US3826172A - Metal, matrix-fiber composite armor - Google Patents

Metal, matrix-fiber composite armor Download PDF

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Publication number
US3826172A
US3826172A US84631469A US3826172A US 3826172 A US3826172 A US 3826172A US 84631469 A US84631469 A US 84631469A US 3826172 A US3826172 A US 3826172A
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armor
panel
metal
matrix
fiber
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T Dawson
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US Secretary of Navy
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US Secretary of Navy
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H5/00Armour; Armour plates
    • F41H5/02Plate construction
    • F41H5/04Plate construction composed of more than one layer
    • F41H5/0414Layered armour containing ceramic material
    • F41H5/0421Ceramic layers in combination with metal layers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/911Penetration resistant layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/12All metal or with adjacent metals
    • Y10T428/1234Honeycomb, or with grain orientation or elongated elements in defined angular relationship in respective components [e.g., parallel, inter- secting, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/12All metal or with adjacent metals
    • Y10T428/12444Embodying fibers interengaged or between layers [e.g., paper, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/12All metal or with adjacent metals
    • Y10T428/12486Laterally noncoextensive components [e.g., embedded, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/12All metal or with adjacent metals
    • Y10T428/12493Composite; i.e., plural, adjacent, spatially distinct metal components [e.g., layers, joint, etc.]
    • Y10T428/12535Composite; i.e., plural, adjacent, spatially distinct metal components [e.g., layers, joint, etc.] with additional, spatially distinct nonmetal component
    • Y10T428/12576Boride, carbide or nitride component
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/12All metal or with adjacent metals
    • Y10T428/12493Composite; i.e., plural, adjacent, spatially distinct metal components [e.g., layers, joint, etc.]
    • Y10T428/12736Al-base component
    • Y10T428/1275Next to Group VIII or IB metal-base component
    • Y10T428/12757Fe

Abstract

A high strength lightweight armor material consisting of metal composites strengthened by high density wire, fiber, or whisker elements, and which is particularly effective against more sophisticated weapons such as shaped charges and tungsten cored projectiles.

Description

Elite Staes tent 1191 Dawson July 39, 1974 [54] METAL, MATRIX-FIBER COMPOSITE 3,406,446 10/ I968 Muldovan 29/ 196.2 X ARMOR 3,431,818 3/1969 King 89/36 A 3,596,344 8/1971 Kreider 29/l9l.6 [75] Inventor: Thomas J. Dawson, Falls Church,

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Assignee: The United States of America s 20,020 1909 Great Britain 109/85 represented by the Secretary of the Navy, Washington, DC. Primary Examiner-Stephen C. Bentley [22] Filed July 1969 Attorney,,Agenr, 0r FirmR. S. Sciascia; Q. E. Hodges [21] Appl. No.: 846,314

[52] US. Cl 89/36 A, 29/19l.6, 29/195 A,- [57 ABSTRACT 109/82 [Sl] Int. Cl. F4lh 5/04 A high t ength lightweight armor material consisting Field Of Search 9 191-6, of metal composites strengthened by high density 29/195 89/36 109/80, 85, 32 wire, fiber, or whisker-elements, and which is particularly effective against more sophisticated weapons References Cited such as shaped charges and tungsten cored projectiles.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 952.877 3/1910 Cowpcr-Coles 89/36 A UX 2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJULBOIHH FIG. 2

FIG.

INVENTOR THOMAS J. DAWSON FIG. 5

ATTORNEYS 1 METAL, MATRIX-FIBER COMPOSITE ARMOR The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to improvements in armor construction which may be employed as protective covering for ships, tanks, or other mobile equipment and which is effective to absorb the energy from both high velocity projectiles and low velocity fragments of exploded metal cases.

While high velocity projectiles are defeated or resisted by armor materials having a high degree of hardness, such materials to be fully effective must also have high strength and toughness to prevent shattering and shear punching.

Similarly, high strength materials are also needed to defeat armor penetration from shrapnel produced by exploding projectiles. However, the effective shear strength of the high strength materials is limited since defeat is due largely to shear punching by reasonably large, low velocity fragments of exploded metal cases.

Fiber strengthened materials offer a strength increase by a factor of up to 10X for light metals, with a corresponding increase in modulars of elasticity and with a comparatively small density increase. This increase in strength can be utilized to defeat projectile fragments from both high and low velocity missiles with a considerable weight saving in the armor material as compared with the strength-density ratio of a similar homogeneous material.

The defeat of the projectile fragments from missiles such as shaped charges requires the diffusion of a jetparticle stream established by the projectile when detonated at a predetermined distance from a target. The normally effective penetration of armor panels by the jet-particle stream from shaped charges occurs as'the result of a phenomenon known as the Munroe effect.

Prior art armoring generally required the use of materials having substantial thickness in order to reduce or diffuse projectile penetration. The resulting effect of thick armor plating was an increase in both the bulk and weight of the material and a decrease in the effective payload of the protected vehicle. Moreover, the mobility of such armored equipment was considerably hampered by, the weight and bulk factors.

Other prior art armor panels consist of laminate structures having a central layer of material comprising a shock absorbing substance such as a cellular or foam plastic composition disposed between layers of face hardened steel. Such constructions, while decreasing the weight of an entire armor assembly further increased the bulk of the armor plating with consequent effects on the mobility of the protected vehicle.

SUMMARY The instant invention solves the aforementioned problems and overcomes the disadvantages of the prior art by using an aluminum alloy panel having a core material consisting of a high density distribution of high tensile strength wires, fibers, or whiskers, having characteristics which permit suitable bonding with the aluminum, said fibers and whiskers being respectively fine and ultra fine wire.

A panel constructed in the manner of the invention has its modulus of elasticity increased 10 times with a comparatively small increase in the density of the unit.

It is well known that the effectiveness of a shaped charge is attributed to three factors, the high velocity of the mixture of gas and minute particles which emanates from the explosion, the high temperature of the mixture, and the abrasive effect which the mixture has on armor shielding.

An effective shield against a shaped charge must therefore be able to diffuse the jet-particle stream which emanates therefrom. Otherwise, the relative density law concerning homogeneous metals, applys and the effectivness of metal armor shielding is generally proportional to its density.

Accordingly, applicant has discovered that armor panels having a discontinuous density are effective to diffuse the jet stream of a shaped charge. In the disclosed invention the high tensile strength fibers are arranged in either a parallel array or a matrix, and provide the discontinuous structure. An armor panel constructed of a homogeneous aluminum alloy, although effective against projectiles and shrapnel, has little effect against a shaped charge, and is present in the invention used mainly as a binder for the fibers.

Accordingly, it is the primary object of this invention to provide armor panels having superior resistance to the impact effect of offensive weapons such as shaped charges.

Another object is to provide an improved armor construction which is capable of being used in place of comparatively thick metal plate.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a lightweight armor material which is limited as to weight and thickness.

A further object is to provide armor panels which will protect a combat vehicle against the penetrating effects produced by the Munroe jet phenomenon.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent after a study of the following specification, claims and the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-section through a protective panel having an eight layer unidirectional wire pattern.

FIG. 2 is a panel section taken along lines 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-section through an armor panel having an eight-ply orthogonal fiber lay-up.

FIG. 4 is a panel section taken along lines 44 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a portion of a panel member partly in elevation and partly in section showing a cross-ply arrangement of wire elements.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The accompanying drawings are primarily intended to illustrate several presently preferred fiber or wire arrangements within an aluminum matrix.

In FIG. 1, for example, the panel, generally identified at 10, comprises layers 12 and 13 of a projectile resistent, lightweight aluminum alloy, such as 2,024 aluminum alloy. An eight layer unidirectional fiber array 14 v is disposed within the layers of aluminum as a reinforcing material.

The fiber or wire array comprises not less than 25 percent of the volume of the composite panel and may be formed by a single strand lay-up process or by using a prefabricated cloth material.

Although stainless steel wire is a preferred material for reinforcement purposes in the construction of the armor panel of the invention, other elements which satisfactorily bond with the aluminum alloy and which increases the tensile strength of the composite, may also be used. For example, fibers of boron and beryllium may be employed in the formation of the armor matrix.

This represents a tensile strength increase of 300 per-,

cent over a homogeneous aluminum alloy with a density increase of only 40 percent.

In FIG. 3, the panel 15 consists of metallic layers 16 and 17 of an aluminum alloy and a reinforcing wire assembly 18 disposed intermediate the aluminum layers. In the embodiment illustrated by FIG. 3, the wire assembly is fabricated by laying up the wires in each individual layer at right angles to the wires of each adjacent layer.

FIG. illustrates an armor panel 19 constructed in the manner of the invention wherein the wire reinforcements 20 are placed in layers having a cross-ply configuration.

The resistance of the armor panels of the invention to projectile penetration may be further enchanced by increasing the hardness of the exposed surface of the panel. This may be accomplished by vapor depositing a layer of titanium carbide 22 (FIG. 3) on that surface of the armor panel which is to be subjected to projectile bombardment. Similar hardness characteristics may also be obtained by bonding a thin layer of ceramic tile 24 (FIG. 1) to the exposed surface of the aluminum composite.

In use, the armor panels are generally made up in the outline of the vehicle or structure to be protected and are secured to the equipment by any appropriate means.

From a careful consideration of this specification, those skilled in the art will recognize that the armor panel constructions herein disclosed are considerably lighter in weight and will have a higher tensile strength characteristics than more conventional thick and heavy armor plating.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

Having fully disclosed the invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A composite armor panel for protection from the effects of high velocity projectile bombardment and particle jet reactions from shaped charges comprising:

a lightweight panel of an aluminum alloy having first and second surfaces;

a high density distribution of regularly arranged fiber elements embedded in said panel intermediate the said surfaces thereof such that portions of said aluminum surround said fiber elements and form a bond therewith; and

a vapor deposited layer of titanium carbide on a surface of said panel which is exposed to projectile bombardment.

2. The armor panel construction as described in claim 1 wherein said fiber elements comprise an eight layer assembly of stainless steel wire.

Claims (1)

  1. 2. The armor panel construction as described in claim 1 wherein said fiber elements comprise an eight layer assembly of stainless steel wire.
US3826172A 1969-07-28 1969-07-28 Metal, matrix-fiber composite armor Expired - Lifetime US3826172A (en)

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Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE2658618A1 (en) * 1976-12-23 1978-06-29 Sommer Metallbau Stahlbau Gmbh Multilayer explosion resistant plate for safe door - includes shock absorbing cast plate with blind holes, grid of steel rods and outer sheet
US4141802A (en) * 1975-12-31 1979-02-27 Societe Nationale Des Poudres Et Explosifs Fibre-reinforced metal panels and production thereof
WO1979000725A1 (en) * 1978-03-08 1979-10-04 Merlin Gerin Cast composite armour
US4178859A (en) * 1976-09-03 1979-12-18 Bochumer Eisenhutte Heintzmann Gmbh & Co. Door-like closure
US4370390A (en) * 1981-06-15 1983-01-25 Mcdonnell Douglas Corporation 3-D Chopped-fiber composites
FR2576550A1 (en) * 1985-01-25 1986-08-01 Pinson Josette Composite shielding against high kinetic-energy projectiles and against fire
US4639387A (en) * 1983-04-25 1987-01-27 Budd Company Fibrous armor material
US4665794A (en) * 1982-03-12 1987-05-19 Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Armor and a method of manufacturing it
US4867044A (en) * 1984-11-26 1989-09-19 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Jam resistant fluid power actuator for ballistic-damage tolerant redundant cylinder assemblies
US4885214A (en) * 1988-03-10 1989-12-05 Texas Instruments Incorporated Composite material and methods for making
US5015533A (en) * 1988-03-10 1991-05-14 Texas Instruments Incorporated Member of a refractory metal material of selected shape and method of making
US5211776A (en) * 1989-07-17 1993-05-18 General Dynamics Corp., Air Defense Systems Division Fabrication of metal and ceramic matrix composites
US5421087A (en) * 1989-10-30 1995-06-06 Lanxide Technology Company, Lp Method of armoring a vehicle with an anti-ballistic material
US5440995A (en) * 1993-04-05 1995-08-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Tungsten penetrators
US5523171A (en) * 1993-12-20 1996-06-04 Hyundai Motor Company Reinforced material for an automobile connecting rod
US5610363A (en) * 1995-02-15 1997-03-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Enhanced whipple shield
US6311605B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2001-11-06 Gerd Kellner Arrangement for protection against shaped changes
WO2002061365A1 (en) * 2000-12-13 2002-08-08 Warwick Mills, Inc. Wearable protective system having protective elements
WO2002070982A1 (en) 2001-03-08 2002-09-12 Deutsche Titan Gmbh Armoured shaped body consisting of a multilayer composite sheet metal and method for producing the same
US20030167910A1 (en) * 2002-03-11 2003-09-11 Strait S. Jared Structural composite armor and method of manufacturing it
US6647855B1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2003-11-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States National Aeronautics And Space Administration Apparatus and method for deploying a hypervelocity shield
US6786126B2 (en) * 2001-02-05 2004-09-07 Wayne B. Sargent Ballistic resistant materials and method of manufacture
US20040216594A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-11-04 Bruce Kay Splinter resistant composite laminate
US20070148486A1 (en) * 2004-01-19 2007-06-28 Jasko Musaefendic High impact strength, elastic, composite, fibre, metal laminate
US20080236378A1 (en) * 2007-03-30 2008-10-02 Intellectual Property Holdings, Llc Affixable armor tiles
US20090031889A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2009-02-05 Saul W Venner Complex Geometry Composite Armor for Military Applications
US20090114083A1 (en) * 2006-01-23 2009-05-07 Moore Iii Dan T Encapsulated ceramic composite armor
US20100282062A1 (en) * 2007-11-16 2010-11-11 Intellectual Property Holdings, Llc Armor protection against explosively-formed projectiles
US20110023697A1 (en) * 2006-05-01 2011-02-03 Warwick Mills, Inc. Mosaic extremity protection system with transportable solid elements
US20120234215A1 (en) * 2009-11-18 2012-09-20 Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd. Casing
US8291808B2 (en) 2010-04-08 2012-10-23 Warwick Mills, Inc. Titanium mosaic body armor assembly
US8534178B2 (en) 2007-10-30 2013-09-17 Warwick Mills, Inc. Soft plate soft panel bonded multi layer armor materials
DE102009024456B4 (en) * 2009-06-10 2013-10-31 Audi Ag Vehicle armor with metal mesh
US8689671B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-04-08 Federal-Mogul World Wide, Inc. Lightweight armor and methods of making
US8904915B2 (en) 2009-03-20 2014-12-09 Warwick Mills, Inc. Thermally vented body armor
US9046326B1 (en) * 2010-03-24 2015-06-02 Miles S. Rothman Ballistic laminate structure, and method for manufacturing a ballistic laminate structure

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US952877A (en) * 1909-05-28 1910-03-22 Sherard Osborn Cowper-Coles Armor-plate.
GB190920020A (en) * 1909-09-01 1910-09-01 Sherard Osborn Cowper-Coles Improvements in Armour Plate.
US3406446A (en) * 1963-10-29 1968-10-22 Stephen A. Muldovan Method of manufacturing laminated metal panel
US3431818A (en) * 1965-04-26 1969-03-11 Aerojet General Co Lightweight protective armor plate
US3596344A (en) * 1968-09-27 1971-08-03 United Aircraft Corp Method of fabricating fiber-reinforced articles

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US952877A (en) * 1909-05-28 1910-03-22 Sherard Osborn Cowper-Coles Armor-plate.
GB190920020A (en) * 1909-09-01 1910-09-01 Sherard Osborn Cowper-Coles Improvements in Armour Plate.
US3406446A (en) * 1963-10-29 1968-10-22 Stephen A. Muldovan Method of manufacturing laminated metal panel
US3431818A (en) * 1965-04-26 1969-03-11 Aerojet General Co Lightweight protective armor plate
US3596344A (en) * 1968-09-27 1971-08-03 United Aircraft Corp Method of fabricating fiber-reinforced articles

Cited By (54)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4141802A (en) * 1975-12-31 1979-02-27 Societe Nationale Des Poudres Et Explosifs Fibre-reinforced metal panels and production thereof
US4178859A (en) * 1976-09-03 1979-12-18 Bochumer Eisenhutte Heintzmann Gmbh & Co. Door-like closure
DE2658618A1 (en) * 1976-12-23 1978-06-29 Sommer Metallbau Stahlbau Gmbh Multilayer explosion resistant plate for safe door - includes shock absorbing cast plate with blind holes, grid of steel rods and outer sheet
WO1979000725A1 (en) * 1978-03-08 1979-10-04 Merlin Gerin Cast composite armour
FR2419498A1 (en) * 1978-03-08 1979-10-05 Merlin Gerin A composite armor flows
US4534266A (en) * 1978-03-08 1985-08-13 Aluminum Company Of America Composite armour plating
DE2940989C1 (en) * 1978-03-08 1985-10-17 Fond Alcoa Mg S A A method for producing a metal-armored plate
US4945814A (en) * 1978-03-08 1990-08-07 Aluminum Company Of America Molded composite armor
US4370390A (en) * 1981-06-15 1983-01-25 Mcdonnell Douglas Corporation 3-D Chopped-fiber composites
US4665794A (en) * 1982-03-12 1987-05-19 Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Armor and a method of manufacturing it
US4639387A (en) * 1983-04-25 1987-01-27 Budd Company Fibrous armor material
US4867044A (en) * 1984-11-26 1989-09-19 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Jam resistant fluid power actuator for ballistic-damage tolerant redundant cylinder assemblies
FR2576550A1 (en) * 1985-01-25 1986-08-01 Pinson Josette Composite shielding against high kinetic-energy projectiles and against fire
US5015533A (en) * 1988-03-10 1991-05-14 Texas Instruments Incorporated Member of a refractory metal material of selected shape and method of making
US4885214A (en) * 1988-03-10 1989-12-05 Texas Instruments Incorporated Composite material and methods for making
US5211776A (en) * 1989-07-17 1993-05-18 General Dynamics Corp., Air Defense Systems Division Fabrication of metal and ceramic matrix composites
US5421087A (en) * 1989-10-30 1995-06-06 Lanxide Technology Company, Lp Method of armoring a vehicle with an anti-ballistic material
US5440995A (en) * 1993-04-05 1995-08-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Tungsten penetrators
US5523171A (en) * 1993-12-20 1996-06-04 Hyundai Motor Company Reinforced material for an automobile connecting rod
US5610363A (en) * 1995-02-15 1997-03-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Enhanced whipple shield
US6311605B1 (en) * 1998-06-05 2001-11-06 Gerd Kellner Arrangement for protection against shaped changes
WO2002061365A1 (en) * 2000-12-13 2002-08-08 Warwick Mills, Inc. Wearable protective system having protective elements
US20020122927A1 (en) * 2000-12-13 2002-09-05 Charles Howland Wearable protective system having protective elements
US6911247B2 (en) 2000-12-13 2005-06-28 Warwick Mills, Inc. Wearable protective system having protective elements
US6786126B2 (en) * 2001-02-05 2004-09-07 Wayne B. Sargent Ballistic resistant materials and method of manufacture
DE10111108A1 (en) * 2001-03-08 2002-09-19 Deutsche Titan Gmbh Armored molding of a multi-layer composite sheet and process for its preparation
DE10111108B9 (en) * 2001-03-08 2004-10-21 Deutsche Titan Gmbh A process for producing an armored shaped body of a multilayer composite sheet
WO2002070982A1 (en) 2001-03-08 2002-09-12 Deutsche Titan Gmbh Armoured shaped body consisting of a multilayer composite sheet metal and method for producing the same
US20040115463A1 (en) * 2001-03-08 2004-06-17 Heinz Sibum Armoured shaped body consisting of a multilayer composite sheet metal and method for producing the same
DE10111108C2 (en) * 2001-03-08 2003-11-27 Deutsche Titan Gmbh A process for producing an armored shaped body of a multilayer composite sheet
US6826996B2 (en) * 2002-03-11 2004-12-07 General Dynamics Land Systems, Inc. Structural composite armor and method of manufacturing it
US20030167910A1 (en) * 2002-03-11 2003-09-11 Strait S. Jared Structural composite armor and method of manufacturing it
US6647855B1 (en) * 2002-09-30 2003-11-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States National Aeronautics And Space Administration Apparatus and method for deploying a hypervelocity shield
US20040216594A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-11-04 Bruce Kay Splinter resistant composite laminate
WO2004094123A2 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-11-04 Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation Splinter resistant composite laminate
WO2004094123A3 (en) * 2003-04-17 2005-03-24 Sikorsky Aircraft Corp Splinter resistant composite laminate
US20070148486A1 (en) * 2004-01-19 2007-06-28 Jasko Musaefendic High impact strength, elastic, composite, fibre, metal laminate
US20090114083A1 (en) * 2006-01-23 2009-05-07 Moore Iii Dan T Encapsulated ceramic composite armor
US7866248B2 (en) 2006-01-23 2011-01-11 Intellectual Property Holdings, Llc Encapsulated ceramic composite armor
US9170071B2 (en) 2006-05-01 2015-10-27 Warwick Mills Inc. Mosaic extremity protection system with transportable solid elements
US20140366713A1 (en) * 2006-05-01 2014-12-18 Warwick Mills Inc. Mosaic extremity protection system with transportable solid elements
US20110023697A1 (en) * 2006-05-01 2011-02-03 Warwick Mills, Inc. Mosaic extremity protection system with transportable solid elements
US9453710B2 (en) * 2006-05-01 2016-09-27 Warwick Mills Inc. Mosaic extremity protection system with transportable solid elements
US8689671B2 (en) 2006-09-29 2014-04-08 Federal-Mogul World Wide, Inc. Lightweight armor and methods of making
US20080236378A1 (en) * 2007-03-30 2008-10-02 Intellectual Property Holdings, Llc Affixable armor tiles
US20090031889A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2009-02-05 Saul W Venner Complex Geometry Composite Armor for Military Applications
US8534178B2 (en) 2007-10-30 2013-09-17 Warwick Mills, Inc. Soft plate soft panel bonded multi layer armor materials
US20100282062A1 (en) * 2007-11-16 2010-11-11 Intellectual Property Holdings, Llc Armor protection against explosively-formed projectiles
US8904915B2 (en) 2009-03-20 2014-12-09 Warwick Mills, Inc. Thermally vented body armor
DE102009024456B4 (en) * 2009-06-10 2013-10-31 Audi Ag Vehicle armor with metal mesh
US20120234215A1 (en) * 2009-11-18 2012-09-20 Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd. Casing
US8555794B2 (en) * 2009-11-18 2013-10-15 Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd. Casing
US9046326B1 (en) * 2010-03-24 2015-06-02 Miles S. Rothman Ballistic laminate structure, and method for manufacturing a ballistic laminate structure
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