive the sleeve into the shoulder, a driving tube is provided which fits over the rod and engages the sleeve, to transmit a driving force to sleeve, thereby flaring the sleeve along the longitudinal scores to form the earth anchor. In accordance with the principles of the invention, a plurality of flared sleeves can be employed on the rod to enhance its anchor or holding characteristics. Additionally, the sleeve can include an upwardly extending longitudinally scored portion which can be flared to achieve an anchor presenting both upper and downward extending flared portions.

In an alternative embodiment of the anchor, in accordance with a broad aspect of the invention, the sleeve is of length longer than the rod such that after flaring the sleeve an upward portion of the sleeve extends to the surface adjacent to the location at which connection is made to the anchor, to thereby receive and resist any compression forces, any tension forces being received and resisted by the rod.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rod for use in conjunction with the anchor in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of a driving tube used in the fabrication of the anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a driving tube plug for use with the driving tube of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a flareable sleeve for use in conjunction with the rod of FIG. 1, and in the fabrication of the anchor in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of the rod of FIG. 1 including the cylinder of FIG. 4 flared in anchor position, showing the operational location of the driver tube of FIG. 2, and including a member for constraining downward movement of the rod.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a wedge collar for use in the fabrication of an anchor in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the invention, including plural flared sleeves.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an anchor incorporating plural flared sleeves.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a shortened flareable sleeve, for use in the fabrication of an anchor, in accordance with the invention, in stone, rock, or the like.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a flareable sleeve, in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the invention, which can be flared at either or both top and bottom.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a conical wedge for use in flaring the top portion of the sleeve of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of apparatus used in the fabrication of an anchor having a sleeve flared at bottom and top.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view, partially in crosssection of an installed anchor, in accordance with the invention, with its sleeve portion flared at bottom and top.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a double conical wedge, for use in the fabrication of an alternative embodiment, in accordance with the invention, in which plural sleeves, flared at bottom and top, are employed.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view, partially in crosssection, of an installed anchor including plural sleeves flared at bottom and top.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view, partially in crosssection, of an alternative embodiment, in accordance with the invention, illustrating the use of the sleeve of FIG. 9 installed in stone or rock.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view, partially in crosssection, of an installed anchor, in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the invention, which can re sist tension and compression forces applied to its attachment points above the earth surface.

FIG. 17 is a front elevation of an interior flareable sleeve for use in a double sleeved anchor, in accordance with an alternative preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 18 is a front elevation of a bottom outside sleeve for use in conjunction with the interior sleeve of FIG.

17 in fabricating the double sleeved anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 9 is a front elevation of a top outside flareable sleeve for use in fabricating the double flared sleeve anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 20 is a front elevation of the sleeves of FIGS. 17-19 in their operational locations, for use in fabricating the double sleeved anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 21 is a front elevation, partly cut away, of the double flared sleeves of FIG. 20, showing hydraulic cylinder installation equipment for installing the anchor within the earth, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 22 is a front elevation of the earth anchor apparatus of FIG. 21, with the bottom portion partially flared.

FIG. 23 is a front elevation of the earth anchor of FIG. 22, with the hydraulic cylinder located in position for effecting additional bottom flaring.

FIG. 24 is a front elevation of the earth anchor of FIG. 23 with the bottom portion further flared.

FIG. 25 is a front elevation of the earth anchor of FIG. 24 with a cylindrical wedge in position for flaring the top portion of the double sleeves in fabricating the earth anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 26 is a front elevation of the cylindrical wedge for use in flaring the top portion of the double sleeves of FIG. 20.

FIG. 27 is a front elevation of the earth anchor, in accordance with the invention, showing the top and bottom portions thereof flared.

FIG. 28 is a top view of a lateral anchor, for use with the earth anchor, in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 29 is a front elevation, partly cut away, showing the earth anchor, fabricated in accordance with the principles of the invention, employing a double flared cylinder and a lateral anchor.

FIG. 30 is a front elevation of an alternative fabrication technique in the installation of the double cylinder of FIG. 20 in rock or similar hard material. 7

In the various figures of the drawing, like reference numerals are used to denote like parts. It should also be pointed out that in the drawing various sizes and shapes of the parts have been exaggerated or distorted for clarity of illustration and ease of description.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS With reference to FIGS. 1-5, apparatus for forming an earth anchor is illustrated. The anchor is formed upon a shaft or rod assembly generally indicated by the reference numeral 10, shown in FIG. 1; the shaft assembly 10 includes rod 11 threaded at its top 12 and bottom 13. A pointed tip member 14 is connected to the bottom of the rod 11 by the threads 13, and includes a shoulder 20 tapered downwardly from the connection of the tip member 14 with the rod 11, to facilitate the flaring of the anchor sleeves, as will become apparent below. The tip member 14 also includes a pointed end 21 opposite the connection to the rod 11 to facilitate driving the rod or shaft assembly 10 into the ground. Thus, the shaft 11, by virtue of its threaded ends, can be exchanged for longer or shorter shaft lengths after insertion into the ground, as necessary.

The shaft assembly 10 can be driven directly into the ground, or can be inserted into the ground by a driving tube, generally indicated by the reference numeral 30,

shown in FIG. 2. The driving tube 30 has an internal hole 31 to enable the tube 30 to be fitted over the length of the shaft assembly (FIG. 1). The tube 30 is therefore positioned such that its end 32 engages the tip member 14. To better receive the end 32 of the driving tube 30, a shoulder 34 can be provided, as shown, on the taper of the tip member 14. The length of the driving tube 30, therefore, is slightly longer than the length of the rod 11, plus the heighth of the tip member 14 above the horizontal shoulder 34 to the connection with the threads 13.

The end of the driving tube 32 has additionally formed therein a hole 38 of diameter larger than the diameter of the longitudinally extending rod receiving hole 31, to receive the driving ring of the anchor sleeve, below described. Additionally, longitudinally disposed at an upward portion of the driving tube 30 are slots 40, on opposite sides of the tube 30, to receive means for constraining downward movement of the rod assembly 10 upon application of driving this force to anchor sleeve, below described, or in other subsequent force application steps, also below described.

Thus in forming the anchor, in accordance with the invention, the driving tube 30 is first placed or titted over the rod 11 of the rod assembly 10, the end 32 bearing upon the horizontal shoulder 34 of the tip member 14. The tube 30 then driven directly by impact, such as by a sledge hammer or the like (not shown) upon its top 42. An impact receiving member, such as that shown in FIG. 3 and generally indicated by the reference numeral 50, can be conveniently employed, if desired, to receive such impact. The impact receiving member 50 is a shaft 52, fitable within the hole 31 of the cylinder 30, a collar 53 to engage the top 42 of the cylinder 30 to transmit the impact force thereto, and a top member 54 to which the impact may be applied. Thus, the top member 54 may be connected to a pneumatic or hydraulic hammer, or may be struck directly by a sledge hammer or the like.

After the rod assembly 10 has been driven to the desired location within the earth or ground, the driving tube 30 is removed therefrom, and a flareable anchor sleeve, generally indicated by the reference numeral 60, shown in FIG. 4, is inserted over the rod 11. Since the tip 34 had been driven into the ground, a channel along the length of the rod assembly 10 will remain, enabling the sleeve 60 to be slideably located adjacent the tip member 14. The sleeve 60 is a cylinder 61, which preferably includes a collar or drive ring 62 is attached by welding on the like to the cylinder 61. The collar 62 functions to receive the driving force for flaring the lower portion of the cylinder 61 against the tip member 14, as below described, and to limit the extent of the splits along the cylinder 61. The cylinder has an internal channel or hole 63 of size such as to enable the sleeve to be slideably disposed over the rod 11, but not over the tip member 14. Thus, after the sleeve 61 is flared, as below described, the tip member 14 is not free to slide through the channel 63, and upward movement of the rod assembly 10 will be constrained.

Along the length of the cylinder 61, adjacent its bottom 64, are at least two preformed division lines. As shown, the division lines, can be areas 65 of the cylinder 61 from which material has been cut, or, can be areas 66 along which the lines have been scored to a desireable depth, or both, as shown. The division lines may be of any convenient number, four being shown in the embodiment illustrated.

Once the flareable sleeve 60 has been placed over the rod 11, the driving tube 30 (FIG. 2) can then be again located over the rod 11, and the top portion of the cylinder 61, the upper portion of the cylinder 61 extending to within the enlarged diameter hole 38 and the ring 62 engaging the bottom 32 of the driving tube 30. The driving force is again reapplied to the driving tube 30, or to an impact receiving member 50 (FIG. 3). As the driving force is received by the sleeve 60, the lower portion of the cylinder 61 is driven into the shoulder 20 of the tip member 14. Because of the taper of the tip member toward the shoulder 20, the cylinder 61 splits and flares outwardly, as shown in FIG. 5. Thus the cylinder 61 is split into outstanding members 75, 76, 77, and 78 which engage the surrounding earth. At this juncture it should be pointed out that although the out standing members 7578 are illustrated as extending substantially horizontally in a straight fashion outwardly from the rod assembly, that in actual practice, the members may in fact be curled upwardly or may assume other configurations, depending upon the size and characteristics of the metal of which the sleeve 60 is formed, and other factors.

Also, as shown in FIG. 5, to prevent the rod assembly, including the rod 11 and tip member 14, from being driven or forced further into the ground upon application of the driving force to the flareable cylinder 60, a piston 70 is provided which engages the threads 12 at the upward end of the rod 11. A horizontally disposed rod 71 is placed through a hole 72 through the piston 70, and through the slots 40 of the driving cylinder 30. The rod 71 bears upon the earth, or upon a plate or washer (not shown) to thereby limit the permitted downward travel of the rod 11 and the tip 14. After the sleeve 60 has been flared, the rod 71 and piston 70 are removed from the rod 11, and the driving tube 30 is removed. The anchor is then completed, and connection can be made above the surface of the earth, for example, to the threads 12 at the top of the rod 11.

It should also be pointed out that the amount or extent of the cylinder 61 of the sleeve 60 which is flared can be controlled by including a mark or a graduated scale, (not shown) upon the driving tube 30 which can be compared to the relative location of the rod 71 within the slot 40. The graduations can be located at any convenient location upon the driving tube 30, but are conveniently located adjacent the slots 40 for simple comparison.

If additional anchor characteristics are desired, additional flareable sleeves can be located on the rod 11. To facilitate the employment of such additional flareable sleeves, a conical wedge, generally indicated by the reference numeral in FIG. 6, can be employed. The

conical wedge 80 includes a cylinder or sleeve 81 fitable on the rod 11 through a longitudinal hole or channel 82. Outwardly extending from the cylinder 81 is a shoulder or skirt 83 downward sloping to receive the end of the subsequently installed flareable sleeve 60'. The anchor is therefore constructed by completing the installation of the first flareable sleeve 60, as above described with reference to FIGS. l-5, removing the driving tube 30, inserting the conical wedge 80 upon the rod 11, placing a second flareable sleeve 60 upon the rod 11, refitting the driving tube 30 over the rod 11,

and applying a driving force thereto to flare the second flareables sleeve 60' against the outstanding shoulder 83 of the wedge 80. Thus, as shown in FIG. 7, an anchor including plural flared sleeves is achieved, presenting a first flare sleeve 60, the conical wedge 80, and the second flared sleeve 60' stacked upon the rod 11. If desired, additional flared sleeves can be stacked upon the rod 11 alternately with wedge assemblies (not shown).

The anchor fabricated in accordance with the principles of the invention can be employed in practically any type of earth formation. In harder formations which may be encountered, such as rock, shale, and the like, the flareable sleeve employed can be shortened, such shortened sleeve having illustrated in FIG. 8 and denoted by the reference numeral 90. The shortened sleeve is similar to the flareable sleeve above described with reference to FIG. 4, and includes a cylinder 92 surrounded by a ring or collar 93 attached thereto. At least two, and preferably four, out portions 94 are provided from the bottom 95 of the cylinder 92 thereby defining flareable members 91. In use, the shortened flareable sleeve 90 is installed in essentially the same manner as that above described with reference to the flareable sleeve member 60 in FIG. 4. It may be necessary in installing the anchor in rock formations to predrill the rock in which connection is to be made to receive the anchor rod. In such cases, the diameter of the pre-drilled hole should be slightly smaller in size than the diameter of the shoulder of the tip member 14.

In another alternative embodiment the invention, for additional anchor properties, the flareable sleeve can be flared at its top, as well as at its bottom, as above described. Thus, as shown in FIG. 9, a flareable sleeve, denoted by the reference numeral 100, can include scores or cuts 103 in the upward extending cylinder portion 101 above the driving force receiving collar 102. In the installation and fabrication of an anchor including such upward extending flareable members, the flareable sleeve 100 is flared at its bottom portion in the manner above described with reference to the flareable sleeve 60 shown in FIG. 4. The upwardly extending cylindrical members are thereafter flared by driving a wedge, such as that illustrated in FIG. 10, denoted by the reference numeral 110, in the top portion thereof. The wedge 110 includes a cylinder 111 with an interior channel 113 for slideably engaging the rod 11, and a downwardly extending conical shoulder or wedge 112 for flaring the cylinder along the division lines 103. In the installation of the double flareable sleeve 100, the sleeve is first located upon the rod 11 and flared at its bottom portion, in a manner similar to that described with reference to the flareable cylinder 60 illustrated in FIG. 4. The wedge 110 is then located adjacent the top of the sleeve 100 as shown in FIG. 11, and is driven by the driving tube thereinto to flare the upward portion of the cylinder 100 to the configuration shown in FIG. 12. The drive tube 30 can then be removed and anchor attachment made to the threads 12 of the anchor rod 11. It should also be noted that in the practice of the invention, the wedge 110 can be recovered and reused after the top portion of the cylinder 100 has been flared.

If plural upward and downward flared sleeves are desired on the rod 11, a double wedge 120, illustrated in FIG. 13, can be employed. The double wedge 1200 includes upward and downward conical wedge shoulder 121 and 122 upon a cylinder 123 slideably receivable upon the rod 11. In use, the bottom conical wedge 122 is driven into the top portion of the sleeve to flare it outwardly, as shown in FIG. 14, for the first installed sleeve, previously flared at its bottom, as above described, with respect to the flareable sleeve 60 of FIG. 4. The second flareable sleeve of similar construction to the sleeve 100 is then placed over the wedge and driven into the top conical wedge 120 to flare the bottom portion of the second sleeve 100'. Finally, the top portion of the flared sleeve 100' is flared with a single wedge member, such as wedge member 110 illustrated in FIG. 10, to form the completed anchor configuration, shown in FIG. 14.

The flareable sleeve configuration 100 shown in FIG. 9 can alternatively be employed either as a soft earth material anchor or rock anchor, depending upon the direction of disposition of the sleeve upon the rod 11. Thus, as shown in FIG. 15, by placing the sleeve 100 upside down from the direction illustrated in FIG. 9, on the rod 11, the smaller or shorter portion of the cylinder can be outwardly driven to engage the rock materials surrounding the anchor in a manner similar to that described with reference to the shortened flareable sleeve of FIG. 8.

Another embodiment of the invention, shown in FIG. 16, includes a downward flareable portion which can be flared to members 150, I51, 152, and 153, below a collar upon an elongated cylinder 156. The elongated cylinder 156 above the collar 155 is of length approximately equal to the length of the rod 11, extending almost to the surface 160 of the earth into which anchor connection is made. After installation washer or plate (not shown) can be placed over the anchor thereby formed to receive downward or compressional forces upon the anchor to be applied to and resisted by the sleeve 156 and the outward flared members 150153. On the other hand, upward forces are applied to the top of the rod 11 at its threads 12, to be thereby resisted by the bearing of the tip member 14 upon the collar 155, and by the outward flared members 150-153.

It should be pointed out that the flareable sleeves of FIGS. 4, 9, and 16, have been illustrated as being of circular cross-section. They can, however, be of any convenient shape such as a square, triangle, oval, parallelogram, and so forth. Likewise, although the rod 11 and tip member 14 have been shown as having circular cross-sections, any suitable cross-sectional shape can be employed to achieve the anchor in accordance with the principles of the invention.

In the fabrication of the anchor, in accordance with the invention, the various parts should be of strength as dictated by the particular use to which the anchor is to be put. Thus, although the anchor and its parts are preferably of steel or other metal, other materials can be employed for uses in which particular large strengths are not required. Likewise, the thickness, for example, of the flared sleeve, the diameter of the rod upon which the flared sleeve is mounted, and like parts may be appropriately chosen depending upon the use of the anchor device and the intended strength to be presented thereby.

In another preferred embodiment of the invention, illustrated with reference to FIGS. 17-29, a double flareable sleeve is employed. The double flareable sleeve is fabricated from three flareable sleeve members, illustrated in FIGS. 17-19, including an inner sleeve 200 which will be flared at its top and bottom, within the flared outer cylinder, as below described. The inner sleeve of cylinder 200 is scored or grooved along its length by scores 201, and, .at its ends, is cut to present slots 202, at the bottom, and slots 203, at the top.

Overfitting the inner cylinder 200 is a bottom cylinder 210, which is of inner diameter slightly larger than the outside diameter of the inner sleeve 200. The bottom outside sleeve 210 includes a plurality of scores 211 along its length (one being shown in FIG. 18), and slots 212 are provided at the bottom 213.

Finally, at the top overfltting the inside sleeve 200 is a top outside sleeve 215, having the same diameter as the bottom outside sleeve 210. The top outside sleeve 215 has slots 216 formed along a substantial portion of its length, and a score 217 for the remainder of its length. The sleeve 200, 210 and 215, are assembled into a single unit, shown in FIG. 20, the upper and lower outside flareable sleeves 210 and 215 being at- I tached together and to the inside sleeve 200 by a weld 218. Thus, a single unit, generally indicated by the reference numeral 220 is presented in which both inside and outside sleeve portions are presented.

It should be pointed out that although the outer cylinder has been described as being fabricated of two members, the lower cylinder 210 and the top cylinder 215, that a single cylinder can be employed, coaxially disposed about the inner cylinder 200, with appropriate structural modifications to facilitate attachment between the inner and outer cylinders, if desired. Furthermore, since the anchor can be located in a predrilled hole in the ground, attachment between the inner and outer cylinders is not essential, but is preferred for convenience and in assuring that the outer cylinder is properly located upon initiating the flaring procedures.

The total length of the inside flareable sleeve 200 is slightly longer than the total combined lengths of the top and bottom outside flareable sleeves 210 and 215, so that the inside flareable sleeve 200 will extend above and below the top and bottom outside flareable sleeve 210 and 215 as shown in FIG. 20.

Although any number of scores or slits may be employed depending upon the particular installation desired, upon the available fabrication machinery and upon other design considerations, preferably the same number of scores (or lines of separation) should be used in both the inner and outer sleeves 200, 210 and 215. Furthermore, for most efficient flaring for maximum anchor attachment, the score or slots should be arranged so that the flared members of the inner sleeve 200 are interdigitated. In other words, the flared members of the inner sleeve 200 will extend outwardly from between the flared members of the outer sleeves 210 and 215. Thus, the scores and slits or cuts of the outer cylinders 210 and 215 are angularly displaced approximately 60 from the grooves of the inner sleeve 200 (assuming by way of example, without limitation, four cuts around the circumference of the cylinders, as shown).

At this juncture, it should be noted that the manner in which the sleeves flare in location in the earth is determined, in part, in addition to the factors above outlined, by the characteristics of the slots or scores preformed in the sleeves. For example, if a sleeve to be flared is merely scored without being actually cut along its length, the members which flare outwardly into the earth will characteristically be curled as they are flared to form an upward hooking shape upon completion of the flaring process. On the other hand, if the lines of division of the cylinder are precut, the members flared will not exhibit as large a curl, and will essentially be merely bent outwardly from and along a point at the end of the preformed slit or cut. This flaring characteristic becomes of particular interest in the fabrication of a double cylinder anchor, since by preforming only grooves or scores along the length of the inner cylinder 200, but forming slots along the desired split portions of the outer cylinders 210 and 215, the anchor formed will be configured with the interior flareable sleeve or cylinder 200 having a higher amount or degree of curl to its outwardly flared members than that of the outer cylinder flared portions. The final anchor embodiment, therefore, can be made by appropriate choice of the length of the slots or grooves, and of the choice between slots and grooves, to be of enhanced strength from that otherwise achievable, since, for example, the outer cylinder flared portions at their less curled configuration, function to brace, support, and lend strength to the outwardly flared portions of the inner sleeve or cylinder, as will become apparent below.

To install the double flareable cylinder 220 of FIG. 20, the installation apparatus is arranged as shown in FIG. 21. The apparatus is similar to that above described with reference to the installation of the earth anchors of FIGS. 5-16, with variations as below described.

Thus, the double flareable cylinder 220 is located on an anchor rod 11 having at its end a wedge 225. In the embodiment illustrated, the anchor 220 is to be installed in a predrilled hole 226 within the earth. The tapered head, above described with reference to the anchor rod 10 of FIG. 1 and the anchors formed therewith, is not necessary (although it can be used if desired), since the hole 226 is preformed. The wedge 225 is held in position by one or more bolts (not shown) in rigid attachment to the anchor rod 11. A driving tube 30 is located over the anchor rod 11 to engage the top of the inner flareable sleeve 200 interlitting with the inner cylinder or sleeve 200 to rest upon the top edge of the top outside sleeve 215. A hydraulic cylinder 230 is attached to the anchor rod 11 to effect the flaring of the flareable sleeves, as below described.

The hydraulic cylinder 230 has an interior shaft 231 which is attached to the anchor rod 11 by a connecting sleeve or collar 233. Conveniently, the top of the anchor rod 11 is threaded, thereby enabling the rod 231 of the hydraulic cylinder 230 to be threadably connected to the anchor rod 11 by the sleeve 233. The hydraulic cylinder 230 can be of any commercially available hydraulic cylinders, the cylinder illustrated being of the type having the interior hydraulic piston 238 which acts within an outer cylinder 240 by application of pressurized hydraulic fluid (source and fluid not shown) through an opening 241. The pressure developed by the hydraulic cylinder 230 is applied between the driving tube 30 and the double flareable sleeve 220 by the downward force upon the driving tube 30 by the hydraulic cylinder 240 distributed thereon by a collar 245, and the upward force of the piston 238 upon the anchor rod 11 and its wedge 225, via the attachment rod 231 and the collar 233. An adjustment nut 248 is threadably engaged upon the rod 231 at its extension above the piston 238 to couple its upward force to the connecting rod 231.

Thus, as shown in FIG. 22, as the hydraulic fluid, under pressure, is applied to the hydraulic cylinder 230, the interior hydraulic piston 238 drives the bottom portion of the double flareable sleeve 220 into the wedge 225. This, therefore, flares both the bottom of the inner sleeve 200 and the bottom outside sleeve 210,

as shown.

At the point at which the inner piston of the hydraulic cylinder 230 is at its upper most extent of travel, if additional flaring is desired, the hydraulic pressure can be released within the hydraulic cylinder 230, and the piston 238 returned to its original position, as shown in FIG. 21. The piston rod engaging adjustment nut 248 can then be screwed down to again engage the top of the piston 238, as shown in FIG. 23. The process can then be repeated by reapplying hydraulic pressure to the interior of the hydraulic cylinder 230, again to raise the piston 238 within the cylinder 240 to effect additional bottom flaring, as shown in FIG. 24.

As above described, the interior sleeve or cylinder 200, being scored (as distinguished from being cut) along its length, will produce anchor members 250 which are generally upwardly curled, as shown. The outer sleeve 210, having its bottom portion primarily slotted (in distinction to being grooved or scored) merely produces anchor members 251 which generally are more outwardly bent than curled. Thus, in the operation or function of the anchor, the outer members 251, in addition to provide resistance to upward movement of the anchor assembly, provide reinforcement to the anchor members 250 of the interior cylinder. By the same token, the interior members 250 provide reinforcement to the outer flared members 251 of the outer cylinders, upon application of upward forces upon the anchor assembly.

For additional anchor strength, if desired, the top portion of the double flareable cylinder 220 can also be flared. As shown in FIG. 25, the apparatus above described with reference to FIGS. 21-24 can be again disposed upon the anchor rod 11, but, in addition, a wedge member 260 is located between the driving sleeve and the top portion of the double flareable sleeve 220. A wedge which can be used to effect this top flare of the double flareable cylinder 220 is shown in FIG. 26. The wedge 260 includes a tapered shoulder 265 which fits into the top of the double cylinder 220 to effect the flaring of its top portion. A locating cylindrically shaped portion 266 extends downwardly from the tapered shoulder 265 to interfit within the top of the inner cylinder 200. Since the flaring wedge 260 must be brought into engagement with the double flareable cylinder 220 in its location underground, a taper 267 can be provided, as shown, upon the bottom of the locating cylindrically shaped portion 266 to facilitate insertion of the locating cylinder 266 within the top of the double flareable cylinder 220. Upwardly extending from the wedge shoulder 265 is a cylinder 269 having a set screw receiving hole 270 formed therein to receive a set screw 272 located within the driving sleeve 30 (see FIG. 25). Within the interior of the wedge 260, a hole 276 is formed to enable the wedge 260 to be located over the anchor rod 11.

In the further fabrication of the anchor, embodying the double flareable sleeve 220, as shown in FIG. 27,

the hydraulic pressure is applied to the hydraulic cylinder 230, in the manner above described with reference to FIGS. 21-24. However, since the bottom portions of the anchors have been flared, members 250 and 251 engaging the earth, the rod 11 and the bottom wedge member 225 and not raised, but instead, the driving tube 30 bears upon the wedge 260 and is forced downwardly into the double flareable cylinder 220. This causes the interior sleeve 200 and the top outside sleeve 215 to flare outwardly, as shown. Thus, the inner cylinder 200 will present flared members 280 outwardly extending from the center axis of the flareable double cylinder 220, in a complimentary fashion to the outer flared members 281 of the top outside cylinder 215. The hydraulic cylinder 230 and the driving tube 30 together with the wedge portion 260 are then removed, and the fabrication of the anchor is thereby completed.

If desired, to present lateral resistance and additional strength to the anchor structure, a lateral resisting structure 280, shown in FIG. 28, can be driven onto the rod 11 to the location shown in FIG. 29. The lateral resisting member 280 includes a pipe or sleeve 281 which is located over the anchor rod 11. The sleeve 281 is welded or otherwise attached to a flat piece of metal 282. The flat piece of metal 282 can be bent, if desired, as shown in FIG. 28, to present additional resistance to forces applied to the lateral resistance member 280, in direction of the arrow 283. Thus, the lateral resistance member 280 is located over the rod 11 of the anchor and driven downwardly into the earth, as shown in FIG. 29.

An eye member 285 can then be threadably attached to the top portion of the rod 11 to effect the completed anchor of FIG. 29.

In relatively hard materials, such as rock, coral, or the like, the double flareable cylinder might not be flareable to the same extent as it would otherwise be in soft materials such as sand, clay, and other similar earth materials. As shown in FIG. 30, an alternative manner of fabrication of the anchor, in accordance with the invention, after the flaring of the bottom portion of the interior and outer flareable cylinders has been effected, rather than employing a top driving wedge, as above described, additional downward pressure can be applied by the hydraulic cylinder 230 upon the driving tube or cylinder 30. Since the limit of flaring of the downward portions of the cylinders has been effected to the degree allowable by the particular earth material, further compressional pressure applied to the double flareable cylinder 220 will not result in additional flaring of members 250 and 251, but instead will cause the outside top cylinder 215 to buckle or crimp at the central portion of the preformed slot to form outward protrusions 290, as shown. Thus, rather than flaring the top portion of the double flareable cylinder 220, the holding or anchoring effect is achieved by effecting the buckling of the outer top cylinder 215, to form members or protrusions 290 extending outwardly into the ground or rock.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated with this certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure is made only by way of example, and that numerous changes in the details of construction and the arrangement and combination of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for making an earth anchor, comprising:

a pair of coaxially disposed sleeves each being at least scored along a portion of their lengths to facilitate separation of said sleeves between the scored portions upon application of a spreading force thereto,

a rod located within said sleeves of length sufficient to extend to near the surface of the earth when said sleeves are located at a desired depth within the earth,

wedge means attached to an end of said rod to engage at least the inner of said sleeves at its bottom,

a driving tube placeable over said rod to engage at least one of said sleeves at its top, and

means for applying a force between said driving tube and said rod whereby said wedge means is moved into said sleeves to apply a spreading force to flare the bottoms thereof.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a second wedge means fittable over said rod to engage the top of at least the inner one of said pair of sleeves,

whereby when a force is applied by said means for applying a force between said driving tube and said rod, said second wedge means applies a spreading force to said sleeves to flare the tops thereof.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said sleeves comprise:

an inner cylinder having a plurality of scores along its length, said scores being spaced equally around the circumference of said cylinder,

a first outer cylinder, fitable coaxially over a bottom portion of said inner cylinder, said first outer cylinder having a plurality of scores along its length, said scores being equally located around the circumference of said first outer cylinder, and disposed angularly displaced from the scores of said inner cylinder,

a second outer cylinder, fitable over a top portion of said inner cylinder, said second outer cylinder having a plurality of scores along a portion of its length, said slots being equally spaced around the circumference of said second outer cylinder and disposed angularly displaced from the scores of said inner cylinder,

said inner cylinder and said first and second outer cylinders being attached together to form a single unit.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said first and second outer cylinders are cut along a substantial portion of their lengths along said scores.

5. An earth anchor, comprising:

an anchor rod,

a pair of sleeves, one disposed within the other, lo-

cated on said anchor rod, and

means attached to said anchor rod for engaging said sleeves to prevent said rod from moving longitudinally upwardly therefrom,

said sleeves being flared at the their top and bottom portions into the earth to thereby prevent said anchor rod from being removable from the earth.

6. The earth anchor of claim 5 wherein said pair of sleeves are cylindrical.

7. The earth anchor of claim 6 wherein said sleeves comprise:

an inner sleeve,

an outer sleeve, including,

a first outer sleeve locatable at a bottom portion of said inner sleeve,

and a second outer sleeve, locatable at a top portion of said inner sleeve, said inner sleeve and said first and second outer sleeves being attached together to form a unit.

8. The earth anchor of claim 7 wherein the flared portions of said inner sleeve are of generally curled configuration and the flared portions of said first and second outer sleeves are of generally straight configuration.

9. An anchor for attachment to rocklike materials, comprising an anchor rod,

a pair of sleeves, one disposed within the other, lo-

cated on said anchor rod within a predrilled hole within said rocklike materials, and

means attached to said anchor rod for engaging said sleeves to prevent said rod from moving longitudinally upwardly therefrom,

said sleeves being flared at their bottom portions into the rocklike materials, said other of said pair of sleeves being buckled outwardly at a top portion thereof to engage the rock within the preformed hole to prevent said anchor rod from being removable from said rocklike material.

10. The method of fabricating an earth anchor in a preformed hole comprising the steps of:

locating a first cylinder coaxially about a second cylinder,

attaching a cylindrical wedge to an end of an anchor rod,

placing said cylinders upon said anchor rod in engagement with said wedge,

locating said anchor rod and said sleeves within said preformed hole, and

applying a force between said sleeves and said anchor rod to flare the bottom portions of said first and second sleeves.

11. The method of claim 10 further comprising the step of locating a wedge upon said anchor rod above said first and second cylinders, and

applying a force between said wedge and said anchor rod, to flare the top portions of said first and second cylinders.

12. The method of claim 10 further comprising the step of continuing to apply a force between said first and second cylinders to cause said first cylinder to buckle at a top portion thereof, said buckled portion engaging the earth adjacent said hole.

Claims (12)

1. Apparatus for making an earth anchor, comprising: a pair of coaxially disposed sleeves each being at least scored along a portion of their lengths to facilitate separation of said sleeves between the scored portions upon application of a spreading force thereto, a rod located within said sleeves of length sufficient to extend to near the surface of the earth when said sleeves are located at a desired depth within the earth, wedge means attached to an end of said rod to engage at least the inner of said sleeves at its bottom, a driving tube placeable over said rod to engage at least one of said sleeves at its top, and means for applying a force between said driving tube and said rod whereby said wedge means is moved into said sleeves to apply a spreading force to flare the bottoms thereof.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a second wedge means fittable over said rod to engage the top of at least the inner one of said pair of sleeves, whereby when a force is applied by said means for applying a force between said driving tube and said rod, said second wedge means applies a spreading force to said sleeves to flare the tops thereof.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said sleeves comprise: an inner cylinder having a plurality of scores along its length, said scores being spaced equally around the circumference of said cylinder, a first outer cylinder, fitable coaxially over a bottom portion of said inner cylinder, said first outer cylinder having a plurality of scores along its length, said scores being equally located around the circumference of said first outer cylinder, and disposed angularly displaced from the scores of said inner cylinder, a second outer cylinder, fitable over a top portion of said inner cylinder, said second outer cylinder having a plurality of scores along a portion of its length, said slots being equally spaced around the circumference of said second outer cylinder and disposed angularly displaced from the scores of said inner cylinder, said inner cylinder and said first and second outer cylinders being attached together to form a single unit.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said first and second outer cylinders are cut along a substantial portion of their lengths along said scores.
5. An earth anchor, comprising: an anchor rod, a pair of sleeves, one disposed within the other, located on said anchor rod, and means attached to said anchor rod for engaging said sleeves to prevent said rod from moving longitudinally upwardly therefrom, said sleeves being flared at the their top and bottom portions into the earth to thereby prevent said anchor rod from being removable from the earth.
6. The earth anchor of claim 5 wherein said pair of sleeves are cylindrical.
7. The earth anchor of claim 6 wherein said sleeves comprise: an inner sleeve, an outer sleeve, including, a first outer sleeve locatable at a bottom portion of said inner sleeve, and a second outer sleeve, locatable at a top portion of said inner sleeve, said inner sleeve and said first and second outer sleeves being attached together to form a unit.
8. The earth anchor of claim 7 wherein the flared portions of said inner sleeve are of generally curled configuration and the flared portions of said first and second outer sleeves are of generally straight configuration.
9. An anchor for attachment to rocklike materials, comprising an anchor rod, a pair of sleeves, one disposed within the other, located on said anchor rod within a predrilled hole within said rocklike materials, and means attached to said anchor rod for engaging said sleeves to prevent said rod from moving longitudinally upwardly therefrom, said sleeves being flared at their bottom portions into the rocklike materials, said other of said pair of sleeves being buckled outwardly at a top portion thereof to engage the rock within the preformed hole to prevent said anchor rod from being removable from said rocklike material.
10. The method of fabricating an earth anchor in a preformed hole comprising the steps of: locating a first cylinder coaxially about a second cylinder, attaching a cylindrical wedge to an end of an anchor rod, placing said cylinders upon said anchor rod in engagement with said wedge, locating said anchor rod and said sleeves within said preformed hole, and applying a force between said sleeves and said anchor rod to flare the bottom portions of said first and second sleeves.
11. The method of claim 10 further comprising the step of locating a wedge upon said anchor rod above said first and second cylinders, and applying a force between said wedge and said anchor rod, to flare the top portions of said first and second cylinders.
12. The method of claim 10 further comprising the step of continuing to apply a force between said first and second cylinders to cause said first cylinder to buckle at a top portion thereof, said buckled portion engaging the earth adjacent said hole.
US3855745A 1973-09-24 1973-11-05 Earth anchor Expired - Lifetime US3855745A (en)

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4038827A (en) * 1975-07-25 1977-08-02 Pynford Limited Pile
FR2517715A1 (en) * 1981-12-03 1983-06-10 Becquet Roger Marker for roads, tracks etc. - is anchored using tube from which rods extend outwardly into ground
EP0104723A1 (en) * 1982-09-24 1984-04-04 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Self-undercutting masonry anchor
US4563110A (en) * 1983-04-18 1986-01-07 New T'ings Inc. Shoring apparatus and method
US4648220A (en) * 1983-09-29 1987-03-10 Gebelius Sven R Supporting member
EP0251165A2 (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-01-07 Itshaq Lipsker Drilling means serving as ground anchor and method
WO1988008066A1 (en) * 1987-04-13 1988-10-20 Larsson Sven Goeran Anchoring device
US4974997A (en) * 1986-06-26 1990-12-04 Secure Anchoring & Foundation Equipment, Inc. Hydraulic setting tool for installing anchoring and foundation support apparatus
US5031378A (en) * 1986-12-01 1991-07-16 Engineered Construction Components (America) Inc. Method of inserting a rivet into a roof structure
WO1993016260A1 (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-08-19 A-Kit Aktiebolag An anchoring device
WO1996004429A1 (en) * 1994-08-01 1996-02-15 Marine Environmental Solutions, L.L.C. Ground anchoring system
US6752817B2 (en) * 2001-03-26 2004-06-22 Bayer Corporation Split pressure ring for lancing device and method of operation
US20060236620A1 (en) * 2005-04-20 2006-10-26 Lacrosse Wills Ground anchor
GB2428704A (en) * 2005-07-25 2007-02-07 Steve Warburton Ground anchor for plant pots
KR100749012B1 (en) 2007-04-30 2007-08-07 (주)서림건설 Wedge-point-tip permanent anchor sets
WO2009101454A1 (en) * 2008-02-14 2009-08-20 Ioannis Lymberis Tie rod for structural projects
US7621098B2 (en) 2001-11-20 2009-11-24 Mfpf, Inc. Segmented foundation installation apparatus and method
US20100139649A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2010-06-10 Almy Charles B Earth-Penetrating Expansion Anchor
US20150252546A1 (en) * 2014-03-07 2015-09-10 Darcy Berger Ground anchor
US20180064034A1 (en) * 2016-09-02 2018-03-08 Richard Floyd Schaefer Landscaping stake and driver

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US2580948A (en) * 1950-11-15 1952-01-01 Paul C Pancake Anchoring device for signposts
US3187858A (en) * 1962-12-11 1965-06-08 Atlantic Res Corp Anchoring device
DE1942793A1 (en) * 1969-08-22 1971-02-25 Siemens Ag Means for widening the shaft at a driven pile
US3797260A (en) * 1972-05-18 1974-03-19 B Webb Pipeline anchoring system

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2580948A (en) * 1950-11-15 1952-01-01 Paul C Pancake Anchoring device for signposts
US3187858A (en) * 1962-12-11 1965-06-08 Atlantic Res Corp Anchoring device
DE1942793A1 (en) * 1969-08-22 1971-02-25 Siemens Ag Means for widening the shaft at a driven pile
US3797260A (en) * 1972-05-18 1974-03-19 B Webb Pipeline anchoring system

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4038827A (en) * 1975-07-25 1977-08-02 Pynford Limited Pile
FR2517715A1 (en) * 1981-12-03 1983-06-10 Becquet Roger Marker for roads, tracks etc. - is anchored using tube from which rods extend outwardly into ground
EP0104723A1 (en) * 1982-09-24 1984-04-04 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Self-undercutting masonry anchor
US4563110A (en) * 1983-04-18 1986-01-07 New T'ings Inc. Shoring apparatus and method
US4648220A (en) * 1983-09-29 1987-03-10 Gebelius Sven R Supporting member
EP0251165A2 (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-01-07 Itshaq Lipsker Drilling means serving as ground anchor and method
US4761098A (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-08-02 Itshaq Lipsker Drilling means serving as ground anchor and method
EP0251165A3 (en) * 1986-06-24 1988-09-28 Itshaq Lipsker Drilling means serving as ground anchor and method
US4974997A (en) * 1986-06-26 1990-12-04 Secure Anchoring & Foundation Equipment, Inc. Hydraulic setting tool for installing anchoring and foundation support apparatus
US5031378A (en) * 1986-12-01 1991-07-16 Engineered Construction Components (America) Inc. Method of inserting a rivet into a roof structure
WO1988008066A1 (en) * 1987-04-13 1988-10-20 Larsson Sven Goeran Anchoring device
WO1993016260A1 (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-08-19 A-Kit Aktiebolag An anchoring device
WO1996004429A1 (en) * 1994-08-01 1996-02-15 Marine Environmental Solutions, L.L.C. Ground anchoring system
US6752817B2 (en) * 2001-03-26 2004-06-22 Bayer Corporation Split pressure ring for lancing device and method of operation
US7621098B2 (en) 2001-11-20 2009-11-24 Mfpf, Inc. Segmented foundation installation apparatus and method
US20060236620A1 (en) * 2005-04-20 2006-10-26 Lacrosse Wills Ground anchor
US8756877B2 (en) * 2005-04-20 2014-06-24 Wills LaCrosse Ground anchor
GB2428704A (en) * 2005-07-25 2007-02-07 Steve Warburton Ground anchor for plant pots
KR100749012B1 (en) 2007-04-30 2007-08-07 (주)서림건설 Wedge-point-tip permanent anchor sets
WO2009101454A1 (en) * 2008-02-14 2009-08-20 Ioannis Lymberis Tie rod for structural projects
US9540783B2 (en) 2008-02-14 2017-01-10 Ioannis Lymberis Tie rod for structural projects
US20100139649A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2010-06-10 Almy Charles B Earth-Penetrating Expansion Anchor
US20150252546A1 (en) * 2014-03-07 2015-09-10 Darcy Berger Ground anchor
US9394663B2 (en) * 2014-03-07 2016-07-19 Darcy Berger Ground anchor
US20180064034A1 (en) * 2016-09-02 2018-03-08 Richard Floyd Schaefer Landscaping stake and driver

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