Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Removable cushion for restraining devices

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3817245A
US3817245A US24209872A US3817245A US 3817245 A US3817245 A US 3817245A US 24209872 A US24209872 A US 24209872A US 3817245 A US3817245 A US 3817245A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
cushion
side
restraining
strap
secured
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
M Kroeger
Original Assignee
M Kroeger
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/37Restraining devices for the body or for body parts, e.g. slings; Restraining shirts
    • A61F5/3769Restraining devices for the body or for body parts, e.g. slings; Restraining shirts for attaching the body to beds, wheel-chairs or the like
    • A61F5/3776Restraining devices for the body or for body parts, e.g. slings; Restraining shirts for attaching the body to beds, wheel-chairs or the like by means of a blanket or belts
    • A61F5/3784Restraining devices for the body or for body parts, e.g. slings; Restraining shirts for attaching the body to beds, wheel-chairs or the like by means of a blanket or belts directly connected to the trunk, e.g. with jacket
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S128/00Surgery
    • Y10S128/15Hook and loop type fastener
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S2/00Apparel
    • Y10S2/92Garment supporter or retainer having a hook-loop type fastener

Abstract

A device for reducing the surface pressure on a patient''s body caused by a restraining belt includes a cushion having a front side with a compressible thickness disposed against the patient''s body. Fastening means on the back side of the cushion hold the cushion in a fixed position against the patient''s body, and thereby protect the patient from contact with the belt. In one form of the invention, the fastening means includes an elongated flexible and movable flap which fits around the restraining belt, and securing means, preferably cooperating elongated ''''Velcro'''' strips, for releasably fastening the free end of the flap to the back side of the cushion. The flap, in its fastened position, forms a tunnel around the restraining belt to hold the cushion against a patient''s body. In another form of the invention, the fastening means includes a pair of longitudinally spaced apart straps on opposite sides of the cushion, and respective loops aligned longitudinally with the straps. The straps extend over the ends of the restraining belt, through their respective loops, and are folded back on themselves to be secured to the back side of the cushion.

Description

Kroeger 1 June 18, 1974 REMOVABLE CUSHION FOR RESTRAINING DEVICES [76] Inventor: MildredM. Kroeger, 1401 N. Los

Robles, Pasadena, Calif. 91104 221 Filed: Apr.7, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 242,098

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 152,225, June 11,

1971, abandoned.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1968 Veasey 128/134 10/1970 Murcott 128/134 X Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-G. F. Dunne Attorney, Agent, or FirmChristie, Parker & Hale ABSTRACT A device for reducing the surface pressure on a pa tients body caused by a restraining belt includes a cushion having a front side with a compressible thickness disposed against the patients body. Fastening means on the back side of the cushion hold the cushion in a fixed position against the patients body, and

thereby protect the patient from contact with the belt.

In one form of the invention, the fastening means includes an elongated flexible and movable flap which fits around the restraining belt, and securing means, preferably cooperating elongated Velcro strips, for releasably fastening the free end of the flap to the back side of the cushion. The flap, in its fastened position, forms a tunnel around the restraining belt to hold the cushion against a patients body. In another form of the invention, the fastening means includes a pair of longitudinally spaced apart straps on opposite sides of the cushion, and respective loops aligned longitudinally with the straps. The straps extend over the ends of the restraining belt, through their respective loops, and are folded back on themselves to be secured to the back side of the cushion.

3 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJun 1a 1914 3.8 171245 sum 1 0r 2 I N VEN TOR. MFPA D M KPO6Q REMOVABLE CUSHION FOR RESTRAINING DEVICES CROSS-REFERENC E TO RELATED APPLICATION This is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Ser. No. 152,225, filed June ll, 1971, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a cushion adapted for releasable connection to a hospital restraining belt to protect a patient from the skin irritations and soresv ordinarily caused by contact with restraining belts and the like.

There are a number of restraining devices for supporting a hospital patient while he is in a bed or wheelchair. A common restraining device includes a first pair of straps wrapped around the patients waist, and a second pair of straps extending outwardly in opposite directions for attachment to the wheelchair or bed. Another common restraining device provides straps which are wrapped around the patients waist and then looped around the back of the wheelchair or tied to a point on the bed remote from the patient.

The relatively narrow straps of these common restraining devices become uncomfortable for the patient after a relatively short time, because they rub against his body and can pinch his skin when he bends his upper trunk forward. Moreover, the restraining belts usually cause the patients hospital gown to wrinkle, which rubs and irritates the patients skin, often causing decubitis sores. Thus, it is common for hospital patients to place their blankets between the restraining belt and their body to reduce the skin irritations caused by the belt.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention provides a cushion which protects hospital patients from the skin irritations and sores ordinarily caused by hospital restraining belts.

Briefly, the cushion has a front side with a compressible thickness, and a rear side to which flexible, releasable fastening means are secured. The fastening means include a free end remote from the back side of the cushion, and means for releasably securing the free end of the fastening means to the back side of the cushion. In use, the compressible side of the cushion is placed against the patients body, and the fastening means is releasably secured around the portion of the restraining belt which ordinarily causes surface pressure on the patients body. Thus, the cushion is held between the patients body and the restraining belt to prevent the belt from rubbing and causing skin irritations.

In a preferred form of the invention, the releasable fastening means includes a pair of longitudinally spaced apart elongated straps secured to opposite sides of the back side of the cushion, and a separate loop secured to the back side of the cushion at a point spaced longitudinally from each strap. In use, each strap is extended over a respective end portion of the restraining belt, threaded through its respective loop, folded back on itself, and extended again over the end portion of the belt, with its free end being releasably secured to the back side of the cushion to hold the cushion in place on the belt.

In another form of the invention, the fastening means comprises a flap with an elongated strip of thistle cloth material secured to its free end. An elongated strip of cooperating thistle cloth material is secured to the back side of the cushion. In use, theflap is wrapped around the restraining belt, and, the thistle cloth strips are thereafter secured to each other to form a tunnel around the restraining belt to hold the cushion in a fixed position against the patients body.

Thus, the cushion can be applied to a restraining belt or removed from it relatively'quick and easily. The releasable feature of the cushion is particularly important because it enables the cushion to be applied to the different sizes of hospital belts presently in use. Therefore, it eliminates the need forpermanently securing pads to these restraining belts, or modifying the belts to facilitate use with a cushion. Moreover, one or more cushions of this invention can be applied to the particular point, or points, of irritation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevation view showing a cushion with a flexible and movable flap secured to its back side;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary schematic elevation view.

showing a typical hospital restraining belt applied to a patient; a

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevation view showing the cushion applied to the restraining belt;

FIG. 4 is a sectional elevation view taken on line 22 of FIG. 3 showing the compressible side of the cushion against the patients body;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary elevation view showing an alternate embodiment of the cushion in which a pair of straps with cooperating loops are secured to the back side of the cushion; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevation view showing the cushion of FIG. 5 applied to the restraining belt.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION-OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The fibers 14 form a thick mat of compressible thickness suitable for cushioning the body of a hospital patient against the surface pressure ordinarily caused by hospital restraining belts and the like. Fibers 14 may be woven into the sheet in a conventional and well known manner, although they also may be secured to the sheet by other suitable methods such as bonding, for example. The fibers preferably are a polyester type synthetic fiber, such as the fiber presently sold under the trademark Kodel. However, other suitable deformable materials may be used, such as fibers made of nylon, wool, or cotton.

A large, substantially rectangular, piece 16 of rugged flexible material such as cotton, nylon, linen, or canvas is secured to the side of sheet 12 opposite fibers 14. A lower half 11 of piece 16 (as viewed in FIG. 1) is fixedly secured to the central portion of sheet 12 by two spaced apart, parallel rows of stitching 18 one row extending along the center of piece 16, and the other row securing the lower edge of the piece 16 to sheet 12. The upper half of piece 16 forms a flexible flap 20 which is movable relative to sheet 12.

A first elongated strip 22 of thistle cloth material is fixedly secured to sheet 12 adjacent to the bottom edge of the lower half 17 of piece 16. Thistle cloth strip 22 preferably is Velcro material of the hook type. Velcro strip 22 preferably extends the entire width of sheet 12, as shown in FIG. 1. A second elongated strip 24 of thistle cloth material is fixedly secured to the free end of flap 20. Preferably, strip 24 is made ofVelcro" material of the pile type. Velcro material is well known and described in US. Pat. Nos. 2,717,437 and 3,009,235. Velcro" strip 24 preferably extends the entire width of flap 20, and is adapted to be firmly, but temporarily, secured to Velcro strip 22 when flap 20 is folded to overlie lower half 17 of piece 16. Other well known fasteners such as snaps, buckles, etc., can be substituted for the Velcro" fasteners, although the latter are preferred because of the quickness and ease with which they may be applied or removed.

A pair of longitudinally spaced apart short pieces 26 of thistle cloth material lying on the longitudinal centerline of lower portion 17 of piece 16 are secured adjacent to opposing outer edges of lower portion 17. Preferably, short pieces 26 are Velcro material of the hook" type. A pair of cooperating longitudinally spaced apart short pieces'28 of Velcro pile material positioned on the longitudinal centerline of flap 20 are secured adjacent opposing outer edges of the flap 20. Thus, when flap 20 is folded to overlie the lower portion 17, Velcro pieces 28 overlie Velcro pieces 26 and may be releasably secured to each other by the application of pressure.

The use of cushion 10 is best understood by referring to FIGS. 2, 3, and 4. A hospital patient 30 is restrained in a hospital bed (not shown) or wheelchair (not shown) by a variety of restraining devices adapted to fit around his waist. FIG. 2 shows a typical hospital restraining device 32 which includes a base portion 34 made of a rugged flexible material such as cotton, nylon, or canvas. An elongated waist strap 36 is secured to the upper edge of base portion 34 by stitching (not shown) and rivets 38. A second elongated strap 40 parallel to waist strap 36 is secured to the lower edge of base portion 34. During use of restraining device 32, waist strap 36 is pulled tightly around the patients waist, or lower torso, and fastened to a buckle 42 at the end of the strap. Buckle 42 may be provided with a lock for use with uncooperative patients. The ends of strap 40 are extended outwardly from the patient for connection to opposite sides of the patients hospital bed, or wheelchair. Since the restraining device generally is wrapped rather tightly around the patients body, waist strap 36 and base portion 34 ususally cause the patients hospital gown to rub against his skin when he moves. It has been found in practice that restraining belts of this type cause skin irritations and decubitis sores in a substantial number of patients who are restrained in their beds or wheelchairs.

Cushion 10 protects patient 30 from the skin irritations normally caused by hospital restraining devices. During use of cushion 10, the surface, consisting of compressible fibers 14, is disposed against the patients body in the area normally subjected to surface pressures caused by the restraining device. In the restraining device shown in FIG. 3, straps 36, rivets 38, and base portion 34 ususally rub against the patient's body and cause irritation. These portions of the restraining device are normally in contact with the patient's back. Thus, cushion 10 is placed against the area of the'patients back normally exposed to these portions of restraining device 32. After the cushion is so positioned, the restraining device is placed against the lower portion 17 of piece 16, as shown in FIG. 4. Thereafter, flap 20 is folded so as to overlie both base portion 34 of the restraining device and the lower portion 17 of piece 16. Velcro strip 24 is then firmly pressed against Velcro strip 22 to form a tunnel around base portion 34 of the restraining device. Flap 20 also is secured adjacent its outer edges between waist strap 36 and strap 30 by firmly pressing short Velcro strips 28 against their cooperating short Velcro strips 26. If it is desired to remove the cushion, flap 20 is simply pulled away from the restraining device to release the cooperating Velcro" strips from engagement with each other.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show alternate means for releasably securing cushion 10 to restraining belt 32. In the alternate embodiment, a pair of laterally spaced apart, elongated straps 44 are secured to opposite sides of sheet 12 on the side of the cushion opposite fibers 14. As

shown best in FIG. 5, one end of each strap is permanently secured to a respective lower corner portion of the cushion so the straps extend vertically along opposite sides. of the cushion. The remaining portion of each strap is freely movable, and extends beyond the upper edge of the cushion. A separate elongated section 46 of Velcro hook material is secured adjacent to the free end of each strap 44. A separate cooperating section 48 ofVelcro pile material is permanently secured to the back side of the cushion below the fixed end of each strap.

A pair of laterally spaced apart square-rings 50 are secured to opposite sides of sheet 12 in longitudinal alignment with straps 44. Each ring is secured to a respective upper corner of the cushion by a separate flexible elongated piece 52 which is looped through its con responding ring and permanently stitched to sheet 12. A line of transverse stitching 54 in each piece forms a separate tunnel for holding one end of each ring in a fixed position on the back of the cushion. The remaining portion of the ring is freely movable relative to the cushion, so the ring may be lifted to provide room for easily threading a strap through it.

A pair of laterally spaced apart, transverse belt loops 56 are permanently secured to opposite sides of sheet 12 by longitudinal stitching 58. Each belt loop 56 is aligned longitudinally with a respective strap and its corresponding square-ring, and is positioned between the ring and the straps point of attachment to the cushion.

Referring to FIG. 6, use of the cushion is carried out by placing it between a patient (not shown in FIG. 6) and his restraining belt 32. The cushion is then releasably secured to the belt by extending each strap 44 over restraining strap 40 of the belt, through its corresponding loop 56, over restraining strap 36, and threading the strap through its respective ring 50. Each strap 44 is then folded back on itself and again extended over restraining strap 36, through loop 56, and over restraining strap 40. The free end of each strap 44 is then releasably secured to the back side of the cushion by pressing Velcro section 46 firmly against Velcro" section 48.

Belt loops 56 hold straps 44 in a fixed position relative to the cushion, and cooperate with the Velcro strips 46, 48 to substantially prevent the straps from coming loose during use. Moreover, belt loops 56 provide means for separating restraining strap 36 from strap 40 so the two straps do not become tangled during use. i i

The embodiment shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 is especially useful for bed patients who must be restrained for long periods of time, andwho are quite active. Such patients, by their movements, can cause a cushion with a releasable fastening means to become loosened from the restraining belt. The releasable fastening means shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 substantially prevents the cushion from being loosened from the restraining belt during normal movements of an active patient. Belt loops 56 and rings 50 cooperate with Velcro strips 46, 48 to provide combined means for holding the straps in a fixed, but releasable, position on the back of the cushion, which substantially prevents the cushion from coming loose from the belt during use.

Thus, the cushion can be applied to a restraining device or removed from it quickly and easily. Moreover, since the cushion is adapted for releasable engagement with a restraining device, it can be applied to different sizes of hospital belts presently in use. It also avoids the need for hospitals to secure pads permanently to restraining devices presently in use. Moreover, several of the cushions may be applied to a given restraining device in the event there are several points of irritation to be protected.

1 claim: r

1. A device for reducing surface pressure on a patients body caused by a restraining belt wrapped around the patients body, the device including a cushion having a front side with a compressible thickness, and a rear side having a major intermediate portion,

a pair of laterally spaced apart elongated straps secured to the reverse side of the cushion and extending in the same general direction, each strap having a front side and a reverse side, with the reverse side thereof normally overlying the rear side of the cushion and thefront side thereof normally facing away from the rear side of the cushion, each strap having only one end thereof secured to the rear side of the cushion so that each strap is freely movable independently of the cushion and extends to a free end remote from the rear side of the cushion, each strap being secured so that the freely movable portion thereof extends across the major intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion with its front side normally facing away from the rear side of the cushion,

a separate elongated section of a first type of thistle cloth material on the front side of each strap adjacent the free end thereof,

a separate elongated section of a second type of thistle cloth material located adjacent the point of attachment of each strap to the cushion and facing away from the rear side of the cushion, the second type of thistle cloth material being adapted to be releasably secured to the first type of thistle cloth material,

anchoring means attached to the rear side of the cushion in longitudinal alignment with the normal extension of each strap, and

a separate loop associated with each strap, each loop being secured to an intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion between, and in longitudinal alignment with, its corresponding anchoring means and the point of attachment of its corresponding strap to the cushion so that each strap can be engaged with the anchoring means, folded back on itself, extended over the first portion of the belt, threaded through the loop, extended over a second portion of the belt, and then releasably fastened at the rear side of the cushion.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the an choring means comprises a separate ring fixed to the rear side of the cushion in longitudinal alignment with each strap, each ring and the point of securement of its associated strap being on opposite sides of the major intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which each second section of thistle cloth material is secured directly to the rear side of the cushion.

Claims (3)

1. A device for reducing surface pressure on a patient''s body caused by a restraining belt wrapped around the patient''s body, the device including a cushion having a front side with a compressible thickness, and a rear side having a major intermediate portion, a pair of laterally spaced apart elongated straps secured to the reverse side of the cushion and extending in the same general direction, each strap having a front side and a reverse side, with the reverse side thereof normally overlying the rear side of the cushion and the front side thereof normally facing away from the rear side of the cushion, each strap having only one end thereof secured to the rear side of the cushion so that each strap is freely movable independently of the cushion and extends to a free end remote from the rear side of the cushion, each strap being secured so that the freely movable portion thereof extends across the major intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion with its front side normally facing away from the rear side of the cushion, a separate elongated section of a first type of thistle cloth material on the front side of each strap adjacent the free end thereof, a separate elongated section of a second type of thistle cloth material located adjacent the point of attachment of each strap to the cushion and facing away from the rear side of the cushion, the second type of thistle cloth material being adapted to be releasably secured to the first type of thistle cloth material, anchoring means attached to the rear side of the cushion in longitudinal alignment with the normal extension of each strap, and a separate loop associated with each strap, each loop being secured to an intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion between, and in longitudinal alignment with, its corresponding anchoring means and the point of attachment of its corresponding strap to the cushion so that each strap can be engaged with the anchoring means, folded back on itself, extended over the first portion of the belt, threaded through the loop, extended over a second portion of the belt, and then releasably fastened at the rear side of the cushion.
2. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which the anchoring means comprises a separate ring fixed to the rear side of the cushion in longitudinal alignment with each strap, each ring and the point of securement of its associated strap being on opposite sides of the major intermediate portion of the rear side of the cushion.
3. Apparatus according to claim 1 in which each second section of thistle cloth material is secured directly to the rear side of the cushion.
US3817245A 1971-06-11 1972-04-07 Removable cushion for restraining devices Expired - Lifetime US3817245A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15222571 true 1971-06-11 1971-06-11
US3817245A US3817245A (en) 1971-06-11 1972-04-07 Removable cushion for restraining devices

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3817245A US3817245A (en) 1971-06-11 1972-04-07 Removable cushion for restraining devices

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3817245A true US3817245A (en) 1974-06-18

Family

ID=26849368

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3817245A Expired - Lifetime US3817245A (en) 1971-06-11 1972-04-07 Removable cushion for restraining devices

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3817245A (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3884225A (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-05-20 Evelyn Ruth Witter Bed patient turn and hold device
US4132229A (en) * 1977-07-28 1979-01-02 Morrison Medical Products Company Safety belt for restraining bed patients
EP0141896A1 (en) * 1983-09-16 1985-05-22 John T. Posey Company Sleeved jacket restraining device
US4611804A (en) * 1983-03-21 1986-09-16 Addair George W Mattress exercise apparatus
US4685454A (en) * 1983-09-16 1987-08-11 J. T. Posey Company Sleeved jacket restraining device
WO1988001159A1 (en) * 1986-08-18 1988-02-25 Stoffregen Robert T Vibratory massaging device
US5105828A (en) * 1991-01-25 1992-04-21 Grant Richard O Back, abdomen and posture supporting and retaining Johnson belt
US5295947A (en) * 1992-04-29 1994-03-22 H.E. Stanley Laboratories Chiropractic brace
US5549121A (en) * 1995-07-25 1996-08-27 Vinci; Vincent A. Surgical arm support
US5676094A (en) * 1994-09-26 1997-10-14 Gun-Munro; Beverly J. Protective leg wrap for animals
US5884382A (en) * 1997-04-29 1999-03-23 Hansen; Jimmy J. Belt buckle cover apparatus and scratch prevention method
US6637429B2 (en) * 2000-11-20 2003-10-28 Annette M. Mundrick Pediatric abdominal support
US20070077860A1 (en) * 2005-10-04 2007-04-05 Catherine Brooks Post-cesarean section scar management undergarment
WO2008040496A1 (en) * 2006-10-05 2008-04-10 Sanchez Alexander Safety brace with a safety strap
US20100258132A1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2010-10-14 Karen Leigh Moore Headgear pad for CPAP interface
US7883453B1 (en) * 2007-12-31 2011-02-08 Tony Cooper Portable, bed mountable exercise strap
US20110087092A1 (en) * 2002-11-14 2011-04-14 General Electric Company Interchangeable Localizing Devices For Use With Tracking Systems
US20110179553A1 (en) * 2010-01-26 2011-07-28 Jason Hazlett Support Belt For Use With Body Armor
US20150157064A1 (en) * 2012-08-27 2015-06-11 Tomoko Inoue Kimono

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3399670A (en) * 1966-02-09 1968-09-03 Joseph K. Veasey Restraining devices
US3535718A (en) * 1968-06-27 1970-10-27 Lumex Restraint device for mounting upon wrist and ankles

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3399670A (en) * 1966-02-09 1968-09-03 Joseph K. Veasey Restraining devices
US3535718A (en) * 1968-06-27 1970-10-27 Lumex Restraint device for mounting upon wrist and ankles

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3884225A (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-05-20 Evelyn Ruth Witter Bed patient turn and hold device
US4132229A (en) * 1977-07-28 1979-01-02 Morrison Medical Products Company Safety belt for restraining bed patients
US4611804A (en) * 1983-03-21 1986-09-16 Addair George W Mattress exercise apparatus
EP0141896A1 (en) * 1983-09-16 1985-05-22 John T. Posey Company Sleeved jacket restraining device
US4685454A (en) * 1983-09-16 1987-08-11 J. T. Posey Company Sleeved jacket restraining device
US4732140A (en) * 1986-08-18 1988-03-22 Stoffregen Robert T Vibratory massager retained against body with belt having elastic strap
WO1988001159A1 (en) * 1986-08-18 1988-02-25 Stoffregen Robert T Vibratory massaging device
US5105828A (en) * 1991-01-25 1992-04-21 Grant Richard O Back, abdomen and posture supporting and retaining Johnson belt
US5569171A (en) * 1992-04-29 1996-10-29 Muncy; Ron Chiropractic brace
US5295947A (en) * 1992-04-29 1994-03-22 H.E. Stanley Laboratories Chiropractic brace
US5676094A (en) * 1994-09-26 1997-10-14 Gun-Munro; Beverly J. Protective leg wrap for animals
US5549121A (en) * 1995-07-25 1996-08-27 Vinci; Vincent A. Surgical arm support
WO1997004724A1 (en) * 1995-07-25 1997-02-13 Vinci Vincent A Surgical arm support
US5884382A (en) * 1997-04-29 1999-03-23 Hansen; Jimmy J. Belt buckle cover apparatus and scratch prevention method
US6637429B2 (en) * 2000-11-20 2003-10-28 Annette M. Mundrick Pediatric abdominal support
US8781556B2 (en) * 2002-11-14 2014-07-15 General Electric Company Interchangeable localizing devices for use with tracking systems
US20110087092A1 (en) * 2002-11-14 2011-04-14 General Electric Company Interchangeable Localizing Devices For Use With Tracking Systems
US20100258132A1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2010-10-14 Karen Leigh Moore Headgear pad for CPAP interface
US20070077860A1 (en) * 2005-10-04 2007-04-05 Catherine Brooks Post-cesarean section scar management undergarment
US7934507B2 (en) 2005-10-04 2011-05-03 Catherine Brooks Post-cesarean section scar management undergarment
WO2008040496A1 (en) * 2006-10-05 2008-04-10 Sanchez Alexander Safety brace with a safety strap
US7883453B1 (en) * 2007-12-31 2011-02-08 Tony Cooper Portable, bed mountable exercise strap
US8635714B2 (en) * 2010-01-26 2014-01-28 Jason Hazlett Support belt for use with body armor
US20110179553A1 (en) * 2010-01-26 2011-07-28 Jason Hazlett Support Belt For Use With Body Armor
US20150157064A1 (en) * 2012-08-27 2015-06-11 Tomoko Inoue Kimono

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3527209A (en) Drop foot support
US3554190A (en) Back, shoulder and stomach support
US3561436A (en) Thoracic belt
US3295517A (en) Leg boosters to relieve body fatigue
US3604750A (en) Harness
US3458867A (en) Elbow protector for bedfast persons
US3158875A (en) Invalid stretcher
US3574871A (en) Safety litter
US3284817A (en) Therapeutic cushion
US3285658A (en) Head support device
US3338236A (en) Padded clavicle splint
US3561434A (en) Dual-purpose belt
US3136311A (en) Patient support garment
US3234568A (en) Lifting and transporting sling for persons
US3141461A (en) Infant's breech cloth
US2979028A (en) Body harness
US3442270A (en) Surgical binder
US3587952A (en) Baby carrier
US5085210A (en) Sleeve for maintaining position of orthopedic knee brace
US3297026A (en) Restraining device
US4124908A (en) Rescue and transportation device
US4970739A (en) Stretcher
US3640273A (en) Strap assembly for securing a patient{40 s arm to an arm board
US4414969A (en) Wrist restraint
US4511358A (en) Urine bag carrier with a stretchable front panel