US3855457A - Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form - Google Patents

Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3855457A
US3855457A US37131973A US3855457A US 3855457 A US3855457 A US 3855457A US 37131973 A US37131973 A US 37131973A US 3855457 A US3855457 A US 3855457A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
path
tickets
ticket
machine
connected
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
L Amundson
W Beuch
C Green
W Harris
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
International Business Machines Corp
Original Assignee
International Business Machines Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K1/00Methods or arrangements for marking the record carrier in digital fashion
    • G06K1/12Methods or arrangements for marking the record carrier in digital fashion otherwise than by punching
    • G06K1/125Methods or arrangements for marking the record carrier in digital fashion otherwise than by punching by magnetic means

Abstract

A machine for processing merchandising tickets each having a magnetizable surface strip and a line for receiving printing. The tickets may be in individual form carried by a hopper or in roll form carried by a supply reel. The machine defines a main path having a magnetic encoding head for encoding information on the magnetic strip of a ticket, a read head for checking the information encoded on the strip and a printer for printing on the print line of a ticket. The machine further defines supply paths connecting the supply reel and hopper with the main path. The machine includes a stacker and a take-up reel and defines paths connecting the main path with both the stacker and the take-up reel. A discard chute and a delivery path for a length of connected tickets are also provided by the machine, and selectively operable swingable deflectors are provided for selectively directing the tickets to this delivery path or to the discard chute. The machine also includes a burster mechanism for separating the tickets in connected form into discrete lengths.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Amundson et a1.

14 1 Dec. 17,1974

1 1 MACHINE FOR PROCESSING MERCHANDISING TICKETS IN BOTH ROLL AND INDIVIDUAL FORM [73] Assignee: International Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, N.Y.

22 Filed: June 18,1973

21 Appl. No.2 371,319

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,149,028 2/1939 Meisel 101/227 2,275,396 3/1942 Johnson 164/115 2,344,720 3/1944 O'Connell 101/227 2,775,298 12/1956 Rubidge 164/115 2,782,712 2/1957 Claff 101/144 3,052,350 9/1962 Marcovitz 209/74 3,180,254 4/1965 Hamisch 101/69 3,651,503 3/1972 Kono 3,735,095 5/1973 Mutz 235/619 R Primary Examiner-Daryl W. Cook Assistant ExaminerRobert M. Kilgore Attorney, Agent, or FirmKeith T. Bleuer 5 7 ABSTRACT A machine for processing merchandising tickets each having a magnetizable surface strip and a line for receiving printing. The tickets may be in individual form carried by a hopper or in roll form carried by a supply reel. The machine defines a main path having a magnetic encoding head for encoding information on the magnetic strip of a ticket, a read head for checking the information encoded on the strip and a printer for printing on the print line of a ticket. The machine further defines supply paths connecting the supply reel and hopper with the main path. The machine includes a stacker and a take-up reel and defines paths connecting the main path with both the stacker and the take-up reel. A discard chute and a delivery path for a length of connected tickets are also provided by the machine, and selectively operable swingable deflectors are provided for selectively directing the tickets to this delivery path or to the discard chute/The machine also includes a burster mechanism for separating the tickets in connected form into discrete lengths.

6 Claims, 26 Drawing Figures PATENTEU BEE I 7 m4 SHEET Ulflf 12 PATENTEnnEcmm 3 855,457

sum czar 12 -lllllllllll PATENTEUUEBITIBH 3855,45?

SHEET 030! 12 FIG 6 PATENTED HEB] 71974 sum as or 12 PATEHTEB DEC] 7 I974 sum 05 or 12 PATENTED DEC! 7 I974 SHEET 0701- 12 PATENTEU DEB] 71974 SHEET 080F122 FATENTED DEC 1 7 m4 SHEET lOUF 12 sum" mar 12 PATENTEQ m1 11914 PATENTED DEC] 71974 SHEET 120? 12 MACHINE FOR PROCESSING MERCHANDISING TICKETS IN BOTH ROLL AND INDIVIDUAL FORM CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS Ser. No. 413,749, filed Nov. 7, 1973, by Paul M. Charlson, Charles D. Green, William J. Harris and Keith E. Inman, entitled Ticket Cartridge and Hopper And Stacker Therefor.

Ser. No. 491,968, filed July 25, 1974, by James R. Dillinger, Robert F. Herald and Irving L. Miller entitled Printing Mechanism.

Ser. No. 488,108, filed July 12, 1974, by Duncan J. Lagoe and John E. Savage, Jr., entitled Document Sensing Device.

Ser. No. 357,428, filed May 4, 1973, by Richard E. Lagergren and entitled Self Threading Take-Up Spool Device.-

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention:

This invention relates to machines for printing and magnetically encoding merchandising tickets of the type having magnetizable surface strips thereon.

2. Description of the Prior Art:

It has previously been proposed to prepare merchandising tags from roll stock having a magnetic surface stripthereon with the tickets after printing and magnetically encoding being severed into individual ticket form and then being accumulated. Such a proposal is contained in US. Pat. No. 3,651,503, issued Mar. 21, 1972, to Harry W. Kono.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved, very versatile machine of this general type for printing and magnetically encoding tickets having strips of magnetizable surface material thereon. More particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide a machine of this type which is arranged to utilize such tickets inrollform or individual tickets of this type and todeliver such tickets in roll form or in individual form.

Still more particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide a machine of this type which includes a burster for separating the tickets in roll form into discrete lengths of tickets each containing a relatively few tickets.

Preferably, the machine defines a main ticket path which includes a magnetic write head, a printer and a read head by means of which the magnetically encoded information may be verified. In addition, the machine includes a ticket supply path connecting a supply reel for a roll of tickets with the main path and a supply path connecting a hopper for individual tickets with the main path. The main path is connected with a take-up reel by means of a first delivery path and is connected with a stacker for individual tickets by a second delivery path. Selectively operable deflectors are provided in the machine for directing the tickets in the various paths. A ticket burster is provided in the main path which operates to burst a continuous strip of tickets on a perforation line in the strip of tickets so as to selectively provide a relatively few tickets in connected form as an output of the machine.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a merchandise ticket processing machine embodying principles of the invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are plan views of strips of tickets used by the machine;

FIGS. 4 and 5, when placed together, constitute a schematic diagram of the principal working parts of the machine;

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the terminal end of the machine including the take-up reel;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 7-7 of FIG.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken on line 8-8 of FIG.

FIG. 9 is a front elevational view of the central card transporting mechanism of the machine;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken on line 10-10 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken on line 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a schematic illustration of a driving motor for the machine together with the belts and pulleys under drive from the motor, as viewed from the rear of the machine;

FIG. 13 is a front elevational view of burster mechanism and input mechanism of the machine;

FIG. 14 is an end view of the burster mechanism;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the hopper mechanism of the machine;

FIG. 16 is a front elevational view of a portion of the hopper mechanism;

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of the hopper mechanism;

FIG. 18 is an end elevational view of the hopper mechanism;

FIG. 19 is a front elevational view of stacker mechanism of the machine which, as shown, has a document card cartridge located in place in the stacker mechanism;

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary top view of a portion of the stacker mechanism;

FIG. 21 is a sectional view taken on line 2l--21 of FIG. 19; A

FIG. 22 is a top plan view of certain electrical switch mechanism included in the stacker mechanism;

FIG. 23 is a top plan view of the switch mechanism with the document card cartridge being disassociated from the stacker mechanism;

FIG. 24 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale of printer mechanism included in the machine and taken on line 24-24 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 25 is a perspective view of one of the document card cartridges used by the machine; and

FIG. 26 is a perspective view of a cover portion of the cartridge shown in FIG. 25.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Tickets of types suitable for use in the ticket encoder of the present invention are illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. The tickets 30 illustrated in FIG. 2 may, for example, be about 2 inches in length (or may be 1 inch or 3 inches long) and are in a continuous strip 32, being separated from adjacent tickets in the strip 32 by means of perforation lines 34. A relatively short slot 36 and a relatively long slot 38 are disposed in eachof the perforation lines 34. Each of the tickets 30 has a round hole 40 in one corner, and a slantwise extending perforation line 42 divides this corner of the ticket 30 with respect to the rest of the ticket. As will be noted, the perforation line 42 does not pass through the opening 40. The tickets 30 and the strip 32 hace no particular coating on the under surfaces.

Each of the tickets 30 has a stripe 44 of magnetic material extending longitudinally of the ticket on the upper surface of the ticket. The stripe may be applied onto the ticket 30 and onto the strip 32 by any suitable means. It will be noted that the slots 38 are longer than the stripes 44 and divide the stripes 44 of adjacent tickets 30 in the strip 32. The slots 36 are outside of the stripes 44. Print lines 46 and 48 may be applied onto the tickets 30, above and below the stripes 44.

The tickets 30 may, for example, be used in connection with articles for sale, such as garments, for example, mens suits or womens dresses. When used in this connection, a ticket 311 is detached from adjacent tickets in the strip 32, and the ticket is fastened onto the garment by means of a small plastic anchor that extends through the opening 40 and through the garment. The magnetic strips 44 has been encoded (using the machine of the present invention) with size, type, and price information for example; and some of this information is printed by the present machine in the print lines 46 and 48 onto the ticket so that the information is in human, readable form. When the article is sold, the ticket is broken into two parts by tearing along the perforation line 42, and the information carried by the stripe 44 is then decoded by any suitable means such as, for example, using the machine of the present invention. The corner of the ticket 30 through which the opening 40 has been provided remains attached to the garment by means of the anchor.

The tickets 50 illustrated in FIG. 3 are individual tickets which have a coating of pressure sensitive adhesive on their lower surfaces, and these individual tickets are carried by a strip 51 of a backing sheet from which the individual tickets may be readily separated. The tickets 50 are spaced from each other on the strip 51 and are somewhat narrower than the strip so as to be spaced from the side edges of the strip. Perforation lines 52 are provided in the strip 51 mid-way between the spaced tickets 50. Magnetic stripes 53, similar to the stripes 44, are provided on the tickets 50; and the stripes 53 are encoded by the machine of the present invention in the same manner as the stripes 44 are encoded. Lines of printing may be applied on to the tickets 50 above and below the stripes 53, similar to the print lines 46 and 48. After the individual tickets 50 have been encoded magnetically and have been printed, they may be detected from the carrier strip 51 and may then be stuck on to a garment, for example, using the adhesive layer for the adhering action.

The machine of the invention is illustrated as an entirety in FIG. 1. Referring to FIG. 1, the machine may be seen to include a cabinet 56 carrying a reel 58 for a supply roll of the tickets 30 or 50, coding and printing mechanism 60, and a takeup reel 62 for rolling up tickets that have been encoded and printed. The mechanism 60 and the takeup reel 62 are pivotally mounted in a suitable manner with respect to the cabinet 56 so that they can be raised into vertical positions as illustrated in FIG. 1. A cover 64 is pivotally mounted on the cabinet 56, and it may be swung downwardly to cover the mechanism 611 after the mechanism 60 has been moved back to be in the principal plane of the reel 58.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the principal components of the mechanism 60 may be seen to include a write head 66, a read head 68, a printer and a document burster 72. The burster 72 is effective on strips 32 and 51 of connected tickets, while the heads 66 and 68 and printer 70 are also effective on individual ones of the tickets 38 (Such as of two inch length) which the machine is arranged to handle. Individual ones of the tickets 30 are contained in a hopper 74, and these individual tickets are directed either into a stacker 76 or else into a discard chute 78.

The individual tickets from the hopper .74 and also the ticket strips 32 and 51 traverse a common path 80 which is defined by the mechanism 60. In particular, this path 80 is provided by a lower frame 82 and an upper frame or backbone 84 that is swingably mounted by means of a pin 86 with respect to the frame 82.

The backbone 84 and the frame 82 also have portions that provide a path 88 leading from the hopper 74 to the path 80 for transporting individual tickets. The frame 82 also provides a path 90 for a ticket strip 32 or 51. The frames 84 and 82 also provide paths 92 and 94 connecting with the path 80 for transporting individual tickets to the stacker 76. Portions of the frame 82 also provide a path 96 connecting the path 92 with the discard pocket 78, paths 98 and 100 for transporting the ticket strips 32 or 51 from the path 80 to the takeup reel 62 and a path 102 which is also for the ticket strips 32 or 51 and arranged to simply direct the strips to the side of the machine for grasping by the operator.

Swingable ticket deflectors 104, 106 and 108 are provided for directing the individual tickets or ticket strips 32 and 51 into the desired paths 92, 94, 96, 98. 100, and 102.

The path 90 is defined in part by rolls 110, 112, I14, and 116. The roll 114 is mounted on the end of a lever 118, and the lever is actuated by an electromagnet 120. An input switch 122 actuated'by a strip 32 or 51 is positioned between the rolls 112 and 116. The burster 72 is positioned in path 90 between the rolls 114 and 116 and the beginning of path 80. A sheet material spring 123 holds a strip 32 or 51 against the face of frame 82 for accurately locating the strip.

The path 88 is in part defined by rolls 124, 126, 128 and 130. The rolls 124 and 126 are positioned opposite each other. The rolls 128 and 130 are likewise positioned opposite each other, and the roll 130 is mounted on a lever 132 which is actuated by a magnet 134. A ticket pick roll 136 is positioned beneath the hopper 74 and is mounted on a swing arm 138. An electromagnet 140 is provided for selectively moving the roll 136 upwardly. A hopper eject switch 142 is positioned immediately downstream of the rolls 124 and 126 to be actuated by individual tickets 30 from the hopper 74. A spring 143 similar to spring 123 is effective on individual tickets in path 88.

A ticket sensor of detector cell 144 is provided at the confluence of the paths 88 and 90. The path 80 is partially defined by rolls 146 and 148 respectively positioned over the write and read heads 66 and 68. The path 80 is also defined by rolls 150, 152, 154, 156, 158 and 161). The roll 152 is positioned opposite the roll and on a swing arm 162 that is actuated by a magnet 164. The rolls 154 and 156 are opposite each other on one side of the printer 70, and the rolls 158 and 160 are opposite each other on the other side of the printer. A ticket sensor or detector 166 is disposed immediately upstream of the rolls 154 and 156.

The path 92 is partially defined by rolls 168 and 170, and the path 94 is partially defined by rolls 172 and 174. A stacker roll 176 is disposed beneath the stacker 76 on the end of a swing arm 178, and an electromagnet 180 is provided for moving the arm 178 and roll 176. A ticket detector switch 182 is provided in the path 94. The path 98 is partially defined by rolls 184 and 186, and the path is partially defined by rolls 188 and 190.

A magnet 192 is provided for actuating the deflector 104. A magnet 194 is provided for actuating the deflectors 106 and 108, and these deflectors are interconnected by a link 196 so that the single magnet 194 is effective for both of the deflectors.

The takeup reel 62 is rotatably disposedwith respect to the frame 82, and a web guide 198 (see FIG. 6) is swingably dispose at the outlet end of the path 100. The guide 198, as it swings, actuates a switch 200 located above the guide 198. The input reel 58 is rotatably disposed on a part of the cabinet 56 (see FIG. 1), and a spring web guide 202 is provided .for directing web from the reel 58 to the mechanism 60.

The path 80 is also partially defined by skew pressure rolls 204 and 206 which respectively have nips with rolls 146 and 148 (see FIGS. 7 11). The rolls 204 and 206 are carried on a U-shaped member 208 of spring sheet material and cooperate with the rolls 146 and 148 so as to move an individual ticket 30 or 50 or a ticket strip 32 or 51 into contact with a rail 210 also forming a part of the path 80. A head backing roll 212 located over the head 66 is coaxially disposed with respect to the roll 1'46 and is fixed on the same shaft 214 as the roll 146. An electric emitter 216 is also driven by the shaft 214. A head backing roll 218 located over the read head 68 is disposed on the same shaft as the roll 148.

A common drive roll 220 is provided for the rolls 146 and 148, and a drive roll 222 is provided for driving the roll 220. A motor 224 carried by the frame 84 is provided for driving the rolls 146 and 148 in addition to the other rolls 150, 154 and 158 along the path 80. The motor 224 has an output pulley 226, and a belt 228 extends the pulley 226 and the roll 222 in addition to idler rolls 230, 232, 234, 236, 238 and 240. The idler rolls 230, 232, 234, 236, and 238 keep the belt 228 in driving contact with the rolls 222, 150, 154, and 158 as shown in FIG. 9. The belt 228 is maintained taut by means of the roll 240 which has a spring device 242 acting on it, tending to move the roll 240 in a direction away from the pulley 226 of the motor 224 as illustrated in FIG. 9.

A motor 244 (see FIG. 12) carried by the frame 82 is used for driving the rolls 126, 128, 116, 174, 168, 184 and 188. The motor 244 has an output pulley 246 driving a belt 248 which extends around a driven pulley 250. A spring loaded idler roll 252 keeps the belt 248 taut. The pulley 250 is fixed on a shaft 253 and thereby drives a coaxially disposed pulley 254, and the pulley 254 drives a belt 256. The belt 256 extends around the pulleys 258, 260, 184a, 168a, 174a, 264, 188a, 266 268, 270, 272, 126a, 128a, and 116a, back to pulley 254. The roll 258 is a spring loaded idler roll for maintaining the belt 256 taut about the previously mentioned rolls. The rolls 126a, 128a, 116a, 184a, 168a, 174a and 188a respectively drive the rolls 126, 128, 116, 184, 168, 174 and 188 in the paths 88, 90, 80, 92, 94, 96, 98, and 102.

The roll is driven from the roll 126 by means of a belt 274 (see FIG. 13), and the roll 110 has a one-way clutching device 276 built into it so that it may freely rotate in the direction 278. The takeup reel 62 is driven by means of a belt 280 (See FIG. 12) extending over rolls 282 and 284. The roll 284 is fixed with respect to the roll 188, and the roll 282 is fixed with respect to the takeup reel 62. The pick roll 136 is driven from the pulley 126a by means of a belt 286 (see FIG. 17) extending around pulleys 288 and 290. The pulley 288 is fixed with respect to the pulley 126a, and the pulley 290 is fixed with respect to the pick roll 136. The roll 176 is driven from the roll 174 by means of a belt 292 (see FIGS. 19 21) that extends over both rolls 174 and 176.

A throat knife assembly is positioned at the exit end of the hopper and comprises a swinging arm 294 pivoted at 296 and carrying a knife 298 (See FIGS. 15 18). The arm 294 also carries a roll 300 disposed in close proximity to the lower end of the knife 298 for assuring that only one ticket at a time may leave the hopper. A spring 302 is effective on the arm 294, attempt ing to move the arm 294 upwardly.

The burster 72 comprises a burster drive roll 304 (See FIG. 13) which is fixed to the shaft 253 and is therefore driven by the motor 244. The roll 304 has a tire 304a of rubber-like material on its periphery. A roll 306 having a knurled periphery is disposed adjacent to the roll 304, and the roll 306 has a flat 306a on its periphery. A disk 308 is coaxially disposed and is fixed with respect to the roll 306, and the disk 308 has a tooth 308a formed on its periphery. The roll 306 has a pin 310 eccentrically fixed thereon. An electromagnet 314 is effective for actuating a'swing lever 316, and the lever 316 carries an abutment arm 318 which is adapted to be effective on the tooth 308a. A bearing block 320 is disposed on the pin 310, and a burster blade 322 is embedded in the block 320 and is reciprocably disposed in a housing 324. The end of the blade 322 is adjacent to the path 90, as shown.

A lever 326 is swingably disposed in the housing 324 and has an arm portion 326a that lies opposite an anvil plate 328. The plate 328 is on the upper side of the path 90 while the arm portion 326a is at times on the lower side of the path 90. A compression spring 330 is effective on the lever 326 and attempts to swing the lever 326 upwardly so that the arm portion 326a applies pressure onto the anvil 328. The lever 326 extends through an opening 332 in the blade 322; and, when the burster 72 is ineffective, the blade 322 holds the lever 326 in its illustrated position with the arm portion 326a ineffective to bear on the anvil 328.

The printer 70 comprises lower and upper print units 70a and 70b (see FIG. 24). Each of the units 70a and 70b includes a plurality of print wires 333, and it will be observed from FIG. 24 that these wires extend at an acute angle a" with respect to each other. The upper unit 70b prints the uppermost line of printing 46 (above stripe 44), while the lowermost unit 700 prints the lower print line 48 (below the stripe 44). The print units 70a and 70b have their wires disposed at the acute angle a so as to provide greater room for the units 70a and 70b with respect to each other.

An inked print ribbon 334 extends around the print unit 70 and over idler rolls 336 and 338 (see FIG. 4). The ribbon is contained in a cartridge 340 and is fed into the cartridge by means of a driving roll 342 having a pressure nip with a pressure roll 344. The roll 342 is driven from the roll 268 (see FIG. 12) over which the belt 256 extends.

Both the hopper 74 and the stacker 76 utilize a ticket cartridge 346 (see FIG. 25). The hopper comprises a table portion 348 (see FIG. 15) and a backboard 350 on which the cartridge rests. The roll 136 moves through the table portion 348, and a retainer spring 352 extends through the backboard 350 for snapping over the cartridge and holding it in position.

The stacker comprises a table portion 354 and a backboard 356 on which a cartridge 346 rests (see FIGS. 19 and 21). The roll 176 extends through the table portion 354, and a retainer spring 358 holds the cartridge 346 in position. A switch 360 (see FIGS. 22 and 23) is positioned on the rear surface of the backboard 356, and the switch 360 includes an actuator arm 362 that extends through the backboard 356 and through the cartridge 346 in the stacker position for indicating when the cartridge 346 in the stacker position is full. A lever 364 extends through the backboard 356 and is actuated when a cartridge 346 is put into the stacker position.

Referring to FIGS. 25 and 26, the cartridge 346 may be seen to comprise an outer casing 346a and a cover 346b. The cover 34612 is disposed in grooves 346a which allow the cover 346b to be raised within the casing 346 to allow tickets to be placed in the cartridge in this manner if desired.

The cartridge is provided on its bottom with an elongate slot 366 which is defined by side flanges 368 and 370. The flanges 366 and 368 are cut away on their ends to provide an elongate slot 372 on the bottom of the cartridge at one end. The side of the cartridge, at the other end, is provided with an elongate slot 374; and a notch 376 is also provided in this side of the cartridge, above the notch 374.

A block 378 in the cartridge 346 moves up and down in the cartridge as tickets are deposited or removed from the cartridge. A constant tension leaf spring 380 has its lower end (as seen in FIG. 25) fixed at the bottom of the cartridge, and a roll 380a of the spring 380 fits within a slot 382 provided in the block 378.

In operation, it will initially be assumed that the tickets in the strip 32 are being processed by the machine. The strip 30 is on the input reel 58 and is drawn from the reel 58, passing around the spring 202. The reel 58 is not driven, and the strip 32 in being pulled from the reel 58 rotates the reel 58, with the spring 202 functioning to yield to prevent breakage of the strip 32 or undue acceleration of the reel 58. The strip 32 is moved manually between the rolls 110 and 112 which are in nipped relation and are initially stationary. The one-way device 276 allows the strip 32 to be moved between the rolls 110 and 112, with corresponding rotation of these rolls. The one-way engaging device 276 engages if there is a tendency of the strip 32 to fall back out of the nip between these rolls.

At this time, the motors 224 and 244 are supplied with electrical energy, and these motors drive the rolls connected with them by means of belts. In particular,

the motor 244 drives the pulleys connected with it by means of the belts 248, 256 and 280 and thus drives the corresponding rolls 116, 128, 126, etc. (see FIG. 12). The motor 224 drives rolls 150, 154, 222, etc., through the belt 228 (see FIG. 9).

At this time, the electromagnet 120 is energized, and this may be accomplished by means of a microcontroller (not shown) with a controlling microprogram (which may be also used for controlling the other controllable mechanisms and elements of the machine). The roll 114 is initially out of nipped relationship with respect to the roll 116, and the magnet 20 is then effective to move the roll 114 into nipped relationship with the roll 116. The roll 116 is driven from the pulleey 116a which in turn is driven by the belt 256, and the roll 114 then rotates along with the roll 116. The roll is drivingly connected with the roll 114 by means of the belt 274, and the roll 110 is thus driven so as to move the strip 32 inwardly of the machine (to the left as seen in FIG. 5).

With this motion of the strip 32, it moves under switch 122; and this actuation of switch 122 may cause de-energization of the magnet due to the action of the controlling system (such as the micro-controller) for the machine. The roll 114 is thus at this time moved out of nipped relationship with respect to the roll 116; and the strip 32 is stationary, with the machine being in a pre-start condition.

Thereupon, when it is desired that a string of tickets 30 shall be processed, the electromagnet 120 is again energized, such as by means of the machine controlling system as an intermediary; and the roll 114 is again moved into nipped relationship with respect to the roll 116. The ticket strip 32 then advances between rolls 110 and 112 and rolls 114 and 116 until the leading end of the strip 32 passes through the sensor 144 and arrives beneath roll 146. The stripe 44 is in alignment with the sensor 144, and the sensor recognizes the edge of a slot 38 due to light being transmitted from one part of the sensor to the other. The sensor 144 detects the ends of subsequent tickets 30 by light shining through the slots 38. The burster 72 at this time is inactive, and the burster blade 322 is in its retracted position as is shown in FIG. 13. The write head 66 then becomes active to magnetically encode on the magnetic stripe 44 of the leading ticket 30 of the strip 32 passing through the machine.

The roll 146 (and also the roll 148) are driven from the roll 222 which is driven from the motor 224 by means of the belt 228. The roll 222 drives the rolls 146 and 148 through the intermediate roll 220. The rolls 204 and 206 have a nip with the rolls 146 and 148 due to the U-shaped spring member 208 on which the rolls 204 and 206 are mounted, and the rolls 204 and 206 function to hold the strip 32 in contact with the rail 210 due to the canting of the rolls 204 and 206.

The write head 66 begins magnetically encoding on the stripe 44 of the leading ticket 30 a predetermined number of counts after the leading end of the strip 32 passes through the sensor 144. The counting is done of emitter pulses derived from the emitter 216 by the controlling system of the machine, the counting action being initiated by the sensor 144. The emitter 216 is driven in timed relationship with respect to the roll 146 which has the same speed on its periphery as the speed of the strip 32. The roll 212 holds the stripe 44 of the leading ticket 30 in tight running contact with the write head 66 during the magnetic encoding by the head 66.

The machine controlling system is also preferably effective to de-energize the magnet 120 as soon as the leading end of the ticket strip 32 is in the nip between the rolls 146 and 204. The latter two rolls are then effective to continue the forward movement of the strip 32 through the machine.

This writing action by the head 66 is preferably under the control of the machine controlling system so that the magnetic encoding begins just a very short distance from the leading end of the stripe 44, and the writing action continues under the control of the system and the emitter 216 for nearly the complete length of the magnetic stripe 44. It is contemplated that the tickets 30 may be in various lengths, such as lengths of one inch, 2 inches or 3 inches, and the controlling system is effective to recognize the difference in the lengths of the stripes 44.

The leading ticket 30 continues with the strip 32 through the machine; and, as the stripe 44 of the leading ticket passes over the read head 68, the information that has been magnetically encoded on the stripe 44 is read by the head 68 and is transmitted to the machine controlling system. The machine controlling system is preferably such as to then check the information that is read by the head 68 against the information that should have been recorded by means of the head 66 upon the same stripe 44. The roll 218 holds the stripe 44 of the leading ticket 30 against the read head 68 so that a reliable reading action is obtained.

The tickets 30 and strip 32 continue to move through the machine, and each of the succeeding tickets is magnetically encoded by the head 66 and has the encoded information read from it by the head 68 in the same manner as has occurred for the first ticket 30. The machine controlling system is preferably such that, if only one isolated ticket 30 does not have the information read by head 68 verified with the information that should have been encoded, the machine continues in operation (but this particular ticket 30 is not printed). However, if the information read by head 68 from two or more successive tickets does not verify with rspect to the information that should have been encoded on the tickets, the machine is preferably shut down by the system.

The heads 66 and 68 may be located so closely together than the magnetic stripe 44 on a 2 inch ticket 30 or a 3 inch ticket 30 is being simultaneously encoded and read, and verification by means of head 68 begins prior to the slot 38 at the trailing edge of the ticket coming in the sensor 144. In the case of 1 inch tickets 30, verifying by means of head 68 on a first ticket 30 is taking place at the time that a second ticket is being magnetically encoded. The machine controlling system is set so as to accommodate for these differences.

Initially, prior to the strip 32 reaching the roll 150, the magnet 164 is energized so as to provide a nip between rolls 150 and 152. Therefore, as the leading edge of the strip 32 reaches these rolls, the strip passes between these rolls and is thereby propelled forwardly along the path 80. The leading end of the strip 32 subsequently enters the nip between the rolls 154 and 156; and at this time the machine controlling system is preferably effective to de-energize the magnet 164 so that the roll 152 moves out of nipped relationship with the roll 150, leaving the strip 32 in a rather loose, slack condition between the rolls 148 and 154 (for better printing action). The machine controlling system, incidentally, is again effective to energize the magnet 164 so as to cause the roll 152 to move into nipped relationship with the roll 150 when the trailing end of a strip 32 reaches the vicinity of the roll 150.

The leading end of the strip 32 passes through the sensor 166 (which, like the sensor 144, is aligned with the stripe 44) just prior to reaching the rolls 154 and 156. The machine controlling system preferably utilizes the signal from the sensor 166 raised when the leading end of the strip 32 passes through the sensor 166 to measure the time required for the leading end of the strip 32 to pass from the sensor 144 to the sensor 166. It this time is unduly great, a jam of the strip 32 has probably occurred in the path 80. The signal from the sensor 166 is also effective to control the printing by the printer so that this printing begins at the proper locations of the ticket 30. The emitter 216 cooperates in this case also so as to assure that printing begins a certain number of counts after the leading end of a ticket 30 has passed through the sensor 166. The machine controlling system is effective to print the charac ters desired on each ticket as it passes beneath the printer 70, and some of these printed characters are preferably some of those which have been magnetically encoded on the stripe 44 of the particular ticket 30 being printed. The print wires 333 are actuated by the print units 70a and 70b to print on the print lines 46 and 48 in accordance with the usual operation of a conventional wire printer.

The magnet 164 is preferably de-energized to supply slack in the strip 32 between the rolls 148 and 158 while simultaneous verification and printing of the tickets 30 on the strip occurs, so that any agitation applied by the wires 333 of the printer 70 to the strip 32 is not transmitted back by the strip 32 to the head 68, possibly upsetting the verifying action. The rolls 152 and when in nipped relationship assure that short lengths of strips 32 continue to travel in the path 80 from the roll 148 to the roll 154 as well as assuring the proper travel of the leading and trailing ends of strips 32 of all lengths.

Whenever the strip 32 from the supply reel 58 is used by the machine, the machine controlling system is effective to maintain the electromagnet 192 energized. The deflector 104 is thus swung into a position so that the ticket strip 32 travels in thepath 98. If the machine controlling system calls for a length of unrolled strip 32 as output (under the direction of the machine operator), the machine controlling system causes the electromagnet 194 to be energized, and the deflector 108 is swung upwardly. The strip 32 then travels in the path 102 and appears at the left end of the machine at which it can be grasped by the machine operator. The rolls 186, 184, 188 and 190 propel the strip 32 through the paths 98 and 102, as is apparent.

In the event that the machine operator wishes the strip 32 after encoding and printing to be wrapped into roll form, the machine controlling system (as directed by the machine operator) causes the electromagnet 194 to be in de-energized condition. The deflector 108 is then swung downwardlly so that the strip 32, instead of entering the path 102, instead enters the path 100. The strip is propelled in this case by the rolls 184 and 186, and the strip passes through the web guide 198 to the takeup reel 62. The takeup reel 62 automatically engages the leading end of the strip 32 and winds the strip 32 into the form of a roll. The takeup reel 62 may be of any suitable self-threading type and may be, for example, of the type disclosed in the co-pending application of Richard Lagergren, Ser. No. 357,428, filed May 4, 1973 Self-Threading Take-Up Spool Device. The strip 32 as it rolls up on the reel 62 makes contact with the guide 198 and swings the guide 198 about its pivot. After a predetermined diameter of rolled up strip 32 is on the takeup reel 62, the guide 198 is swung through such an angle that it actuates the switch 200, and the switch 200 may be used for stopping the machine at this time.

The burster 72 is effective for strip output (the out put of a batch of encoded and printed tickets through the path 102) for determining the end of the strip that passes out of the machine through the path 102. The machine controlling system (under the direction of the machine operator) determines the particular number of tickets to be encoded and printed prior to the line along the strip 32 at which the burster 72 is effective. When the desired number of tickets have been encoded and printed, the machine controlling system stops the motor 224 with the trailing edge of the desired batch of tickets 30 opposite the burst blade 322, and the ticket strip 32 is thus stationary and is located with the perforation line 34 at the trailing end of the desired batch of tickets directly above the burst blade 322. In this connection, the output of the sensor 144 is utilized by the machine controlling system for counting the number of tickets that are in the batch, prior to stoppage of the motor 224.

After the trailing end of the desired batch of tickets 30 is stopped in alignment with the burster blade 32, the machine controlling system is effective to energize the electromagnet 314. The lever 316 is thus swung in the counterclockwise direction as seen in FIG. 13 and moves the abutment arm 318 out of engagement with the tooth 308a formed on the disk 308. The sprig 330 is effective through the lever 326 on the blade 322, and the blade 322 thus applies a rotative force on the disk 308 and roll 306 through the block 320, tending to rotate the disk 308 and roll 306 in the counterclockwise direction as seen in FIG. 13. The flat 306a is thus moved out of registry with the periphery of the roll 304, and the knurled periphery of the roll 306 is moved into engagement with the tire 304a on the roll 304. The roll 304 is continuously driven from the motor 244 via belt 248, pulley 250 and shaft 253, and the roll 306 and disk 308 are thereby driven in the counterclockwise direction as seen in FIG. 13. The blade 322 is thereby moved upwardly, along with the block 320 on pin 310, and the lever 326 swings outwardly with the blade 322. The lever 326 clamps the strip 32 between it and the anvil plate 328 and thus fixed the strip 32 at its upstream side with respect to the blade 322. The blade 322 continues its outward movement and breaks the strip 32 at the perforation 34 in alignment with the blade 322. The strip 32 is held on its downstream side at this time, so that the blade 322 can be thus effective, by means of the rolls 146, 148, etc., driven from the motor 224 which at this time is inoperative. The roll 184 continues to be driven from the motor 244; however, since this roll has a smooth periphery, it has no adverse effect on the strip 32 for the brief time that the burster 72 is effective.

After the bursting has thus been effective to sever the desired batch of tickets from the roll of tickets on the supply reel 58, the machine control system may be then effective to start the motor 224 to move the desired batch of tickets in strip form out of the machine through the paths 80, 98 and 102.

In the event that the ticket strip 32 is being rolled up on the reel 62 in lieu of traveling through the path 102, the machine control system may be likewise effective for severing the strip 32 at the trailing end of the tickets to be wound on to the reel 62. The switch 122 may be used for detecting the end of the strip 32 as it comes off of the supply reel 58.

The machine controlling system preferably is such that it renders the printer effective for every ticket that is properly verified using the read head 68. If there is a lack of verification using the head 68, in this case the machine controlling system does not print on that particular ticket; and the ticket is subsequently not used. In the event that there is no verification of two or more consecutive tickets 30, the machine controlling system preferably shuts down the machine.

The ticket strip 51, which does not include the slots 38 through which the sensors 144 and 166 can operate, functions in substantially the same manner as the strip 32; since the strip 51 is translucent to such an extent that sufficient light passes between the parts of the sensors to detect the spaces between adjacent tickets 50. The machine controlling system is properly adjusted so that, for any differences in length of the tickets 50, the machine controlling system operates as has just above been described.

The machine is also useful with individual tickets. The individual tickets are the tickets 30 which have been previously disassociated from each other by splitting them apart on the perforation lines 34. Tickets 30 of a 2 inch length in particular are contemplated for this usage. The individual tickets are first loaded into a cartridge 346 (see FIGS. 25 and 26), and the tickets may be so loaded (with stripes 44 down) by moving the tickets individually, with longitudinal bending thereof, between the side flanges 368 and 370. As the tickets move into the cartridge, they move against the block 378 and against the action of the spring 380, the coil of which rotates within the slot 382. Eventually a stack of the tickets 30 is thus collected in the cartridge 346, with the spring 380 holding the block 378 against the stack and with the lower end of the stack being held in the cartridge 346 by the flanges 368 and 370. Alternately, the tickets 30 may be loaded as a stack into the cartridge 346 by removing the cover 346b, elevating the block 378 against the action of the spring 380 and then moving the stack of tickets into the cartridge. The loaded cartridge is placed upon the table portion 348 and beneath the spring 352 which functions to retain the cartridge 346 in place so as to form the hopper 74.

An empty cartridge 346 may be moved into place on to the table portion 354 and beneath the retainer spring 358 so as to form the stacker 76. The cartridge 346 when thus being moved into position contacts and moves the lever 364 so as to actuate the switch 360, which thus may be used in connection with the machine controlling system to indicate that the stacker 76 is in ready condition for machine operation. The lever 364 and switch parts have thus moved from their FIG. 23 positions to their FIG. 22 positions. When the cartridge 346 is in place on the table portion 354, the actuator arm 362 extends through a corresponding opening in the rear of the cartridge 346 as shown in FIG. 22. When the tickets recieved by the stacker 76 eventually stack to a level at which the block 378 contacts and moves the actuator arm 362, the switch 360 is again thereby changed back to its original condition so as to stop the machine through the intermediary of the machine controlling system. The stack of tickets that are thus loaded into a cartridge 346 acting as the stacker 76 may also be used for subsequent processing by the machine, with the cartridge 346' containing these tickets being moved from the stacker position to the hopper position whereby this loaded cartridge 346 then constitutes the hopper 74.

The machine may be operated for simply reading tickets 30 that have been detached from merchandise,

and in this case the tickets are normally manually loaded individually into a cartridge 346 from the bottom. In this case, the machine controlling system preferably directs to the stacker 76 only those of the tickets which do not verify according-to the machine controlling system. These tickets then are re-read, either visually or by the machine. Those of the tickets that are being read and that verify properly are directed to the discard chute 78 and have no further use. In the event that a stack of the tickets 30 are to be encoded and printed; in this case, a stack of the tickets is loaded into the cartridge after removing the cover 346a. These individual tickets 30 after being magnetically encoded, verified and printed by the machine are collected in the hopper 76 for subsequent usage on pieces of merchandise. In the event that there is a lack of verification of a ticket that is being encoded, this particular ticket goes into the discard chute 78.

It will now be assumed that the hopper 74 has blank tickets '30 in it which are to be magnetically encoded and printed by the machine. The lowermost ticket 30 of the-stack of tickets in the hopper 74 is fed from the hopper due to the energization of the magnet 140 by the action of the machine controlling system. The roll 136 is thus raised to have contact with the lowermost ticket 30, and this ticket is thus moved out of the hop per 74, through the slot 374 and between the knife 298 and roll 300. The knife 298 fits in the half of the slot 36 at the leading edge of the ticket 30 being fed from the hopper and cooperates with the roll 300 so as to assure that only one ticket 30 at a time is thus fed from the hopper 74. The ticket enters the nip between the rolls 124 and 126 and is thus propelled forwardly in the path 88. When the ticket 30 coming out of the hopper 74 is detected by the switch 142, the machine controlling system then is effective to de-energize the magnet 146, lowering the roll 136. The machine controlling system also preferably is arranged so that the roll 136 will be dropped in the same manner, if after a predetermined time subsequent to raising of the roll 136, a ticket does not actuate the switch 142. The machine controlling system also preferably is arranged so that in the latter case, the roll 136 will be raised a second time to re-attempt to feed a ticket 30 from the bottom of the hopper 74.

When a ticket has successfully been fed from the hopper 74 to actuate the switch 142, the switch 142 is effective by means of the machine controlling system to energize the magnet 134. The roll 130 is then moved to have a nip with the roll 128, and the ticket 30 is propelled down the path 88 by means of the rolls 128 and 130. Both of the rolls 126 and 128 are driven from the motor 244 as previously described. The magnet 134 is de-energized by the machine controlling system a predetermined time after the trailing edge of the ticket 30 in the path 88 de-actuates the switch 142. The roll is thus at this time moves out of nipped relationship with respect to the roll 128. The ticket thus is stopped just after leaving the switch 142, and side spring 143 moves the ticket against the face of backbone 84 to properly align the ticket in the machine, with the rolls 130 and 128 being out of driving relationship with respect to the ticket.

At this time, the machine controlling system again energizes the magnet I34, moving the roll 130 back into nipped relationship with respect to the roll 128; and the ticket 30 is then driven by the rolls 128 and 130 toward the sensor 144. The leading edge of the ticket 30 acting on the sensor 144 causes reading and verifying actions to take place similarly as with a ticket 30 on a strip 32; and rhe sensor 144, in the case of the individual ticket and by means of the machine controlling system, again tie-energizes the magnet 134 to raise the roll 130 from the roll 128 a predetermined time after the leading edge of the ticket is detected by the sensor 144. The rolls 146 and 148 are then effective to drive the ticket, after the ticket has left the control of the rolls 128 and 130.

After an individual ticket has been magnetically encoded and has been verified by the heads 66 and 68, being driven by the rolls 146 and 148, the ticket enters the nip between the rolls 150 and 152. While individual tickets are being processed, the magnet 164 is kept energized, so that the rolls 152 and 150 remain in nipped relationship to propel the individual tickets 30 through the path 80. The latter rolls propel a ticket 30 forwardly until the ticket reaches the rolls 154 and 156, passing through the detector 166. Printing is accomplished by the printer 70 on the individual ticket in the same manner as a ticket has previously been printed while on a strip 32. The detector 166 also has a timing action with respect to the detector 144, using the machine controlling system, to determine that there is no jamming of individual tickets in the path 80.

While a first individual ticket 30 is being magnetically encoded and verified by the heads 66 and 68 as just described, a second individual ticket 30 is picked from the hopper 74 and moves into the path 88 in the same manner as the first ticket 30. The second tickeet 30 is magnetically encoded, verified and printed in the same manner as the first ticket. Normally there is a spacing between successive individual tickets in the paths 88 and 80 of about 1 /2 inches.

The magnet 192 is maintained in de-energized condition when individual tickets 30 are being used, and the rolls 158 and 160 propel the individual tickets into the path 92. If a particular individual ticket has been magnetically encoded and has had the coding verified, the magnet 194 is de-energized; and the deflector 106 is in a position so as to cause the individual ticket 30 to move from the path 92 to the path 94. The rolls and 168 in this case propel the ticket into the path 94. The leading edge of the ticket 30 makes the switch 182, and a check is thus made to determine the presence of a ticket at this point. The magnet is energized by means of the machine controlling system, so as to raise the roll 176, a predetermined time after the individual

Claims (6)

1. In a machine for processing merchandise tickets in both connected or roll form and separate or individual ticket form, means defining a main ticket path, an encoding head in said path for encoding information on a ticket moving in said path, a read head in said path located downstream in the direction of ticket movement in said path with respect to said write head for reading encoded information on a ticket in said path, a hopper for individual tickes, a supply reel for a roll of tickets, means defining a first supply path connecting said reel with said main path for supplying connected tickets to said main path, means defining a second supply path connecting said hopper with said main path for supplying individual tickets to said main path, a stacker for individual tickets, a take-up reel for tickets in connected form, means defining a connected ticket delivery path connecting said main path with said take-up reel for delivering tickets in connected form from said main path to said reel, means defining an individual ticket delivery path connecting said main path with said stacker for delivering individual tickets from said main path to said stacker, means defining an auxiliary individual ticket delivery path connected with said first named individual ticket delivery path for delivering individual tickets to a discard chute, means defining an auxiliary connected ticket delivery path connected with said first named connected ticket delivery path for delivering connected tickets exclusive of said take-up reel, a selectively operable ticket deflector for routing tickets from said main path to either said first named individual ticket delivery path or to said first named connected ticket delivery path, a selectively operable ticket deflector for routing individual tickets from said first named individual ticket delivery path to said auxiliary individual ticket delivery path, and a selectively operable ticket deflector for routing connected tickets from said first named connected ticket delivery path to said auxiliary connected ticket delivery path.
2. A machine for processing merchandise tickets comprising means defining a ticket path; means for moving a ticket along said path; an encoding head in said path for encoding a ticket moving in said path; a read head in said path located downstream, in the direction of ticket movement, with respect to said encoding head for reading encoded information on a ticket moving in said path; a ticket hopper including a ticket cartridge; means for moving tickets one at a time out of the bottom of said cartridge into said path; a ticket stacker and comprising a ticket cartridge; means for moving tickets from the discharge end of said path into the bottom of said stacker cartridge; and support means for said hopper cartridge and said stacker cartridge, said cartridges being identical whereby said stacker cartridge may be moved onto the support means for said hopper cartridge after removal of the hopper cartridge from its support means whereby the stacker cartridge now becomes the hopper cartridge.
3. A machine for processing merchandise tickets as set forth in claim 2 and including means defining an auxiliary ticket discharge path to receive tickets from said first named path and to discharge them into a discard chute, and a selectively operable ticket deflector for routing tickets to said auxiliary ticket discharge path instead of said stacker cartridge.
4. A machine for processiNg merchandise tickets including means defining a ticket path, an encoding head in said path for encoding tickets moving in said path, another head in said path located downstream of said first named head with respect to ticket movement for acting on the tickets as they move along said path, the machine including an upper frame part and a lower frame part and said heads being carried by said lower frame part, means for moving said tickets along said path and including a plurality of drive rolls rotatably mounted on said upper frame part, and a motor mounted on said upper frame part and drivingly connected with said drive rolls, said upper frame part being swingably mounted on said lower frame part so that the upper frame part and the rolls carried thereby may be moved away from said lower frame part and from said heads whereby tickets may be removed from said path at will.
5. A machine for processing merchandise tickets which are in connected form having perforate lines dividing the tickets from each other, said machine including means defining a ticket path, an encoding head in said path for encoding the tickets as they move in said path, another head in said path located downstream with respect to ticket movement and said first named head for acting on the tickets as they move along said path, means for moving the connected tickets along said path and including a plurality of nipped rolls between which the connected tickets move and means for driving some of said rolls, and a burster in said path located upstream with respect to said first named head and including a radially moveable burster blade adapted to engage the perforate line between a pair of consecutive tickets travelling in said path in order to burst the tickets apart on said perforate line.
6. A machine as set forth in claim 5, said burster including an anvil part which is swingably mounted and is moved by the action of the burster blade moving toward the perforate line between a pair of consecutive tickets in said path for fixing these tickets as the burster blade moves to burst the tickets apart on their said perforate line.
US3855457A 1973-06-18 1973-06-18 Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form Expired - Lifetime US3855457A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3855457A US3855457A (en) 1973-06-18 1973-06-18 Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form

Applications Claiming Priority (13)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3855457A US3855457A (en) 1973-06-18 1973-06-18 Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form
FR7414325A FR2233669B1 (en) 1973-06-18 1974-04-19
IT2171574A IT1007986B (en) 1973-06-18 1974-04-22 Machine for the treatment of slips or labels to be applied to care items
SE7406340A SE7406340A (en) 1973-06-18 1974-05-13
GB2150774A GB1453665A (en) 1973-06-18 1974-05-15 Document feeder and processor
JP5463274A JPS5329496B2 (en) 1973-06-18 1974-05-17
NL7406713A NL7406713A (en) 1973-06-18 1974-05-20
BE144811A BE815610A (en) 1973-06-18 1974-05-28 machine for processing labels in rolls or separated
CA 201580 CA1059621A (en) 1973-06-18 1974-06-04 Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form
DE19742427324 DE2427324C2 (en) 1973-06-18 1974-06-06
AT476374A AT345597B (en) 1973-06-18 1974-06-10 Machine for selectively processing in a roll form or separately present articles cards or labels
BR494674A BR7404946D0 (en) 1973-06-18 1974-06-17 Machines for processing goods labels both in roll form as an individual
IN141723B IN141723B (en) 1973-06-18 1974-11-02 Document processor

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3855457A true US3855457A (en) 1974-12-17

Family

ID=23463473

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3855457A Expired - Lifetime US3855457A (en) 1973-06-18 1973-06-18 Machine for processing merchandising tickets in both roll and individual form

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (1) US3855457A (en)
JP (1) JPS5329496B2 (en)
BE (1) BE815610A (en)
CA (1) CA1059621A (en)
DE (1) DE2427324C2 (en)
FR (1) FR2233669B1 (en)
GB (1) GB1453665A (en)
NL (1) NL7406713A (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2500634A1 (en) * 1975-01-09 1976-07-15 Johannes Loersch Printing machine for photographic slide frames - has mosaic printing head which applies desired text to individual frames
US4025956A (en) * 1975-12-30 1977-05-24 Nozaki Insatsu Shigyo Kabushiki Kaisha Printing machine
US4192618A (en) * 1977-03-28 1980-03-11 Lrc, Inc. High speed ticket printer
US4217820A (en) * 1975-01-09 1980-08-19 Johannes Lorsch Apparatus for printing on transparency slides
US4262591A (en) * 1978-12-18 1981-04-21 Robert C. Cook Office label printer and dispenser
US4381705A (en) * 1980-12-01 1983-05-03 Cubic Western Data Modularized ticket handling system for use in automatic ticket preparation system
US4463939A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-08-07 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Slip issuing device
US4535892A (en) * 1980-12-01 1985-08-20 Cubic Western Data Modularized ticket handling system for use in automatic ticket preparation system
US4593893A (en) * 1984-03-30 1986-06-10 Walter Suter Method and apparatus for sequentially advancing and cutting forms from two continuous form-webs
WO1988002734A1 (en) * 1986-10-14 1988-04-21 Bryce Office Systems, Inc. Envelope printing system for addresses and bar codes
US4889437A (en) * 1985-09-16 1989-12-26 Almex Control Systems Limited Ticket issuing machines
US4895466A (en) * 1988-01-20 1990-01-23 Datamax Corporation Processor for forms with multi-format data
US4909648A (en) * 1988-01-20 1990-03-20 Datamax Corporation Processor for forms with multi-format data
US5217178A (en) * 1991-02-21 1993-06-08 4-Seasons Counting Systems, Inc. Roll-to-roll stamp counter
US5326181A (en) * 1986-10-14 1994-07-05 Bryce Office Systems Inc. Envelope addressing system adapted to simultaneously print addresses and bar codes
US6732926B2 (en) * 2000-12-13 2004-05-11 Stephen P. Shoemaker, Jr. Barcode ticket reader

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2328575B1 (en) * 1975-10-24 1983-02-18 Nozaki Insatsu Shigyo Kk
GB2088860B (en) * 1980-12-09 1984-05-23 Wyeth John & Brother Ltd Process for preparing ring-fused pyridine derivatives
JPS57158994U (en) * 1981-04-01 1982-10-06
US5218631A (en) * 1985-07-10 1993-06-08 First Data Resources Inc. Telephonic-interface game control system
US5255309A (en) * 1985-07-10 1993-10-19 First Data Resources Inc. Telephonic-interface statistical analysis system

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2149028A (en) * 1937-07-02 1939-02-28 Meisel Press Mfg Company Convertible printing press
US2275396A (en) * 1941-03-19 1942-03-03 Ibm Record controlled perforating machine
US2344720A (en) * 1941-10-18 1944-03-21 United Autographic Register Co Printing and bursting machine
US2775298A (en) * 1953-11-17 1956-12-25 Ibm Ledger posting machine
US2782712A (en) * 1952-12-22 1957-02-26 M B Claff & Sons Inc Sheet or web fed rotary printing press
US3052350A (en) * 1961-05-31 1962-09-04 Burroughs Corp Item handling apparatus
US3180254A (en) * 1963-06-27 1965-04-27 Monarch Marking Systems Inc Tag marking machine
US3651503A (en) * 1969-07-22 1972-03-21 Tag A Tron Inc System for processing merchandizing tags having printed and magnetic information thereon
US3735095A (en) * 1969-04-23 1973-05-22 Kienzle Apparate Gmbh Card routing apparatus

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2149028A (en) * 1937-07-02 1939-02-28 Meisel Press Mfg Company Convertible printing press
US2275396A (en) * 1941-03-19 1942-03-03 Ibm Record controlled perforating machine
US2344720A (en) * 1941-10-18 1944-03-21 United Autographic Register Co Printing and bursting machine
US2782712A (en) * 1952-12-22 1957-02-26 M B Claff & Sons Inc Sheet or web fed rotary printing press
US2775298A (en) * 1953-11-17 1956-12-25 Ibm Ledger posting machine
US3052350A (en) * 1961-05-31 1962-09-04 Burroughs Corp Item handling apparatus
US3180254A (en) * 1963-06-27 1965-04-27 Monarch Marking Systems Inc Tag marking machine
US3735095A (en) * 1969-04-23 1973-05-22 Kienzle Apparate Gmbh Card routing apparatus
US3651503A (en) * 1969-07-22 1972-03-21 Tag A Tron Inc System for processing merchandizing tags having printed and magnetic information thereon

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2500634A1 (en) * 1975-01-09 1976-07-15 Johannes Loersch Printing machine for photographic slide frames - has mosaic printing head which applies desired text to individual frames
US4217820A (en) * 1975-01-09 1980-08-19 Johannes Lorsch Apparatus for printing on transparency slides
US4025956A (en) * 1975-12-30 1977-05-24 Nozaki Insatsu Shigyo Kabushiki Kaisha Printing machine
US4192618A (en) * 1977-03-28 1980-03-11 Lrc, Inc. High speed ticket printer
US4262591A (en) * 1978-12-18 1981-04-21 Robert C. Cook Office label printer and dispenser
US4381705A (en) * 1980-12-01 1983-05-03 Cubic Western Data Modularized ticket handling system for use in automatic ticket preparation system
US4535892A (en) * 1980-12-01 1985-08-20 Cubic Western Data Modularized ticket handling system for use in automatic ticket preparation system
US4463939A (en) * 1981-07-10 1984-08-07 Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Slip issuing device
US4593893A (en) * 1984-03-30 1986-06-10 Walter Suter Method and apparatus for sequentially advancing and cutting forms from two continuous form-webs
US4889437A (en) * 1985-09-16 1989-12-26 Almex Control Systems Limited Ticket issuing machines
WO1988002734A1 (en) * 1986-10-14 1988-04-21 Bryce Office Systems, Inc. Envelope printing system for addresses and bar codes
US5326181A (en) * 1986-10-14 1994-07-05 Bryce Office Systems Inc. Envelope addressing system adapted to simultaneously print addresses and bar codes
US4895466A (en) * 1988-01-20 1990-01-23 Datamax Corporation Processor for forms with multi-format data
US4909648A (en) * 1988-01-20 1990-03-20 Datamax Corporation Processor for forms with multi-format data
US5217178A (en) * 1991-02-21 1993-06-08 4-Seasons Counting Systems, Inc. Roll-to-roll stamp counter
US6732926B2 (en) * 2000-12-13 2004-05-11 Stephen P. Shoemaker, Jr. Barcode ticket reader

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA1059621A1 (en) grant
FR2233669A1 (en) 1975-01-10 application
GB1453665A (en) 1976-10-27 application
BE815610A1 (en) grant
BE815610A (en) 1974-09-16 grant
JPS5028944A (en) 1975-03-24 application
NL7406713A (en) 1974-12-20 application
CA1059621A (en) 1979-07-31 grant
DE2427324A1 (en) 1975-01-09 application
FR2233669B1 (en) 1978-08-04 grant
JPS5329496B2 (en) 1978-08-21 grant
DE2427324C2 (en) 1982-04-29 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3222057A (en) Apparatus and method for controlling and receiving and/or dispensing paper money
US4034210A (en) Credit card carriers and methods of manufacture
US6003857A (en) Singulating apparatus for a mail handling system
US4375189A (en) Label printer
US5099290A (en) Continuous paper printer with monitoring time period in which the paper feed speed is lower than when printing
US4712113A (en) Thermal transfer ribbon mechanism and recording method
US4022455A (en) Demographic assembling and addressing machine for magazines and the like
US4278489A (en) Web splicing apparatus
US4165029A (en) Paper advance mechanism for an ink jet printer
US6652173B1 (en) Ticket dispensing mechanism
US4924240A (en) Feed for thermal printing ribbon
US5954438A (en) Sheet presenter and method of using same
EP0633553A1 (en) Apparatus for recording symbols printed on documents or the like
US4188252A (en) Label positioning and applying apparatus
US4189337A (en) Real time labeler system
US4771896A (en) Apparatus for forming a running shingle of documents
US3131932A (en) Document stacking device
US5922169A (en) Linerless label applying system
US4979838A (en) Receipt cutting mechanism for dot matrix printer
US4501224A (en) Continuous tag printing apparatus
US3223059A (en) Automatic feeding, sewing, cutting and stacking apparatus
US4179113A (en) Apparatus for feeding leaflets to rapidly moving articles
US3555587A (en) Method and apparatus for binding packets of sheet material
US5503702A (en) High speed labeler
US4094451A (en) Lottery ticket dispenser for break-resistant web material