US3851393A - Oral implant - Google Patents

Oral implant Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3851393A
US3851393A US40162973A US3851393A US 3851393 A US3851393 A US 3851393A US 40162973 A US40162973 A US 40162973A US 3851393 A US3851393 A US 3851393A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
portion
jawbone
blade
blade portion
implant
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
C Weiss
I Lew
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ORATRAONICS Inc
Original Assignee
ORATRAONICS Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61CDENTISTRY; APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR ORAL OR DENTAL HYGIENE
    • A61C8/00Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools
    • A61C8/0018Means to be fixed to the jaw-bone for consolidating natural teeth or for fixing dental prostheses thereon; Dental implants; Implanting tools characterised by the shape
    • A61C8/0019Blade implants

Abstract

An oral implant of the vented blade type is disclosed with a series of major improvements. The implant generally comprises a relatively thin vented blade adapted to be seated into the groove of the patient''s jawbone, a crown supporting head, and a neck integrally connecting the head to the blade. In one embodiment suitable for use in the frontal segment of a patient''s jawbone, the blade has a curvature corresponding to the average curvature of a frontal jawbone segment and is inclined relative to the head so that the head remains relatively vertical while the blade follows the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment. In another embodiment, the neck connecting the blade and the head has a length not less than the gingival thickness so that the blade may be inserted into the jawbone with the head being maintained spaced from the gumline. In still another embodiment, the blade has a horizontally symmetrical main portion and a horizontally extending tab portion to fully utilize the available adjacent jawbone space and provide enhanced retention. In this embodiment the heads are disposed off-center and asymmetrically along the blade length to provide added options in exact head location by permitting reversal of the blade at the time of final seating.

Description

atent 1 11% States Weiss et al.

[ ORAL IMPLANT [73] Assignee: Oratraonics Incorporated, New

York, NY.

[22] Filed: Sept. 28, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 401,629

Primary Examiner-Robert Peshock 5 7 ABSTRACT An oral implant of the vented blade type is disclosed with a series of major improvements. The implant generally comprises a relatively thin vented blade adapted to be seated into the groove of the patients jawbone, a crown supporting head, and a neck integrally connecting the head to the blade.

In one embodiment suitable for use in the frontal segment of a patients jawbone, the blade has a curvature corresponding to the average curvature of a frontal jawbone segment and is inclined relative to the head so that the head remains relatively vertical while the blade follows the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment. In another embodiment, the neck connecting the blade and the head has a length not less than the gingival thickness so that the blade may be inserted into the jawbone with the head being maintained spaced from the gumline. In still another embodiment, the blade has a horizontally symmetrical main portion and a horizontally extending tab portion to fully utilize the available adjacent jawbone space and provide enhanced retention. In this embodiment the heads are disposed off-center and asymmetrically along the blade length to provide added options in exact head location by permitting reversal of the blade at the time of final seating.

. PATENTE L EEC 74 SHEET 10F 3 PATENTEL DEB 31974 SHEET 2 BF 3 PATENTELBEB 31914 3.851.393

sum 3 or 5 Fla? ORAL IMPLANT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Oral implantology provides a means of permanently mounting an artificial tooth or teeth in the absence of sufficient natural tooth structure for constructing a conventional fixed bridge while avoiding the cleaning problems inherent in the use of removable bridges. Endosteal implants used for this purpose include the various pin type and spiral screw type'implants which are inserted directly into the jawbone at the ridge crest; the self-tapping vented implant designed by Dr. Leonard I. Linkow; the blade vent or ring type implant developed by Dr. Leonard I. Linkow and described in his U.S. Pat. No. 3,465,441 (issued Sept. 9, 1969 and entitled Ring Type Implant For Artificial Teeth), and the latest ype of vented blade endosseous implants having a periodontic head developed by Dr. Leonard I. Linkow and his associates and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,729,825 (issued May 1, 1973 and entitled Oral Implant).

As described in the last mentioned patent, a vented blade endosseous implant generally comprises a relatively thin vented blade adapted to be seated into a groove in the patients jawbone, a crown supporting periodontic head and a neck integrally connecting the head to the blade. The periodontic head is formed in the shape of a truncated pyramid and is provided on the side adjacent the neck with inclined beveled surfaces adapted to securely seat on correspondingly chamfered surfaces at the mouth of the groove in the ridge crest of the patients jawbone, thereby to provide an automatic limitation on depth of insertion and tremendous increased lateral stability. The head is also provided with a plurality of accurately spaced scorelines for facilitatingmeasurement of depth insertion. The blade may take on a variety of contours designed to conform to various anatomical structures encountered and is preferably provided with a series of bone-engaging teeth extending parallel to the blade edge. Various blade contours and tooth profiles are disclosed, including a preferred staggered tooth arrangement. The insertion technique is rather simple and comprises incising the fibromucosal tissue at the ridge crest along the enis seated to the desired depth into the jawbone. The tissue is then sutured. The open vents in the blade allow for substantial regeneration of bone therethrough, thereby providing greatly increased retention after healing and bone growth. When healing takes place after about a few weeks, final impressions are taken to complete the final bridge.

While endosteal implants of the type described have been found quite satisfactory for use in portions of the jawbone along the sides of the mouth where the jawbone is relatively linear and disposed in a vertical plane with the ridge crest, such implants have not been satisfactory for use in the frontal segments of the jawbone due to the extreme curvature of the jawbone in that region and also the jutting angle of the jawbone in that region. While there are natural individual variations in the curvature and jutting angle of the jawbone in such segments, the frontal jawbone segments generally have, a horizontal convex curvature with a radius of about centimeters and a jutting angle of about 10. As is wellknown to students of anatomy, the frontal lower jawbone segment juts obliquely forwardly and downwardly while the upper jawbone segment juts obliquely backwardly and upwardly. Accordingly, an attempt to insert a conventional endosseous implant into the frontal segment of the lower or upper jawbone would result in the head being angled sharply backwardly or sharply forwardly, respectively. While the dental practitioner, prior to inserting the implant, could bend the head relative to the blade to enable the head to be generally vertical in the patients mouth (the precise angle being determined by the requirement of proper meshing of the head-supported teeth with other teeth), such adjustments obviously impair the interaction between the beveled shoulder surfaces on the underside of the head and the corresponding chamfered surface of the jawbone groove in which it will be seated. And even so, the horizontal length of the implant is limited to two heads (that is, the equivalent of two adjacent roots in the jawbone segment) due to the linearity of the implant relative to the curvature of the frontal jawbone segment.

Furthermore, conventional endosteal implants have not been designed to make advantageous use of the available adjacent lengths of jawbone (that is, those lengths devoid of teeth which are adjacent to the length relatively directly beneath the head). Generally, such implants had blades which did not extend much beyond the heads which would eventually bear the artificial teeth.

There are also indications that a segment of the dental practitioners have in particular instances avoided or minimized use of endosteal implants in the belief that the interaction between the periodontic head and the gum surface above jawbone is deleterious from a clinical point of view.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an endosteal implant suitable for use in the frontal segment of the patients jawbone.

It is also an object to provide such an implant which will permit the head or support portion to be relatively upstanding while the blade portion follows the jutting angle of a frontal jawbone segment, without any impairment of the structural strength of the implant or the interaction of the shoulder surface of the underside of the head with the corresponding surface of the jawbone segment.

It is another object to provide such an implant having a horizontal length of up to six teeth.

It is a further object to provide an endosteal implant which fully utilizes the available adjacent jawbone space to provide improved seating for the implant.

Another object of the present invention is to provide such an endosteal implant in which the interaction between the head and the gum over the jawbone in which the implant is inserted is minimized.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE It has now been found that the above and related objects of the present invention are provided in an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in a frontal jawbone segment of the patients mouth comprising a relatively thin blade portion and a comparatively massive support portion. The blade portion has a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the frontal jawbone segment to a suitable depth, and the support-portion is substantially wider than the blade portion and operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend therefrom outwardly of the jawbone segment for mounting of an artificial tooth structure. The underside of the support portion nearest the blade portion has a shoulder surface adapted to be seated on a corresponding surface of the jawbone segment, whereby engagement of the shoulder surface with the bone surface provides an automatic limitation on insertion depth and increased lateral stability. The blade portion has a horizontal length equivalent to at least two adjacent dental roots in a frontal jawbone segment and a horizontally convex curvature equivalent to the average curvature of the frontal jawbone segment. The axes of the blade portion and support portion form an included angle deviating from 180 to permit the support portion to be substantially vertical when the blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment at an angle to the vertical.

In a preferred embodiment, the blade portion has a horizontal length equivalent to at least six dental roots in the frontal jawbone segment. The blade portion furthermore has a horizontal convex curvature with a radius of about centimeters, whereby the blade portion substantially follows the curvature of the frontal jawbone segment. The included angle is typically about I l0-l 75, preferably about 170, whereby the support portion is substantially vertical when the blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment. Preferably the blade portion and support portion are operatively connected by a neck portion axially aligned with the blade portion, with the axis of the support portion and neck portion forming the included angle.

In another embodiment of the oral implant, the neck portion has a height not less than the gingival thickness, and preferably not less than 0.04 millimeters to permit the support portion to remain above the gum line when the blade portion is inserted into the jawbone. The underside of the support portion nearest the blade portion has beveled shoulder surfaces inclined to the blade portion to facilitate cleaning and dental hygiene.

In another embodiment of the oral implant, the blade portion has a main portion comprising the bulk thereof and a tab portion integral therewith extending horizontally from one end thereof, the main portion being substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis therethrough. The tab portion is adapted to utilize additional available adjacent jawbone to provide improved engagement between implant and jawbone and hence enhances the retention and lateral stability of the implant.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a front elevation view of an embodiment of the improved endosteal implant incorporating design features of the present invention and suitable for use in the frontal segment of a lower jawbone;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the implant of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation view partially in cross-section, of the implant of FIG. 1 in its ultimate oral environment;

FIG. 4 is a front elevation view of an embodiment of the improved endosteal implant incorporating extended blade and extended neck design features of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the implant of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a side elevation view of the implant of FIG. 4; and

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 are front elevation views of additional embodiments of the improved endosteal implant incorporating design features of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawing, wherein like referenced numerals designate identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views, and in particular to FIGS. 1-3 thereof, therein illustrated is a representative embodiment of an improved endosteal implant suitable for use in the frontal segment of a patients lower jawbone. The implant generally designated by the numeral 10 comprises a unitary metallic structure including an implant or blade portion generally designated by the numeral 12, a crown supporting head or support portion generally designated by the numeral 14, and a linking or neck portion generally designated by the numeral 16 integral with and connecting blade portion 12 to support portion 14. Neck portion 16 comprises an upstanding neck formed integral with blade portion 12 and support portion 14, and operatively connecting the upper surface of the blade portion 12 to the lower surface of the support portion 14. The implant 10 is preferably cast in pure titanium or another metal of extremely high strength which is relatively inert to an oral environment.

The insert 10 typically has at least two, and preferably at least six, support portions 14. Each support portion 14 is a relatively massive, multi-faceted body substantially wider than the blade portion 12 and generally tapered in the direction away from the neck portion 16. More particularly, the undersurface of the support head 14 includes a plurality of inclined or beveled shoulder surfaces 26 extending upwardly and outwardly from neck portion 16. Typically, four such inclined shoulder surfaces 26 extend upwardly from the front rear and side surfaces of the neck portion 16, the surfaces 26 being generally in the shape of a parallelogram connected at their corners by triangular surfaces 28 (see FIG. 3), thereby to define a polygonal base line 30 from which the supporting portion extends generally upwardly. The head portion comprises a plurality of inwardly inclined trapezoidal side surfaces 32 intersecting shoulder surfaces 26 and 28 at base line 30 and extending upwardly generally in the form of a pyramid.

The pyramid is truncated by a generally horizontal top 7 surface 33.

The blade portion 12 is in the form of a relatively thin blade tapering to a relatively narrow edge 40 adapted to be seated into the patient's jawbone. The blade portion 12 further includes a series of enclosed openings or vents 42 in its sidewalls 44 designed to facilitate bone regeneration therethrough. The blade portion 12 is provided on both side surfaces 44 with a series of bone engaging teeth 46 extending in generally equally spaced, generally parallel arrangement along the entire length of the blade portion 12 and following the contour thereof. While the teeth 46 are shown as staggered on opposite sides of surfaces 44, they may also be formed generally in registration on opposite side surfaces 44 in the form of an inverted christmas tree, the exact incline or shape of the teeth 46 being varied to suit the individual circumstances.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. l-3, the endosteal implant 10 is adapted for insertion into the frontal segment of a patients jawbone and the blade portion 12 has a horizontally convex curvature equivalent to the average curvature of the frontal jawbone segment; that is, a horizontal convex curvature with a radius of about centimeters. The length of the blade portion 12 horizontally along the convex curvature is equivalent to at least the length occupied by two adjacent dental roots in the frontal jawbone segment, and preferably six adjacent dental roots in instances where the endosteal implant is to occupy the entire frontal jawbone segment. The axes of the blade portion 12 and the support portion 14 (and more particularly, the axes of the neck portion 16 and'the support portion 14) deviate from 180 by the average jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment. In the case of an implant adapted for use in the lower jawbone segment where the jutting angle is downward and forward, the support portion 14 will be inclined forwardly of the blade portion 12 (or to the right, as shown in FIG. 3), while in the case of an implant adapted for use in the upper jawbone where the jutting angle is upward and backwards, the support portion 14 will be inclined rearwardly of the blade portion 12 (that is, to the left or opposite to the direction of inclination illustrated in FIG. 3). In either case the included angle deviates from 180 sufficiently to permit the support portion 14 to be substantially vertical when the blade portion 12 is seated into the frontal jawbone segment at anangle to the vertical. More specifically, the included angle is about I l0-l 75, preferably about 170 to enable the blade portion 12 to be seated into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle while the support portion 14 remains substantially upright and deviates from the vertical only insofar as required to insure proper occlusion or bite. The environment in which the implant l0 willreside is indicated in phantom line in FIG. 3.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-6, therein illustrated is an embodiment of an endosteal implant having an extended blade portion 12 and an extended neck portion 16. As therein illustrated, this embodiment is adapted for use in other than the frontal segments of a patients jawbone, and, accordingly, the blade portion 12 has no convex curvature, there may be one or more support portions 14, and the axes of the blade portion 12and support portion 14 lie in a single vertical plane. v

To provide the practitioner with additional flexibility and the option of utilizing additional available adjacent jawbone for additional engagement with the blade portion 12, in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 4-6 the blade portion 12 comprises a main portion 12' and a tab portion 12". The main portion 12' is substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis X-X therethrough,

v and a tab portion 12" is integral therewith and extends horizontally from one end thereof. The tab portion 12" provides improved engagement between the implant l0 and the jawbone as it substantially increases the surface area of the blade portion side 44 engaged by the jawbone. Furthermore, the tab portion 12" provides a vented area 20" in addition to the vented area 20 of blade portion 12 at the time of final seating to modify the disposition of the support portion 14 in the patients mouth.

Obviously the main blade portion 12 can be provided with a tab portion 12" at either end thereof. If the available adjacent jawbone length that is, the length of jawbone without teeth adjacent the length to be occupied by main blade portion 12 is insufficient to accommodate both of tab portions 12', one or both of the tab portions 12" may be ground down or entirely cut away to meet the limitations on available adjacent jawbone space. Ultimately, in instances where no additional available jawbone length is available beyond that absolutely required by the main portion 12', the tab portion or portions 12" may be completely removed until only the horizontally symmetrical main blade portion 12' remains.

To provide the practitioner with still additional flexibility and the option of either driving the blade portion 12 further into the jawbone for enhanced engagement or leaving the support portion 14 spaced above the gum line, as some practitioners prefer in certain instances, the neck portion 16 has a height greater than that heretofore used in endosteal implants. The height of the extended neck portion 16 is not less than the gingival thickness (that is, the distance between the top of the gum 60 and the top of the jawbone 62), and preferably not less than at least 0.04 millimeters. The extended neck portion '16 permits the blade portion 12 to be seated deeper into the jawbone 62, thereby allowing for more substantial bone regeneration atthe ridge crest and increased retention. Alternatively, the extended neck portion 16 permits those practitioners, who in certain instances prefer the support portion 14 to be spaced above the gum line, the option of seating the blade portion 12 into the bone 62 to a lesser depth, so as to leave the support portion 14 above the gum line formed by the fibromucosal tissue 60. In this instance the inclined beveled shoulder surfaces 26, 28 of the underside of the support portion 14 facilitate flossing and cleaning at the gum line.

It will be kept in mind that the extended blade and extended neck design features may also be utilized separately or together in connection with the embodiment of an oral implant adapted for use in the frontal jawbone segment, and in fact the extended neck feature hereinabove described is present in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-3.

A representative sample of blade shapes and contours which may be provided in accordance with the present invention and which advantageously utilize the extended neck portion 16 is illustrated in FIGS. 7-9. The various areas of the mouth and the various bone conditions to which the illustrated implants are best suited will be immediately apparent to dental surgeons and dentists skilled in the art, and accordingly they will not be described in detail herein. Suffice it to say that the shape and size of the neck portion, blade portion and vent openings in all of the illustrated embodiments have been carefully designed from clinical experience to provide the maximum retention, bone regeneration and stability to various bone conditions and locations with a minimum of trauma to the bone and/or tissue upon insertion.

Referring now in particular to FIG. 3, the following technique is used for insertion of the implant 10 into the patients jawbone. After suitable X-rays have been taken, an incision is made by a sharp scalpel along the fibromucosal tissue 60 in the area where the implant 10 will be inserted. The incision is made along the alveolar crest so that the tissue 60 may be retracted to expose sufficient jawbone 62 without tearing it. The soft tissue 60 is then retracted, preferably with a periosteal elevator to expose the bone 62. A groove slightly narrower (by about 0.2 millimeters) than the blade portion 12 to be received is then cut into the cortical layer of the bone at the crest of the ridge 64. (Especially when the support portion 14 is to rest directly on the jawbone 62, the groove is preferably formed with oppositely inclined chamfered surfaces 66 at the ridge crest, generally in the form of a countersink accurately dimensioned to snugly receive the inclined beveled shoulder surfaces 26 of the support portion 14. For this purpose a tool having a corresponding inclined edge surface may be provided.) The depth of the actual groove should equal the desired depth of insertion (usually no more than 7 millimeters) and will depend upon the condition of the bone 62, the particular profile of the implant l utilized, and the degree of interaction desired between chamfered bone surfaces 66 and support shoulder surfaces 26, 28. The properly chosen implant is then placed with its relatively narrow blade edge 40 inserted in the groove, and a suitable instrument (preferably a plastic headed mallet) is applied to the upper surface of the blade portion 12 and used to tap the blade portion 12 downward, thereby laterally wedging it into the alveolar bone 62 to the desired depth.

In order to facilitate monitoring of the insertion depth by the dentist or oral surgeon, the support portion 14 is preferably provided with a plurality of parallel, equally spaced score lines 80 extending along surfaces 32. In a preferred embodiment, the score lines 80 are exactly one millimeter apart so that the insertion depth may from time to time be accurately measured. At any particular point in the insertion process, the depth of the insertion may be accurately plotted on an X-ray to determine if the blade has impinged on any extraneous anatomical structures.

When the support portion 114 is to rest directly on the jawbone 62, insertion to the proper final depth is insured by the provision for accurate seating of inclined shoulder surfaces 26, 28 on the countersunk surfaces 66 of the initial groove in the ridge crest. In addition to insuring accurate depth of insertion, this feature considerably enhances the initial retention, lateral stability and general feel of the implant 10 immediately after insertion. Moreover, proper seating of the shoulder surfaces 26, 28 insures that the implant 10 has been properly inserted with the blade portion 12 following the jutting angle and the support portion 14 being substantially vertical.

The incised tissue 60 is then closed, preferably by the use of interrupted sutures, along the base line 30 of the support portion 14 when the support portion 14 rests directly on jawbone 62 or just below the shoulder surfaces 26, 28 of the support portion 14 when the support portion 14 is to be spaced above the gum line, as shown in FIG. 3. The sutures may be removed after approximately 5-7 days, and the denture is then cemented directly into position over the exposed, upwardly extending support portions 14.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing that we have designed a number of improvements in endosteal implants. The extended neck and the extended blade portion features are obviously utilizable in connection with frontal jawbone segments as well as lateral jawbone segments. Furthermore, an endosteal implant having a unique horizontal convex curvature and an included angle between the blade and support portions has been provided especially for use in the frontal segments of the jawbone.

Now that a limited number of embodiments of the present invention have been herein specifically shown and described, other modifications and variations will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the spirit and scope of the present invention is to be limited only by the appended claims, and not by the foregoing disclosure.

We claim:

1. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the frontal jawbone segment of a patients mouth comprising A. a relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the frontal jawbone segment to a suitable depth, and

B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend therefrom outwardly of the frontal jawbone segment for mounting an artificial tooth structure, the underside of said support portion nearest said blade portion having a shoulder surface adapted to seat on a corresponding surface of the frontal jawbone segment, whereby engagement of said shoulder surface with the bone surface provides an automatic limitation on insertion depth and increased lateral stability; the improvement wherein said blade portion has a horizontal convex curvature equivalent to the average curvature of the frontal jawbone segment and a horizontal length equivalent to at least two adjacent dental roots in the frontal jawbone segment, and wherein the axes of said blade portion and said support portion form an included angle deviating from 180 to permit said support portion to be substantially vertical when said blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment at an angle to the vertical.

2. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion has a length equivalent to at least six dental roots in the frontal jawbone segment.

3. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said included angle is about 1 l0-l whereby said support portion is substantially vertical when said blade portion is seated into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment.

4. The oral implant of claim 3 wherein said included angle is about 5. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion has a horizontal convex curvature with a radius of about 10 centimeters.

6. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion and said support portion are operative connected by a neck portion axially aligned with said blade portion, whereby the axes of said support portion and neck portion form said included angle.

7. The oral implant of claim 6 wherein said neck portion has a height not less than the gingival thickness.

8. The oral implant of claim 6 wherein said neck portion has a height of at least 0.04 millimeters.

9. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion is comprised of a main portion comprising the bulk thereof and a tab portion integral therewith extending horizontally from one end of said main portion, said main portion being substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis therethrough, whereby said tab portion provides improved engagement between said implant and the frontal jawbone segment.

10. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said oral implant includes a plurality of said support portions, each of said support portions being adapted to engage a single artificial tooth structure.

11. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said oral implant includes only a single blade portion adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone.

12. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the jawbone of a patients mouth, comprising A. a relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone to a suitable depth, and

B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion, operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend thereform outwardly of the jawbone for mounting said artificial tooth structure;

the improvement wherein said blade portion has a main portion comprising the bulk thereof and at least one tab portion integral therewith extending horizontally from one end thereof, said main portion being substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis therethrough,

whereby said tab portion is adapted to utilize additional available adjacent jawbone to provide improved engagement between said implant and the jawbone and hence enhance retention and lateral stability of said implant.

113. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said support portion is off-center of said blade portion.

M. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said implant has a plurality of support portions asymmetricallydisposed along the length of said blade portion.

15. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said oral implant includes a plurality of said support portions, each of said support portions being adapted to engage a single artificial tooth structure.

' 16. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said oral implantincludes only a single blade portion adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone.

17. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the frontal jawbone segment of a patients mouth comprising Afa relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the frontal jawbone segment to a suitable depth, and

B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend therefrom outwardly of the frontal jawbone segment for mounting an artificial tooth structure, the underside of said support portion nearest said blade portion having a shoulder surface adapted to seat on a corresponding surface of the'frontal jawbone segment, whereby engagement of said shoulder surface with the bone surface provides an automatic limitation on insertion depth and increased lateral stability; the improvement wherein the axes of said blade portion and said support portion form an included angle deviating from 180 to permit said support portion to be substantially vertical when said blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment at an angle to the vertical.

18. The oral implant of claim 17 wherein said included angle is about 1 lO-l whereby said support portion is substantially vertical when said blade portion is seated into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment.

19. The oral implant of claim 18 wherein said included angle is about 20. The oral implant of claim 17 wherein said blade portion and said support portion are operative connected by a neck portion axially aligned with said blade portion, whereby the axes of said support portion and neck portion form said included angle.

Disclaimer 3,851,393.0harles M. Weiss and Isiah Lew, New York, N.Y. ORAL IM- PLANT. Patent dated Dec. 3, 1974. Disclaimer filed May 11, 1976, by the assignee, Omtomlcs, Inc.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1-20 of said patent.

[Ojficial Gazette July 6, 1.976.]

Claims (20)

1. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the frontal jawbone segment of a patient''s mouth comprising A. a relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the frontal jawbone segment to a suitable depth, and B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend therefrom outwardly of the frontal jawbone segment for mounting an artificial tooth structure, the underside of said support portion nearest said blade portion having a shoulder surface adapted to seat on a corresponding surface of the frontal jawbone segment, whereby engagement of said shoulder surface with the bone surface provides an automatic limitation on insertion depth and increased lateral stability; the improvement wherein said blade portion has a horizontal convex curvature equivalent to the average curvature of the frontal jawbone segment and a horizontal length equivalent to at least two adjacent dental roots in the Frontal jawbone segment, and wherein the axes of said blade portion and said support portion form an included angle deviating from 180* to permit said support portion to be substantially vertical when said blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment at an angle to the vertical.
2. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion has a length equivalent to at least six dental roots in the frontal jawbone segment.
3. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said included angle is about 110*-175*, whereby said support portion is substantially vertical when said blade portion is seated into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment.
4. The oral implant of claim 3 wherein said included angle is about 170*.
5. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion has a horizontal convex curvature with a radius of about 10 centimeters.
6. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion and said support portion are operative connected by a neck portion axially aligned with said blade portion, whereby the axes of said support portion and neck portion form said included angle.
7. The oral implant of claim 6 wherein said neck portion has a height not less than the gingival thickness.
8. The oral implant of claim 6 wherein said neck portion has a height of at least 0.04 millimeters.
9. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said blade portion is comprised of a main portion comprising the bulk thereof and a tab portion integral therewith extending horizontally from one end of said main portion, said main portion being substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis therethrough, whereby said tab portion provides improved engagement between said implant and the frontal jawbone segment.
10. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said oral implant includes a plurality of said support portions, each of said support portions being adapted to engage a single artificial tooth structure.
11. The oral implant of claim 1 wherein said oral implant includes only a single blade portion adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone.
12. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the jawbone of a patient''s mouth, comprising A. a relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone to a suitable depth, and B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion, operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend thereform outwardly of the jawbone for mounting said artificial tooth structure; the improvement wherein said blade portion has a main portion comprising the bulk thereof and at least one tab portion integral therewith extending horizontally from one end thereof, said main portion being substantially symmetrical about a vertical axis therethrough, whereby said tab portion is adapted to utilize additional available adjacent jawbone to provide improved engagement between said implant and the jawbone and hence enhance retention and lateral stability of said implant.
13. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said support portion is off-center of said blade portion.
14. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said implant has a plurality of support portions asymmetrically disposed along the length of said blade portion.
15. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said oral implant includes a plurality of said support portions, each of said support portions being adapted to engage a single artificial tooth structure.
16. The oral implant of claim 12 wherein said oral implant includes only a single blade portion adapted to be seated directly into the jawbone.
17. In an oral implant for permanently implanting an artificial tooth supporting structure in the frontal jawbone segment of a patient''s mouth comprising A. a relatively thin blade portion having a relatively narrow edge adapted to be seated directly into the frontal jawbone segment to a suitable depth, and B. a comparatively massive support portion substantially wider than said blade portion operatively connected thereto and adapted to extend therefrom outwardly of the frontal jawbone segment for mounting an artificial tooth structure, the underside of said support portion nearest said blade portion having a shoulder surface adapted to seat on a corresponding surface of the frontal jawbone segment, whereby engagement of said shoulder surface with the bone surface provides an automatic limitation on insertion depth and increased lateral stability; the improvement wherein the axes of said blade portion and said support portion form an included angle deviating from 180* to permit said support portion to be substantially vertical when said blade portion is driven into the frontal jawbone segment at an angle to the vertical.
18. The oral implant of claim 17 wherein said included angle is about 110*-175*, whereby said support portion is substantially vertical when said blade portion is seated into the frontal jawbone segment parallel to the jutting angle of the frontal jawbone segment.
19. The oral implant of claim 18 wherein said included angle is about 170*.
20. The oral implant of claim 17 wherein said blade portion and said support portion are operative connected by a neck portion axially aligned with said blade portion, whereby the axes of said support portion and neck portion form said included angle.
US3851393A 1973-09-28 1973-09-28 Oral implant Expired - Lifetime US3851393A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3851393A US3851393A (en) 1973-09-28 1973-09-28 Oral implant

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3851393A US3851393A (en) 1973-09-28 1973-09-28 Oral implant

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3851393A true US3851393A (en) 1974-12-03

Family

ID=23588547

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3851393A Expired - Lifetime US3851393A (en) 1973-09-28 1973-09-28 Oral implant

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3851393A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3952414A (en) * 1974-10-29 1976-04-27 Shovers Aaron H Bone implant
FR2300540A1 (en) * 1975-02-12 1976-09-10 Koch Werner Enossal implant for fixing fixed dentures, device
DE3537132A1 (en) * 1985-10-18 1987-05-07 Manfred Dr Muench Endosteal jaw implant
US20090011384A1 (en) * 2005-08-30 2009-01-08 Michael Collins Dental implant for a jaw with reduced bone volume and improved osseointegration features
US20090061387A1 (en) * 2007-08-30 2009-03-05 Matthew Lomicka Multiple root implant
US8814567B2 (en) 2005-05-26 2014-08-26 Zimmer Dental, Inc. Dental implant prosthetic device with improved osseointegration and esthetic features

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3641671A (en) * 1970-09-10 1972-02-15 Harold D Roberts Endosseous ramus implant and denture support frame
US3729825A (en) * 1971-08-02 1973-05-01 Oratronics Inc Oral implant

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3641671A (en) * 1970-09-10 1972-02-15 Harold D Roberts Endosseous ramus implant and denture support frame
US3729825A (en) * 1971-08-02 1973-05-01 Oratronics Inc Oral implant

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3952414A (en) * 1974-10-29 1976-04-27 Shovers Aaron H Bone implant
FR2300540A1 (en) * 1975-02-12 1976-09-10 Koch Werner Enossal implant for fixing fixed dentures, device
DE3537132A1 (en) * 1985-10-18 1987-05-07 Manfred Dr Muench Endosteal jaw implant
US8814567B2 (en) 2005-05-26 2014-08-26 Zimmer Dental, Inc. Dental implant prosthetic device with improved osseointegration and esthetic features
US20090011384A1 (en) * 2005-08-30 2009-01-08 Michael Collins Dental implant for a jaw with reduced bone volume and improved osseointegration features
US8562346B2 (en) 2005-08-30 2013-10-22 Zimmer Dental, Inc. Dental implant for a jaw with reduced bone volume and improved osseointegration features
US8899981B2 (en) 2005-08-30 2014-12-02 Zimmer Dental, Inc. Dental implant for a jaw with reduced bone volume and improved osseointegration features
US20090061387A1 (en) * 2007-08-30 2009-03-05 Matthew Lomicka Multiple root implant
US9149345B2 (en) * 2007-08-30 2015-10-06 Zimmer Dental, Inc. Multiple root implant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Ochsenbein Osseous resection in periodontal surgery
Buser et al. Surgical procedures in partially edentulous patients with ITI implants Note
US3919772A (en) Dental implant assembly and method for attaching the same to the jaw bone
Bahat et al. Use of wide implants and double implants in the posterior jaw: a clinical report.
Tuverson Orthodontic treatment using canines in place of missing maxillary lateral incisors
Andersson et al. Single-tooth restorations supported by osseointegrated implants: results and experiences from a prospective study after 2 to 3 years.
US7329122B1 (en) Accelerated orthodontic apparatus and method
Cronin Jr et al. Mandibular implants and the growing patient.
US7153132B2 (en) Mini-dental implant surgical stent
US6854972B1 (en) Dental implants and dental implant/prosthetic tooth systems
Cortellini et al. The modified papilla preservation technique. A new surgical approach for interproximal regenerative procedures
Becker et al. Alveolar bone anatomic profiles as measured from dry skulls: Clinical ramifications
Engelke et al. Alveolar reconstruction with splitting osteotomy and microfixation of implants.
Åstrand et al. Combination of natural teeth and osseointegrated implants as prosthesis abutments: a 2-year longitudinal study.
Matter et al. Creeping attachment after free gingival grafts
Wehrbein et al. Palatal bone support for orthodontic implant anchorage-a clinical and radiological study
US6431867B1 (en) Dental implant system
US5772438A (en) Method for installing a permanent bridge between a pair of abutment teeth
Lewis et al. Single tooth implant supported restorations.
US4547157A (en) Submergible post-type dental implant system and method of using same
Kent et al. Biointegrated hydroxylapatite-coated dental implants: 5-year clinical observations
US4687443A (en) Submergible post-type dental implant system and method of using same
Spear et al. Interdisciplinary management of single-tooth implants
US5695336A (en) Dental implant fixture for anchorage in cortical bone
Ochsenbein Newer concepts of mucogingival surgery