US3837541A - Starting fluid injection system - Google Patents

Starting fluid injection system Download PDF

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US3837541A
US3837541A US34417173A US3837541A US 3837541 A US3837541 A US 3837541A US 34417173 A US34417173 A US 34417173A US 3837541 A US3837541 A US 3837541A
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reservoir
valve
means
plug
pressure
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G Grigsby
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LUBRASTART INT
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LUBRASTART INT
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02NSTARTING OF COMBUSTION ENGINES; STARTING AIDS FOR SUCH ENGINES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F02N19/00Starting aids for combustion engines, not otherwise provided for
    • F02N19/001Arrangements thereof

Abstract

In a system for dispensing a metered quantity of starting fluid in an internal combustion engine, means for pressurizing the starting fluid reservoir from an external source of compressed air, including a valving system to accomplish this and a special check valve particularly adapted for use in the system.

Description

United States Patent 11 1 Grigsby Sept. 24, 1974 STARTING FLUID INJECTION SYSTEM [75] Inventor: Gilbert R. Grigsby, Los Angeles,

Calif.

[73] Assignee: Lubrastart International, Los

Angeles, Calif.

[22] Filed: Mar. 23, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 344,171

[52] US. Cl. 222/397 [51] Int. Cl B65d 83/14 [58] Field of Search 222/450, 396, 397, 399,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Campbell 222/397 2,653,792 9/1953 Sacchini 137/540 x 3,603,487 9/1971 Cook 3,620,424 11/1971 Grigsby 222/450 Primary ExaminerStanley H. Tollberg Assistant Examiner-John P. Shannon Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Fulwider, Patton, Rieber, Lee & Utecht [5 7 ABSTRACT In a system for dispensing a metered quantity of starting fluid in an internal combustion engine, means for pressurizing the starting fluid reservoir from an external source of compressed air, including a valving system to accomplish this and a special check valve particularly adapted for use in the system.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures STARTING FLUID INJECTION SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to the use of a metered fluid dispensing apparatus, such as shown in US. Pat. No. 3,620,424, granted Nov. 16, 1971, particularly as that fluid dispensing apparatus is connected to an internal combustion engine, so that a measured quantity of starting fluid is injected into the engine each time it is started.

While the fluid dispensing apparatus shown in that earlier patent works extremely well, that prior device in its most common form makes use of a replaceable reservoir which contains the starting fluid under pres sure. The use of a replaceable reservoir is quite satisfactory for the individual car owner who uses his car in the usual business and pleasure routine. However, in the case of commercial and industrial users, it is preferable to purchase the starting fluid in bulk quantities and to refill the reservoir rather than to replace it. Such a refilling operation requires pressurizing of the reservoir after it has been filled, and this requires additional facilities. The present invention provides such a system intended primarily for use where bulk quantities of starting fluid are to be added to the reservoir and where auxiliary means are provided for pressurizing the fluid within the reservoir.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The fluid injector of the present invention includes a pressurized reservoir of special design and a pressurizing system such that the reservoir may be depressurized to permit the addition of fluid, while a manually operated valve prevents the loss or release of pressure from the supply. In addition, a check valve prevents the loss of pressure from the reservoir when the supply is interrupted.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a system as it would appear installed on, for example, a truck engine;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view, partially in section, of the upper portion of the reservoir;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the filler cap of the reservoir shown in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the check valve installed in the pressure supply line.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED FORM As has been disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,620,494, previously mentioned, the starting of internal combustion engines can be greatly aided by the injuection of a volatile combustible fuel, such as ether, at the time that the starter of the engine rotates the crank shaft. This more volatile fuel, which is not suitable for continuous operation of the engine, is very effective in starting the operation thereof, particularly under adverse temperature conditions. Even under normal temperature conditions, the use of a starting fluid can greatly reduce the starting or cranking time and this, in addition to the obvious savings in battery wear, engine wear, etc., also greatly reduces the discharge of unburned hydrocarbons into the atmosphere.

In the case of trucks, construction equipment and many other internal combustion engines operated in regions of cold weather, the advantages of using a start ing fluid injected into the engine are becoming more apparent.

The metered fluid dispensing apparatus shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,620,424 is very effective in providing a quicker starting of an internal combustion engine, with the various attendant advantages. However, in many applications, the system disclosed in that patent can be improved, particularly in connection with the fluid reservoir. The present invention makes use of the basic system shown in that patent, but provides certain improvements in the fluid supply or reservoir system.

The injection system shown in FIG. 1 includes a reservoir 10 supported by suitable means adjacent the engine it is to serve, and has a fluid discharge control means 11 connected to the bottom of the cylinder and feeding a discharge conduit 12. A measuring chamber 13 provides the desired amount of fluid for each operation and the control means 11 is actuated electrically or by some other suitable means (not shown) to deliver a measured quantity of fluid each time the control means is actuated. The reservoir 10 holds the starter fluid and has a valve in the bottom of the reservoir that is controlled by the actuator 11 to deliver the starter fluid to the measuring chamber 13. These features and construction are disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,620,424, as previously mentioned.

In the present system, the reservoir 10, instead of being replaced when empty, is refilled and then pressurized with compressed air. FIG. 2 shows the upper end of the reservoir 10, and it will bes'een that there is a central opening 14, adapted to receive a removable 5 threads 16, so that the plug may be quickly and easily installed and removed. The plug 15 also has suitable shaped surfaces 17 adapted to receive a wrench or other tool to tighten the plug. A sealing ring 18 between the upper, surface surrounding the opening 14 and the lower surface of the wrench-receiving portion 17 provides the necessary seal to prevent the escape of air or fluid out the aperture 14 when the plug 15 is tightened in place.

As shown in FIG. 3, the plug 15 is also provided with a pressurizing valve 20 in its central portion. The valve 20 includes a generally cylindrical body 21 having a centrally located flange 22 shaped to receive a wrench, so that the valve 20 may be securely tightened and held in the plug 15 by means of screw threads 23. The interior of the valve body 21 is threaded to receive a valve member 24 of the well-known type used in pneumatic tires. Such a valve has a stem 25 attached to a valve head 26 that is urged against a valve seat 27 by a spring 28. With this arrangement, it is a simple matter to pressurize the interior of the reservoir 10 by applying to the valve 20 an air hose of the type used to inflate pneumatic tires. The air pressure then goes through the cylindrical member 21, moving the valve head 26 away from the valve seat 27 against the urging of the spring 28. When the air hose is removed, the spring 28 then urges the valve head 26 against the valve seat 27 to prevent the escape and discharge of air from within the the reservoir 10. Should it be desired to depressurize the reservoir, the valve stem 25 may be pressed inwardly, as is done in the case of pneumatic tires when it is wished to deflate them. To prevent accidental loss of pressure from the valve assembly 20, it is generally considered desirable to place a valve cap 30, as seen in FIG. 2, on the valve assembly 20.

To complete the plug 15, a keeper 32 is inserted within the reservoir and connected to the bottom of the cap by a chain 33, so that when the plug is removed from the reservoir, it cannot accidentally be dropped and lost. It will be understood, of course, that the keeper 32 has a length greater than the diameter of the opening 14 so that the keeper will not accidentally be removed through the opening. Finally, an aperture 34 extends through the threaded portion 16 of the plug to connect to the interior of the reservoir 10. In this way, should the reservoir not be depressurized by the valve 20 prior to removal of the plug 15, the aperture 34 will release the pressure from within the reservoir while the threads 16 still hold the plug 15 to the reservoir. In this way the plug will not be explosively ejected from the reservoir.

In addition to the filler plug 15, the top of the reservoir 10 is provided with a connection to an air supply (not shown). The air connection 40 includes a connector 41 threadedly inserted through the top of the reservoir 10 and having a tube or conduit 42 that extends to the supply of air under pressure. Installed in the conduit 42, between the air supply and the reservoir 10, is a manually operable valve 43 operable to turn off the supply of air under pressure when the reservoir 10 is to be refilled. Preferably, the valve 43 is located adjacent the reservoir 10, as in FIG. 1, so that the supply of air can conveniently be controlled by the person servicing the reservoir. It will be realized that should the supply of air not be turned off, air will continue to enter the reservoir 10 as the plug 15 is being removed, thus making the filling of the reservoir more difficult and the subsequent re-insertion of the 'plug 15 both more difficult and hazardous.

In many instances, the supply of compressed air is provided by the same engine whose starting is assisted by the fuel injection system including the reservoir 10. Consequently, when the engine is stopped, the air compressor is also stopped, and it cannot be assumed that the same air pressure will be maintained once the compressor has stopped. Without pressure in the reservoir 10, the fluid injector will not work, and consequently the system would fail to operate precisely at the time it was most needed. To overcome these problems, a check valve 44 is installed in the conduit 42. While various forms of check valves can be used, the form shown in FIG. 4 has been found to be extremely effective.

As best illustrated in that figure, the valve 44 includes a tubular body 45 having a screw threaded portion 46 at each end and a wrench-receiving portion 47 intermediate the two threaded portions. An axial bore 50 extends through the body 45, the bore being generally of a uniform diameter throughout the length of the body, but with a reduced diameter at one end to form a valve seat 51. At the opposite end, the bore 50 is provided with screw threads 52 to receive a threaded plug 53. The head of the plug 53 is adapted to receive a wrench or other tightening tool and the maximum dimension across the head is less than the diameter of the root of the threads 46.

The plug 53 has an axial bore 54 so that air may pass axially through the plug into the chamber formed by 6 the bore 50in the body 45. A cylindrical valve member 55 is mounted within the bore 50 adjacent the end thereof, opposite the plug 53, and carries an axially projecting tip 56 that receives an O-ring 57. As seen in FIG. 4, the tip 56 projects through the reduced opening formed in the end of the body 45 and the O-ring 57 forms the valve head that bears against the valve seat 51. A spring 60 extends between the plug 53 and the valve member 55 to urge the member and the valve head 57 against the valve seat 51. It will be realized that the valve member 55 must be somewhat smaller in diameter than the bore 50 so that air may pass freely throughout the entire length of the valve body 45. Couplings 62, shown in FIG. 1, engage the threaded portions 46 of the valve body 45 and connect the conduit 42 to the check valve.

To complete the installation, a removable plug is mounted in the top of the reservoir 10 so that, if desired, a pressure gauge (not shown) may be installed.

It will be appreciated that the actuator 11 and metering chamber 13 and related valving equipment operate in the manner set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 3,620,424. When the reservoir 10 has had a major portion of the starting fluid removed, the reservoir is refilled by the driver or by mechanics who customarily service the equipment. To refill the reservoir 10, the valve 43 is first turned to OFF or closed position, and preferably, the reservoir is depressurized by releasing the air within it by means of the valve 24. Should this not be done, or should a residual amount ofpressure remain in the reservoir 10 after the operation of the valve 24, the remainder of the pressure is allowed to escape as the plug 15 is unscrewed and the aperture 34 is permitted to vent to the atmosphere. When the plug 15 has been removed, the reservoir 10 is filled the desired amount by the addition of suitable starting fluid that is poured through the opening 14. The plug 15 is then replaced and tightened down to make a sealing fit with the edges of the opening 14. The valve 43'is then opened, and if there is pressure available in the conduit 42, the reservoir 10 is thereby pressurized, ready for operation. If there is no pressure available in the con duit 42, an external source of air pressure is applied to the valve 24 in the plug 15 and the reservoir 10 is pressurized in this way. The check valve 44 prevents the pressure within the reservoir 10 from escaping through the compressor.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that there has been provided a starting fluid injection system fully capable of achieving the objects and securing the advantages heretofore set forth. While a preferred form of the system has been disclosed, it will be appreciated that the invention is not to be limited to the particular form or arrangement of parts herein described and shown, except as limited by the claims.

I claim.

1. In a system for dispensing a metered quantity of fluid under pressure, having a reservoir adapted to be pressurized, a metering chamber, and a valving system adapted to control the filling of said metering chamber and the discharge of fluid therefrom, the means for pressurizing said reservoir which includes:

a filling plug removably held in said reservoir and making a sealing fit therewith, said plug having aperture means opening as said plug is loosened to release any pressure in said reservoir but closed when said plug is in sealing position;

first valve means acting to prevent the release of pressure from within said reservoir but operable to pass air under pressure into said reservoir to pressurize the same, said first valve means being adapted to be removably connected to a supply of air under pressure; and

supply means connected to said reservoir and normally operable to provide air under pressure to said reservoir to maintain the pressure therein.

2. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a conduit with a check valve connected thereto, operable to admit air under pressure into said reservoir but to prevent the release of air under pressure from said reservoir.

3. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said first valve means is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure, but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.

4. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said first valve means is mounted in said filling plug and is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.

5. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a conduit, valve means operable to prevent the passage of air under pressure along said conduit, and check valve means operable to prevent the passage of air under pressure from said reservoir along said conduit.

6. Means as defined in claim 5 in which said first valve means is mounted in said filling plug and is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.

7. Means as defined in claim 6 in which said check valve means includes:

a generally cylindrical body having an axial passageway therethrough, said passageway being constricted at one end of said body to form a wall;

a plug mounted in the end of said passageway opposite said wall, said plug having an axially extending aperture therethrough;

a valve body in said passageway having space between said body and said passageway for the passage of fluid therealong, said body having a tip adapted to extend into the constricted portion of said passageway;

a resilient O-ring mounted on said tip and adapted to bear against said wall adjacent said constricted portion of said passageway, whereby said passageway is closed when said ring bears against said wall; and

a spring extending between said plug and said valve body and urging said body toward said wall.

8. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a check valve comprising:

a generally cylindrical body having an axial passageway therethrough, said passageway being constricted at one end of said body to form a wall;

a plug mounted in the end of said passageway opposite said wall, said plug having an axially extending aperture therethrough;

a valve body in said passageway having space between said body and said passageway for the passage of fluid therealong, said body having a tip adapted to extend into the constricted portion of said passageway;

a resilient O-ring mounted on said tip and adapted to bear against said wall adjacent said constricted portion of said passageway, whereby said passageway is closed when said ring bears against said wall; and

a spring extending between said plug and said valve body and urging said body toward said wall.

Claims (8)

1. In a system for dispensing a metered quantity of fluid under pressure, having a reservoir adapted to be pressurized, a metering chamber, and a valving system adapted to control the filling of said metering chamber and the discharge of fluid therefrom, the means for pressurizing said reservoir which includes: a filling plug removably held in said reservoir and making a sealing fit therewith, said plug having aperture means opening as said plug is loosened to release any pressure in said reservoir but closed when said plug is in sealing position; first valve means acting to prevent the release of pressure from within said reservoir but operable to pass air under pressure into said reservoir to pressurize the same, said first valve means being adapted to be removably connected to a supply of air under pressure; and supply means connected to said reservoir and normally operable to provide air under pressure to said reservoir to maintain the pressure therein.
2. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a conduit with a check valve connected thereto, operable to admit air under pressure into said reservoir but to prevent the release of air under pressure from said reservoir.
3. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said first valve means is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure, but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.
4. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said first valve means is mounted in said filling plug and is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.
5. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a conduit, valve means operable to prevent the passage of air under pressure along said conduit, and check valve means operable to prevent the passage of air under pressure from said reservoir along said conduit.
6. Means as defined in claim 5 in which said first valve means is mounted in said filling plug and is normally not connected to a supply of air under pressure but instead is exposed to the ambient pressure surrounding said reservoir.
7. Means as defined in claim 6 in which said check valve means includes: a generally cylindrical body having an axial passageway therethrough, said passageway being constricted at one end of said body to form a wall; a plug mounted in the end of said passageway opposite said wall, said plug having an axially extending aperture therethrough; a valve body in said passageway having space between said body and said passageway for the passage of fluid therealong, said body having a tip adapted to extend into the constricted portion of said passageway; a resilient O-ring mounted on said tip and adapted to bear against said wall adjacent said constricted portion of said passageway, whereby said passageway is closed when said ring bears against said wall; and a spring extending between said plug and said valve body and urging said body toward said wall.
8. Means as defined in claim 1 in which said supply means includes a check valve comprising: a generally cylindrical body having an axial passageway therethrough, said passageway being constricted at one end of said body to form a wall; a plug mounted in the end of said passageway opposite said wall, said plug having an axially extending aperture therethrough; a valve body in said passageway having space between said body and said passageway for the passage of fluid therealong, said body having a tip adapted to extend into the constricted portion of said passageway; a resilient O-ring mounted on said tip and adapted to bear against said wall adjacent said constricted portion of said passageway, whereby said passageway is closed when said ring bears against said wall; and a spring extending between said plug and said valve body and urging said body toward said wall.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4350270A (en) * 1980-10-27 1982-09-21 The Perlick Company, Inc. Portable keg tapping coupler with vent

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1648575A (en) * 1923-08-24 1927-11-08 Dry Ice Corp Of America Carbonator
US2653792A (en) * 1949-11-05 1953-09-29 Marquette Metal Products Co Check valve with plug mating a flanged nonmetallic sealing element
US3603487A (en) * 1969-11-17 1971-09-07 Prod Res & Chem Corp In-line sealant dispenser
US3620424A (en) * 1969-04-30 1971-11-16 Lubrastart International Metered fluid dispensing apparatus

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1648575A (en) * 1923-08-24 1927-11-08 Dry Ice Corp Of America Carbonator
US2653792A (en) * 1949-11-05 1953-09-29 Marquette Metal Products Co Check valve with plug mating a flanged nonmetallic sealing element
US3620424A (en) * 1969-04-30 1971-11-16 Lubrastart International Metered fluid dispensing apparatus
US3603487A (en) * 1969-11-17 1971-09-07 Prod Res & Chem Corp In-line sealant dispenser

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4350270A (en) * 1980-10-27 1982-09-21 The Perlick Company, Inc. Portable keg tapping coupler with vent

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