US3817409A - Silo unloader and apparatus therefor - Google Patents

Silo unloader and apparatus therefor Download PDF

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US3817409A
US3817409A US28338472A US3817409A US 3817409 A US3817409 A US 3817409A US 28338472 A US28338472 A US 28338472A US 3817409 A US3817409 A US 3817409A
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fluid
pressure
auger
drive
delivering
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R Weaver
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R Weaver
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Priority to US05/218,736 priority Critical patent/US4057151A/en
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Priority to US05283384 priority patent/US3817409A/en
Priority claimed from PH14794A external-priority patent/PH9760A/en
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Publication of US3817409A publication Critical patent/US3817409A/en
Priority claimed from CA263,370A external-priority patent/CA1023682A/en
Priority claimed from CA289,913A external-priority patent/CA1045572A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01FPROCESSING OF HARVESTED PRODUCE; HAY OR STRAW PRESSES; DEVICES FOR STORING AGRICULTURAL OR HORTICULTURAL PRODUCE
    • A01F25/00Storing agricultural or horticultural produce; Hanging-up harvested fruit
    • A01F25/16Arrangements in forage silos
    • A01F25/20Unloading arrangements
    • A01F25/2018Bottom unloading units for tower silos

Abstract

A silo unloader is provided, of the bottom unloader type, wherein an auger type conveyor is utilized for cutting silage and delivering it generally radially inwardly, with one or more auxiliary augers being provided. Te auger is supported at its radial outermost end and is intermittently driven in a sweeping motion. Particularly novel driving apparatus is provided, for causing such a sweeping motion of the auger, as well as systems for lubricating various components of the apparatus.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Weaver 1111 3,817,409 1451 June 18, 1974 SILO UNLOADER AND APPARATUS THEREFOR [76] Inventor: Richard L. Weaver, Rt. 1,
Myerstown, Pa. 17067 22 Filed: Aug. 24, 1972 21 Appl. 190.; 283,384
Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 218,736. Jan. 18,
52 us. c1 214/17 DA, 91/412 511 1111.0. 865g 65/46 58 Field of Search 214/17 DA;91/4l2 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,237,788 3/1966 Weaver et a1 214/17 DA 3,391,809 7/1968 Weaver et al 214/17 DA 3,408,901 11/1968 lnhofer 214/17 DA x 3,499,556 3/1970 Broberg 214/17 DA Primary ExaminrRobert G. Sheridan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Paul & Paul 571 ABSTRACT A silo unloader is provided, of the bottom unloader type, wherein an anger type conveyor is utilized for cutting silage and delivering it generally radially inwardly, with one or more auxiliary augers being provided. Te auger is supported at its radial outermost end and is intermittently driven in a sweeping motion. Particularly novel driving apparatus is provided, for causing such a sweeping motion of the auger, as well as systems for lubricating various components of the apparatus.
6 Claims, 19 Drawing Figures 44- TO BEARING, 9o +ro BAND, 103
alarrms PATENTEDJuu 18 um SHEET 2 BF 8 PATENTEDJuu 18 m4 sum u or a PATENTEDJUM 18 I974 sum 5 or 8 FoRwARD DRIVE f i YZ Ill RETURN STROKE SHEET 8 0F 8 I05 I03 I i REVERSE DRIVE PATENTEDJuu 1m REVERSE RETURN STROKE FIE PATENTEDJuu 1a 1914 saw 7 ur a wmm 1 SlLO UNLOADER AND APPARATUS THEREFOR CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This is a continuation-in-partof application Ser. No. 218,736, filed Jan. 18, 1972.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Storage silos for the storage of grain, feed and the like can be either of the top unloader type, or bottom unloader type. It is often preferred to utilize silos of the bottom unloader type, in that, by withdrawing silage from the bottom of the silo, the oldest silage is utilized first, as well as for many other reasons. The present invention is directed toward bottom unloaders for silos.
Bottom unloaders have also been developed in the past, but difficulties with such unloaders have very often been experienced, in that the tremendous weight of silage upon the bottom unloaders often compact silage about the unloader, acting as a brake, and jamming the operation of the unloader. I
Particularly, when the unloader is of the auger type, with teeth or other suitable cutting devices for cutting silage as an auger is rotated about its axis, and for propelling, or otherwise conveying silage thus cut, to a generally central location, it is also necessary to move such an auger across the floor of a silo.
If such an auger is of a radial type, adapted for a sweeping motion about a center, for example, of a generally cylindrical silo, such may sweep acrossthe floor of the silo, cutting a path, with silage from an upper part of the silo then falling downwardly into the zone justpreviously traversed by the auger.
It has been found that such augers must be constructed in such a manner as to withstand tremendous silage forces.
Also, there is present the problem of how to drive the auger in its sweeping motion. Some systems have been developed, whereby a motor or the like may be mounted at a radial outermost end of an auger for driving a member which in turn, is engageable with another member at the periphery of the silo floor,'or inside the silo wall. However, if a motor or the like is adapted for movement with the auger about the silo, in its sweeping action, should the auger become jammed, it may be exceedingly difficult, if not impossible to service the motor.
THE PRESENT INVENTION each of the objectsset forth immediately above,
wherein the auger is adapted for use as a bottom unloader for a silo.
It is a further object of this invention to provide a novel drive for causing a sweeping motion of an auger, about a pivot generally at one end thereof.
It is another object of this invention to accomplish the above object, wherein such drive for the auger is intermittent.
It is a further object of this invention to accomplish the two objects set forth immediately above, wherein a drive band is utilized.
It is another object of this invention to accomplish the object set forth above, wherein the drive for the band is disposed inside the silo, and even further, wherein a novel splice is provided for the band.
Another object of this invention resides in lubrication devices and systems for the various moving components necessary to provide a workable silo bottom unloader.
A further object of this invention is to provide a novel fluid drive system and components thereof, separately, and for use with an auger drive, and more specifically, to provide a novel fluid drive synchronizing system, and components therefor.
Another object of this invention resides in the provision of a novel two-way valve device.
Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following brief descriptions of the drawing figures, detailed description of the preferred embodiment, and the appended claims.
IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a silo unloader and apparatus, in accordance with this invention, with the illustration being taken through a silo, and with the silo being shown in section.
FIG. 2 is a sectional view, through a portion of the auger pivoting apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1, with an auger also being fragmentally illustrated in phantom, the illustration being taken generally along the line II of FIG. 1.
FIG. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view, taken through the right end of the auger of FIG. 1, and the auxiliary auger connected thereto, generally along the line III-III of FIG. 1.
- FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view, through the unloader of FIG. 1, taken generally along the line IV-IV of FIG. 1.
FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken through the band and track of this invention, generally along the line V-V of FIG. 4.
FIG. 6 is a sectional view, also taken through the band and with the track being illustrated in phantom, and with lubrication delivery means for the track also being illustrated, such section being taken along the line VIVI of FIG. 4.
FIG. 7 is a fragmentary end perspective view of a portion of the unloader apparatus of this invention, particularly illustrating the auxiliary auger and cutting means of both the auxiliary auger and primary auger.
FIG. 8 is an enlarged bottom view of the drive apparatus illustrated in broken lines in FIG. 1, with two different positions of movable components of the apparatus being illustrated, one in full lines, and one in phantom.
FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view of some of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 8, taken generally along the line IX-IX of FIG. 8.
FIG. is a sectional view, through a particularly novel two-way valve of this invention.
FIG. 11 is a schematic view of certain delivery systems for the fluid drive motor that provides the rotational drive for the auger of this invention, and for the lubrication systems of this invention, with several of the components being fragrnentally or schematically illustrated, in perspective, for the sake of clarity.
FIG. 12 is a schematic view of the band drive system and apparatus in accordance with this invention, illustrating the system of forward drive.
FIG. 13 is a view similar to that of FIG. 12, with the system illustrating the return stroke following a forward drive stroke.
FIG. 14 is a view also similar to that of FIG. 12, with the system adapted for reverse drive.
FIG. 15 is a view similar to that of FIG. 12, with the system adapted for effecting the return stroke of reverse drive.
F I6. 16 is a partial schematic illustration of modifications to the system illustrated in FIGS. 12 through 15, wherein means is provided for synchronizing the sweeping advance of the auger, to the rotation of the auger.
FIG. 17 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the pressure sensing valve utilized in the schematic illustration of FIG. 16.
FIG. 18 is a partial schematic illustration of the system of FIG. 16, but wherein the flow of driving fluid is illustrated during operation of the pressure sensing valve, during which delivery of fluid to the advance cylinder is diverted in response to pressure build-up for rotating the auger about its axis, as for example during jamming of the auger during its rotation.
FIG. 19 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a portion of the band used to advance the auger, specifically illustrating the band splice.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings in detail, reference is first made to FIG. 1, wherein a silo 20 is illustrated, that may be of concrete or the like construction, having a cylindrical wall 21, and a silo bottom or floor 22. The unloader apparatus is generally designated by the numeral 23.
A central outlet zone 24 is disposed, generally at the geometric center of the silo 20, for receivingsilage through quadrant openings 25, 26, 27 and 28 thereof with such quadrants being divided by spacer supports 30 extending radially inwardly from an outer peripheral ring 31 carried by the concrete floor 32, to an inner ring 33.
A central supporting plate 34 having a cylindrical sleeve 35 extending downwardly therefrom, and welded thereto, is provided, for rotary motion within the ring 33. A pair of bars 36 are welded to the sleeve 35, and extend downward therefrom, and are provided with a cross bar 37 connecting across the bottom thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 2.
A fluid drive motor 38 is provided, disposed beneath the center support plate 34, and suitably mounted for rotational movement therewith, with the motor 38 having an output shaft 40 with a sprocket, or suitable drive member 41, to which is connected a drive chain 42, that in turn is connected in driving engagement with a driven sprocket 43, connected to a shaft 44 of an auger 45. The shaft 44 is suitably mounted on a bearing 46 housed within a frame member 47, with the frame member 47 being carried by the plate 34, and connected thereto by suitable fasteners 48 or the like.
A suitable supply 50, for lubricating grease, and for fluid for driving the fluid drive motor 38, is provided, with a device 50 being carried by a support 51, which in turn, is suitably carried by a concrete, metal or other suitable non-moving base member 52. The member 50 comprises a fixed outer container 53, to which is delivered fluid supply and return lines 54 and 55 respectively, for the fluid drive motor 38, and also to which is delivered suitable lubricant lines, such as grease lines 56, 57, 58 and 60. An internal canister-type member 61 illustrated in broken lines in FIG. 3, is adapted for rotation with a top plate 62, that in turn, is bolted or suitably connected to the cross bar 37, and adapted for movement therewith, and with drive fluid lines 63 and 64 connected for movement with the plate 62, and with the lines 63 and 64 being respectively connected in communication with lines 54 and 55. Similarly, lubricant delivery lines 66, 67, 68 and 70 are adapted for delivering lubricant from the respectively associated lines 56, 57, 58 and 60, but with the latter-mentioned group of lines being stationary, and with the lines 66, 67, 68, and 70 rotating with the plate 62. The means which accomplishes such rotation is not specifically a part of the invention of this application.
The lubricant delivery line 70 is adapted to deliver lubricating grease or the like through an outlet 71, for lubricating the sprockets 41 and 43, and the connecting chain 42. It will be apparent'that other suitable drive means other than the chain-and sprocket arrangement may be utilized, for rotating the shaft 44, by a motor 38 or the like.
The unloader 23 includes an auger 72 and a support arm 73 therefor. THe auger 72 is provided with a plurality of leftwardly bent cutting teeth 74, as viewed in FIG. 3, mounted to a helically disposed flange 75, carried by the auger 72, by suitable bolts 76 or the like, with the teeth 74 thus being arranged in helicallywound fashion, as illustrated in FIG. 1, such that that portion of the auger 72 from the generally centrally disposed openings 26, 27, 28 and 30 outwardly of the primary auger 72, is adapted to facilitate, upon driving the auger 72 in the clockwise direction illustrated by the arrow 77 in FIG. 4, moving silage leftwardly, as viewed in FIG. 1, for disposition through the openings 26, 27, 28 and 30.
It will be noted that the openings 26, 27, 28 and 30 are not precisely centrally located, but only generally" centrally located, with respect to the bottom 22 of the silo 20, in order to accommodate the pivotal center support 34, for the auger 72 and its support arm 73. Cutting means or cutting teeth 78 are disposed in an oppositely wound helix to that of the disposition of the teeth 74, for oppositely directed conveyance of silage.
Thus, silage disposed above the rotating support plate 34 will be conveyed from the precise geometric center of the plate 34, radially outwardly to the openings 26, 27, 28 and 30, which, are described herein as being generally centrally located with respect to the silo.
The silo support arm 73 is welded, bolted, or otherwise suitably connected to a channel member 80, that in turn, is carried by the rotatable center support 34.
The right-most end of the auger 72 is carried, by a suitable supporting bracket 81, that in turn is carried by the support arm 73, for driving of the radial outer most end of the auger 72, through the support arm 73, by means later to be described hereinafter.
A spindle 82, disposed within a bore 83 of the auger 72 as illustrated in FIG. 3, is provided, with a left-most portion 84, as illustrated in FIG. 3, being connected to the cylindrical portion 85 of the auger 72, by means of the bearing 46 in FIG. 2 is lubricated from the line 68.
In order to deliver the grease or other lubricant through the line 67 to the bearing 91, the line 67 is run through the support arm 73, as illustrated in FIG. 4, to the hear ing 91, following the generally S-shaped, or tortuous path of the upper surface of the support bracket 81, as illustrated in the perspective view of FIG. 7. Such delivery of lubricant to the bearing 91 is necessary, in order to properly lubricate the same, and in order to do so without placing the delivery line 67, in a position in which it may be severed by bearing-protecting silage cutting teeth 94 and 95. Y
With particular reference to FIGS. 4 and 7, it can be seen that the support arm 73 carries a wiping blade 96, at the lower most end thereof, that may be triangular construction or the like, in section, as illustrated in FIG. 4, by having its right-most edge, as illustrated in FIG. 4, in close running clearance with the outer edges of the cutting teeth 74, for facilitating the wiping of the teeth, and for preventing accumulated silage on the teeth, from being delivered to that zone between the auger 72 and the support arm 73. If such silage were allowed to accumulate between the auger7 2 and the support arm 73', such could build up, and compact within such zone, acting upon the auger 72, as a brake, thereby slowing down the rotation of the auger 72 about is radial, or longitudinal axis. Accordingly, the wiping means 96 is highly desirable, and performs an important function in accordance with this invention. A similar wiping means 97 is also provided for the auxiliary auger, later to be discussed herein, with the wiping means 97 being in close running clearance with adjacent outermost teeth carried by the auxiliary auger, also later tobe discussed herein.
It will be noted that the support arm 73 is generally triangular in transverse cross-section, as illustrated in FIG. 4, and is welded or otherwise suitably secured, as at 98, to a support member 100, generally of inverted U-shaped configuration, in transverse section illustrated in FIG. 5.'The member 100 is bolted, by means of bolts 101 or the like, or otherwise suitably carried by an upstanding support member 102, with the member 102 having an angularly sloped surface 99, also facilitating the seating of the support arm 73 thereon, as illustrated in FIG. 4. The support 102 is welded to an upper portion of a band 103. The band 103 is generally circular in configuration, and constructed as acomplete band, of the general size of the track 104 illustrated in FIG. 1, having a plurality of slots, or voids 105 therein with the voids 105 being equidistantly arcuately spaced about the band 103, in accordance with a desired predetermined stroke, later to be discussed herein. The band 103 is disposed against a track surface 106, of the circular track 104 illustrated in radial section, in FIG. 5. Movement of the band 105, will be noted, is of the band rotating within the opening or track 104, with the entire circular band being moved simultaneously. The opening 104 is constructed by means of the channel illustrated, such channel 107 being disposed beneath the floor 108 of the silo, with the concrete floor 22 being cutaway, as illustrated in FIG. 5, to have an angular or chamfered portion 110, in order to accommodate the support member 102 as the member 102 is moved about the silo bottom, in response to movement of the band 103.
It will be noted that the surface of the track member 106, next adjacent the movable band 103 that slides thereagainst, must be lubricated, and such lubrication is provided by means of a duct or channel 111, cut into the band itself 103, as illustrated in FIG. 6, with the band being provided with lubricant being delivered through the member 102, by the duct 112 illustrated, with the duct 112 being supplied with grease, orother suitable lubricant by the line 66 illustrated in FIG. 2,
passing through the support arm 73, as illustrated in erally, the auxiliary auger 115, will have a tapered configuration, as illustrated in FIG. 3, and have two helically wound rows of cutting and conveying teeth 117, as illustrated in FIG. 7, with the two rows being disposed generally parallel to each other, for facilitating the conveying of silage in a right-to-left direction, as viewed in FIG. 3. The auger 115 is provided with the bearing-protecting teeth 94, and 95, which teeth 94 and 95 are adapted, upon rotation of the auger 115, about its radial axis to define a surface of revolution that is cup-like, or that is of the configuration of the frustum of a cone, and that encompasses the right-most end of the main auger 72, having the bearing 91 disposed thereon. This is for the purpose of protecting the bearing 91, to maintain the same free from compacting of silage thereabout, and for protecting the grease line.
67. It is for this reason that the supporting bracket 81 provide clearance for the rotating blades 94 and 95. It will be noted that the auxiliary auger 115 is also keyed to the spindle portion 87, by a suitable key and slot arrangement 120, of conventional type, in order that shear stresses and the like will be transmitted through the key arrangement 120, rather than through the bolt 116, with the bolt 116 fixing the position of the auxiliary auger 115, in an end-wise, or longitudinal direction. It will also be noted that the right-most end of the cylindrical portion 85 of the main auger 72 is provided with a sleeve 121 welded thereto at 122, for overhanging the bearing 91, as illustrated in FIG. 3, with the helical wound flange 95, in that position, for a portion of its that with teeth of the auxiliary auger, such as the teeth 94 and 95, being constructed as illustrated, in order to encompass-the right-most portion of the main auger 72, the conveyance of the silage from the zone of cutting of the auxiliary auger 115, to the zone of conveyance of the main auger 72 by teeth 74 thereof, is facilitated.
It will also be noted, with reference to FIG. 3, that the supporting arm or bracket 81 is illustrated 90 out of phase, on order to clearly illustrate the manner in which the member 81 conforms to the configuration of the blades 94 and 95.
A secondary auxiliary auger 126 is connected to the auger 115, by a thru-bolt 127, passing through connecting holes 128 at the right-most end of the auxiliary auger 115, with the auxiliary auger also having cutting teeth 130 carried thereby, and wound thereabout in a manner which will facilitate the conveying of silage cut thereby, from right to left, as illustrated in FIG. 3, with the peripheries of the cutting teeth 130, in conjunction with the cutting teeth 117, describing a generally frusto-conical surface of revolution. The purpose of the secondary auxiliary auger 126, is for cutting the silage most closely adjacent a silo wall 21. Depending upon the diameter of the silo 20, the number and length of auxiliary augers 115 and 126, may be appropriately selected. It will be noted that the second auxiliary auger 126 may for example be of 2 inches in length, 4 inches in length, or as desired, and that any number of the same may be utilized. Furthermore, the teeth or screwtype blade 130 on the periphery thereof might have any desired pitch. The desirability of easily changeable auxiliary augers such as 126 is as follows. When silage within a silo is wet, as the arm or auger sweeps across the silo floor, the wet silage will tend to fall downwardly behind the auger, particularly if the fiber length of the silage is short. However, in the reverse situation, as for example, when the fiber length is long and the silage is dry, for example, if it has been stored for a long period of time, after the auger has made a pass, the silage may remain in dome-like configuration, and not fall to the floor of the silo. Particularly in such instances it becomes desirable to then cut the silo closer to the silo wall, in order to facilitate folding of the silage from such a dome-like configuration. However, if a large bite" is taken along the silo wall, because of the forces of such silage opposing the sweep of the auger across the silo floor, with such forces being active at the very end of the auger, the force offered by the resistance caused by the silage can jam or wedge the auger, impeding its sweep. Accordingly, a small bite" by the second auxiliary auger, or third auxiliary auger, or whatever the number of the end auger may be, be-
comes desirable. Thus, the end or final auxiliary auger 126 then approaches the bottom of the dome of silage somewhat like the peeling of an apple, taking a slight or shallow bite" first, whereby the auger may overcome the resistance afforded by dry silage along the silo wall, and then the end-most auxiliary auger is changed, or added to, in order that the auger may then take a deeper bite, etc. It is thus seen that the dome" of silage may be undercut along the wall, to facilitate its falling downwardly toward the silo floor, for removal.
With reference to FIG. 11, it will be apparent that oil and grease may be supplied to the members 50, from suitable supplies, as indicated, which would normally be located externally of the silo, but which could be located internally of the silo, beneath the floor thereof. However, for ease and facility in effecting the delivery of lubricating fluid such as grease, to the track for the band 103, to the bearing 91 to the bearing 46, and to the sprockets and chain 41, 43, and 42, a pressurized container of grease may be maintained outside the silo, for periodic actuation, or for automatic actuation, if desired, being delivered by suitable delivery lines, not shown, through an underground tunnel, or beneath the silo foundation, with such lines 56, 57, 58 and 60 then communicating with the container 50. Thus, the abovementioned and other components of the apparatus and system of this invention that require lubrication, may be lubricated from externally of the silo, either automatically, or by merely actuating a grease supply system as aforesaid.
With specific reference to FIG. 8, the unique apparatus of this invention for driving the annular drive band 103 is illustrated. A zone or pit 131 is provided, beneath the floor 108 of the silo 20, having outer and inner walls 132 and 133, and end wall 134 and 135. Such walls may be framed with steel channels such as that 136, if desired. A floor plate 137 is provided, extending between the upper flanges of the channels 107 and 136, as illustrated in FIG. 9. This plate 137 may be welded to the channels, as illustrated, and carries therebeneath a pair of guide members 138 and 140, generally welded thereto, that provide a slide for a movable platemember 141 therebetween. The plate 141 is adpated to slide through the arcuate paths defined by the guides 137 and 138, such paths being designated by the arcuate dotted line 142, for the outer edge 143 of the plate 141. It will be noted that the guides 138 and also provide a supporting function, in that they have extensions that engage beneath the plate 141 for carrying the same, as illustrated most clearly in FIG. 9.
A first drive means 144, of the oil-operative hydraulic drive piston type is provided, with fluid drive and return lines 145 and 146 respectively connected thereto, and with the cylinder 144 being carried by a suitable mounting bracket 147, that in turn is carried by the plate 141, for movement therewith by any suitable, bolting, welding, or attachment devices. A cylinder rod 148 of the piston cylinder 144 is connected to a clevis 150 that in turn is pivotally connected to a lug 151 of a push-rod 152 with the push-rod 152 having at its leftmost end as illustrated in FIG. 9, a lug 153, that is adapted to engage within the slots or voids 155 of the band 103, upon introducing fluid through the line 145, to the piston cylinder 144, for driving the lug 153 leftwardly as viewed in FIG. 9. Thus, the lug 153 would assume the phantom line position as illustrated in FIG. 9, upon energizing the cylinder 144.
The plate 141 is driven by a second drive means, or piston cylinder 154, having its right-most end as viewed in FIG. 8 mounted to the wall 135, by a suitable pivotal mount 155, and with its left-most end connected to a suitable yoke or clevis 156, that in turn is pivotally connected at 157 to a plate 158, that in turn may be carried by suitable plates, brackets or the like secured to the movable plate 141. In any event, the piston cylinder or drive means 154 is adapted, upon energizing the cylinder 154, from the right inlet 160 thereof to drive the plate 141 leftward as viewed in FIG. 8, such that the band 103 and auger 72 would be driven in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 1. This, of course, is with the lug 153 in engagement with the voids or slots 105, of the band 103. The band 103, as viewed in FIG. 9 will thus move against a cut-down portion 161 of the track plate 106.
Also mounted to and carried for movement with the plate 141, is a spool valve 162, suitably carried by brackets 163, that are welded, bolted or otherwise secured to a support plate 158 or the like that is carried by the plate 141. The spool valve 162 is thus adapted for movement with the plate 141, throughout the stroke, the energization or driving of which is provided by the piston of the piston cylinder 154, and with the length of the stroke being determined by a pair of limit switch members or lugs 164 and 165, against which opposite ends 166 and 167 of the spool valve 162 engage. Thus, upon movement of the plate 141 from the full line position illustrated in FIG. 8, to the phantom line position thereof, the member 166 of the spool valve 162 will engage a stop or limit device 164, that in turn, will alter the delivery of driving fluid, in a way that will later be described herein, to reverse the fluid being applied to the first drive cylinder 144, for return of the lug 153 to the full line position illustrated in FIG. 9, from the driving phantom line position thereof, and then, in sequence, to reverse the direction of drive of the piston within the cylinder 154, to withdraw the plate 141 from the phantom line position illustrated in FIG. 8, to the full line position thereof. Following this, in the forward direction of drive, the cylinder 144 will again be actuated as aforesaid, followed, once again, by the actuation of the cylinder 154, such that, in sequence, the lug 153 will again become engaged within a void 105 of the band 103, and then the cylinder 154 will be actuated to once again drive the plate 141, to the phantom line position thereof illustrated in FIG. 8.
It will also be apparent that the spacing of the slots or voids 105 of the bank 103 will be determined by the placement of the lug 164, for example, relative to the contact member 166 of thespool valve 162. Thus, the distance of drive of the plate 141, in a transverse direction (or arcuate to be more precise) is determined by the placement of the lug 164, which in turn is determined by the distance between centers of adjacent voids 105 of the band 103.
In some instances, it may be desirable to reversely drive the aguer 72; i.e. in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 1, for example, should the auger 72 meet with excessive resistance, from silage or the like, or for any other reason. In this instance, the cylinder 144 will be actuated as aforesaid and then the piston cylinder 154 will be reversely actuated, to drive from left to right, as viewed in FIG. 8, followed by retraction of the lug 153 from a void, and by return of the piston within the cylinder 154 from right-to-left, then followed once again by energizing the cylinder 144 such that the lug 153 again comes into engagement with a void 105, followed once again, by actuation of the cylinder 154, for driving of the piston therein from left to right once again, as viewed in FIG. 8.
It is thus seen that a unique drive system is provided,
disposed within the silo 20, mounted beneath the floor 22 thereof, completely out of contact with silage.
With particular reference to FIGS. 12, 13, 14 and 15,
the hydraulic drivefor the cylinders 144 and 154 of this invention is most clearly illustrated. It will be understood that this system-has been particularly designed for use in driving the band 103 that in turn causes the auger and auger arm of this invention to sweep across a silo floor, but that this system may be utilized to drive other members, if desired, in other environments.
With reference to FIG. 12, a fluid'such as oil, is supplied from a supply tank 170, and is delivered to a compressor 171. This oil is then raised to a desired pressure, which, throughout the illustrations of FIGS. 12 through 15 will be designated by those lines having the solid arrows, with the return lines being those having the dotted arrowheads. Accordingly, with reference to FIG. 12, pressurized fluid passes from the compressor 171, to the inlet 172 of the spool valve 162, and, be- 'cause the spool valve 162 is in a right-most position, wherein the movable right end of the probe 167 is in engagement with the lug 165, the oil will follow the path designated by the arrow 173, through the line 174, to enter the Tee 175 through the inlet 176 thereof. The Tee 175 has a lower line 177 connected to a valve I 178, which will later be described hereinafter, but
line 180, through the manually actuable switch 181,
which an operator has preset the manually actuable lever 182 thereof, to such a position that the oil will follow the path indicated by the arrow 183, as illustrated, to enter the inlet of the piston cylinder 144, to drive the lug 153, from the full line position illustrated in FIG. 12, to the phantom line position thereof, in engagement within a void 105 of the bank 103. Upon completing such movement, the pressure will back up through the line 184, 183, 180, until the pressure is sufficient to operate the valve 178, at which time only will the piston within the cylinder 154 be operated, by the entry of fluid through the linlet thereof, such that the piston within the cylinder 154 will move leftward, as viewed in FIG. 12, guiding the plate- 141 leftward, and carrying the band 103, also leftward, as-viewed in FIG. 12. Because the spool valve 162 is also carried by the plate 141, the spool valve 162 will also be moved leftward, until its left-most end probe 166 strikes the lug 164, at which time the spool valve will be actuated as illustrated in FIG. 13, such that pressurized fluid delivered to the inlet 172 thereof will pass outwardly through outlet 185, through line 186, to inlet 187 of the cylinder 154, and also through the line 188, back through the switch 181, through the path 190 thereof,
to inlet 146 to'the cylinder 144. However, it will be' I 103, and then, as back pressure builds up, to a point at which the pre-load of the valve 178 is met in the reverse direction, the valve will open and permit the oil to drive the piston within the cylinder 154 rightward, as viewed in FIG. 13, such that the plate 141 may move rightward from the position illustrated in FIG. 13, withactuated to drive the plate 141, in a forward direction,
which corresponds to a clockwise direction of rotation of the auger 72 as illustrated in FIG. 1, and with each increment of leftward movement of the band 103, the lug 153 is withdrawn, such that, upon return stroke of the piston of the cylinder 154, and upon return movement of the plate 141 and lug 153 carried thereby, the band 103 will not be returned therewith.
Should it be desired to reverse the direction of rotation of the auger 72, to a counter-clockwise direction of rotation, as viewed in FIG. 1, the handle 182 may be moved from the phantom line position illustrated in FIG. 14, to the full line position thereof. Thus, oil entering the port 172 would pass through the spool valve 162 and out the port 192 thereof, through the line 193 and to the Tee 187 ofthe cylinder 154 at which point it would meet resistance determined by the preload of the valve 178, thereby allowing the pressurized oil to pass through the line 194, through the switch 181, to the line 195, to be delivered to the drive port 145 of the first drive cylinder 144, for causing the lug 153 to enter a void 105 of the belt or band 103. Once again, back pressure will build up, back through the line 195, 194 to the Tee," 187, sufficient to overcome the preload of the valve 178, whereby the piston within the cylinder 154 will be driven rightward, as viewed in FIG. 14, thereby moving the plate 141 rightward, and carrying the band 103 in a rightward direction. Upon the spool tip 167, striking the lug 165, as illustrated in FIG. 15, incoming fluid to the port 172 of the spool valve 162 will be diverted to the port 196, through the line 197 to the Tee 175, once again, meeting resistance, and thereby delivering the pressurized fluid to the line 198, the switch 181, and to the line 200, into the port 146 of the cylinder 144, for lifting the lug 153 thereof from a void or slot 105 in the band 103, and with increased build-up of backup pressure within the line 200, and line 198, the valve 178 will be actuated to guide the piston within the cylinder 154, leftward, while the lug 152 is out of engagement relative to a void of the band 103. Thus, the complete operation of the hydraulic drive system of this invention is readily understood, such that by merely running hydraulic lines beneath the silo, to the outside thereof, an operator may by throwing a simple switch or lever 182, readily reverse the direction of sweep of the auger 72. The operation of the valve 178 will readily be understood with reference to FIG. 10, whereby an inlet 177, and an outlet 202 are provided, in a base block 203. Of course, the inlets and outlets may be reversed, depending upon whichever one of the ports 177 and 202 are connected to a line having the greatest pressure. Thread members 204 and 205, are in threaded connection within passageways 206 and 207, with the passageways 206 and 207 being in communication with associated respective passage portions 208 and 210, that in turn are in communication with movable ball valve members, respectively associated, 211 and 212. The ball valve 211 is provided with a preload spring 213, and with a threaded adjustment 214, whereby merely turning the member 214, and with its threads in deeper engagement with complemental threads of a bore 214 thereof, the spring 213 may be even more greatly compressed or released, depending upon the direction of turning of the member 214. The spring 216 is similarly operable, and is provided with a similar adjustment 217 for facilitating the preload setting. A duct 219 is provided, in communication between a passage 206 and the bore 218 in which the spring 216 is disposed. Similarly, a duct 220 is disposed in communication between the passage 210 and the bore 215.
Incoming fluid entering port 177, for example, will enter the duct 220, and will only serve to further or more tightly engage the ball valve member 211, within its valve seat. Accordingly, pressure must build up, until the pressure of fluid in the line 177 is sufficient to overcome the pressure exerted against the seat 221 by the ball 212, as applied by the force from the spring 216, in compression thereagainst. When sufficient pressure is on the ball 212, to overcome the force applied by the spring 216, the ball will move rightward, from the position illustrated in FIG. 10, for passage of fluid through the bore 218, the duct 217, and outwardly through the port 202. The operation is identical in reverse, and such need not be described in detail. It will thus be seen that a novel two-way valve is presented that is highly desirable for use with the system illustrated in FIGS. 12 through 15 herein, as well as for use with other systems.
With reference now to FIGS. l6, l7 and 18 in particular, a modification of the above-discussed drive system will be understood. Fluid delivered from an oil or like supply is provided through a filter 230 to the compressor or fluid motor 171. It will be noted that the motor 171 may, if necessary comprise two separate motors connected for achieving the desired pressure. In any event, fluid delivered from the motor or motors 171 passes through a flow divider 231, which effectively splits the flow of oil or other fluid between the valve 162 for delivery to an advancing cylinder 154, on the one hand, and between the valve 232 for delivery to the motor 38 through the swivel 50 on the other hand. The flow divider 231 is generally manually preset for providing an oil pressure or the like in line 233 of within the range of 400 to 800 psi, for delivery to the valve 162 at such pressure. It will be noted that the oil return from the lines 234, 235, through a filter 236, and an oil cooler 237 of any conventional type, through the line 238, is to the original oil supply 170, in order to complete that portion of the fluid circuit.
The other portion of the oil or other suitable fluid delivered to the flow divider 231 enters a manually operablereversing valve 232 through the line 240. During the normal operation of the system, when jamming of the auger against silage does not occur, and it is not desired to reverse the direction of turning of the auger about its own axis, the oil from the line 240 passes directly through the reversing valve to the line 241, and to the swivel device 50 through the line 242. The fluid then passes through the device 50 in the manner aforesaid, through the line 64, to drive the motor 38, that turns the auger about its own axis as is described in detail above. The return line for oil from the motor 38, for completing the circuit, is back through the line 63, the device 50, the line 54, the reversing valve 232, through the lines 243 and 244, to the line 235, for eventual return to the oil supply 170.
It will be noted that a pressure sensing valve 246 is provided, connected by a line 247 to the oil line 241, and also connected to the line 244 by a line 248, and further connected to a line 250 by a line 251, with the lines 250 and 251 being connected to the line of delivcry of oil from the flow divider to the valve 162, namely the line 233.
The oil delivered to the reversing valve 232 is delivered at a substantially higher pressure than that for the line 233 for operating the advance motion of the auger, with the oil in line 240 being generally within the range 1,200 to 1,500 psi. (This of course is psi gauge). This is because the auger, in its turning motion, as it is cutting through the silage, meets substantial turning resistance. The flow divider 231 is of a selected sort that will accommodate the delivery to line 233 of pressure at 400 to 800 psig, but which will deliver to the line 240 oil at a pressure of 1,200 to 1,500 psig.
Upon the auger 72 therefore being stopped in its rotation, or otherwise jamming, or even without jamming meeting a resistance that requires a pressure in the line 64 for operating the motor 38 substantially above normal operating pressure, as for example, above 1,500 psig, the pressure in the line 64, and in the line 55 will back-up as will the pressure in line 247 connected thereto, such that, at 1,500 psig, (or whatever other pressure the valve 246 is selected to operate at), the cylindrical spool slider member 253 of the valve 246, will overcome the pressure or resistance offered thereagainst by the spring 254, and will compress the spring 254 while sliding in its bore 255, in its vertical upward movement from the position illustrated for the member 253 in H6. 17, until the reduced diameter portion 256, or other suitable port (for example a port passing through the diameter of the member 253) becomes aligned with the bore 257, in a manner not illustrated, whereby vthe pressure in line 251, which is the same as that in the line 233, of oil being delivered to the valve 162, for operating the advance cylinder 154 (or even the retraction of the cylinder 154 if desired), is relieved by the oil passing from the line 233, through the line 251, and into the pressure sensing valve 246, through the port 258 thereof, past the slider member 253, inasmuch as its port 256 is aligned with the port 257, with the oil then returning via the lines 248, 244, and 235,.
back to the oil supply 170, without passing through the valve 162, for operation of the cylinder 154. This is because the pressure in the line 233 will take the path of least resistance, and rather than being operative to actuate the cylinder 154, through the valve 162, will flow through the line 251, and through the valve 246, as immediately aforesaid.
This pressure build-up, and oil flow during the time in which the pressure sensing valve 246 is in an open position, as for example when pressure in the line 55 exceeds 1,500 psig (assuming that is the setting for the valve 246), is illustrated most clearly in FIG. 18, in which thesolid arrows indicate the flow of oil from the flow divider 231.
As described above, then, upon the auger meeting excessive turning resistance, the auger advance is stopped. It will further be noted that the valve 246 is provided with an adjustment means 260, for controlling the precise point at which there will be sufiicient presclosing of the valve 246, thereby permitting delivery of oil to the cylinder 154 through the valve 162 in a normal manner.
If the pressure against the auger is not sufficiently relieved to permit this, at least, by discontinuing the advanced provided by activation of the cylinder 154, the pressure will not be increased above the level at which the valve 246 is operative. in the latter event, the reversing valve 232 may be manually actuated, if necessary, to direct the driving fluid into the line 54 from the valve 232, rather than into the line 241, whereby the motor 38 will be reversely driven, as will the auger undergo a reverse drive, and with the pressure in the lines 64 and 55 then being relieved, inasmuch as the activation of the reversing valve 232 will permit the oil to flow from the lines 55 and 64, into the line 242, then into the line 241, and through the reversing valve 232 to the line 243. With the oil passing into the line 243 from the valve 232, it is delivered through the line 244, to the line 235, and eventually back to the oil supply 170.
When it is desired to close down the system, and to relieve the pressure in the lines, the valve 261, being a manually operated pressure relief valve may be manually actuated to relieve the pressure in line 250, and
consequently in line 233, and thus to relieve the oil pressure in the lines that actuate the cylinder 154 through the valve 162, by opening the line 250 to the line 235. Similarly, in closing down the system the reversing valve 232 may be actuated, in order to open the lines 64, 55, 242, 241 to the line 243, 244, and into the line 235, also to relieve the pressure in that portion of the system which operates the turning of the auger about its own axis during shut-down.
With reference to FIG. 19, the band 103 is illustrated, as having a splice 265, connecting its opposite ends. It will be understood that the band 103 will preferably be constructed as a single unit, with its opposite ends welded together as illustrated in FIG. 19, to comprise a circular or hoop-like arrangement. By cutting the ends 266 and 267 of the band 103 as illustrated, to complementally interfit with one another as illustrated, an extraordinarily strong connection may be realized, such that, upon engagement of a lug 153 within a void 105 thereof, the opposite ends 266 and 267 of the band 103, that define the void 105 will be sufficiently strong to operate as though there was no connection whatsoever at that point. Moreover, such a cut as illustrated in FIG. 19 permits welding along all of the linear locations 268, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, and 276, on the front and rear sides of the band 103, if desired. Thus, sufficient weld locations are presented by such a complemental interfit as illustrated in FIG. 19, that opening of the connections of the ends 266 and 267 of the band 103 does not present a problem. Moreover, it
'will be noted that the openings 105 remain the same distance apart from one another, irrespective of the splice or connection 265, such that the splice 265 does not interfere in any way whatsoever with the usual stroke of advance movement of the auger (or even the retraction thereof). Thus, it will be clear that the end 266 is originally separate from the end 267, along weld lines 268, 270,271, 272, 273, 274, 275, and 276, but that the two ends 266 and 267 are welded along those locations. Furthermore, it will be noted that the splice 265 of the ends 266 and 267 of the'band 103 is completed without the addition of any external supporting members on either side of the band 103, or on ends thereof, but that only the ends themselves of the band 103 are utilized and welded together. Thus, no projections interfere with the advance or movement of the band 103, or other components of the apparatus of this invention.
It will be apparent that the various details of construction, as well as the use and operation of the components and systems set forth herein may vary, in accordance with particular applications of such features. Also, details may be made in parts and arrangements of parts, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as recited in the appended claims. Furthermore, such modifications as are within the skill of those in the art may also be made all within the spirit and scope of the claimed invention.
What is claimed is:
1. Apparatus for driving a generally radial auger for a silo, comprising a first fluid drive means for driving the auger in an arcuate advance motion through an arc, said first fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a first predetermined pressure, second fluid drive means for turning the radial auger about its own axis, in a rotational motion, said second fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a second predetermined pressure greater than said first predetermined pressure, and automatic pressure relief means connecting said first and second fluid drive means whereby fluid pressure build-up resulting from resistance to the turning of the auger about its own axis will discontinue the provision of driving fluid for driving the auger in its advance motion, said automatic pressure relief means being in operative connection to said delivering means for said second fluid drive means, said automatic pressure relief means also having means associated therewith operative in response to a third predetermined pressure in said delivering means for said second fluid drive means during said pressure buildup to cause a by-pass of the lower pressure fluid of said first drive means through said relief means.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, including reversing valve means for reversing the direction of turning of said auger about its own axis.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said associated means includes a pressure sensing valve, said pressure sensing valve including a cylindrical spool slider member within a bore slidingly disposed against the resistance of an adjustable spring at one end and said second fluid pressure at the other end.
4. The apparatus of claim 3, said slider member having port means, passing therethrough transversely to said bore, for relieving said first fluid pressure through said port means when said port means becomes aligned both with a source of said first fluid pressure and bypass means by the movement of said slider member under said second fluid pressure within said bore against said spring resistance at said third predetermined pressure.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said delivering means are connected to a single flow divider means, said flow divider means having a single source of pressurized fluid for delivery to an inlet thereof, and a pair of outlets corresponding to the said delivering means that provide fluid at said first and second predetermined pressures.
6. Apparatus for driving a generally radial auger for a silo, comprising a first fluid drive means for driving the auger in an arcuate advance motion through an are, said first fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a first predetermined pressure, second fluid drive means for turning the radial auger about its own axis in a rotational motion, said second fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a second predetermined pressure greater than said first predetermined pressure, and automatic pressure relief means connecting said first and second fluid drive means whereby fluid pressure build-up resulting from resistance to the turning of the auger about its own axis will discontinue the provision of driving fluid for driving the auger in its advance motion, said automatic pressure relief means being in operative connection to said delivering means for said second fluid drive means, said automatic pressure relief means also having means associated therewith operative in response to a third predetermined pressure in said delivering means for said second fluid drive means during said pressure build-up to cause a by-pass of the lower pressure fluid of said first drive means through said relief means; said associated means including a pressure sensing valve, said pressure sensing valve including a cylindrical spool slider member within a bore slidingly disposed against the resistance of an adjustable spring at one end and said secondfluid pressure at the other end; said slider member having port means, passing therethrough transversely to said bore, for relieving said first fluid pressure through said port means when said port means becomes aligned both with a source of said first fluid pressure and by-pass means by the movement of said slider member under said second fluid pressure within said bore against said spring resistance at said third predetermined pressure; said delivering means being connected to a single flow divider means, said flow divider means having a single source of pressurized fluid for delivery to an inlet thereof, and a pair of outlets corresponding to the said delivering means that provide fluid at said first and second predetermined pressures; said apparatus including reversing valve means for reversing the direction of the turning of said auger about its own axis.
UNlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF "CORRECTION v Patent No} 3817409 I Dated June 18, 1974 Inventor(g) Richard L.- Weaver It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that saidxLetters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:
Abstract line 5 change "To" to The-.
Column 8 lines 30 and 31 "adpated" to -v adapted--.
9 Column 9 line 37 change "bank" to band Column 10 line 31 change "bank' to -band-. Column 10 line 36 change "linle' to -in let v Column 10 line 56 change "bank" to -band-.
Column 14 lines 5 and 6 change "advanced" to advance-. I
Signed and sealed this 8th day of October 1974.
SEAL AtteStI McCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-105O (10-69) USCOMM'DC 60375-P69 U.S, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1969 0-366-334

Claims (6)

1. Apparatus for driving a generally radial auger for a silo, comprising a first fluid drive means for driving the auger in an arcuate advance motion through an arc, said first fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a first predetermined pressure, second fluid drive means for turning the radial auger about its own axis, in a rotational motion, said second fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a second predetermined pressure greater than said first predetermined pressure, and automatic pressure relief means connecting said first and second fluid drive means whereby fluid pressure build-up resulting from resistance to the turning of the auger about its own axis will discontinue the provision of driving fluid for driving the auger in its advance motion, said automatic pressure relief means being in operative connection to said delivering means for said second fluid drive means, said automatic pressure relief means also having means associated therewith operative in response to a third predetermined pressure in said delivering means for said second fluid drive means during said pressure buildup to cause a by-pass of the lower pressure fluid of said first drive means through said relief means.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, including reversing valve meanS for reversing the direction of turning of said auger about its own axis.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said associated means includes a pressure sensing valve, said pressure sensing valve including a cylindrical spool slider member within a bore slidingly disposed against the resistance of an adjustable spring at one end and said second fluid pressure at the other end.
4. The apparatus of claim 3, said slider member having port means, passing therethrough transversely to said bore, for relieving said first fluid pressure through said port means when said port means becomes aligned both with a source of said first fluid pressure and by-pass means by the movement of said slider member under said second fluid pressure within said bore against said spring resistance at said third predetermined pressure.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said delivering means are connected to a single flow divider means, said flow divider means having a single source of pressurized fluid for delivery to an inlet thereof, and a pair of outlets corresponding to the said delivering means that provide fluid at said first and second predetermined pressures.
6. Apparatus for driving a generally radial auger for a silo, comprising a first fluid drive means for driving the auger in an arcuate advance motion through an arc, said first fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a first predetermined pressure, second fluid drive means for turning the radial auger about its own axis in a rotational motion, said second fluid drive means including means for delivering driving fluid at a second predetermined pressure greater than said first predetermined pressure, and automatic pressure relief means connecting said first and second fluid drive means whereby fluid pressure build-up resulting from resistance to the turning of the auger about its own axis will discontinue the provision of driving fluid for driving the auger in its advance motion, said automatic pressure relief means being in operative connection to said delivering means for said second fluid drive means, said automatic pressure relief means also having means associated therewith operative in response to a third predetermined pressure in said delivering means for said second fluid drive means during said pressure build-up to cause a by-pass of the lower pressure fluid of said first drive means through said relief means; said associated means including a pressure sensing valve, said pressure sensing valve including a cylindrical spool slider member within a bore slidingly disposed against the resistance of an adjustable spring at one end and said second fluid pressure at the other end; said slider member having port means, passing therethrough transversely to said bore, for relieving said first fluid pressure through said port means when said port means becomes aligned both with a source of said first fluid pressure and by-pass means by the movement of said slider member under said second fluid pressure within said bore against said spring resistance at said third predetermined pressure; said delivering means being connected to a single flow divider means, said flow divider means having a single source of pressurized fluid for delivery to an inlet thereof, and a pair of outlets corresponding to the said delivering means that provide fluid at said first and second predetermined pressures; said apparatus including reversing valve means for reversing the direction of the turning of said auger about its own axis.
US05283384 1972-01-18 1972-08-24 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor Expired - Lifetime US3817409A (en)

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US05/218,736 US4057151A (en) 1972-01-18 1972-01-18 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor
US05283384 US3817409A (en) 1972-01-18 1972-08-24 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor

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US05283384 US3817409A (en) 1972-01-18 1972-08-24 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor
PH14794A PH9760A (en) 1972-08-24 1973-07-02 A watthour meter assembly having an auxiliary lag plate mounted on a potential plux return bar
CA179,458A CA1003780A (en) 1972-08-24 1973-08-23 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor
CA263,370A CA1023682A (en) 1972-08-24 1976-10-14 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor
CA289,913A CA1045572A (en) 1972-08-24 1977-10-31 Silo unloader and apparatus therefor

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3942657A (en) * 1973-10-17 1976-03-09 Knutsen R W Apparatus for unloading material such as chips or the like from the bottom of a silo
US4076133A (en) * 1975-11-26 1978-02-28 Weaver Richard L Silo unloader blades
US4095703A (en) * 1975-12-15 1978-06-20 Weaver Richard L Drive system for silo unloader
US4266901A (en) * 1978-11-03 1981-05-12 Wellons, Inc. Storage bin having driven agitator
US4583903A (en) * 1984-01-03 1986-04-22 Tiger Industries, Inc. Apparatus for bottom unloading of storage structures
US4585385A (en) * 1982-02-01 1986-04-29 Veda, Inc. Bottom unloader
US4717308A (en) * 1983-12-14 1988-01-05 E-Z Trail, Inc. Container unloading system
US20100158652A1 (en) * 2008-12-23 2010-06-24 Schwing Bioset, Inc. Obstruction clearance mode for silo with reciprocating frame
US20120163947A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Sukup Manufacturing Company Variable speed sweep system
US20130216340A1 (en) * 2012-02-20 2013-08-22 Jason Luster Bin sweep
US8662354B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-03-04 Rdp Technologies, Inc. Sludge handling system with rotating discharge device for discharging sludge from a bin

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US3237788A (en) * 1964-03-04 1966-03-01 Richard L Weaver Silo unloader
US3391809A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-07-09 Richard L. Weaver Silo bottom unloader system
US3408901A (en) * 1967-12-18 1968-11-05 Hawk Bilt Mfg Corp Coordinated hydraulic motor control system and pressure coordinating valve therefor
US3499556A (en) * 1967-07-03 1970-03-10 Smith Harvestore Products Hydraulic unloading mechanism for a storage structure

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3237788A (en) * 1964-03-04 1966-03-01 Richard L Weaver Silo unloader
US3391809A (en) * 1966-07-25 1968-07-09 Richard L. Weaver Silo bottom unloader system
US3499556A (en) * 1967-07-03 1970-03-10 Smith Harvestore Products Hydraulic unloading mechanism for a storage structure
US3408901A (en) * 1967-12-18 1968-11-05 Hawk Bilt Mfg Corp Coordinated hydraulic motor control system and pressure coordinating valve therefor

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3942657A (en) * 1973-10-17 1976-03-09 Knutsen R W Apparatus for unloading material such as chips or the like from the bottom of a silo
US4076133A (en) * 1975-11-26 1978-02-28 Weaver Richard L Silo unloader blades
US4095703A (en) * 1975-12-15 1978-06-20 Weaver Richard L Drive system for silo unloader
US4266901A (en) * 1978-11-03 1981-05-12 Wellons, Inc. Storage bin having driven agitator
US4585385A (en) * 1982-02-01 1986-04-29 Veda, Inc. Bottom unloader
US4717308A (en) * 1983-12-14 1988-01-05 E-Z Trail, Inc. Container unloading system
US4583903A (en) * 1984-01-03 1986-04-22 Tiger Industries, Inc. Apparatus for bottom unloading of storage structures
US20100158652A1 (en) * 2008-12-23 2010-06-24 Schwing Bioset, Inc. Obstruction clearance mode for silo with reciprocating frame
US8376682B2 (en) * 2008-12-23 2013-02-19 Schwing Bioset, Inc. Obstruction clearance mode for silo with reciprocating frame
US20120163947A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Sukup Manufacturing Company Variable speed sweep system
US8662354B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-03-04 Rdp Technologies, Inc. Sludge handling system with rotating discharge device for discharging sludge from a bin
US20130216340A1 (en) * 2012-02-20 2013-08-22 Jason Luster Bin sweep

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