US3839623A - Electric heater with add-on leads - Google Patents

Electric heater with add-on leads Download PDF

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US3839623A
US3839623A US39303973A US3839623A US 3839623 A US3839623 A US 3839623A US 39303973 A US39303973 A US 39303973A US 3839623 A US3839623 A US 3839623A
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sheath
end
add
lead
heater
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A Portmann
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Watlow Electric Manufacturing Co
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Watlow Electric Manufacturing Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • H05B3/02Details
    • H05B3/06Heater elements structurally combined with coupling elements or holders
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • H05B3/40Heating elements having the shape of rods or tubes
    • H05B3/42Heating elements having the shape of rods or tubes non-flexible
    • H05B3/46Heating elements having the shape of rods or tubes non-flexible heating conductor mounted on insulating base

Abstract

An electric heater comprising a heater body including a sheath, a heating element within the sheath and at least one terminal extending from one end of the sheath. The heater further comprises an add-on (e.g., a flexible or a solid wire lead) lead secured to the terminal exteriorly of the heater body, an insulator surrounding the junction of the add-on and its terminal, and an oversleeve surrounding the insulator and overlying a portion of the sheath. The oversleeve is secured to the sheath thereby positively to hold the insulator in position relative to the heater body.

Description

United States Patent [191 Portm'ann 3,839,623 Oct. 1, 1974 Temple Mn m" m m "n mmm Bn fl -nu hers WCLD 55772 66667 99999 HHHHH 2 96 6 200 324 09 ,393 75 08 62046 ,233 33333 1 ELECTRIC HEATER WITH ADD-ON LEADS Inventor: Albert Lee Portmann, Labadie, Mo.

[22] Filed:

Primary Examiner- Volodymyr V. Mayewsky Attorney, Agent, or Firml(oenig, Senniger, Powers and Leavitt 21 App]. No: 393,039

[57] ABSTRACT An electric heater comprising a heater bod y including a sheath, a heating element within the sheath and at least one terminal extending from one end of the sheath. The heater further comprises an add-on (e.g., a flexible or a solid wire lead) lead secured to the terminal exteriorly of the heater body, an insulator surrounding the junction of the add-on and its terminal, and an oversleeve surrounding the insulator and overlying a portion of the sheath. The oversleeve is secured t0 the sheath thereby positively to hold the insulator in position relative to the heater body.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures 2 00 vAvA343 4 4 777 %MM ua 8 8800 355333 4 399333 0 4 2 .n H 77 n. n 82 s S n n 053 T u.. u" N u "n 39 u n l E nu 2 T u u 5 2 d m m" 0 4 A H H m .n P m mm m U MI w mm m mm m WW4 e 6 m a e n e fl m ng ""4 rT 0 0 0 MwS DBSBVB "h 9 C D M E899334 2 T555666 S l999 99 0 NHHH/// L03 435322 dfi lfl m n-l3 27348 F 52448 1 ,5 1 ll 1 68032 l 6 3788 2 55 5 ll. .l 222333 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to electric resistance heaters and more particularly to cartridge heaters.

This invention is directly concerned with cartridge and tubular heaters to which electric power leads (e.g., flexible braided leads or special solid wire leads) may be added. Typically, cartridge heaters, such as those described in the coassigned Desloge US. Pat. No. 2,831,951, have a resistance heating wire wrapped about a ceramic core to form a heating coil. The ends of this coil are connected to solid wire electrical power leads (e.g., solid nickel alloy terminal pins) inserted into longitudinal bores in the core so as to supply electrical power to the coil. The core and the terminal wires are inserted in a metallic sheath with the terminal pins extending outwardly from the sheath at one end thereof. A thermally conductive, electrically insulating material is placed in the sheath to separate the coil from the sheath. The sheath is then swage-formed so as to seal the core within the sheath and to compact the electrical insulation thereby to provide increased heat transfer from the coil to the sheath. Tubular heaters are similar to cartridge heaters except that the heating coil is not wrapped about a core and that only one terminal wire extends from each end of the heater.

In many applications, the heater power leads are not required to be moved or flexed once the heater is installed in a working position and, thus, solid wire terminals are well suited for power leads. However, in many other instances the power leads are required to repeatedly flex, or a power lead of a different alloy is required. While solid wire terminals are preferred in many applications due to their good current carrying capacity, solid wire leads have the disadvantage of failing (breaking) under repeated flexing or bending. F lexible lead wires have been provided for cartridge heaters by crimping or otherwise securing flexible leads to the solid wire terminals extending endwise from one end of the sheath. However, flexing of the flexible leads may place undue strain on the junction between the solid terminal and the flexible wires. An example of the above-described flexible lead connection is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,61 1,559. Also, in many known prior art heaters with specially added leads, the junction of the special lead and the terminal pin is exposed to ambient conditions which may in turn cause corrosion of the junction. So-called compacted-in-place flexible leads have been used with some success in cartridge heaters. These compacted-in-place heaters utilize a stranded nickel or other high temperature flexible wire inserted into the bores in the core to take the place of the solid terminal wires. These flexible leads extend from the end of the heater and are compacted in place relative to the sheath in much the same manner as conventional solid leads. However, since these flexible leads are within the heated length of the heater, they are usually attached to the heater in the early stages of manufacture, and these flexible leads are carried along at all subsequent manufacturing steps thus adding to the complexity and cost of manufacturing the heater. Also, these compacted-in-place, stranded wire flexible leads do not have as long a service life as solid wire leads, and cannot be added to existing heaters.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTlON Among the several objects of this invention may be noted the provision of an electric heater having power leads added to a previously manufactured heater body in which the junction of the added leads and the heater terminals are protected against strain; the provision of such a heater in which leads of various materials (e.g., flexible stranded wire or special alloy solid wire) may readily be secured to standard heater bodies; the provision of such a heater in which the added leads are protected from the relatively high temperatures within the heater body; the provision of such a heater in which the unheated length of the heater is not substantially greater than similar heaters without added leads and in which the unheated length is constant regardless of the length of the heated length of the heater; the provision of such a heater with flexible leads having a watt density and long service life similar to heaters having solid wire power leads; the provision of such a heater which is of rugged and economical construction. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

Briefly, an electric heater of this invention comprises a heater body having a sheath, a heating element within the sheath, and at least one terminal extending from one end of the sheath for supplying electrical power to the heating element. The heater further comprises an add-on lead secured to the terminal exteriorly of the heater body, insulating means surrounding the junction of the terminal and the add-on leads, and an oversleeve surrounding the insulating means and overlying a portion of the sheath. The oversleeve is secured to the sheath thereby positively to hold the insulating means in position relative to the heater body so as to relieve strain from the add-on leads at the junction between the terminals and the add-on leads.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is an exploded perspective view illustrating a cartridge heater of this invention having flexible leads, with some of the parts shown in section;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal section of the heater showing the various parts in assembled relation prior to an oversleeve being secured in place to the heater; and

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, illustrating the heater after securing of the oversleeve to the sheath.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODlMENT Referring now to the drawings, an electric cartridge heater of this invention, indicated in its entirety at T, is shown to include a heater body 3 having a sheath 5, a heating element 7 disposed within the sheath, and a pair of terminal pins 9a,9b extending beyond one end of the heating element.

More particularly, the heater body 3 is similar to the cartridge heater disclosed in the coasigned Desloge US. Pat. No. 2,831,951 in which the sheath is a tube of stainless steel or other high-temperature metal closed at one end. The heating element "7 includes a core 10 of ceramic material or the like having two sideby-side bores lla,llllb extending lengthwise therethrough. A length of resistance wire 13 is wrapped in helical fashion about the outer cylindric surface of the core to form a heating coil. The end of the wire at each end of the coil is inserted into a respective bore 11a or 11b (one wire end in each bore) in core 10. A solid nickel alloy or other high-temperature conductor wire terminal pin 9a or 9b is inserted into a respective bore so that one terminal pin is in electrical contact with one end of wire 13 and the other pin is in electrical contact with the other end of wire 13, thereby to connect the coil in series to the terminal pins and to thus complete a heating circuit. An electrical insulating powder 15 having relatively good thermal conductance, such as magnesium oxide (MgO), fills the gap within the sheath between the core and the inside of the sheath to electrically insulate the coil wire from the sheath and to enhance heat transfer from the heating element to the sheath. A lava or ceramic end plug 17 having holes 19a,19b there'through for passage of terminal pins 9a,9b, respectively, closes off the open end of the sheath. The entire sheath with the above-described parts and insulating material therein is then swage- 'formed to compress end plug 17 so as to close the sheath, to compact insulating material 15, and to compress core 10 so that terminal pins 9a,9b securely contact their respective ends of coil wire 13. In FIGS. 2 and 3, heater body 3 is shown as a preassembled unit having been previously manufactured in accordance with the above-described procedure. It will be noted that terminal pins 9a,9b extend beyond the end of the heater element a short distance (e.g., 5/16 inch). The solid wire terminal pins provide high current carrying capability and have minimal surface area so as to minimize oxidation of the portions of the terminal pins which are located within the heated length of the heating element and which are subjected to high temperatures (e.g., 1,700F.).

In accordance with this invention, an add-on power lead 21a or 21b is secured at a respective junction 23a,23b to a respective terminal pin 9a,9b. As shown, add-on leads 2la,21b are shown to be flexible leads having a plurality of small-diameter wires stranded or twisted together to form a flexible conductor 25; however, it will be understood that other add-on leads, such as special alloy solid leads (not shown), may be secured to terminal pins 9a,9b. A flexible insulation cover 27 surrounds and insulates flexible conductor 25. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, a short length of the conductor extends beyond the insulation cover at one end of the lead for securement to a respective terminal pin at junctions 23a,23b. The flexible conductors are shown to be crimped to its respective terminal pin 9a,9b at junctions 23a,23b, but it will be understood that the flexible conductors may be secured to their terminal pins in any suitable manner, such as by welding or by soldering, as well as by crimping. Preferably, insulation cover 27 is of braided fiber glass material or other material able to withstand relatively high temperatures (e.g., 600 to 800F. or higher) and yet permit flexing of the leads. It will be understood, however, that other insulating material may be used, depending on the application for the heater.

A ceramic header or insulator 29 having a pair of longitudinal bores 31a,3lb extending therethrough is applied to flexible leads 2la,2lb with bore 31a receiving lead 21a and with bore 31b receiving lead 211). Each bore 3la,31b has an enlarged portion 33a,33b, respectively, for reception of a respective junction 23a,23b, with the remainder of these bores being substantially the same cross section (i.e., diameter) as the cross section of leads 21a,2lb with insulation covers 27 thereon. One end of insulator 29, constituting its inner end, is adapted to bear against an adjacent end of heater body 3 with junctions 23a, 231) received in the enlarged portions 3311,3312 of bores 3la,31b and with the flexible leads extending endwise from the insulator. Preferably, insulator 29 is molded of a ceramic material, such as steatite. With the diameter of bores 31a,31b substantially the same as the diameter as the flexible leads 2la,21 b, and with insulator 29 secured in place adjacent the outer end of heater body 3, the insulator supports the flexible leads and prevents strain from being placed on junctions 23a,23b due to flexing of the leads.

A cylindric oversleeve 35 having an inside diameter slightly larger than the outside diameter of sheath 5 is also applied to flexible leads 2111,2112, this oversleeve being open at both ends. Its one end, constituting its outer end, is of decreased cross sectional area (i.e., of decreased diameter) and is adapted to contact the outer surface of insulator 29 when the insulator is in abutting relation with the outer end of heater body 3. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, an inwardly projecting flange 37 is provided at the outer end of oversleeve 35 for engagement with the outer end of insulator 29. Over sleeve 35 is longer than insulator 29 so that, with the insulator abutting against the heater body 3 and with flange 37 in engagement with the outer end of the insulator, a portion of the oversleeve overlies the outer end portion of sheath 5. Oversleeve 35 is a cylindrical member formed from thin-wall, stainless steel or other high-temperature tubing.

With the heater of this invention assembled as shown in FIG. 3, oversleeve 35 is secured to the outer end of sheath 5, as by roll-forming, swaging or by other diameter reduction processes. With the oversleeve secured to sheath 5, the outer diameter of the sheath and the outer diameter of the oversleeve are substantially the same and the transition between the sheath and the oversleeve is substantially flush. It will be understood that with flexible leads 2311,23b secured to terminals 9a,9b as heretofore described and with the flexible leads 21a,21b supported within bores 31a,3lb of insulator 29, and with the insulator secured to the outer end of the sheath 5 by oversleeve 35, the flexible leads may be repeatedly flexed relative to the heater without damage to the flexible leads or without damage to terminal pins 9a,9b.

It will be understood that the add-on leads of this invention may be used in conjuction with heaters other than cartridge heaters, such as tubular heaters having one terminal extending from each end of the heater or other heaters having more than two terminals at each end of the heater.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. An electric heater comprising a metallic sheath of circular cross section, a heating element within the sheath, means closing one end of the sheath, and at least one terminal extending from said one end of the sheath for supplying electrical power to the heating element, said heater further comprising an add-on lead secured to said terminal exteriorly of said sheath, insulating means surrounding the junction of said terminal and said add-on lead, said insulating means comprising a rigid insulator having a longitudinal bore extending therethrough from one end thereof to the other, said bore accommodating said add-on lead, and a metallic oversleeve of generally circular cross section surrounding the insulating means and overlying a portion of said sheath adjacent said one end thereof, said insulator being adapted to abut against said one end of said sheath and against said closing means, said oversleeve being open at its outer end for the passage therethrough of said flexible lead, said outer end being of decreased cross-section thereby to engage said insulator and to hold it in abutting relation relative to said one end of said sheath so as to relieve strain from said junction, said oversleeve overlapping a portion of the sheath being secured to said sheath by means of a diam eter reduction process whereupon after securing, the diameter of said sheath clear of said oversleeve and the diameter of said oversleeve are substantially the same so as to permit insertion of the heater in holes having a close fit with said sheath.

2. An electric heater as set forth in claim 1 wherein said add-on lead is a flexible lead having flexible insulation on its exterior, said insulated flexible lead being adapted for reception in said bores in said insulator.

3. An electric heater as set forth in claim ll further comprising a pair of terminals extending from said one end of the sheath and a pair of add-on leads, one for each terminal, wherein said insulating means comprises an insulator having two longitudinal bores extending therethrough, each said bore accommodating a respective add-on lead and a respective junction.

* l =l l=

Claims (3)

1. An electric heater comprising a metallic sheath of circular cross section, a heating element within the sheath, means closing one end of the sheath, and at least one terminal extending from said one end of the sheath for supplying electrical power to the heating element, said heater further comprising an add-on lead secured to said terminal exteriorly of said sheath, insulating means surrounding the junction of said terminal and said add-on lead, said insulating means comprising a rigid insulator having a loNgitudinal bore extending therethrough from one end thereof to the other, said bore accommodating said add-on lead, and a metallic oversleeve of generally circular cross section surrounding the insulating means and overlying a portion of said sheath adjacent said one end thereof, said insulator being adapted to abut against said one end of said sheath and against said closing means, said oversleeve being open at its outer end for the passage therethrough of said flexible lead, said outer end being of decreased cross-section thereby to engage said insulator and to hold it in abutting relation relative to said one end of said sheath so as to relieve strain from said junction, said oversleeve overlapping a portion of the sheath being secured to said sheath by means of a diameter reduction process whereupon after securing, the diameter of said sheath clear of said oversleeve and the diameter of said oversleeve are substantially the same so as to permit insertion of the heater in holes having a close fit with said sheath.
2. An electric heater as set forth in claim 1 wherein said add-on lead is a flexible lead having flexible insulation on its exterior, said insulated flexible lead being adapted for reception in said bores in said insulator.
3. An electric heater as set forth in claim 1 further comprising a pair of terminals extending from said one end of the sheath and a pair of add-on leads, one for each terminal, wherein said insulating means comprises an insulator having two longitudinal bores extending therethrough, each said bore accommodating a respective add-on lead and a respective junction.
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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3970822A (en) * 1975-03-17 1976-07-20 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electric cartridge heater
US4186369A (en) * 1977-11-02 1980-01-29 Wylain, Inc. Connector for terminating the end of a sheathed heating element
US4287502A (en) * 1979-06-19 1981-09-01 Amark Industries, Inc. Cartridge heater structure
US4346287A (en) * 1980-05-16 1982-08-24 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electric heater and assembly
DE3427207A1 (en) * 1984-07-24 1986-02-06 Hotset Heizpatronen Zubehoer Wire connection device for an electrical patronenheizkoerper
FR2634478A1 (en) * 1988-07-25 1990-01-26 Financ Cetal Sarl Process for manufacturing an insulating bar boron nitride mainly used in the heating elements protected, and the bar thus obtained
US4975563A (en) * 1986-06-20 1990-12-04 Kanthal Limited Heating devices
US5034595A (en) * 1990-05-09 1991-07-23 Ogden Manufacturing Co. Cartridge heater assembly
US5198641A (en) * 1991-02-26 1993-03-30 Sakaguchi Dennetsu Kabushiki Kaisha Sheathed heater
US5247158A (en) * 1992-07-17 1993-09-21 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electrical heater
US5536478A (en) * 1994-12-01 1996-07-16 Corning Incorporated Electrical leads for a fluid heaters
US5714924A (en) * 1995-01-27 1998-02-03 Tdk Corporation Positive characteristic thermistor device
US5917150A (en) * 1996-06-17 1999-06-29 Corning Incorporated Mineral-insulated cable terminations
US6031213A (en) * 1994-12-07 2000-02-29 Ngk Insulators, Ltd. Electrode structure and electric heater comprising the same
DE19906702A1 (en) * 1999-02-18 2000-09-14 Hotset Heizpatronen Zubehoer Heating element for industrial purposes esp. galvanic bath has contact pins which together with connection zone incorporating insulation-stripped connection strands are coated with insulating lacquer
US6172345B1 (en) * 1999-09-27 2001-01-09 Emerson Electric Co. High-voltage cartridge heater and method of manufacturing same
US6191400B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2001-02-20 Emerson Electric Co. Metal sheath heating element and method of manufacturing same
US20020093417A1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2002-07-18 Reiner Gross Electrical resistor with thermal voltage prevention
US20040211771A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-10-28 Walter Crandell Compacted cartridge heating element with a substantially polygonal cross section
FR2873534A1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2006-01-27 Atlantic Ind Soc Par Actions S Insulating element
WO2006042587A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-27 Contitech Techno-Chemie Gmbh Crimped connection
US20070187856A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2007-08-16 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Multi-layered blown film forming apparatus and multi-layered blown film forming method
US20070194007A1 (en) * 2006-02-06 2007-08-23 Bleckmann Gmbh & Co. Kg Tubular heater with insulating material in the connection end region
US20080290085A1 (en) * 2007-05-22 2008-11-27 Schlipf Andreas Heating cartridge with coupling element
US20130056456A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-07 Andreas SCHLIPF Electric heater with connection wire
US20150296568A1 (en) * 2014-04-14 2015-10-15 Mahle Behr France Rouffach S.A.S Electric heater
US20150341987A1 (en) * 2012-07-24 2015-11-26 Al Bernstein Radiator element
EP3361573A1 (en) * 2017-02-14 2018-08-15 Turk & Hillinger GmbH Electrical device comprising a connecting cable and method for connecting an electrical device comprising a connecting cable

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US2888547A (en) * 1958-06-19 1959-05-26 Earl P Saper Portable immersion electric liquid heater
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Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3970822A (en) * 1975-03-17 1976-07-20 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electric cartridge heater
US4186369A (en) * 1977-11-02 1980-01-29 Wylain, Inc. Connector for terminating the end of a sheathed heating element
US4287502A (en) * 1979-06-19 1981-09-01 Amark Industries, Inc. Cartridge heater structure
DE3153393C2 (en) * 1980-05-16 1993-04-01 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Co., St. Louis, Miss., Us
US4346287A (en) * 1980-05-16 1982-08-24 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electric heater and assembly
DE3427207A1 (en) * 1984-07-24 1986-02-06 Hotset Heizpatronen Zubehoer Wire connection device for an electrical patronenheizkoerper
US4975563A (en) * 1986-06-20 1990-12-04 Kanthal Limited Heating devices
FR2634478A1 (en) * 1988-07-25 1990-01-26 Financ Cetal Sarl Process for manufacturing an insulating bar boron nitride mainly used in the heating elements protected, and the bar thus obtained
EP0356361A1 (en) * 1988-07-25 1990-02-28 Financiere Cetal, S.A.R.L. Method of fabricating a boron nitride isolating rod essentially used for sheathed heating elements and rod obtained by this method
US5034595A (en) * 1990-05-09 1991-07-23 Ogden Manufacturing Co. Cartridge heater assembly
US5198641A (en) * 1991-02-26 1993-03-30 Sakaguchi Dennetsu Kabushiki Kaisha Sheathed heater
US5247158A (en) * 1992-07-17 1993-09-21 Watlow Electric Manufacturing Company Electrical heater
US5536478A (en) * 1994-12-01 1996-07-16 Corning Incorporated Electrical leads for a fluid heaters
US6031213A (en) * 1994-12-07 2000-02-29 Ngk Insulators, Ltd. Electrode structure and electric heater comprising the same
US5714924A (en) * 1995-01-27 1998-02-03 Tdk Corporation Positive characteristic thermistor device
US5917150A (en) * 1996-06-17 1999-06-29 Corning Incorporated Mineral-insulated cable terminations
DE19906702A1 (en) * 1999-02-18 2000-09-14 Hotset Heizpatronen Zubehoer Heating element for industrial purposes esp. galvanic bath has contact pins which together with connection zone incorporating insulation-stripped connection strands are coated with insulating lacquer
US6172345B1 (en) * 1999-09-27 2001-01-09 Emerson Electric Co. High-voltage cartridge heater and method of manufacturing same
US6191400B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2001-02-20 Emerson Electric Co. Metal sheath heating element and method of manufacturing same
US20020093417A1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2002-07-18 Reiner Gross Electrical resistor with thermal voltage prevention
US20040211771A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-10-28 Walter Crandell Compacted cartridge heating element with a substantially polygonal cross section
US20070187856A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2007-08-16 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Multi-layered blown film forming apparatus and multi-layered blown film forming method
FR2873534A1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2006-01-27 Atlantic Ind Soc Par Actions S Insulating element
EP1619932A3 (en) * 2004-07-23 2007-04-25 Atlantic Industrie Insulating element
WO2006042587A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-27 Contitech Techno-Chemie Gmbh Crimped connection
US20070264861A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2007-11-15 Scheuermann Stefan J Crimped Connection
US20070194007A1 (en) * 2006-02-06 2007-08-23 Bleckmann Gmbh & Co. Kg Tubular heater with insulating material in the connection end region
US7496284B2 (en) * 2006-02-06 2009-02-24 Bleckmann Gmbh & Co. Kg Tubular heater with insulating material in the connection end region
US20080290085A1 (en) * 2007-05-22 2008-11-27 Schlipf Andreas Heating cartridge with coupling element
US8426780B2 (en) 2007-05-22 2013-04-23 Türk & Hillinger GmbH Heating cartridge with coupling element
US20130056456A1 (en) * 2011-09-06 2013-03-07 Andreas SCHLIPF Electric heater with connection wire
US20150341987A1 (en) * 2012-07-24 2015-11-26 Al Bernstein Radiator element
US9936538B2 (en) * 2012-07-24 2018-04-03 Al Bernstein Radiator element
US20150296568A1 (en) * 2014-04-14 2015-10-15 Mahle Behr France Rouffach S.A.S Electric heater
US9655169B2 (en) * 2014-04-14 2017-05-16 Mahle International Gmbh Electric heater
EP3361573A1 (en) * 2017-02-14 2018-08-15 Turk & Hillinger GmbH Electrical device comprising a connecting cable and method for connecting an electrical device comprising a connecting cable
CN108429018A (en) * 2017-02-14 2018-08-21 塔克及海林阁有限公司 Electric device is connected to the method for connecting cable and with the electric device of the cable

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